Dr Ashleigh Guillaumier

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Ashleigh Guillaumier (PhD, BPsych(Hons Class 1)) is a National Heart Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Newcastle, Faculty of Health and Medicine. Dr Guillaumier completed her PhD entitled An Exploration of Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Smokers’ Responses to Three Tobacco Control Strategies in 2014 and was recipient of the CAPHIA PhD Excellence in Public Health Award in 2015.

Dr Guillaumier has 31 publications, including 30 journal articles and 1 report. She has been CI on six external research grants and three internal research grants. Her total external research funding is $225,637.

Ashleigh is a member of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco Oceania (SRNT-O) organising committee, and the Hunter Cancer Research Alliance – Implementation Science steering committee.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Cancer Control
  • Health Promotion
  • Public Health
  • Tobacco Control

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 70
170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified 20
111299 Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified 10

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Postdoctoral Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Postdoctoral Research Fellow Priority Research Centre (PRC) for Healthy Lungs | The University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Postdoctoral Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (30 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Denham AMJ, Baker AL, Spratt N, Guillaumier A, Wynne O, Turner A, et al., 'The unmet needs of informal carers of stroke survivors: a protocol for a systematic review of quantitative and qualitative studies', BMJ OPEN, 8 (2018)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-019571
Co-authors Olivia Wynne, Amanda Baker, Neil Spratt, Parker Magin, Billie Bonevski
2018 Wynne O, Guillaumier A, Twyman L, McCrabb S, Denham AMJ, Paul C, et al., 'Signs, fines and compliance officers: A systematic review of strategies for enforcing smoke-free policy', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph15071386
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Sam Mccrabb, Billie Bonevski, Amanda Baker, Olivia Wynne, Chris Paul
2018 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, McCrabb S, Bonevski B, 'Integrating smoking cessation care in alcohol and other drug treatment settings using an organizational change intervention: a systematic review.', Addiction, 113 2158-2172 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/add.14369
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Sam Mccrabb, Flora Tzelepis, Eliza Skelton, Billie Bonevski
2018 Denham A, Halpin S, Twyman L, Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, 'Prevent 2nd stroke: a pilot study of an online secondary prevention program for stroke survivors', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 42 484-490 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12794
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Sean Halpin
2018 Guillaumier A, Manning V, Wynne O, Gartner C, Borland R, Baker AL, et al., 'Electronic nicotine devices to aid smoking cessation by alcohol- and drug-dependent clients: protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial', TRIALS, 19 (2018)
DOI 10.1186/s13063-018-2786-1
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Eliza Skelton, Amanda Baker, Olivia Wynne
2018 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey M, et al., 'Integrating smoking cessation care into routine service delivery in a medically supervised injecting facility: An acceptability study', Addictive Behaviors, 84 193-200 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Background: Among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) the prevalence of tobacco smoking exceeds 80%; making smoking cessation intervention a priority for this popu... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Background: Among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) the prevalence of tobacco smoking exceeds 80%; making smoking cessation intervention a priority for this population. This study aims to examine staff and client perspectives from a supervised injecting facility regarding: i) whether an organizational change intervention increased rates of smoking cessation care delivery (pre- to post-intervention); and ii) acceptability of the intervention. Methods: A pre-and-post intervention pilot study in a supervised injecting facility was conducted in Sydney, Australia between July 2014¿December 2015. The intervention employed an organizational change approach and included six components. Cross-sectional samples of staff (pre n = 27, post n = 22) and clients (pre n = 202, post n = 202) completed online surveys pre and post intervention. Results: From pre to post-intervention staff reported smoking cessation practices significantly increased for the provision of verbal advice (30% to 82%; p < 0.001), offer of free or subsidized nicotine replacement therapy (30% to 91%; p < 0.001), referral to a general practitioner (19% to 64%; p = 0.001), and follow-up to check on quit smoking progress (18.5% to 64%; p = 0.001). Significantly more clients reported receiving all smoking cessation strategies post-intervention. Over 85% of staff agreed that it was acceptable to address client smoking as part of usual care and 95% of clients agreed that it was acceptable to be asked by staff about their tobacco smoking. Conclusions: Increasing the provision of smoking cessation care using an organizational change approach is both feasible for staff and acceptable to staff and clients of supervised injecting facilities.

DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.04.001
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Sam Mccrabb, Flora Tzelepis, Billie Bonevski
2017 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Dunlop A, McCrabb S, et al., 'Smoking cessation care provision in Australian alcohol and other drug treatment services: A cross-sectional survey of staff self-reported practices', Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 77 101-106 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Introduction Clinical practice guidelines recommend alcohol and other drug (AOD) services assess client&apos;s smoking status and offer smoking cessation care (SCC) to all ... [more]

© 2017 Introduction Clinical practice guidelines recommend alcohol and other drug (AOD) services assess client's smoking status and offer smoking cessation care (SCC) to all smokers. The aim of this study was to examine Australian AOD program staff report of recommended SCC practices: assessment and recording of smoking status; and the provision of 9 types of SCC. The study also assessed how the decision to provide SCC is made and the AOD program service and AOD staff characteristics associated with the provision of SCC. Methods Between July¿October 2014, treatment staff from 31 Australian AOD services participated in an online cross-sectional survey. In addition, a site contact at each service was interviewed to gather service related data. Results Overall, 362 AOD program staff participated (response rate¿=¿57%) and 62% estimated that client smoking status was recorded for the ¿majority or all¿ of their clients. About a third (33%) reported that they ¿always¿ provide verbal advice to their clients to quit smoking, 18% ¿always¿ offered free or subsidized NRT and 16% ¿always¿ followed-up to check on client quit progress. Thirty percent reported that the decision to provide SCC was made on a client by client basis and 26% offered SCC only when the client requested assistance. Government-managed services, age and gender of AOD program staff were significantly associated with the provision of SCC. Conclusion Most AOD program staff report that smoking status is recorded for the majority of their clients however, the frequency with which SCC practices are delivered is low and the decision to provide care is arbitrary.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsat.2017.04.003
Co-authors A Dunlop, Billie Bonevski, Eliza Skelton, Flora Tzelepis, Sam Mccrabb
2017 Thornton L, Quinn C, Birrell L, Guillaumier A, Shaw B, Forbes E, et al., 'Free smoking cessation mobile apps available in Australia: a quality review and content analysis', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 41 625-630 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 The Authors Objectives: This review aimed to identify free, high-quality, smoking cessation mobile applications (apps) that adhere to Australian smoking cessation treatment... [more]

© 2017 The Authors Objectives: This review aimed to identify free, high-quality, smoking cessation mobile applications (apps) that adhere to Australian smoking cessation treatment guidelines. Methods: A systematic search of smoking cessation apps was conducted using Google. The technical quality of relevant apps was rated using the Mobile Application Rating Scale. The content of apps identified as high quality was assessed for adherence to smoking cessation treatment guidelines. Results: 112 relevant apps were identified. The majority were of poor technical quality and only six ¿high-quality¿ apps were identified. These apps adhered to Australian treatment guidelines in part. The efficacy of two apps had been previously evaluated. Conclusions: In lieu of more substantial research in this area, it is suggested that the high-quality apps identified in this review may be more likely than other available apps to encourage smoking cessation. Implications for public health: Smoking cessation apps have the potential to address many barriers that prevent smoking cessation support being provided; however few high-quality smoking cessation apps are currently available in Australia, very few have been evaluated and the app market is extremely volatile. More research to evaluate smoking cessation apps, and sustained funding for evidence-based apps, is needed.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12688
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin
2017 Guillaumier A, Twyman L, Paul C, Siahpush M, Palazzi K, Bonevski B, 'Financial Stress and Smoking within a Large Sample of Socially Disadvantaged Australians', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 14 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph14030231
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2017 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Paul C, d'Este C, Durkin S, Doran C, 'Which Type of Antismoking Advertisement Is Perceived as More Effective? An Experimental Study With a Sample of Australian Socially Disadvantaged Welfare Recipients', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH PROMOTION, 31 209-216 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.4278/ajhp.141125-QUAN-593
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul, Catherine Deste
2017 Skelton E, Bonevski B, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Dunlop A, et al., 'Tobacco smoking policies in Australian alcohol and other drug treatment services, agreement between staff awareness and the written policy document', BMC Public Health, 17 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: Comprehensive smoke-free policy in the alcohol and other drug (AOD) setting provides an opportunity to reduce tobacco related harms among clients... [more]

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: Comprehensive smoke-free policy in the alcohol and other drug (AOD) setting provides an opportunity to reduce tobacco related harms among clients and staff. This study aimed to examine within AOD services: staff awareness of their service's smoking policy compared to the written policy document and staff and service factors associated with accurate awareness of a total ban and perceived enforcement of a total ban. Methods: An audit of written tobacco smoking policy documents and an online cross-sectional survey of staff from 31 Australian AOD services. In addition, a contact at each service was interviewed to gather service-related data. Results: Overall, 506 staff participated in the survey (response rate: 57%). Nearly half (46%) perceived their service had a total ban with 54% indicating that this policy was always enforced. Over one-third (37%) reported a partial ban with 48% indicating that this policy was always enforced. The audit of written policies revealed that 19 (61%) services had total bans, 11 (36%) had partial bans and 1 (3%) did not have a written smoking policy. Agreement between staff policy awareness and their service's written policy was moderate (Kappa 0.48) for a total ban and fair (Kappa 0.38) for a partial ban. Age (1 year increase) of staff was associated with higher odds of correctly identifying a total ban at their service. Conclusions: Tobacco smoking within Australian AOD services is mostly regulated by a written policy document. Staff policy awareness was modest and perceived policy enforcement was poor.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3968-y
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors A Dunlop, Eliza Skelton, Flora Tzelepis, Billie Bonevski, Sam Mccrabb
2017 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Paul C, Wiggers J, Germov J, Mitchell D, Bunch D, 'Australian university smoke-free policy implementation: A staff and student survey', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 28 165-169 (2017) [C1]

Issue addressed Universities represent important settings for the implementation of public health initiatives such as smoke-free policies. The study aimed to assess staff and stud... [more]

Issue addressed Universities represent important settings for the implementation of public health initiatives such as smoke-free policies. The study aimed to assess staff and student attitudes towards policy enforcement and compliance as well as the acceptability of the provision of cessation support in this setting. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted following the introduction of a designated-areas partial smoke-free policy at two campuses of one Australian university in 2014. Staff (n=533) and students (n=3060) completed separate online surveys assessing attitudes towards smoke-free policy enforcement and compliance, and acceptability of university-provided cessation support. Results Students held significantly stronger beliefs than staff that the smoke-free policy required staff enforcement (69% vs 60%) and violation penalties (67% vs 60%; both P's <0.01); however, most staff (66%) did not believe enforcement was part of their role. Only 55% of student smokers were aware that the university provided any cessation support. 'Free or cheap nicotine replacement therapy' (65%) and 'free stop smoking counselling service' (60%) were the most popular strategies student smokers thought the university should provide. Conclusions University staff and students hold conflicting views over the need for policy enforcement and who is responsible for enforcement roles. Students view the university as an acceptable setting for the provision of smoking cessation support. So what? Where staff are expected to enforce smoke-free policies, specific education and training should be provided. Ongoing monitoring of compliance and enforcement behaviour appears necessary to avoid the pervasive kind of non-compliance to smoke-free policies that have been seen in other settings.

DOI 10.1071/HE16063
Co-authors John Germov, Billie Bonevski, John Wiggers, Chris Paul
2017 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Dunlop A, McCrabb S, et al., 'Addressing tobacco in Australian alcohol and other drug treatment settings: a cross-sectional survey of staff attitudes and perceived barriers', SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT PREVENTION AND POLICY, 12 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13011-017-0106-5
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors A Dunlop, Sam Mccrabb, Eliza Skelton, Billie Bonevski, Flora Tzelepis
2017 Wilson A, Guillaumier A, George J, Denham A, Bonevski B, 'A systematic narrative review of the effectiveness of behavioural smoking cessation interventions in selected disadvantaged groups (2010-2017)', Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine, 11 617-630 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor &amp; Francis Group. Introduction: Tobacco remains the key modifiable risk factor for the development of a number of diseases, inclu... [more]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Introduction: Tobacco remains the key modifiable risk factor for the development of a number of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, lower respiratory infections, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, tuberculosis and cancer. Among priority populations, smoking prevalence remains high, smokers tend to relapse more often and earlier and fewer are able to sustain quit attempts. This systematic review provides an update on the literature. Areas covered: Twenty-four randomized controlled trials published from 2010¿2017, in English language, were identified after searching on Medline, Ovid, Embase and PsycINFO databases. Studies reported on the effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions among six disadvantaged groups known to have high smoking rates: (i) homeless, (ii) prisoners, (iii) indigenous populations, (iv) at-risk youth, (v) people with low income, and (vi) those with a mental illness. Narrative review and assessment of methodological quality of included papers was undertaken. Expert commentary: There is a growing evidence base of methodologically robust studies evaluating a variety of behavioural smoking cessation interventions for priority populations. Multi-component interventions and those examining behavioural interventions incorporating mindfulness training, financial incentives, motivational interviewing and extended telephone-delivered counseling may be effective in the short-term, particularly for smokers on low incomes and people with a mental illness.

DOI 10.1080/17476348.2017.1340836
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Amanda Wilson, Billie Bonevski
2016 McCarter K, Martinez U, Britton B, Baker A, Bonevski B, Carter G, et al., 'Smoking cessation care among patients with head and neck cancer: a systematic review', BMJ OPEN, 6 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012296
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Gregory Carter, Kristen Mccarter, Sean Halpin, Amanda Baker, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Paul C, D¿Este C, Twyman L, Palazzi K, Oldmeadow C, 'Self-Exempting Beliefs and Intention to Quit Smoking within a Socially Disadvantaged Australian Sample of Smokers', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 13 118-118 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph13010118
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski, Christopher Oldmeadow
2016 Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Bryant J, Gartner C, Guillaumier A, 'Electronic cigarettes: Awareness, recent use, and attitudes within a sample of socioeconomically disadvantaged Australian smokers', Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 18 670-677 (2016) [C1]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. Introduction: Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) awareness, ... [more]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. Introduction: Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) awareness, trial of e-cigarettes in the past 12 months, source and perceptions of safety and effectiveness was assessed within a disadvantaged sample of adult Australian smokers receiving welfare aid. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was administered to clients who smoke at two community service organizations in New South Wales, Australia from October 2013 to July 2014. E-cigarette awareness, trial in past 12 months, sources of e-cigarettes and perceptions of the safety and effectiveness of e-cigarettes to help people quit were assessed along with sociodemographic and smoking-related variables. Results: In total, 369 participants completed the survey (77% response rate). Awareness and trial of e-cigarettes were reported by 77% (n = 283) and 35% (n = 103) of the sample, respectively. E-cigarettes were most commonly obtained from friends/strangers followed by tobacco shops (tobacconists). Trying e-cigarettes in the past 12 months was significantly associated with positive perceptions of their safety (odds ratio [OR] = 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1, 3.1) and effectiveness (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.1, 3.2). Motivation to quit tobacco smoking was also significantly positively associated with positive perceptions of e-cigarette safety (OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 1.1, 1.4) and effectiveness (OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 1.0, 1.3). Conclusions: Rates of awareness and trial of e-cigarettes within a disadvantaged sample of Australian smokers are comparable to rates found within representative samples of the general Australian population. Previously trying e-cigarettes and higher levels of motivation to quit were associated with more positive perceptions of e-cigarette safety and effectiveness. Implications: This study demonstrates that socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers are aware of and accessing e-cigarettes in a country with relatively high restrictions covering e-cigarette sale and use.

DOI 10.1093/ntr/ntv183
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski, Jamie Bryant
2016 Bonevski B, Guillaumier A, Shakeshaft A, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., 'An organisational change intervention for increasing the delivery of smoking cessation support in addiction treatment centres: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial', TRIALS, 17 (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s13063-016-1401-6
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, A Dunlop, Catherine Deste, Flora Tzelepis, Andrew Searles, Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2016 Wilson AJ, Bonevski B, Dunlop A, Shakeshaft A, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., ''The lesser of two evils': A qualitative study of staff and client experiences and beliefs about addressing tobacco in addiction treatment settings', Drug and Alcohol Review, 35 92-101 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs. Introduction and Aims: The aim of this study was to explore beliefs about tobacco dependence treatment from th... [more]

© 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs. Introduction and Aims: The aim of this study was to explore beliefs about tobacco dependence treatment from the perspective of staff and clients in addiction treatment settings.Design and Methods: A qualitative study was conducted between August and November 2013 using grounded theory methodology. Participants were recruited from four government-funded drug and alcohol services in a regional centre of New South Wales, Australia. Treatment centre staff (n=10) were interviewed using a semistructured interview guide and two focus groups (n=5 and n=6) were held with clients of the same treatment centres.Results: Both clients and staff wish to do more about tobacco use in addiction treatment services, but a number of barriers were identified. Staff barriers included lack of time, tobacco-permissive organisational culture, lack of enforcement of smoke-free policies, beliefs that tobacco is not a treatment priority for clients and that clients need to smoke as a coping strategy, and perceptions that treatment was either ineffective or not used by clients. Clients reported smoking as a habit and for enjoyment or stress relief, seeing staff smoking, nicotine replacement therapy unaffordability and perceptions that nicotine replacement therapy may be addictive, and inability to relate to telephone cessation counselling as barriers to quitting smoking.Discussion and Conclusions: Client and staff perceptions and attitudes about the treatment of tobacco, particularly those relating telephone support and nicotine replacement therapy, provided information, which will inform the design of smoking cessation programs for addiction treatment populations. [Wilson AJ, Bonevski B., Dunlop A., Shakeshaft A, Tzelepis F., Walsberger S., Farrell M., Kelly PJ, Guillaumier A. 'The lesser of two evils': A qualitative study of staff and client experiences and beliefs about addressing tobacco in addiction treatment settings. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015].

DOI 10.1111/dar.12322
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, A Dunlop, Billie Bonevski, Amanda Wilson
2016 Paul C, Bonevski B, Twyman L, D'Este C, Siahpush M, Guillaumier A, et al., 'The 'price signal' for health care is loud and clear: A cross-sectional study of self-reported access to health care by disadvantaged Australians', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 40 132-137 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Public Health Association of Australia. Objective: To describe self-reported inability to access health care and factors associated with lack of access among a socioeconomi... [more]

© 2015 Public Health Association of Australia. Objective: To describe self-reported inability to access health care and factors associated with lack of access among a socioeconomically disadvantaged group. Method: A cross-sectional survey with 906 adult clients of a large community welfare agency in New South Wales. Clients attending the service for emergency assistance completed a touchscreen survey. Results: Inability to access health care in the prior year was reported by more than one-third of the sample (38%), compared to the 5% found for the general population. Dentists (47%), specialists (43%) or GPs (29%) were the least accessible types of health care. The main reason for inability to access health care was cost, accounting for 60% of responses. Almost half (47%) the sample reported delayed or non-use of medicines due to cost. Increasing financial stress was associated with increased inability to access GP or specialist care, medicines and imaging. Higher anxiety scores were associated with inability to access health care, and with cost-related inability to access medicines and imaging. Conclusion: For disadvantaged groups, cost-related barriers to accessing care are prominent and are disproportionately high - particularly regarding dentistry, specialist and GP care. Implications: Improvements in health outcomes for disadvantaged groups are likely to require strategies to reduce cost-related barriers to health care.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12405
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Chris Paul, Elizabeth Fradgley, Billie Bonevski, Jamie Bryant, Catherine Deste
2015 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Paul C, 'Tobacco health warning messages on plain cigarette packs and in television campaigns: A qualitative study with Australian socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers', Health Education Research, 30 57-66 (2015) [C1]

© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. Television advertisements, packaging regulations and health warning labels (HWLs) are designed to communicate anti-smoking... [more]

© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. Television advertisements, packaging regulations and health warning labels (HWLs) are designed to communicate anti-smoking messages to large number of smokers. However, only a few studies have examined how high smoking prevalence groups respond to these warnings. This study explored how socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers engage with health risk and cessation benefit messages. Six focus groups were conducted over September 2012-April 2013 with adult clients of welfare organizations in regional New South Wales, Australia who were current smokers (n = 51). Participants discussed HWLs, plain packaging and anti-smoking television advertisements. Discussions were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Highly emotive warnings delivering messages of negative health effects were most likely to capture the attention of the study participants; however, these warning messages did not prompt quit attempts and participants were sceptical about the effectiveness of cessation programmes such as telephone quitlines. Active avoidance of health warning messages was common, and many expressed false and self-exempting beliefs towards the harms of tobacco. Careful consideration of message content and medium is required to communicate the anti-smoking message to disadvantaged smokers who consider themselves desensitized to warnings. Health communication strategies should continue to address false beliefs about smoking and educate on cessation services that are currently underutilized.

DOI 10.1093/her/cyu037
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2015 Bonevski B, Guillaumier A, Twyman L, 'Electronic nicotine devices considered through an equity lens', Addiction, 110 1069-1070 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/add.12953
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Billie Bonevski
2015 Bonevski B, Twyman L, Paul C, D'Este C, West R, Siahpush M, et al., 'Comparing socially disadvantaged smokers who agree and decline to participate in a randomised smoking cessation trial', BMJ OPEN, 5 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008419
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Christopher Oldmeadow, Jamie Bryant, Billie Bonevski
2015 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Wiggers J, Kypri K, Bonevski B, McElduff P, et al., 'Targeting multiple health risk behaviours among vocational education students using electronic feedback and online and telephone support: Protocol for a cluster randomised trial Health behavior, health promotion and society', BMC Public Health, 15 (2015) [C3]

© 2015 Tzelepis et al. Background: Technical and Further Education (TAFE) colleges are the primary provider of vocational education in Australia. Most TAFE students are young adul... [more]

© 2015 Tzelepis et al. Background: Technical and Further Education (TAFE) colleges are the primary provider of vocational education in Australia. Most TAFE students are young adults, a period when health risk behaviours become established. Furthermore, high rates of smoking, risky alcohol consumption, inadequate fruit and vegetable intake and insufficient physical activity have been reported in TAFE students. There have been no intervention studies targeting multiple health risk behaviours simultaneously in this population. The proposed trial will examine the effectiveness of providing TAFE students with electronic feedback regarding health risk behaviours and referral to a suite of existing online and telephone services addressing smoking, risky alcohol consumption, fruit and vegetable intake, and physical activity levels. Methods/Design: A two arm, parallel, cluster randomised trial will be conducted within TAFE campuses in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. TAFE classes will be randomly allocated to an intervention or control condition (50 classes per condition). To be eligible, students must be: enrolled in a course that runs for more than 6 months; aged 16 years or older; and not meet Australian health guideline recommendations for at least one of the following: smoking, alcohol consumption, fruit and/or vegetable intake, or physical activity. Students attending intervention classes, will undertake via a computer tablet a risk assessment for health risk behaviours, and for behaviours not meeting Australian guidelines be provided with electronic feedback about these behaviours and referral to evidence-based online programs and telephone services. Students in control classes will not receive any intervention. Primary outcome measures that will be assessed via online surveys at baseline and 6 months post-recruitment are: 1) daily tobacco smoking; 2) standard drinks of alcohol consumed per week; 3) serves of fruit consumed daily; 4) serves of vegetables consumed daily; and 5) metabolic equivalent minutes of physical activity per week. Discussion: Proactive enrolment to existing online and telephone services has the potential to address modifiable determinants of disease. This trial will be the first to examine a potentially scalable intervention targeting multiple health risk behaviours among students in the vocational training setting.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1898-8
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Clare Collins, Chris Paul, Patrick Mcelduff, Philip Morgan, Kypros Kypri, Flora Tzelepis, Luke Wolfenden, Billie Bonevski, Andrew Searles, John Wiggers, Marita Lynagh
2015 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Paul C, ''Cigarettes are priority': A qualitative study of how Australian socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers respond to rising cigarette prices', Health Education Research, 30 599-608 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyv026
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul
2014 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Doran C, Paul C, D'Este C, Siahpush M, 'Paying the price: A cross-sectional survey of Australian socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers' responses to hypothetical cigarette price rises', Drug and Alcohol Review, 33 177-185 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/dar.12103
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul, Catherine Deste
2014 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Paul C, Durkin S, D'Este C, 'Socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers' ratings of plain and branded cigarette packaging: an experimental study', BMJ OPEN, 4 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004078
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Chris Paul, Catherine Deste, Billie Bonevski
2013 Bonevski B, Guillaumier A, Paul C, Walsh R, 'The vocational education setting for health promotion: A survey of students' health risk behaviours and preferences for help', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 24 185-191 (2013) [C1]

Background Adolescence and young adulthood is a time of risky health behaviour initiation and experimentation. Smoking, risky drinking, poor nutrition and physical activity, and a... [more]

Background Adolescence and young adulthood is a time of risky health behaviour initiation and experimentation. Smoking, risky drinking, poor nutrition and physical activity, and a lack of sun protection behaviour, often become established in early adulthood. Levels of health risk behaviours occurring amongst tertiary education and training students and their preferences for types of on-campus health promotion programs were examined. Method A cross-sectional pen-and-paper classroom survey was conducted at one Sydney-based TAFE New South Wales Institute campus in May 2010. The survey assessed demographics, smoking, alcohol use, sun protection, nutrition, physical activity and health promotion program preferences. Results: Two hundred and twenty-four students participated (97% consent); the majority were aged 16-24 years (59%) and female (51%). Current smoking (35%), risky drinking (49%) and inadequate physical activity (88%) rates were high. Adequate vegetable intake (3.6%) and sun protection behaviours (5.4%) were low and 33% of students were overweight or obese. Popular health promotion programs included food and activity subsidies, practical skills classes and social outings. Conclusion Participation in health risk behaviours among this sample was high. The setting of tertiary education and workplace training represents an opportunity for early intervention into risky health behaviours among young people. So what? This study is the first to provide information on the prevalence of health risk behaviours and preferences for types of health promoting programs among students of an Australian community college. The results show that young adults regularly participate in multiple health risk behaviours, such as smoking, drinking, poor nutrition, physical activity and lack of sun protection. © 2013 Australian Health Promotion Association.

DOI 10.1071/HE13047
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul
2012 Guillaumier AM, Bonevski B, Paul CL, 'Anti-tobacco mass media and socially disadvantaged groups: A systematic and methodological review', Drug and Alcohol Review, 31 698-708 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Bryant J, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'The association between cannabis use and motivation and intentions to quit tobacco within a sample of Australian socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers.', Health Educ Res, 31 771-781 [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyw049
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Chris Paul, Frances Kaylambkin, Jamie Bryant, Christopher Oldmeadow, Billie Bonevski
Show 27 more journal articles

Conference (32 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Bonevski B, Guillaumier A, Skelton E, Walsberger S, Twyman L, Wood W, et al., 'WORKSHOP: ORGANISATIONAL CHANGE APPROACHES FOR INCREASING SMOKING CESSATION CARE DELIVERY IN ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG SERVICES', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2017)
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Billie Bonevski
2017 Bonevski B, Guillaumier A, Skelton E, Shakeshaft A, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, et al., 'ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG TREATMENT CLIENT PERCEPTIONS OF ELECTRONIC CIGARETTE USE, SAFETY AND HARM REDUCTION', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2017)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Eliza Skelton, Catherine Deste, A Dunlop
2017 Bonevski B, Skelton E, Guillaumier A, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Lambert S, 'SAME SAME BUT DIFFERENT: A COMPARISON OF HETEROSEXUAL AND LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL AND TRANSGENDER CLIENT PREFERENCES AND REPORTED RECEIPT OF SMOKING CARE IN ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG TREATMENT', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2017)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Eliza Skelton, Flora Tzelepis
2017 Guillaumier A, Dunlop AJ, Baker AL, Gartner C, Borland R, Bonevski B, 'QUITENDS: A PILOT OF ELECTRONIC NICOTINE DEVICES FOR SMOKING CESSATION WITH ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG TREATMENT CLIENTS WITH ABRUPT CESSATION OR GRADUAL REDUCTION OF CIGARETTES', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2017)
Co-authors A Dunlop, Amanda Baker, Billie Bonevski
2017 Silberberg L, Guillaumier A, Dunlop A, Wilkinson R, Bonevski B, 'ATTITUDES AND USE OF ELECTRONIC CIGARETTES AMONG A POPULATION OF ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG USE TREATMENT SEEKERS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2017)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, A Dunlop, Ross Wilkinson
2017 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey ME, et al., 'BARRIERS AND FACILITATORS TO INTEGRATING SMOKING CESSATION CARE IN A MEDICALLY SUPERVISED INJECTING FACILITY', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2017)
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Billie Bonevski, Flora Tzelepis
2017 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey ME, et al., 'INTEGRATING TOBACCO DEPENDENCE TREATMENT INTO ROUTINE SERVICE DELIVERY IN A MEDICALLY SUPERVISED INJECTING FACILITY', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2017)
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Flora Tzelepis, Billie Bonevski
2017 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey M, et al., 'Integrating tobacco dependence treatment into routine service delivery in a medically supervised injecting facility', Melbourne, Vic, Australia (2017)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12613
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Billie Bonevski, Sam Mccrabb, Eliza Skelton
2017 Bonevski B, Guillaumier A, Skelton E, Walsberger S, Twyman L, Wood W, et al., 'Organisational change approaches for increasing smoking cessation care delivery in alcohol and other drug services', Melbourne, Vic, Australia (2017)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12613
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Eliza Skelton
2017 Guillaumier A, Lubman D, Gartner C, Borland R, Baker A, Segan C, et al., 'QuitNic: A pilot study comparing standard nicotine replacement therapy and electronic cigarettes for smoking cessation upon client discharge from a smoke-free drug and alcohol detox unit', Melbourne, Vic, Australia (2017)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12613
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Amanda Baker
2017 Bonevski B, Skelton E, Guillaumier A, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Lambert S, 'Same same but different: A comparison of heterosexual and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender client preferences and reported receipt of smoking care in alcohol and other drug treatment', Melbourne, Vic, Australia (2017)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12613
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Flora Tzelepis, Eliza Skelton
2017 Bonevski B, Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, et al., 'Barriers and facilitators to integrating smoking cessation care in a medically supervised injecting facility', Melbourne, Vic, Australia (2017)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12613
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Sam Mccrabb, Billie Bonevski, Flora Tzelepis
2017 Silberberg L, Guillaumier A, Dunlop A, Wilkinson R, Bonevski B, 'Attitudes and use of electronic cigarettes among a population of alcohol and other drug use treatment seekers', Melbourne, Vic, Australia (2017)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12613
Co-authors A Dunlop, Billie Bonevski
2017 Bonevski B, Guillaumier A, Skelton E, Shakeshaft A, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, et al., 'Alcohol and other drug treatment client perceptions of electronic cigarette use, safety and harm reduction', Melbourne, Vic, Australia (2017)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12613
Co-authors A Dunlop, Eliza Skelton, Catherine Deste, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2017 Guillaumier A, Dunlop A, Baker A, Gartner C, Borland R, Bonevski B, 'QuitEnds: A pilot of electronic nicotine devices for smoking cessation with alcohol and other drug treatment clients with abrupt cessation or gradual reduction of cigarettes', Melbourne, Vic, Australia (2017)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12613
Co-authors A Dunlop, Billie Bonevski, Amanda Baker
2016 Skelton E, Bonevski B, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, et al., 'ADDRESSING TOBACCO SMOKING IN A MEDICALLY SUPERVISED INJECTING CENTER WITH AN ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE INTERVENTION: AN ACCEPTABILITY STUDY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Eliza Skelton, Flora Tzelepis
2016 Skelton E, Bonevski B, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, 'THE POTENTIAL OF ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE INTERVENTIONS TO INCREASE THE DELIVERY OF SMOKING CESSATION CARE IN THE ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG TREATMENT SETTING: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Flora Tzelepis, Billie Bonevski
2016 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Wiggers J, Kypri K, Bonevski B, McElduff P, et al., 'A PILOT CLUSTER RANDOMISED TRIAL OF ELECTRONIC FEEDBACK, ONLINE AND TELEPHONE SUPPORT ON MULTIPLE HEALTH BEHAVIOURS AMONG VOCATIONAL EDUCATION STUDENTS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Clare Collins, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Philip Morgan, Patrick Mcelduff, Luke Wolfenden, Billie Bonevski, Andrew Searles, John Wiggers, Marita Lynagh, Kypros Kypri
2016 Skelton E, Bonevski B, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey M, 'AN ORGANISATIONAL CHANGE INTERVENTION FOR SMOKING CESSATION CARE IN A MEDICALLY SUPERVISED INJECTING CENTRE: AN ACCEPABILITY STUDY', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Flora Tzelepis, Billie Bonevski
2016 Skelton E, Bonevski B, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Woods W, Jauncey M, 'TOBACCO USE AND INTEREST IN SMOKING CESSATION AMONG PEOPLE WHO INJECT DRUGS IN A MEDICALLY SUPERVISED INJECTING CENTRE (MSIC)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Billie Bonevski, Eliza Skelton
2016 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Shakeshaft A, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., 'TOBACCO SMOKING CESSATION INTENTIONS AND PREFERENCES FOR QUIT SUPPORT AMONG CLIENTS OF DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT SERVICES IN AUSTRALIA', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors A Dunlop, Andrew Searles, Billie Bonevski, Eliza Skelton, Catherine Deste, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul
2016 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Shakeshaft A, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., 'TOBACCO SMOKING CESSATION INTENTIONS AND PREFERENCES FOR QUIT SUPPORT AMONG CLIENTS OF DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT SERVICES IN AUSTRALIA', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2016)
Co-authors Andrew Searles, Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul, Eliza Skelton, A Dunlop, Flora Tzelepis
2016 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Twyman L, Paul C, Baker A, 'ENFORCEMENT STRATEGIES FOR EFFECTIVE SMOKE-FREE POLICY IMPLEMENTATION: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Amanda Baker, Chris Paul
2015 Skelton E, Bonevski B, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, 'STAFF AND MANAGER ATTITUDES, BARRIERS AND ORGANISATIONAL READINESS FOR DELIVERY OF SMOKING CESSATION CARE TO CLIENTS OF AUSTRALIAN DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT CENTRES', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Flora Tzelepis, Eliza Skelton
2015 Skelton E, Bonevski B, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey M, 'TOBACCO SMOKING BEHAVIOURS, NICOTINE DEPENDENCE AND INTEREST IN QUITTING - A SURVEY OF SYDNEY MEDICALLY SUPERVISED INJECTING CENTRE CLIENTS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Flora Tzelepis, Billie Bonevski
2015 Skelton E, Bonevski B, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey M, 'THE TOBACCO SMOKING PROFILE OF CLIENTS ATTENDING A MEDICALLY SUPERVISED INJECTING CENTRE', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Flora Tzelepis, Billie Bonevski
2014 Bonevski B, Guillaumier A, Stirling R, Fowlie C, Walsberger S, Fry R, 'TACKLING NICOTINE TOGETHER: A PARTNERSHIP PROJECT BETWEEN RESEARCH, THE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT SECTOR AND THE CANCER COUNCIL NSW FOR TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Billie Bonevski
2014 Bonevski B, Wilson A, Dunlop A, Shakeshaft A, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., 'SMOKING CESSATION IN DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT SETTINGS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY OF STAFF AND CLIENT BARRIERS AND FACILITATORS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Eliza Skelton, Billie Bonevski, Amanda Wilson, A Dunlop
2014 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Paul C, 'A QUALITATIVE STUDY EXPLORING AUSTRALIAN SOCIOECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED SMOKERS' RESPONSES TO INCREASING CIGARETTE PRICES', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul
2013 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Paul C, d'Este C, Doran C, Siahpush M, 'WHAT IS THE COST? MAINTENANCE OF SMOKING DESPITE CIGARETTE PRICE RISES AMONG HIGHLY SOCIOECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED SMOKERS', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2013)
Co-authors Chris Paul, Catherine Deste, Billie Bonevski
2013 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Paul C, d'Este C, Durkin S, 'WHY VS. HOW: WHAT GETS THE ANTI-SMOKING MESSAGE ACROSS TO HIGHLY SOCIOECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED SMOKERS?', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2013)
Co-authors Chris Paul, Catherine Deste, Billie Bonevski
2013 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Paul C, d'Este C, Durkin S, 'WILL CIGARETTE PLAIN PACKAGING WORK AMONGST HIGHLY SOCIOECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED SMOKERS? THE RESULTS OF AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2013)
Co-authors Chris Paul, Catherine Deste, Billie Bonevski
Show 29 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $168,000

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $3,000

ON Prime$3,000

Funding body: CSIRO

Funding body CSIRO
Project Team

Guillaumier, A., Bonevski, B.

Scheme ON Prime
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20171 grants / $150,000

Healthy living after stroke: An innovative and low-cost online secondary prevention intervention for stroke survivors$150,000

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Doctor Ashleigh Guillaumier, Professor Billie Bonevski
Scheme Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1600653
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20161 grants / $15,000

A feasibility pilot study of electronic nicotine devices for smoking cessation with alcohol and other drug (AOD) treatment clients$15,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team Professor Billie Bonevski, Professor Amanda Baker, Doctor Ashleigh Guillaumier, Associate Professor Adrian Dunlop
Scheme Research Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600980
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current0

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD An Investigation of an Organisational Change Approach for Smoking Cessation in the Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Setting PhD (Psychiatry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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News

UON Heart Foundation 2017 Research Funding

December 5, 2016

University of Newcastle researchers awarded highly competitive Heart Foundation grants.

Public health excellence in research awarded

September 11, 2015

The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health has received a CAPHIA public health award.

Plain cigarette packs impact ‘taste’

July 15, 2014

Smokers involved in a study published by UON researchers believed the quality of their cigarettes deteriorated following the implementation of plain packaging.

Dr Ashleigh Guillaumier

Position

Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email ashleigh.guillaumier@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4033 5718
Fax (02) 4903 5692

Office

Room 5016
Building McAuley Centre
Location Mater Hospital

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