Dr Jamie Bryant

Dr Jamie Bryant

NHMRC-ARC Research Development Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

I am a behavioural scientist with a long-standing interest and commitment to improving health outcomes. Since July 2011 I have been a member of the Health Behaviour Research Collaborative within the Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour, working under the mentorship of Laureate Professor Rob Sanson-Fisher. I was awarded my PhD in March 2012, and commenced an Australian Research Council Post-Doctoral Industry Fellowship in July 2012. I am currently an NHMRC-ARC Dementia Research Development Fellow (2017-2021). Mu current work spans a number of areas including Indigenous health, cancer prevention (smoking and alcohol use), and dementia.

I have been a Chief Investigator on 15 grants totaling more than $6 million, and published more than 80 peer-reviewed manuscripts and 5 commissioned reports.


Qualifications

  • PhD (Behavioural Science), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), University of Newcastle

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
NHMRC-ARC Research Development Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
NHMRC-ARC Research Development Fellow Priority Research Centre (PRC) for Healthy Lungs | The University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
NHMRC-ARC Research Development Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2012 - 31/12/2015 Fellow APDI (ARC)

ARC - Linkage - Projects (including Australian Postdoctoral (Industry) Fellowships)

University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (86 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Bryant J, West R, Siahpush M, et al., 'What factors are associated with abstinence amongst socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers? A cross-sectional survey of use of cessation aids and quitting approach', Drug and Alcohol Review, 37 170-179 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Introduction and Aims: This study aimed to compare current and ex-smokers' sociodemographic and psychosoci... [more]

© 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Introduction and Aims: This study aimed to compare current and ex-smokers' sociodemographic and psychosocial characteristics, use of cessation aids and abrupt versus gradual quitting approaches. Design and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of financially disadvantaged adults attending a community service organisation was conducted in New South Wales, Australia, between February 2012 and December 2013. Sociodemographic and psychosocial factors, use of cessation aids and gradual versus abrupt quit approach were assessed. ¿2tests and logistic regression compared characteristics of current and ex-smokers. Results: Of 905 individuals who completed the survey, 639 (71%) were current smokers and 107 (12%) were ex-smokers. Ex-smokers were older [odds ratio (OR)¿=¿1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI)¿=¿1.01, 1.05], had higher odds of being female (OR¿=¿1.67, 95% CI¿=¿1.06, 2.65), lower odds of being financially stressed (OR¿=¿0.87, 95% CI¿=¿0.76, 0.99), lower odds of anxiety and depression symptoms (OR¿=¿0.91, 95% CI¿=¿0.84, 0.98) and lower odds of having friends and family who were smokers (ORs ranged from 0.30¿0.43). Ex-smokers had lower odds of using cessation aids and higher odds of reporting abrupt quitting during their last quit attempt (OR¿=¿4.48, 95% CI¿=¿2.66, 7.54). Conclusions: Lower levels of disadvantage, less smoking in social networks, less use of cessation aids and abrupt (vs. gradual) quitting approaches were associated with being an ex-smoker. Lower use of evidence based methods to quit by disadvantaged ex-smokers requires further exploration. [Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Bryant J, West R, Siahpush M, D'este C, Oldmeadow C, Palazzi K. What factors are associated with abstinence amongst socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers? A cross-sectional survey of use of cessation aids and quitting approach. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;00:000-000].

DOI 10.1111/dar.12561
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Christopher Oldmeadow, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul
2018 Bryant J, Smits R, Turon H, Sanson-Fisher R, Engel J, 'Optimal cancer care: what essential elements of care would help haematological cancer patients obtain and understand information about their disease and its treatment and impact?', Supportive Care in Cancer, 26 2843-2849 (2018) [C1]

© 2018, The Author(s). Purpose: To describe the perceptions of haematological cancer patients about the components of care deemed essential to supporting them to obtain and unders... [more]

© 2018, The Author(s). Purpose: To describe the perceptions of haematological cancer patients about the components of care deemed essential to supporting them to obtain and understand information about their cancer, its treatment and its impact on their life. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted with individuals diagnosed with haematological cancer. Eligible patients presenting for a scheduled outpatient appointment were invited to complete a pen-and-paper survey in the clinic waiting room while waiting for their appointment. Those who completed the survey were mailed a second survey approximately 4¿weeks later. Participants provided data about their demographic and disease characteristics and perceptions of optimal care for haematological cancer patients. Results: A total of 170 patients completed both surveys and were included in the analysis. The items endorsed as essential components of care by the highest number of participants were being able to share accurate information about their disease, treatment and ongoing care with their GP/family doctor (49%); being able to obtain up-to-date information specific to their circumstances (43%); being able to obtain information in the amount of detail that they want (34%); being able to call a health care professional at the treatment centre where they are receiving care (34%) and being able to call an experienced health care professional who has knowledge of their disease and its treatment (34%). Conclusions: Further research is needed to determine ways of meeting the preferences of haematological cancer patients and determining the associated impact on patient outcomes.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-018-4140-2
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2018 Hall AE, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher RW, Fradgley EA, Proietto AM, Roos I, 'Consumer input into health care: Time for a new active and comprehensive model of consumer involvement', Health Expectations, 21 707-713 (2018)

© 2018 The Authors Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Background: To ensure the provision of patient-centred health care, it is essential that consumers ... [more]

© 2018 The Authors Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Background: To ensure the provision of patient-centred health care, it is essential that consumers are actively involved in the process of determining and implementing health-care quality improvements. However, common strategies used to involve consumers in quality improvements, such as consumer membership on committees and collection of patient feedback via surveys, are ineffective and have a number of limitations, including: limited representativeness; tokenism; a lack of reliable and valid patient feedback data; infrequent assessment of patient feedback; delays in acquiring feedback; and how collected feedback is used to drive health-care improvements. Objectives: We propose a new active model of consumer engagement that aims to overcome these limitations. This model involves the following: (i) the development of a new measure of consumer perceptions; (ii) low cost and frequent electronic data collection of patient views of quality improvements; (iii) efficient feedback to the health-care decision makers; and (iv) active involvement of consumers that fosters power to influence health system changes.

DOI 10.1111/hex.12665
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Elizabeth Fradgley
2018 Mansfield E, Noble N, Sanson-Fisher R, Mazza D, Bryant J, 'Primary Care Physicians' Perceived Barriers to Optimal Dementia Care: A Systematic Review.', Gerontologist, (2018)
DOI 10.1093/geront/gny067
Co-authors Elise Mansfield, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2018 Fradgley EA, Paul CL, Bryant J, Zucca A, Oldmeadow C, 'System-wide and group-specific health service improvements: Cross-sectional survey of outpatient improvement preferences and associations with demographic characteristics', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph15020179
Co-authors Chris Paul, Alison Zucca, Christopher Oldmeadow, Elizabeth Fradgley
2018 Waller A, Bryant J, Cameron E, Galal M, Symonds I, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Screening for recommended antenatal risk factors: How long does it take?', Women and Birth, (2018)

© 2018 Australian College of Midwives. Background: Detection and management of antenatal risk factors is critical for quality care. Aims: To determine (1) women's views about... [more]

© 2018 Australian College of Midwives. Background: Detection and management of antenatal risk factors is critical for quality care. Aims: To determine (1) women's views about when they should be asked about antenatal health factors as recommended in the Australian antenatal guidelines; and (2) the time required to provide recommended care using a clinical scenario. Methods: In Phase 1, pregnant women attending an outpatient obstetrics clinic at a public hospital were surveyed about preferred screening for antenatal risk factors during visit(s). In Phase 2, a hypothetical clinical scenario of a woman attending her first antenatal visit with a practicing midwife was video-recorded to extrapolate the time taken to ask about and offer assistance to manage clinical, screening and lifestyle risk factors. Findings: Most women (96%) perceived they should be asked about each of the risk factors at least once (i.e. at first visit). Total time taken to ask about all risk factors was 52. min. More time was spent discussing clinical (11. min) than lifestyle factors (4. min). Adjusting for the estimated prevalence of each risk factor, the time taken to offer assistance was 8. min per woman. Average time required for detecting and offering assistance to manage risk factors is 60. min per average risk woman. Conclusion: Women are willing to be asked about risk factors; however this process is time-consuming. Strategies to streamline visits and prioritise recommendations so time-efficient yet comprehensive care can be delivered are needed, particularly when factors require monitoring over time and for those who may be 'at-risk' for multiple factors.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2018.01.005
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller
2018 Olver I, Carey M, Boyes A, Hall A, Noble N, Bryant J, et al., 'The timeliness of patients reporting the side effects of chemotherapy.', Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, 26 3579-3586 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-018-4225-y
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Natasha Noble
2018 Sanson-Fisher RW, Noble NE, Searles AM, Deeming S, Smits RE, Oldmeadow CJ, Bryant J, 'A simple filter model to guide the allocation of healthcare resources for improving the treatment of depression among cancer patients', BMC CANCER, 18 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12885-018-4009-2
Co-authors Natasha Noble, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Christopher Oldmeadow, Andrew Searles
2018 Watson R, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Mansfied E, Evans T-J, 'What is a 'timely' diagnosis? Exploring the preferences of Australian health service consumers regarding when a diagnosis of dementia should be disclosed', BMC HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, 18 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-3409-y
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Elise Mansfield
2018 Jayakody A, Passmore E, Oldmeadow C, Bryant J, Carey M, Simons E, et al., 'The impact of telephone follow up on adverse events for Aboriginal people with chronic disease in new South Wales, Australia: A retrospective cohort study', International Journal for Equity in Health, 17 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12939-018-0776-2
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2018 Bryant J, Hobden B, Forshaw K, Oldmeadow C, Walsh J, Sanson-Fisher R, 'How accurately do general practitioners detect concurrent tobacco use and risky alcohol consumption? A cross-sectional study in Australian general practice.', Aust J Prim Health, (2018)
DOI 10.1071/PY17122
Co-authors Bree Hobden, Christopher Oldmeadow, Kristy Fakes, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2018 Hobden B, Bryant J, Carey M, Baker AL, Farrell M, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Finding the optimal treatment model: A systematic review of treatment for co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 52 737-750 (2018) [C1]

© The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2018. Objectives: Alcohol misuse and depression are commonly co-occurring conditions. To date, no review has examin... [more]

© The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2018. Objectives: Alcohol misuse and depression are commonly co-occurring conditions. To date, no review has examined the most efficacious treatment model for psychosocial treatment of co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression. This systematic review determined the: (i) methodological quality of publications examining psychosocial treatment of co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression using a sequential, parallel or integrated treatment model; and (ii) effectiveness of each dual treatment model compared to single treatment for those with co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression. Methods: PubMed, Medline and PsycInfo databases were searched for studies which were included if they involved treatment for alcohol misuse and depression and could be classified into one of the three treatment models. Included studies were assessed using the Cochrane¿s Effective Practice and Organisation of Care risk of bias criteria. Relevant study characteristics and outcomes were extracted and are presented in a narrative review format. Results: Seven studies met inclusion criteria. None were categorised as low risk on the risk of bias criteria. No studies examined a sequential model of treatment, three examined a parallel model and four examined an integrated model of dual-focussed treatment. The studies examining the parallel model and two out of four studies examining the effectiveness of an integrated model demonstrated greater improvement for alcohol or depression outcomes compared to control conditions. Conclusion: Evidence for the psychosocial treatment of co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression is limited to a handful of studies. The evidence has several methodological limitations, which impact the interpretation of the findings. Therefore, while international guidelines recommend integrated dual-focussed treatment for co-occurring conditions, there is little evidence supporting the superiority of this treatment format for co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression. High-quality research demonstrating improvements in patient outcomes is required to ensure recommendations for clinical practice are based on strong empirical evidence.

DOI 10.1177/0004867418758922
Co-authors Bree Hobden, Amanda Baker, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2018 Waller A, Sanson-Fisher R, Ries N, Bryant J, 'Increasing advance personal planning: The need for action at the community level', BMC Public Health, 18 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 The Author(s). Background: Advance personal planning is the process by which people consider, document and communicate their preferences for personal, financial and health ... [more]

© 2018 The Author(s). Background: Advance personal planning is the process by which people consider, document and communicate their preferences for personal, financial and health matters in case they lose the ability to make decisions or express their wishes in the future. Discussion: Advance personal planning is most often undertaken by individuals who are seriously ill, often in the context of a medical crisis and/or at the time of admission to hospital. However, the clinical utility and legal validity of the planning process may be compromised in these circumstances. Patients may lack sufficient capacity to meaningfully engage in advance personal planning; there may be insufficient time to adequately reflect on and discuss wishes with key others; and there may also be limited opportunity for inter-professional input and collaboration in the process. Here, we propose an agenda for research to advance the science of advance personal planning by promoting a 'whole community' approach. Adoption of advance personal planning at a community level may be achieved using a variety of strategies including public media campaigns, intervening with professionals across a range of health care and legal settings, and mobilising support from influential groups and local government. One potentially promising method for encouraging earlier adoption of advance personal planning among a broader population involves a community action approach, whereby multiple evidence-based strategies are integrated across multiple access points. Community action involves calling on community members, professionals, community and/or government organisations to work collaboratively to design and systematically implement intervention strategies with the aim of bringing about desired behaviour change. An example of a community action trial to improving uptake and quality of advance personal planning is described. Conclusion: While promising, there is a need for rigorous evidence to demonstrate whether a community action approach is effective in establishing whole community adoption of advance personal planning.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5523-5
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Nola Ries, Amy Waller
2018 Hobden B, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Oldmeadow C, Carey M, 'Co-occurring depression and alcohol misuse is under-identified in general practice: A cross-sectional study', Journal of Health Psychology, 23 1085-1095 (2018) [C1]

© 2016, The Author(s). Depression and alcohol misuse are common co-occurring conditions. This study aimed to determine the accuracy of general practitioner identification of depre... [more]

© 2016, The Author(s). Depression and alcohol misuse are common co-occurring conditions. This study aimed to determine the accuracy of general practitioner identification of depression and alcohol misuse. Participants from 12 Australian general practices reported demographic and health risk behaviour data. General practitioners were asked to indicate the presence or absence of six health risk factors for individual patients. Accuracy of general practitioner identification was low at 21 per cent. Those with severe alcohol misuse, no chronic diseases and lower education levels were more likely to be identified. Routine screening prior to patient appointments may be a simple and efficient way to increase identification rates.

DOI 10.1177/1359105316643855
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Bree Hobden
2017 Mansfield E, Boyes AW, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Quantifying the unmet needs of caregivers of people with dementia: a critical review of the quality of measures', International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 32 274-287 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/gps.4642
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Elise Mansfield, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2017 Bryant J, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Turon H, Wei A, Kuss B, 'The Patients¿ Perspective: Hematological Cancer Patients¿ Experiences of Adverse Events as Part of Care', Journal of Patient Safety, (2017)

Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved OBJECTIVE: To describe in a sample of patients with a confirmed diagnosis of a hematological cancer: (a) the propo... [more]

Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved OBJECTIVE: To describe in a sample of patients with a confirmed diagnosis of a hematological cancer: (a) the proportion who self-report experiencing an unexpected adverse event as part of their care; (b) how the adverse event was handled by the health-care organization; and (c) the sociodemographic, disease, and treatment characteristics associated with experiencing an adverse event. DESIGN: Cross sectional survey. SETTING: Three Australian hematological oncology treatment centers. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals with a confirmed diagnosis of a hematological cancer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Participants were asked if they had ever experienced an adverse event in their cancer care. Those who did were asked about their perceptions concerning what the adverse event was related to, how much harm the event caused, who identified the adverse event, and how the health-care organization responded to the adverse event. RESULTS: Forty-two participants (26.4%) perceived that they had experienced an unexpected adverse event as part of their care. Most were told about the event as soon as it happened (62%) and were given an explanation about why the event occurred (75%). Fewer were given information about how to take the matter further if they wished (43%). Participants who were unemployed, retired, disabled, or performed home duties and those whose employment status was ¿other¿ had higher odds of reporting an adverse event than those in full- or part-time employment. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need for routinely querying patients during their treatment regarding the occurrence of unexpected adverse events. In addition, there is a need for improvement in the responses of health-care providers and the health-care system to these events in regard to full disclosure, apology, and options available to the patient for resolution.

DOI 10.1097/PTS.0000000000000347
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2017 Hobden B, Bryant J, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Oldmeadow C, 'Computer tablet or telephone? A randomised controlled trial exploring two methods of collecting data from drug and alcohol outpatients', Addictive Behaviors, 71 111-117 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Objective Both computerised and telephone surveys have potential advantages for research data collection. The current study aimed to determine the: (i) feasibility, (ii) ac... [more]

© 2017 Objective Both computerised and telephone surveys have potential advantages for research data collection. The current study aimed to determine the: (i) feasibility, (ii) acceptability, and (iii) cost per completed survey of computer tablet versus telephone data collection for clients attending an outpatient drug and alcohol treatment clinic. Design Two-arm randomised controlled trial. Method Clients attending a drug and alcohol outpatient clinic in New South Wales, Australia, were randomised to complete a baseline survey via computer tablet in the clinic or via telephone interview within two weeks of their appointment. All participants completed a three-month follow-up survey via telephone. Results Consent and completion rates for the baseline survey were significantly higher in the computer tablet condition. The time taken to complete the computer tablet survey was lower (11¿min) than the telephone condition (17¿min). There were no differences in the proportion of consenters or completed follow-up surveys between the two conditions at the 3-month follow-up. Acceptability was high across both modes of data collection. The cost of the computer tablet condition was $67.52 greater per completed survey than the telephone condition. Conclusion There is a trade-off between computer tablet and telephone data collection. While both data collection methods were acceptable to participants, the computer tablet condition resulted in higher consent and completion rates at baseline, therefore yielding greater external validity, and was quicker for participants to complete. Telephone data collection was however, more cost-effective. Researchers should carefully consider the mode of data collection that suits individual study needs.

DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.03.009
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Mariko Carey, Bree Hobden, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2017 Carey M, Boyes AW, Bryant J, Turon H, Clinton-McHarg T, Sanson-Fisher R, 'The Patient Perspective on Errors in Cancer Care: Results of a Cross-Sectional Survey', Journal of Patient Safety, (2017)

Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to explore medical oncology outpatients' perceived experiences of ... [more]

Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to explore medical oncology outpatients' perceived experiences of errors in their cancer care. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted. English-speaking medical oncology outpatients aged 18 years or older were recruited from 9 Australian cancer treatment centers. Participants completed 2 paper-and-pencil questionnaires: an initial survey on demographic, disease and treatment characteristics upon recruitment; and a second survey on their experiences of errors in cancer care 1 month later. RESULTS: A total of 1818 patients (80%) consented to participate, and of these, 1136 (62%) completed both surveys. One hundred forty-eight participants (13%) perceived that an error had been made in their care, of which one third (n = 46) reported that the error was associated with severe harm. Of those who perceived an error had been made, less than half reported that they had received an explanation for the error (n = 65, 45%) and only one third reported receiving an apology (n = 50, 35%) or being told that steps had been taken to prevent the error from reoccurring (n = 52, 36%). Patients with university or vocational level education (odds ratio [OR] = 1.6 [1.09¿2.45], P = 0.0174) and those who received radiotherapy (OR = 1.72 [1.16¿2.57]; P = 0.0076) or ¿other¿ treatments (OR = 3.23 [1.08¿9.63]; P = 0.0356) were significantly more likely to report an error in care. CONCLUSIONS: There is significant scope to improve communication with patients and appropriate responses by the healthcare system after a perceived error in cancer care.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

DOI 10.1097/PTS.0000000000000368
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Allison Boyes, Mariko Carey, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2017 Carey M, Boyes AW, Smits R, Bryant J, Waller A, Olver I, 'Access to clinical trials among oncology patients: results of a cross sectional survey.', BMC cancer, 17 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12885-017-3644-3
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Amy Waller, Mariko Carey
2017 Grady A, Carey M, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Hobden B, 'A systematic review of patient-practitioner communication interventions involving treatment decisions', Patient Education and Counseling, 100 199-211 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd Objectives To examine the: 1) methodological quality of interventions examining strategies to improve patient-practitioner communication involving trea... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd Objectives To examine the: 1) methodological quality of interventions examining strategies to improve patient-practitioner communication involving treatment decisions; 2) effectiveness of strategies to improve patient-practitioner communication involving treatment decisions; and 3) types of treatment decisions (emergency/non-emergency) in the included studies. Methods Medline, PsychINFO, CINAHL, and Embase were searched to identify intervention studies. To be included, studies were required to examine patient-practitioner communication related to decision making about treatment. Study methodological quality was assessed using Cochrane's Effective Practice and Organisation of Care risk of bias criteria. Study design, sample characteristics, intervention details, and outcomes were extracted. Results Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. No studies were rated low risk on all nine risk of bias criteria. Two of the three interventions aimed at changing patient behaviour, two of the five practitioner directed, and one of the three patient-practitioner directed interventions demonstrated an effect on decision-making outcomes. No studies examined emergency treatment decisions. Conclusions Existing studies have a high risk of bias and are poorly reported. There is some evidence to suggest patient-directed interventions may be effective in improving decision-making outcomes. Practice implications It is imperative that an evidence-base is developed to inform clinical practice.

DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2016.09.010
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Bree Hobden
2017 Hobden B, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Oldmeadow C, Carey M, 'Do rates of depression vary by level of alcohol misuse in Australian general practice?', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 23 263-267 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 La Trobe University. Limited data exist regarding co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression among general practice patients. This study examined the prevalence of depressi... [more]

© 2017 La Trobe University. Limited data exist regarding co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression among general practice patients. This study examined the prevalence of depression by level of alcohol misuse, and the sociodemographic factors associated with depression and increased alcohol misuse severity. A cross-sectional survey was administered to 3559 Australian general practice patients. Patients completed their demographic details, the Patient Health Questionnaire (9-item) and the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (Consumption items). The prevalence of alcohol misuse and depression was 6.7%, and depression prevalence varied significantly according to level of alcohol misuse (P<0.001). Age, gender, Aboriginality and number of chronic diseases were associated with depression and higher levels of alcohol misuse. These findings may assist General Practitioners in identifying those at risk of experiencing co-morbid depression and alcohol use, and aid in effective treatment and referral.

DOI 10.1071/PY16076
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Christopher Oldmeadow, Mariko Carey, Bree Hobden
2017 Bryant J, Waller A, Cameron E, Hure A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Diet during pregnancy: Women's knowledge of and adherence to food safety guidelines', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 57 315-322 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Background: As a precaution against acquiring food-borne illnesses, guidelines recommend wo... [more]

© 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Background: As a precaution against acquiring food-borne illnesses, guidelines recommend women avoid some foods during pregnancy. Aims: To examine among women receiving antenatal care: (i) level of knowledge and self-reported adherence to guidelines about foods that should be avoided during pregnancy; and (ii) associated socio-demographic characteristics. Methods: Women attending a public outpatient clinic who were: pregnant or had recently given birth; 18 years or older; able to complete an English language survey with minimal assistance; and had at least one prior antenatal appointment for their current pregnancy, were asked to complete a cross-sectional survey. Results: In total 223 women (64% consent rate) participated. Knowledge of foods to avoid during pregnancy was poor, with 83% of women incorrectly identifying at least one unsafe food as safe to consume. The average knowledge score for foods to avoid during pregnancy was 7.9 (standard deviation = 3.4; median = 9; interquartile range: 6¿11; n = 218) out of a possible score of 12. Having more general practice (GP) visits for antenatal care and fewer tertiary antenatal visits were significantly associated with higher knowledge. Women with a higher number of GP visits and those receiving care in a high-risk clinic were more likely to be adherent to guidelines. Conclusions: The majority of pregnant women have poor knowledge of food avoidance guidelines and continue to consume foods that put them at risk.

DOI 10.1111/ajo.12523
Co-authors Amy Waller, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alexis Hure
2017 Hobden B, Carey M, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Oldmeadow C, 'Clinician identification of elevated symptoms of depression among individuals seeking treatment for substance misuse.', Drug and alcohol dependence, 181 71-76 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.09.013
Co-authors Bree Hobden, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Christopher Oldmeadow
2016 Mansfield E, Bryant J, Regan T, Waller A, Boyes A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Burden and Unmet Needs of Caregivers of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients: A Systematic Review of the Volume and Focus of Research Output', COPD: Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, 13 662-667 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Taylor &amp; Francis Group, LLC. Caregivers of individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience significant burden. To develop effective intervent... [more]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Caregivers of individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience significant burden. To develop effective interventions to support this vulnerable group, it is necessary to understand how this burden varies as a function of patient well-being and across the illness trajectory. This systematic review aimed to identify the number and type of data-based publications exploring the burden and unmet needs of caregivers of individuals with COPD. Medline, Embase, PsycINFO and Cochrane databases were searched for studies published between January 2000 and February 2014. Studies were eligible if they were quantitative studies examining unmet needs of, or burden on, adult caregivers of individuals with COPD. Eligible papers were categorised according to (i) type (i.e. descriptive, measurement and intervention studies); (ii) whether they measured associations between patient and caregiver burden and (iii) whether they measured caregiver burden longitudinally. Twenty-seven data-based papers met criteria for inclusion. There was a significant increase in the total number of publications over time. The majority of publications were descriptive studies (n¿=¿25), with one measurement and one intervention study identified. Fourteen descriptive studies measured the relationship between patient or caregiver factors and caregiver burden. Only two studies measured caregiver burden over time. There are a number of gaps in the body of research examining burden and unmet needs of caregivers of individuals with COPD that preclude the development of effective interventions for this population. Greater research effort should be directed towards identifying rigorous measurement tools which more accurately characterise caregiver burden, so that evidence-based interventions can be developed.

DOI 10.3109/15412555.2016.1151488
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Elise Mansfield, Amy Waller, Allison Boyes
2016 Bryant J, Boyes AW, Hall A, Girgis A, D'Este C, Sitas F, 'Prevalence and factors related to smoking and smoking cessation 6 months following a cancer diagnosis: a population-based study (vol 10, pg 645, 2016 )', JOURNAL OF CANCER SURVIVORSHIP, 10 1112-1112 (2016)
DOI 10.1007/s11764-016-0561-4
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Allison Boyes
2016 Waller A, Bryant J, Cameron E, Galal M, Quay J, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Women's perceptions of antenatal care: Are we following guideline recommended care?', BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 16 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-0984-y
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Amy Waller, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2016 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley E, Hobden B, Zucca A, Henskens F, et al., 'A consumer register: an acceptable and cost-effective alternative for accessing patient populations', BMC Medical Research Methodology, 16 1-10 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however, they have several limitations including low c... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however, they have several limitations including low consent and participation rates, and potential selection bias. To improve access to samples for research, the utility of a new model of recruitment termed the 'Consumer Register', that allows for direct patient recruitment from hospitals, was examined. This paper reports: (i) consent rates onto the register; (ii) preferred methods and frequency of contact; and (iii) the feasibility of establishing the register, including: (a) cost per person recruited to the register; (b) the differential cost and consent rates of volunteer versus paid data collectors; and (c) participant completion rates. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in five outpatient clinics in Australia. Patients were approached by volunteers or paid data collectors and asked to complete a touch-screen electronic survey. Consenting individuals were asked to indicate their willingness and preferences for enrolment onto a research register. Descriptive statistics were used to examine patient preferences and linear regression used to model the success of volunteer versus paid data collectors. The opportunity and financial costs of establishing the register were calculated. Results: A total of 1947 patients (80.6 %) consented to complete the survey, of which, 1486 (76.3 %) completed the questionnaire. Of the completers, the majority (69.4 %, or 1032 participants) were willing to be listed on the register and preferred to be contacted by email (50.3 %). Almost 39 % of completers were willing to be contacted three or more times in a 12 month period. The annual opportunity cost of resources consumed by the register was valued at $37,187, giving an opportunity cost per person recruited to the register of $36. After amortising fixed costs, the annual financial outlay was $23,004 or $22 per person recruited to the register. Use of volunteer data collectors contributed to an annual saving of $14,183, however paid data collectors achieved significantly higher consent rates. Successful enrolment onto the register was completed for 42 % of the sample. Conclusions: A Consumer Register is a promising and feasible alternative to population-based registries, with the majority of participants willing to be contacted multiple times via low-resource methods such as email. There is an effectiveness/cost trade off in the use of paid versus volunteer data collectors.

DOI 10.1186/s12874-016-0238-8
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Andrew Searles, Frans Henskens, Christopher Oldmeadow, Elizabeth Fradgley, Alison Zucca, Bree Hobden, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2016 Fradgley EA, Paul CL, Bryant J, Oldmeadow C, 'Getting right to the point: Identifying Australian outpatients' priorities and preferences for patient-centred quality improvement in chronic disease care', International Journal for Quality in Health Care, 28 470-477 (2016) [C1]

© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. Objectives: To identify spec... [more]

© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. Objectives: To identify specific actions for patient-centred quality improvement in chronic disease outpatient settings, this study identified patients' general and specific preferences among a comprehensive suite of initiatives for change.Design and setting: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in three hospital-based clinics specializing in oncology, neurology and cardiology care located in New South Wales, Australia.Participants and measures: Adult English-speaking outpatients completed the touch-screen Consumer Preferences Survey in waiting rooms or treatment areas. Participants selected up to 23 general initiatives that would improve their experience. Using adaptive branching, participants could select an additional 110 detailed initiatives and complete a relative prioritization exercise.Results: A total of 541 individuals completed the survey (71.1% consent, 73.1% completion). Commonly selected general initiatives, presented in order of decreasing priority (along with sample proportion), included: improved parking (60.3%), up-to-date information provision (15.0%), ease of clinic contact (12.9%), access to information at home (12.8%), convenient appointment scheduling (14.2%), reduced wait-times (19.8%) and information on medical emergencies (11.1%). To address these general initiatives, 40 detailed initiatives were selected by respondents.Conclusions: Initiatives targeting service accessibility and information provision, such as parking and up-to-date information on patient prognoses and progress, were commonly selected and perceived to be of relatively greater priority. Specific preferences included the need for clinics to provide patient-designated parking in close proximity to the clinic, information on treatment progress and test results (potentially in the form of designated brief appointments or via telehealth) and comprehensive and trustworthy lists of information sources to access at home.

DOI 10.1093/intqhc/mzw049
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Chris Paul, Elizabeth Fradgley, Christopher Oldmeadow
2016 Bryant J, Boyes AW, Hall A, Girgis A, D Este C, Sitas F, 'Prevalence and factors related to smoking and smoking cessation 6¿months following a cancer diagnosis: a population-based study', Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 10 645-653 (2016) [C1]

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Purpose: Limited research has examined smoking amongst recent cancer survivors or the relative contribution of factors on smoking... [more]

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Purpose: Limited research has examined smoking amongst recent cancer survivors or the relative contribution of factors on smoking behaviour. This study aimed to describe amongst recent Australian cancer survivors (i) prevalence of smoking by cancer type, (ii) characteristics associated with continued smoking following diagnosis, (iii) intention to quit among those who continue to smoke and (iv) characteristics associated with quitting following diagnosis. Method: Cross-sectional data were analysed from 1299 cancer survivors diagnosed with their first primary cancer recruited from two Australian cancer registries in Australia between 2006 and 2008. Results: Of participants, 8.6¿% reported current smoking. Participants who were younger and single or widowed reported higher odds of current smoking. Participants who had a certificate/diploma or tertiary education reported lower odds of smoking. Among current smokers, 53¿% intended to quit in the future. Lung cancer survivors reported more than four times the odds of quitting smoking since diagnosis compared to other cancer types. Conclusion: Of recent Australian cancer survivors, 14¿% report continued smoking. Implications for Cancer Survivors: Smoking following a cancer diagnosis is associated with increased risk of mortality and further morbidity. There is a need to target cessation efforts towards survivors who are younger, without a partner and with a low level of education.

DOI 10.1007/s11764-015-0510-7
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Catherine Deste
2016 Fradgley EA, Bryant J, Paul CL, Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Oldmeadow C, 'Cross-sectional data that explore the relationship between outpatients' quality of life and preferences for quality improvement in oncology settings', Journal of Oncology Practice, 12 e746-e754 (2016) [C1]

Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology. Purpose This cross-sectional study assessed the association between oncology outpatients&apos; quality improvement prefe... [more]

Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology. Purpose This cross-sectional study assessed the association between oncology outpatients' quality improvement preferences and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Implementation of specific initiatives preferred by patients with lower HRQoL may be a strategic approach to enhancing care for potentially vulnerable patients. Methods English-speaking adults were recruited from five outpatient chemotherapy clinics located in New South Wales, Australia. Using touch screen devices, participants selected up to 25 initiatives that would improve their experiences and completed the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) survey. The logistic odds of selecting an initiative according to FACT-G scores were calculated to determine whether preferences were associated with HRQoL after controlling for potential confounders. Results Of the 411 eligible outpatients approached to participate, 263 (64%) completed surveys. Commonly selected initiatives were up-to-date information on treatment and condition progress (19.8%), access to or information on financial assistance (18.3%), and reduced clinic wait times (17.5%). For those with relatively lower FACT-G scores, the adjusted odds of selecting five initiatives illustrated an increasing trend: convenient appointment scheduling systems (+23% [P =.002]), reduced wait times (+15% [P =.01]), information on medical emergencies (+14% [P =.04]), access to or information on financial assistance (+15% [P =.009]), help to maintain daily living activities (+18% [P =.007]). Conclusion Two areas of improvement were commonly selected: easily accessible health services and information and support for self-management. Although the results suggest an association between a few quality improvement preferences and HRQoL, a wider spectrum of patient characteristics must be considered when targeting quality improvement to patient subgroups.

DOI 10.1200/JOP.2016.011023
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Elizabeth Fradgley, Chris Paul, Christopher Oldmeadow
2016 Hall A, Lynagh M, Tzelepis F, Paul C, Bryant J, 'How can we help haematological cancer survivors cope with the changes they experience as a result of their cancer?', Ann Hematol, 95 2065-2076 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00277-016-2806-8
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Marita Lynagh
2016 Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Bryant J, Gartner C, Guillaumier A, 'Electronic cigarettes: Awareness, recent use, and attitudes within a sample of socioeconomically disadvantaged Australian smokers', Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 18 670-677 (2016) [C1]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. Introduction: Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) awareness, ... [more]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. Introduction: Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) awareness, trial of e-cigarettes in the past 12 months, source and perceptions of safety and effectiveness was assessed within a disadvantaged sample of adult Australian smokers receiving welfare aid. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was administered to clients who smoke at two community service organizations in New South Wales, Australia from October 2013 to July 2014. E-cigarette awareness, trial in past 12 months, sources of e-cigarettes and perceptions of the safety and effectiveness of e-cigarettes to help people quit were assessed along with sociodemographic and smoking-related variables. Results: In total, 369 participants completed the survey (77% response rate). Awareness and trial of e-cigarettes were reported by 77% (n = 283) and 35% (n = 103) of the sample, respectively. E-cigarettes were most commonly obtained from friends/strangers followed by tobacco shops (tobacconists). Trying e-cigarettes in the past 12 months was significantly associated with positive perceptions of their safety (odds ratio [OR] = 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1, 3.1) and effectiveness (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.1, 3.2). Motivation to quit tobacco smoking was also significantly positively associated with positive perceptions of e-cigarette safety (OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 1.1, 1.4) and effectiveness (OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 1.0, 1.3). Conclusions: Rates of awareness and trial of e-cigarettes within a disadvantaged sample of Australian smokers are comparable to rates found within representative samples of the general Australian population. Previously trying e-cigarettes and higher levels of motivation to quit were associated with more positive perceptions of e-cigarette safety and effectiveness. Implications: This study demonstrates that socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers are aware of and accessing e-cigarettes in a country with relatively high restrictions covering e-cigarette sale and use.

DOI 10.1093/ntr/ntv183
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Chris Paul
2016 Wolfenden L, Milat AJ, Lecathelinais C, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Bryant J, et al., 'What is generated and what is used: A description of public health research output and citation', European Journal of Public Health, 26 523-525 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved. The aim of this short report was to describe the ... [more]

© 2016 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved. The aim of this short report was to describe the output and citation rates of public health. Data-based publications and literature reviews from the year 2008, and their 5-year citation rates were extracted from 10 randomly selected public health journals. In total, 86.2% of publications were descriptive/epidemiological studies, 56.8% used cross-sectional (56.8%) designs and 77.8% were classified as research translation stage 2. Reviews and publications describing randomized controlled trials were the most highly cited, but were infrequently published. Strategies to address the discordance between public health research output and research citation may improve the impact of public health research.

DOI 10.1093/eurpub/ckw047
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong, Amy Waller
2016 Paul C, Bonevski B, Twyman L, D'Este C, Siahpush M, Guillaumier A, et al., 'The 'price signal' for health care is loud and clear: A cross-sectional study of self-reported access to health care by disadvantaged Australians', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 40 132-137 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Public Health Association of Australia. Objective: To describe self-reported inability to access health care and factors associated with lack of access among a socioeconomi... [more]

© 2015 Public Health Association of Australia. Objective: To describe self-reported inability to access health care and factors associated with lack of access among a socioeconomically disadvantaged group. Method: A cross-sectional survey with 906 adult clients of a large community welfare agency in New South Wales. Clients attending the service for emergency assistance completed a touchscreen survey. Results: Inability to access health care in the prior year was reported by more than one-third of the sample (38%), compared to the 5% found for the general population. Dentists (47%), specialists (43%) or GPs (29%) were the least accessible types of health care. The main reason for inability to access health care was cost, accounting for 60% of responses. Almost half (47%) the sample reported delayed or non-use of medicines due to cost. Increasing financial stress was associated with increased inability to access GP or specialist care, medicines and imaging. Higher anxiety scores were associated with inability to access health care, and with cost-related inability to access medicines and imaging. Conclusion: For disadvantaged groups, cost-related barriers to accessing care are prominent and are disproportionately high - particularly regarding dentistry, specialist and GP care. Implications: Improvements in health outcomes for disadvantaged groups are likely to require strategies to reduce cost-related barriers to health care.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12405
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Elizabeth Fradgley, Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2016 Bryant J, Mansfield E, Hall A, Waller A, Boyes A, Jayakody A, et al., 'The psychosocial outcomes of individuals with hematological cancers: Are we doing enough high quality research, and what is it telling us?', Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology, 101 21-31 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This systematic review assessed the quantity and quality of research examining the psychosocial outcomes among hematological cancer patients. Studies ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This systematic review assessed the quantity and quality of research examining the psychosocial outcomes among hematological cancer patients. Studies were categorised as either measurement, descriptive or intervention. Intervention studies were further assessed according to Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) methodological criteria. A total of 261 eligible papers were identified. The number of publications increased by 8.8% each year (95% CI = 7.5-10.2%; p < 0.0001). The majority of studies were descriptive (n = 232; 89%), with few measurement (n = 8; 3%) and intervention (n = 21; 8%) studies identified. Ten intervention studies met EPOC design criteria, however only two interventions, one targeted at individuals with Hodgkin's or Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and one targeted at individuals with leukaemia, lymphoma or myelomatosis were successful in improving patients' psychosocial outcomes. Despite an increasing volume of research examining psychosocial outcomes of hematological cancer patients, there is a need for robust measurement and methodologically rigorous intervention research in this area.

DOI 10.1016/j.critrevonc.2016.02.016
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Elise Mansfield, Allison Boyes, Natalie Dodd, Amy Waller
2016 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley E, Hobden B, Zucca A, Henskens F, et al., 'A consumer register: an acceptable and cost-effective alternative for accessing patient populations', BMC medical research methodology, 16 134 (2016)

BACKGROUND: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however,¿they have several limitations including low consent and participati... [more]

BACKGROUND: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however,¿they have several limitations including low consent and participation rates, and potential selection bias. To improve access to samples for research, the utility of a new model of recruitment termed the 'Consumer Register', that allows for direct patient recruitment from hospitals, was examined. This paper reports: (i) consent rates onto the register; (ii) preferred methods and frequency of contact; and (iii) the feasibility of establishing the register, including: (a) cost per person recruited to the register; (b) the differential cost and consent rates of volunteer versus paid data collectors; and (c) participant completion rates. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in five outpatient clinics in Australia. Patients were approached by volunteers or paid data collectors and asked to complete a touch-screen electronic survey. Consenting individuals were asked to indicate their willingness and preferences for enrolment onto a research register. Descriptive statistics were used to examine patient preferences and linear regression used to model the success of volunteer versus paid data collectors. The opportunity and financial costs of establishing the register were calculated. RESULTS: A total of 1947 patients (80.6¿%) consented to complete the survey, of which, 1486 (76.3¿%) completed the questionnaire. Of the completers, the majority (69.4¿%, or 1032 participants) were willing to be listed on the register and preferred to be contacted by email (50.3¿%). Almost 39¿% of completers¿were willing to be contacted three or more times in a 12¿month period. The annual opportunity cost of resources consumed by the register was valued at $37,187, giving an opportunity cost per person recruited to the register of $36. After amortising fixed costs, the annual financial outlay was $23,004 or $22 per person recruited to the register. Use of volunteer data collectors contributed to an annual saving of $14,183, however paid data collectors achieved significantly higher consent rates. Successful enrolment onto the register was completed for 42 % of the sample. CONCLUSIONS: A Consumer Register is a promising and feasible alternative to population-based registries, with the majority of participants willing to be contacted multiple times via low-resource methods such as email. There is an effectiveness/cost trade off in the use of paid versus volunteer data collectors.

Co-authors Frans Henskens, Andrew Searles, Elizabeth Fradgley, Bree Hobden, Alison Zucca, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2016 Jayakody A, Bryant J, Carey M, Hobden B, Dodd N, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Effectiveness of interventions utilising telephone follow up in reducing hospital readmission within 30 days for individuals with chronic disease: a systematic review', BMC HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, 16 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1650-9
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Natalie Dodd, Bree Hobden
2016 Bryant J, Mansfield E, Boyes AW, Waller A, Sanson-Fisher R, Regan T, 'Involvement of informal caregivers in supporting patients with COPD: A review of intervention studies', International Journal of COPD, 11 1587-1596 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Bryant et al. Caregivers of individuals with COPD have a key role in maintaining patient adherence and optimizing patient function. However, no systematic review has examin... [more]

© 2016 Bryant et al. Caregivers of individuals with COPD have a key role in maintaining patient adherence and optimizing patient function. However, no systematic review has examined how the caregiver role has been operationalized in interventions to improve outcomes of individuals with COPD or the quality or effectiveness of these interventions. The aims of this review were to 1) determine whether caregivers have been involved as part of interventions to improve outcomes of individuals with COPD; 2) determine the risk of bias within included intervention studies; and 3) examine the effectiveness of interventions that have involved caregivers in improving outcomes of individuals with COPD. The electronic databases of Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Library were searched from January 2000 to November 2015. Experimental studies testing interventions that involved a caregiver to improve COPD patient outcomes were eligible. Nine studies involving caregivers met inclusion criteria. No studies reported any intervention components targeted solely at caregivers, with most instead including caregivers in dyadic or group education sessions about COPD delivered by health care professionals. The risk of bias identified in included studies was mixed. Seven of the nine studies were effective in improving a broad range of outcomes. These findings highlight that there is an urgent need for methodologically rigorous interventions to examine the effectiveness of strategies to assist caregivers to provide direct care, encourage adherence to health care provider recommendations, act as a health care advocate, and provide emotional and psychosocial support to individuals with COPD.

DOI 10.2147/COPD.S107571
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Amy Waller, Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Elise Mansfield
2016 Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Bryant J, West R, Siahpush M, et al., 'Factors associated with concurrent tobacco smoking and heavy alcohol consumption within a socioeconomically disadvantaged Australian sample', Substance Use and Misuse, 51 459-470 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Taylor &amp; Francis Group, LLC. Background: Tobacco use and heavy alcohol consumption occur more frequently in socioeconomically disadvantaged groups. Little is known ab... [more]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Background: Tobacco use and heavy alcohol consumption occur more frequently in socioeconomically disadvantaged groups. Little is known about the sociodemographic and psychosocial factors associated with use of alcohol and tobacco in disadvantaged groups in comparison to low-risk users. Objectives: This study aimed to compare the characteristics of low-risk users with: disadvantaged smokers only; disadvantaged heavy drinkers only; and disadvantaged concurrent smokers and heavy drinkers. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of socioeconomically disadvantaged adult clients attending a community welfare agency assessed tobacco use, alcohol use, demographic, and psychosocial variables. Multivariable analysis using multinomial logistic regression was carried out. Results: The sample consisted of 835 participants; 40% (n = 331) were concurrent users, 31% were smokers only (n = 252), 11% were heavy drinkers only (n = 93), and 18% were low-risk users (n = 149). Compared with those who neither smoked nor consumed alcohol heavily, concurrent users were more likely to be younger, have only some contact with family, have more friends and family who were smokers, have no fixed home address, live alone, and have higher levels of financial stress. Most of these factors were shared by individuals who were smokers only. Factors associated with heavy drinkers only were frequent contact with family and having more friends and family who were smokers. Conclusion: Among those Australians who suffer severe economic hardship, being a concurrent smoker and heavy drinker appears to be associated with more isolated living conditions and financial stress but some contact with family.

DOI 10.3109/10826084.2015.1122065
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul, Catherine Deste, Christopher Oldmeadow
2015 Bryant J, Zucca A, Brozek I, Rock V, Bonevski B, 'Sun Protection Attitudes and Behaviours Among First Generation Australians with Darker Skin Types: Results from Focus Groups', Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 17 248-254 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10903-013-9900-y
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Alison Zucca
2015 Grady A, Carey M, Oldmeadow C, Bryant J, Mazza D, Sanson-Fisher R, 'GP detection of health risk factors among general practice patients at risk of primary and secondary stroke', Family Practice, 32 336-342 (2015) [C1]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Background. People with a history of stroke or heart disease are at increased risk of future stroke; ... [more]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Background. People with a history of stroke or heart disease are at increased risk of future stroke; therefore, identification of risk factors by GPs is critical. Objectives. To compare the following among general practice patients with and without a history of stroke or heart disease: (i) self-reported prevalence rates of lifestyle risk factors; (ii) accuracy of GP detection of patient-reported risk factors and (iii) average proportion of patient-reported risk factors detected by GPs. Methods. Consecutive patients attending a participating general practice clinic were invited to participate in a cross-sectional touchscreen survey assessing lifestyle risk factors in 2010-11. The GP of each consenting patient completed a corresponding survey assessing the patient's risk factors. Demographic characteristics of patients and GPs were obtained. Results. Data from 51 GPs and 564 patients were analysed. Patients without a history of stroke or heart disease reported significantly higher rates of smoking (12%) and risky alcohol consumption (56%) than patients with a history of stroke or heart disease (6% and 36%, respectively). Low sensitivity of GP detection of risk factors was found for all risk factors for all patients. Patients with a history of stroke or heart disease have a significantly higher mean proportion of risk factors detected by their GP compared to patients without a history of stroke or heart disease (P = 0.00). Conclusion. Given low sensitivity and specificity of GP detection of risk factors among patients, alternate methods of identification are needed. Research is required to determine strategies to facilitate secondary care of patients with a history of stroke or heart disease by GPs.

DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmv024
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Waller A, Forshaw K, Bryant J, Carey M, Boyes A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Preparatory education for cancer patients undergoing surgery: A systematic review of volume and quality of research output over time', Patient Education and Counseling, 98 1540-1549 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Objective: To determine the volume and scope of research output examining preparation of patients for people undergoing cancer-related surgical treatm... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Objective: To determine the volume and scope of research output examining preparation of patients for people undergoing cancer-related surgical treatment, and the impact of pre-operative education on patient outcomes and health care utilisation. Methods: Medline, EMBASE, PsychINFO databases were systematically searched. Eligible papers were coded as data-based or non-data-based. Data-based papers were further classified as descriptive, measurement or intervention studies. Methodological quality and effectiveness of intervention studies were assessed using Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) criteria. Results: We identified 121 eligible papers. The number of publications significantly increased over time. Most were data-based (n = 99) and descriptive (n = 83). Fourteen intervention studies met EPOC design criteria. Face-to-face interventions reported benefits for anxiety (5/7), satisfaction (1/1), knowledge (3/3) and health care costs (1/1). Audio-visual and multi-media interventions improved satisfaction (1/1) and knowledge (2/3), but not anxiety (0/3). Written interventions were mixed. Conclusion: Descriptive studies dominate the literature examining preoperative education in oncology populations, with few rigorous intervention studies. Pre-operative education can improve satisfaction, knowledge and reduce anxiety. Practice implications: Further work should be directed at multi-modal interventions, and those that include the caregiver, given their role in assisting patients to prepare and recover from surgery.

DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2015.05.008
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Amy Waller, Allison Boyes, Kristy Fakes, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Regan T, Carey M, Bryant J, Waller A, Mansfield E, Sitas F, Tracey E, 'Prevalence and correlates of current smoking among medical oncology outpatients', Psycho-Oncology, 24 1258-1264 (2015) [C1]

Copyright © 2015 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd. Background Continued smoking following a cancer diagnosis has adverse impacts on canc... [more]

Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Background Continued smoking following a cancer diagnosis has adverse impacts on cancer treatment and puts individuals at risk of secondary cancers. Data on the prevalence and correlates of smoking among cancer patients are critical for successfully targeting smoking cessation interventions. Aims To explore among a sample of medical oncology outpatients (a) the prevalence of self-reported current smoking and (b) the demographic and psychosocial factors associated with self-reported smoking. Methods A heterogeneous sample of cancer patients aged 18 years or over was recruited from 1 of 11 medical oncology treatment centres across Australia. Patients completed a survey assessing the following: smoking status; socio-demographic, disease and treatment characteristics; time since diagnosis; anxiety; and depression. Factors associated with self-reported smoking were examined using a univariate and multivariate mixed-effects logistic regression. Results A total of 1379 patients returned surveys and 1338 were included in the analysis. The prevalence of current smoking was 10.9% (n=146). After adjusting for treatment centre, patients aged 65 years and older and those without health concession cards were significantly less likely to smoke. Patients diagnosed with lung cancer and those without private health insurance were more likely to smoke. Discussion A minority of cancer patients reported continued smoking at an average time of 13 months post-diagnosis. Patients, who are younger, have been diagnosed with lung cancer and have lower socioeconomic status are at-risk groups and represent important targets for smoking cessation advice and intervention.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3893
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Elise Mansfield, Amy Waller
2015 Grady AM, Bryant J, Carey ML, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Levi CR, 'Agreement with evidence for tissue Plasminogen Activator use among emergency physicians: A cross-sectional survey', BMC Research Notes, 8 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Grady et al. Background: Emergency department staff play a crucial role in the triage of stroke patients and therefore the capacity to deliver time-dependent treatments suc... [more]

© 2015 Grady et al. Background: Emergency department staff play a crucial role in the triage of stroke patients and therefore the capacity to deliver time-dependent treatments such as tissue Plasminogen Activator. This study aimed to identify among emergency physicians, (1) rates of agreement with evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke care; and (2) individual and hospital factors associated with high agreement with evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use. Methods: Australian fellows and trainees of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine were invited to complete an online cross-sectional survey assessing perceptions of tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke. Demographic and hospital characteristics were also collected. Results: 429 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine members responded (13% response rate). Almost half (47.2%) did not agree with any statements regarding the benefits of tissue Plasminogen Activator use for acute stroke. Perceived routine administration of tissue Plasminogen Activator by the head of respondents' emergency department was significantly associated with high agreement with the evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke. Conclusions: Agreement with evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke is not high among responding Australian emergency physicians. In order for tissue Plasminogen Activator treatment to become widely accepted and adopted in emergency settings, beliefs and attitudes towards treatment need to be in accordance with clinical practice guidelines.

DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1242-5
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Christopher Levi
2015 Fradgley EA, Paul CL, Bryant J, 'A systematic review of barriers to optimal outpatient specialist services for individuals with prevalent chronic diseases: What are the unique and common barriers experienced by patients in high income countries?', International Journal for Equity in Health, 14 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Fradgley et al. Health utilization and need assessment data suggest there is considerable variation in access to outpatient specialist care. However, it is unclear if the t... [more]

© 2015 Fradgley et al. Health utilization and need assessment data suggest there is considerable variation in access to outpatient specialist care. However, it is unclear if the types of barriers experienced are specific to chronic disease groups or experienced universally. This systematic review provides a detailed summary of common and unique barriers experienced by chronic disease groups when accessing and receiving care, and a synthesized list of possible health service initiatives to improve equitable delivery of optimal care in high-income countries. Quantitative articles describing barriers to specialist outpatient services were retrieved from CINAHL, MEDLINE, Embase, and PyscINFO. To be eligible for review, studies: were published from 2002 to May 2014; included samples with cancer, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, arthritis, ischaemic heart disease, stroke, asthma, chronic pulmonary disorder (COPD) or depression; and, were conducted in high-income countries. Using a previously validated model of access (Penchansky and Thomas' model of fit), barriers were grouped according to five overarching domains and defined in more detail using 33 medical subject headings. Results from reviewed articles, including the scope and frequency of reported barriers, are conceptualized using thematic analysis and framed as possible health service initiatives. A total of 3181 unique records were screened for eligibility, of which 74 studies were included in final analysis. The largest proportion of studies reported acceptability barriers (75.7 %), of which demographic disparities (44.6 %) were reported across all diseases. Other frequently reported barriers included inadequate need assessment (25.7 %), information provision (32.4 %), or health communication (20 %). Unique barriers were identified for oncology, mental health, and COPD samples. Based on the scope, frequency and measurement of reported barriers, eight key themes with associated implications for health services are presented. Examples include: common accommodation and accessibility barriers caused on service organization or physical structure, such as parking and appointment scheduling; common barriers created by poor coordination of care within the healthcare team; and unique barriers resulting from inadequate need assessment and referral practices. Consideration of barriers, across and within chronic diseases, suggests a number of specific initiatives are likely to improve the delivery of patient-centered care and increase equity in access to high-quality health services.

DOI 10.1186/s12939-015-0179-6
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Chris Paul, Elizabeth Fradgley
2015 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley E, Regan T, Hobden B, Ackland SP, 'Oncology patients overwhelmingly support tissue banking.', BMC Cancer, 15 413 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1416-5
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Elizabeth Fradgley, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Bree Hobden, Stephen Ackland
2015 Bryant J, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Mansfield E, Regan T, Bisquera A, 'Missed opportunities: General practitioner identification of their patients' smoking status', BMC Family Practice, 16 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: In order to provide smoking cessation support to their patients in line with clinical practice guidelines, general pract... [more]

© 2015 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: In order to provide smoking cessation support to their patients in line with clinical practice guidelines, general practitioners must first ascertain whether their patients' use tobacco. This study examined (i) the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of general practitioner detection of smoking, and (ii) the general practitioner and patient characteristics associated with detection of tobacco use. Methods: Eligible patients completed a touchscreen computer survey while waiting for an appointment with their general practitioner. Patients self-reported demographic characteristics, medical history, and current smoking status. Following the patient's consultation, their general practitioner was asked to indicate whether the patient was a current smoker (yes/no/unsure/not applicable). Smoking prevalence, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive values (with 95% confidence intervals) were calculated using patient self-report of smoking status as the gold standard. Generalised estimating equations were used to examine the general practitioner and patient characteristics associated with detection of tobacco use. Results: Fifty-one general practitioners and 1,573 patients in twelve general practices participated. Patient self-report of smoking was 11.3% compared to general practitioner estimated prevalence of 9.5%. Sensitivity of general practitioner assessment was 66% [95% CI 59-73] while specificity was 98% [95% CI 97-98]. Positive predictive value was 78% [95% CI 71-85] and negative predictive value was 96% [95% CI 95-97]. No general practitioner factors were associated with detection of smoking. Patients with a higher level of education or who responded 'Other ' were less likely to be detected as smokers than patients who had completed a high school or below level of education. Conclusion: Despite the important role general practitioners play in providing smoking cessation advice and support, a substantial proportion of general practitioners do not know their patient's smoking status. This represents a significant missed opportunity in the provision of preventive healthcare. Electronic waiting room assessments may assist general practitioners in improving the identification of smokers.

DOI 10.1186/s12875-015-0228-7
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Elise Mansfield, Mariko Carey
2015 Bonevski B, Twyman L, Paul C, D'Este C, West R, Siahpush M, et al., 'Comparing socially disadvantaged smokers who agree and decline to participate in a randomised smoking cessation trial', BMJ OPEN, 5 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008419
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul, Christopher Oldmeadow
2015 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Stevenson W, Smits R, Henskens F, Wei A, et al., 'Protocol of a multi-centre randomised controlled trial of a web-based information intervention with nurse-delivered telephone support for haematological cancer patients and their support persons', BMC Cancer, 15 (2015) [C3]

© 2015 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: High rates of anxiety, depression and unmet needs are evident amongst haematological cancer patients undergoing treatmen... [more]

© 2015 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: High rates of anxiety, depression and unmet needs are evident amongst haematological cancer patients undergoing treatment and their Support Persons. Psychosocial distress may be minimised by ensuring that patients are sufficiently involved in decision making, provided with tailored information and adequate preparation for potentially threatening procedures. To date, there are no published studies evaluating interventions designed to reduce psychosocial distress and unmet needs specifically in patients with haematological cancers and their Support Persons. This study will examine whether access to a web-based information tool and nurse-delivered telephone support reduces depression, anxiety and unmet information needs for haematological cancer patients and their Support Persons. Methods/Design: A non-blinded, parallel-group, multi-centre randomised controlled trial will be conducted to compare the effectiveness of a web-based information tool and nurse-delivered telephone support with usual care. Participants will be recruited from the haematology inpatient wards of five hospitals in New South Wales, Australia. Patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia, acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, Burkitt's lymphoma, Lymphoblastic lymphoma (B or T cell), or Diffuse Large B-Cell lymphoma and their Support Persons will be eligible to participate. Patients and their Support Persons will be randomised as dyads. Participants allocated to the intervention will receive access to a tailored web-based tool that provides accurate, up-to-date and personalised information about: cancer and its causes; treatment options including treatment procedures information; complementary and alternative medicine; and available support. Patients and Support Persons will complete self-report measures of anxiety, depression and unmet needs at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks post-recruitment. Patient and Support Person outcomes will be assessed independently. Discussion: This study will assess whether providing information and support using web-based and telephone support address the major psychosocial challenges faced by haematological patients and their Support Persons. The approach, if found to be effective, has potential to improve psychosocial outcomes for haematological and other cancer patients, reduce the complexity and burden of meeting patients' psychosocial needs for health care providers with high potential for translation into clinical practice.

DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1314-x
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Frans Henskens, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Flora Tzelepis, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul
2015 Bonevski B, Magin P, Horton G, Bryant J, Randell M, Kimlin MG, 'An internet based approach to improve general practitioners' knowledge and practices: The development and pilot testing of the "ABC's of vitamin D" program', International Journal of Medical Informatics, 84 413-422 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2015.01.006
Co-authors Parker Magin, Billie Bonevski, Graeme Horton
2015 Carey M, Yoong SL, Grady A, Bryant J, Jayakody A, Sanson-Fisher R, Inder KJ, 'Unassisted detection of depression by GPs: Who is most likely to be misclassified?', Family Practice, 32 282-287 (2015) [C1]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Background. Meta-analyses indicate 50% of cases of depression are not detected by GPs. It is importan... [more]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Background. Meta-analyses indicate 50% of cases of depression are not detected by GPs. It is important to examine patient and GP characteristics associated with misclassification so that systems can be improved to increase accurate detection and optimal management for groups at risk of depression. Objective. To examine patient and GP characteristics associated with GP misclassification of depression for patients classified by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 as depressed. Methods. A cross-sectional study within general practices in two states of Australia. GPs completed a one-page paper and pencil survey indicating whether they thought each patient was clinically depressed. Patients completed a computer tablet survey while waiting for their appointment to provide demographic information and indicate depression status. Chi-square analyses were used to determine whether patient and GP characteristics were associated with a false-negative and false-positive result. The probability of misclassification was modelled using Generalized Estimating Equations to account for clustering of patients. Results. Fifty GPs from 12 practices participated. GPs completed surveys for 1880 patients. Younger patients aged 25-44, and those with a health care card were less likely to have a false-negative assessment. Patients with 0-3 GP visits in the past 12 months, and those with private health insurance were less likely to have a false-positive assessment. GPs who worked five sessions or fewer per week were more likely to make false-positive assessments.

DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmu087
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Kerry Inder, Serene Yoong, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Bryant J, Yoong SL, Sanson-Fisher R, Mazza D, Carey M, Walsh J, Bisquera A, 'Is identification of smoking, risky alcohol consumption and overweight and obesity by General Practitioners improving? A comparison over time.', Family practice, 32 664-671 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmv078
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2014 Smits R, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Tzelepis F, Henskens F, Paul C, Stevenson W, 'Tailored and integrated Web-based tools for improving psychosocial outcomes of cancer patients: the DoTTI development framework.', J Med Internet Res, 16 e76 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.2849
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Frans Henskens, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Grady A, Bryant J, Carey M, Paul C, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Enablers of the implementation of tissue plasminogen activator in acute stroke care: A cross-sectional survey', PLoS ONE, 9 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Grady et al. Objective: To assess emergency physicians&apos; perceptions of individual and system enablers to the use of tissue Plasminogen Activator in acute stroke.Method... [more]

© 2014 Grady et al. Objective: To assess emergency physicians' perceptions of individual and system enablers to the use of tissue Plasminogen Activator in acute stroke.Method: Australian fellows and trainees of Australasian College for Emergency Medicine completed a 57-item online survey assessing enablers to implementation of evidence-based practice across six domains: knowledge, skills, modelling, monitoring, feedback, and maintenance. Demographic and workplace characteristics were obtained. Descriptive statistics were calculated to describe demographic and workplace characteristics of responders, and survey responses. Each domain received an overall score (%) based on the number of responders agreeing with all items within the domain.Results: A total of 429 (13%) Australasian College for Emergency Medicine members responded. 17.7% of respondents reported they and/or their workplace met all knowledge-related enablers, however only 2.3% had all skill-related enablers in place. Of respondents who decide which patients receive tissue Plasminogen Activator treatment, 18.1% agreed that all maintenance-related enablers are in place at their hospital, compared to 6.6% for those who do not decide which patients receive tissue Plasminogen Activator treatment. None of the respondents had all items in place cross all domains.Conclusions: Even when allowing for the low response rate, it seems likely there is a lack of individual and system enablers supporting the implementation of bestpractice stroke care in a number of Australian hospitals. Quality improvement programs could target all domains, particularly the skills-training and feedback emergency physicians receive, to aid implementation of tissue Plasminogen Activator treatment for acute stroke.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0114778
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Bryant J, Passey ME, Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'A systematic review of the quality of reporting in published smoking cessation trials for pregnant women: An explanation for the evidence-practice gap?', Implementation Science, 9 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: To facilitate translation of evidence into clinical practice, it is critical that clear, specific, and detailed informat... [more]

© 2014 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: To facilitate translation of evidence into clinical practice, it is critical that clear, specific, and detailed information about interventions is provided in publications to promote replication, appropriate aggregation in meta-analysis, and implementation. This study examined whether twenty elements of interventions deemed essential for such translational application were reported in sufficient detail in smoking cessation trials with pregnant women. Methods: Searches of electronic databases using MeSH terms and keywords identified peer-reviewed English language studies published between 2001 and 2012. Eligible studies reported a smoking cessation intervention targeted at pregnant women and met Cochrane's Effective Practice and Organization of Care group study design criteria. Each intervention arm of eligible studies was assessed against the developed twenty criteria. Results: Thirty relevant studies reported the findings of 45 intervention arms. The mode of delivery of the intervention was reported in 100% of intervention arms. Other well-reported criteria included reporting of the provider who delivered the intervention (96%), sample characteristics (80%), and the intervention setting (80%). Criteria not reported adequately included care provided to women who relapse (96% not reported), details about training given to providers (77% not reported), and the method of quit advice advised (76% not reported). No studies reported 100% of relevant criteria. Conclusions: Current standards of reporting of intervention content and implementation are suboptimal. The use of smoking cessation specific checklists for reporting of trials, standard reporting using behaviour change taxonomies, and the publication of protocols as supplements should be considered as ways of improving the specificity of reporting.

DOI 10.1186/s13012-014-0094-z
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Clinton-Mcharg T, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Tzelepis F, Bryant J, Williamson A, 'Anxiety and depression among haematological cancer patients attending treatment centres: Prevalence and predictors', Journal of Affective Disorders, 165 176-181 (2014) [C1]

Background This study aimed to: (1) estimate the prevalence of anxiety and/or depression among haematological cancer patients attending treatment centres; and (2) explore the demo... [more]

Background This study aimed to: (1) estimate the prevalence of anxiety and/or depression among haematological cancer patients attending treatment centres; and (2) explore the demographic, disease and treatment characteristics associated with anxiety and/or depression. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with outpatients from three haematology clinics in Australia. Patients with a confirmed diagnosis of haematological cancer were approached by a research assistant while waiting for their appointment and invited to participate in the survey. Participants completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and self-reported demographic, disease and treatment characteristics. Results Questionnaires from 304 participants were returned. Twenty-seven percent of patients reported anxiety and 17% reported depression. Specifically, 15% reported anxiety without depression, 5% reported depression without anxiety, and 12% reported comorbid anxiety and depression. Participants who had to relocate to receive treatment had almost three times the odds of reporting anxiety and/or depression compared to those who did not have to move. Former smokers also had significantly higher odds of reporting anxiety and/or depression. Limitations The HADS is likely to have produced some false positives and false negatives when compared with gold standard structured clinical interviews for assessing psychological morbidity. Conclusions Approximately 20% of haematological cancer patients attending outpatient clinics may experience clinically significant levels of anxiety and/or depression. Providing additional tailored support to patients who have had to relocate for treatment, and to former smokers, may help to reduce anxiety and depression among these subgroups. © 2014 Published by Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2014.04.072
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Flora Tzelepis
2014 Paul CL, Bryant J, Turon H, Brozek I, Noble N, Zucca A, 'A narrative review of the potential for self- tanning products to substitute for solaria use among people seeking a tanned appearance', PHOTODERMATOLOGY PHOTOIMMUNOLOGY & PHOTOMEDICINE, 30 160-166 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/phpp.12103
Co-authors Alison Zucca, Natasha Noble, Chris Paul
2014 Waller A, Forshaw K, Bryant J, Mair S, 'Interventions for preparing patients for chemotherapy and radiotherapy: a systematic review', Supportive Care in Cancer, (2014) [C1]

Purpose Undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be physically and psychologically stressful for people with cancer. Providing preparatory information to cancer patients as th... [more]

Purpose Undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be physically and psychologically stressful for people with cancer. Providing preparatory information to cancer patients as they face treatment and its aftermath has the potential to improve patient outcomes. This study assessed the methodological quality and effectiveness of interventions providing preparatory information about chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy to cancer patients in improving patient outcomes and health care use. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were systematically searched from January 1995 until October 2012. Inclusion criteria: (1) met Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) criteria for study design; (2) included adults with a current cancer diagnosis; (3) delivered preparatory information via a health care provider or was self-directed; (4) examined psychological well-being, quality of life, physical symptoms, satisfaction, knowledge, or health service utilisation. Studies were assessed for methodological quality using the EPOC criteria. Results Eighteen studies involving 3,443 cancer patients met inclusion criteria. Interventions included written information, audiotapes, videotapes, and computer programs. Interventions improved patient satisfaction (6/7 studies), information needs and patient knowledge (5/6 studies), physical symptoms (3/4 studies) and cost (1/1 study). More than half of the interventions improved psychological outcomes and quality of life (10/17 studies). Conclusion Providing preparatory information can improve patient-reported outcomes in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy, especially with respect to satisfaction and knowledge. Some, but not all, studies improved psychological outcomes and physical symptoms. There is a need for methodologically rigorous research to determine the most effective timing and method of delivery of preparatory information to improve patient outcomes. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-014-2303-3
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Kristy Fakes, Amy Waller
2014 Grady A, Carey M, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Recruitment of healthcare specialists', EMA - Emergency Medicine Australasia, 26 516-517 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1742-6723.12275
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2014 Fradgley EA, Paul CL, Bryant J, Roos IA, Henskens FA, Paul DJ, 'Consumer participation in quality improvements for chronic disease care: development and evaluation of an interactive patient-centered survey to identify preferred service initiatives.', Journal of medical Internet research, 16 e292 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.3545
Citations Scopus - 9
Co-authors Chris Paul, Frans Henskens, Elizabeth Fradgley
2014 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Walsh J, Stewart J, 'Health research priority setting in selected high income countries: a narrative review of methods used and recommendations for future practice', Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation, 12 1-11 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1478-7547-12-23
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Bonevski B, Randell M, Paul C, Chapman K, Twyman L, Bryant J, et al., 'Reaching the hard-to-reach: A systematic review of strategies for improving health and medical research with socially disadvantaged groups', BMC Medical Research Methodology, 14 (2014) [C1]

Background: This study aims to review the literature regarding the barriers to sampling, recruitment, participation, and retention of members of socioeconomically disadvantaged gr... [more]

Background: This study aims to review the literature regarding the barriers to sampling, recruitment, participation, and retention of members of socioeconomically disadvantaged groups in health research and strategies for increasing the amount of health research conducted with socially disadvantaged groups. Methods. A systematic review with narrative synthesis was conducted. Searches of electronic databases Medline, PsychInfo, EMBASE, Social Science Index via Web of Knowledge and CINHAL were conducted for English language articles published up to May 2013. Qualitative and quantitative studies as well as literature reviews were included. Articles were included if they reported attempts to increase disadvantaged group participation in research, or the barriers to research with disadvantaged groups. Groups of interest were those described as socially, culturally or financially disadvantaged compared to the majority of society. Eligible articles were categorised according to five phases of research: 1) sampling, 2) recruitment and gaining consent, 3) data collection and measurement, 4) intervention delivery and uptake, and 5) retention and attrition. Results: In total, 116 papers from 115 studies met inclusion criteria and 31 previous literature reviews were included. A comprehensive summation of the major barriers to working with various disadvantaged groups is provided, along with proposed strategies for addressing each of the identified types of barriers. Most studies of strategies to address the barriers were of a descriptive nature and only nine studies reported the results of randomised trials. Conclusions: To tackle the challenges of research with socially disadvantaged groups, and increase their representation in health and medical research, researchers and research institutions need to acknowledge extended timeframes, plan for higher resourcing costs and operate via community partnerships. © 2014 Bonevski et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2288-14-42
Citations Scopus - 155Web of Science - 154
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul
2014 Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Bryant J, 'Perceived barriers to smoking cessation in selected vulnerable groups: A systematic review of the qualitative and quantitative literature', BMJ Open, 4 1-15 (2014) [C1]

Objectives: To identify barriers that are common and unique to six selected vulnerable groups: low socioeconomic status; Indigenous; mental illness and substance abuse; homeless; ... [more]

Objectives: To identify barriers that are common and unique to six selected vulnerable groups: low socioeconomic status; Indigenous; mental illness and substance abuse; homeless; prisoners; and at-risk youth. Design: A systematic review was carried out to identify the perceived barriers to smoking cessation within six vulnerable groups. Data sources: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycInfo were searched using keywords and MeSH terms from each database's inception published prior to March 2014. Study selection: Studies that provided either qualitative or quantitative (ie, longitudinal, crosssectional or cohort surveys) descriptions of selfreported perceived barriers to quitting smoking in one of the six aforementioned vulnerable groups were included. Data extraction: Two authors independently assessed studies for inclusion and extracted data. Results: 65 eligible papers were identified: 24 with low socioeconomic groups, 16 with Indigenous groups, 18 involving people with a mental illness, 3 with homeless groups, 2 involving prisoners and 1 involving at-risk youth. One study identified was carried out with participants who were homeless and addicted to alcohol and/or other drugs. Barriers common to all vulnerable groups included: smoking for stress management, lack of support from health and other service providers, and the high prevalence and acceptability of smoking in vulnerable communities. Unique barriers were identified for people with a mental illness (eg, maintenance of mental health), Indigenous groups (eg, cultural and historical norms), prisoners (eg, living conditions), people who are homeless (eg, competing priorities) and at-risk youth (eg, high accessibility of tobacco). Conclusions: Vulnerable groups experience common barriers to smoking cessation, in addition to barriers that are unique to specific vulnerable groups. Individual-level, community-level and social networklevel interventions are priority areas for future smoking cessation interventions within vulnerable groups

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006414
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 62
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul
2014 Bryant J, Boyes A, Jones K, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, Fry R, 'Examining and addressing evidence-practice gaps in cancer care: A systematic review', Implementation Science, 9 (2014) [C1]

Background: There is increasing recognition of gaps between best scientific evidence and clinical practice. This systematic review aimed to assess the volume and scope of peer-rev... [more]

Background: There is increasing recognition of gaps between best scientific evidence and clinical practice. This systematic review aimed to assess the volume and scope of peer-reviewed cancer research output in the years 2000, 2005, and 2010.Methods: Eligible papers were published in English and reported on evidence-practice gaps in cancer care. The electronic database Medline was searched for three time periods using MeSH headings and keywords. Abstracts were assessed against eligibility criteria by one reviewer and checked by a second. Papers meeting eligibility criteria were coded as data-based or non-data-based, and by cancer type of focus. All data-based papers were then further classified as descriptive studies documenting the extent of, or barriers to addressing, the evidence-practice gap; or intervention studies examining the effectiveness of strategies to reduce the evidence-practice gap.Results: A total of 176 eligible papers were identified. The number of publications significantly increased over time, from 25 in 2000 to 100 in 2010 (p < 0.001). Of the 176 identified papers, 160 were data-based. The majority of these (n = 150) reported descriptive studies. Only 10 studies examined the effectiveness of interventions designed to reduce discrepancies between evidence and clinical practice. Of these, only one was a randomized controlled trial. Of all data-based studies, almost one-third (n = 48) examined breast cancer care.Conclusions: While the number of publications investigating evidence-practice gaps in cancer care increased over a ten-year period, most studies continued to describe gaps between best evidence and clinical practice, rather than rigorously testing interventions to reduce the gap. © 2014 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1748-5908-9-37
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Paul CL, Turon H, Bonevski B, Bryant J, McElduff P, 'A cross-sectional survey of experts' opinions about the relative effectiveness of tobacco control strategies for the general population versus disadvantaged groups: What do we choose in the absence of evidence?', BMC Public Health, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-1144
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Patrick Mcelduff, Chris Paul
2013 Passey ME, Bryant J, Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'How will we close the gap in smoking rates for pregnant Indigenous women?', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 199 39-41 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.5694/mja12.11848
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Hall A, Lynagh M, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Supportive care needs of hematological cancer survivors: A critical review of the literature', Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology, 88 102-116 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.critrevonc.2013.03.008
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Marita Lynagh
2013 Bryant J, Bonevski B, Paul CL, Lecathelinais CL, 'A cross-sectional survey of health risk behaviour clusters among a sample of socially disadvantaged Australian welfare recipients', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 37 118-123 (2013) [C1]

Objective: To examine the prevalence and clustering of six health risk behaviours (smoking, alcohol, inadequate sun protection, physical inactivity, and inadequate fruit and veget... [more]

Objective: To examine the prevalence and clustering of six health risk behaviours (smoking, alcohol, inadequate sun protection, physical inactivity, and inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption) among severely disadvantaged individuals. Methods: A cross-sectional touch screen computer survey was conducted with 383 clients attending a social and community welfare organisation in New South Wales. Participants were assessed on smoking status, alcohol consumption, fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, sun protection and socio-demographic characteristics. Descriptive statistics, factor analysis and logistic regression were used to assess the prevalence, clustering and socio-demographic predictors of health risk behaviours. Results: Ninety-eight per cent of the participants reported inadequate vegetable consumption, 62.7% reported inadequate fruit consumption, 82.5% reported inadequate sun protection, 61.7% smoked tobacco, 51.4% consumed alcohol at risky levels and 36.5% were insufficiently active. Most participants (87%) reported three or more risk behaviours. Male participants, younger participants and those with lower education were more likely to smoke tobacco and consume alcohol. Conclusions: The prevalence of health risk behaviours among a sample of typically hard-to-reach, severely disadvantaged individuals is extremely high. Implications: Future intervention development should take into account the likelihood of health risk clustering among severely disadvantaged groups. © 2013 The Authors.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12028
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2013 Bryant J, McDonald VM, Boyes A, Sanson-Fisher R, Paul C, Melville J, 'Improving medication adherence in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A systematic review', Respiratory Research, 14 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1465-9921-14-109
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 44
Co-authors Vanessa Mcdonald, Allison Boyes, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Carey M, Bryant J, Yoong SL, Russell G, Barker D, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Prostate specific antigen testing in family practice: a cross sectional survey of self-reported rates of and reasons for testing participation and risk disclosure', BMC FAMILY PRACTICE, 14 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2296-14-186
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Daniel Barker, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong, Mariko Carey
2013 Bonevski B, Bryant J, Lambert S, Brozek I, Rock V, 'The ABC of Vitamin D: A Qualitative Study of the Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Vitamin D Deficiency amongst Selected Population Groups', NUTRIENTS, 5 915-927 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu5030915
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Billie Bonevski
2012 Bonevski B, Bryant JL, Lynagh MC, Paul CL, 'Money as motivation to quit: A survey of a non-random Australian sample of socially disadvantaged smokers' views of the acceptability of cash incentives', Preventive Medicine, 55 122-126 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Chris Paul, Marita Lynagh, Billie Bonevski
2012 Bonevski B, Baker AL, Twyman LH, Paul CL, Bryant JL, 'Addressing smoking and other health risk behaviours using a novel telephone-delivered intervention for homeless people: A proof-of-concept study', Drug and Alcohol Review, 31 709-713 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski, Amanda Baker
2012 Paul CL, Bonevski B, Turon HE, Bryant JL, 'The balancing act: Experts' opinions about the relative resourcing of tobacco control efforts for the general population versus disadvantaged populations', Drug and Alcohol Review, 31 602-607 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2012 Bryant JL, Bonevski B, Paul CL, Hull P, O'Brien J, 'Implementing a smoking cessation program in social and community service organisations: A feasibility and acceptability trial', Drug and Alcohol Review, 31 678-684 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul
2011 Bryant JL, Bonevski B, Paul CL, Lecathelinais LC, 'Assessing smoking status in disadvantaged populations: Is computer administered self report an accurate and acceptable measure?', BMC Medical Research Methodology, 11 153 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul
2011 Bryant JL, Bonevski B, Paul CL, O'Brien J, Oakes W, 'Developing cessation interventions for the social and community service setting: A qualitative study of barriers to quitting among disadvantaged Australian smokers', BMC Public Health, 11 493 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-11-493
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2011 Bryant JL, Bonevski B, Paul CL, 'A survey of smoking prevalence and interest in quitting among social and community service organisation clients in Australia: a unique opportunity for reaching the disadvantaged', BMC Public Health, 11 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-11-827
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2011 Bonevski B, Bowman JA, Richmond R, Bryant JL, Wye PM, Stockings EA, et al., 'Turning of the tide: Changing systems to address smoking for people with a mental illness', Mental Health and Substance Use, 4 116-129 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/17523281.2011.555073
Citations Scopus - 9
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Jenny Bowman
2011 Bonevski B, Bryant JL, Paul CL, 'Encouraging smoking cessation among disadvantaged groups: A qualitative study of the financial aspects of cessation', Drug and Alcohol Review, 30 411-418 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2010.00248.x
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2011 Bryant JL, Bonevski B, Paul CL, McElduff P, Attia JR, 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of behavioural smoking cessation interventions in selected disadvantaged groups', Addiction, 106 1568-1585 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2011.03467.x
Citations Scopus - 61Web of Science - 59
Co-authors Chris Paul, John Attia, Patrick Mcelduff, Billie Bonevski
2011 Bonevski B, Paul CL, Walsh RA, Bryant JL, Lecathelinais LC, 'Support for smoke-free vocational education settings: An exploratory survey of staff behaviours, experiences and attitudes', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 22 11-16 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2010 Bryant JL, Bonevski B, Paul CL, O'Brien J, Oakes W, 'Delivering smoking cessation support to disadvantaged groups: A qualitative study of the potential of community welfare organizations', Health Education Research, 25 979-990 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyq051
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2010 Paul CL, Ross S, Bryant JL, Hill W, Bonevski B, Keevy N, 'The social context of smoking: A qualitative study comparing smokers of high versus low socioeconomic position', BMC Public Health, 10 1-7 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-211
Citations Scopus - 61Web of Science - 58
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
Fradgley EA, Paul CL, Bryant J, Collins N, Ackland SP, Bellamy D, Levi CR, 'Collaborative Patient-Centered Quality Improvement: A Cross-Sectional Survey Comparing the Types and Numbers of Quality Initiatives Selected by Patients and Health Professionals.', Eval Health Prof, 39 475-495 [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0163278716659524
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Chris Paul, Stephen Ackland, Christopher Levi, Elizabeth Fradgley
Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Bryant J, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'The association between cannabis use and motivation and intentions to quit tobacco within a sample of Australian socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers.', Health Educ Res, 31 771-781 [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyw049
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ashleigh Guillaumier, Christopher Oldmeadow, Billie Bonevski, Frances Kaylambkin, Chris Paul
Show 83 more journal articles

Conference (27 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Olver I, Carey M, Boyes A, Hall A, Bryant J, Walsh J, Sansom-Fisher R, 'The Timeliness of Patients Reporting the Side Effects of Chemotherapy', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Mariko Carey
2016 Smits R, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Turon H, Herrmann A, Richards L, 'DO HEMATOLOGICAL CANCER PATIENTS GET THE INFORMATION THEY NEED ABOUT THEIR CANCER AND ITS TREATMENT?', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2016 Hall AE, Paul C, Bryant J, Lynagh MC, Rowlings P, Enjeti A, Small H, 'To adhere or not to adhere: Rates and reasons of medication adherence in hematological cancer patients', CRITICAL REVIEWS IN ONCOLOGY HEMATOLOGY (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.critrevonc.2015.08.025
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Anoop Enjeti, Marita Lynagh, Chris Paul
2015 Fradgley E, Paul C, Bryant J, Oldmeadow C, 'AIMING FOR THE RIGHT QUALITY IMPROVEMENT TARGET: CROSS-SECTIONAL DATA EXPLORING OUTPATIENTS' PRIORITIES AND PREFERENCES FOR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT IN TERTIARY CLINICS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Paul, Christopher Oldmeadow, Elizabeth Fradgley
2015 Fradgley E, Paul C, Bryant J, Collins N, Ackland S, Bellamy D, Levi C, 'ADVANCING COLLABORATIVE QUALITY IMPROVEMENT IN TERTIARY SETTINGS: DO CHRONIC DISEASE OUTPATIENTS AND HEALTH PROFESSIONALS IDENTIFY SIMILAR TYPES AND NUMBERS OF QUALITY INITIATIVES?', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Christopher Levi, Elizabeth Fradgley, Stephen Ackland, Chris Paul
2014 Henskens FA, Paul DJ, Wallis M, Bryant J, Carey M, Fradgley E, et al., 'Web-based support for population-based medical research: Presenting the QuON survey system', HEALTHINF 2014 - 7th International Conference on Health Informatics, Proceedings; Part of 7th International Joint Conference on Biomedical Engineering Systems and Technologies, BIOSTEC 2014 (2014) [E1]

This paper discusses the needs of medical researchers working in the area of patient-centred medicine, in particular their use of survey data in measuring patient opinions, needs,... [more]

This paper discusses the needs of medical researchers working in the area of patient-centred medicine, in particular their use of survey data in measuring patient opinions, needs, perceived quality of care received, and priorities of health service interventions. Until quite recently, collection of survey data has been either paper-based, or achieved using computer software that largely duplicated paper-based processes with limited additional functionality. The authors investigate the use of web-based technology to support collection of such data from patients, including experiences and observations on enhanced/additional functionality made possible by its adoption. A novel software design termed QuON is presented, together with examples of its capabilities and uses in current research projects. Copyright © 2014 SCITEPRESS - Science and Technology Publications. All rights reserved.

Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Mark Wallis, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Frans Henskens, Elizabeth Fradgley, Alison Zucca, Chris Paul
2014 Henskens FA, Paul DJ, Wallis M, Bryant J, Carey M, Fradgley E, et al., 'How Do Health Researchers Benefit From Web-Based Survey Systems?', Proceedings of e-Health 2014, Lisbon, Portugal (2014) [E1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Frans Henskens, Elizabeth Fradgley, Chris Paul, Alison Zucca, Mariko Carey, Mark Wallis, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Paul DJ, Henskens FA, Bryant J, Smits R, Sanson-Fisher R, Stevenson W, 'The Haematology Treatment Aid - Providing Personalized Information to Patients and Carers', Proceedings of e-Health, Lisbon, Portugal (2014) [E1]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Frans Henskens
2014 Fradgley E, Paul C, Bryant J, Zucca A, 'A Multi-site Study to Explore Patient-identified and Prioritized Health Service Initiatives to Improve Oncology Outpatient Care: Are We Aiming for the Right Targets?', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Paul, Alison Zucca, Elizabeth Fradgley
2014 Fradgley E, Paul C, Bryant J, Roos I, 'Optimising New Technologies to Enable Consumer Participation in Quality Improvements for Oncology Care: Development and Evaluation of an Interactive Survey of Preferences and Priorities', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Paul, Elizabeth Fradgley
2014 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley L, Regan T, Hobden B, Ackland S, Turon H, 'ONCOLOGY PATIENTS OVERWHELMINGLY SUPPORT TISSUE BANKING', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Stephen Ackland, Bree Hobden, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Elizabeth Fradgley
2014 Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Bryant J, D'Este CA, West R, et al., 'OUTCOMES OF A SMOKING CESSATION INTERVENTION DESIGNED FOR SOCIALLY DISADVANTAGED SMOKERS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL (RTC)', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Billie Bonevski, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul
2014 Bryant J, Yoong SL, Sanson-Fisher R, Mazza D, Carey M, Walsh J, Bisquera A, 'IS IDENTIFICATION OF SMOKING, RISKY ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION AND OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY BY GENERAL PRACTITIONERS IMPROVING? A COMPARISON OF DETECTION RATES IN AUSTRALIA BETWEEN 1982 AND 2011', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong
2014 Carey M, Bryant J, Mansfield E, Bisquera A, Sanson-Fisher R, Mazza D, 'CORRELATES OF THE DETECTION OF CANCER RISK FACTORS BY GENERAL PRACTITIONERS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Elise Mansfield, Mariko Carey
2014 Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Bryant J, D'Este CA, Oldmeadow C, Palazzi K, 'WHAT ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT BARRIERS TO QUITTING SMOKING? A CROSS-SECTIONAL SURVEY OF PERCEPTIONS OF HIGHLY DISADVANTAGED SMOKERS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Paul, Christopher Oldmeadow, Billie Bonevski, Catherine Deste
2013 Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Bryant J, West R, Siahpush M, D'Este C, 'TRY AND TRY AGAIN: FREQUENCY AND PREDICTORS OF SMOKING CESSATION ATTEMPTS IN A SOCIOECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED SAMPLE', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2013)
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2013 Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Bryant J, West R, Siahpush M, D'Este C, 'RISKY COMBINATIONS: THE PREVALENCE AND PREDICTORS OF TOBACCO AND ALCOHOL USE WITHIN A HIGHLY SOCIOECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED SAMPLE', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2013)
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2013 Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Bryant J, '"SMOKING IS A PART OF MY LIFE NOW". A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE SELF-REPORTED BARRIERS TO SMOKING CESSATION WITHIN SELECTED SOCIOECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED GROUPS', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2013)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul
2013 Kelly PJ, Hitsman B, Bonevski B, Baker AL, Ciecierski CC, Kang J, et al., 'MULTIPLE HEALTH RISK BEHAVIOURS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Amanda Baker
2013 Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Bryant J, West R, Siahpush M, D'Este C, 'RISKY COMBINATIONS: THE PREVALENCE AND PREDICTORS OF TOBACCO AND ALCOHOL USE WITHIN A HIGHLY SOCIOECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED SAMPLE', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Billie Bonevski
2013 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Stevenson W, Henskens F, Smits R, 'Build it, but will They Come? Development and patient use of an Online Information Tool Designed to Reduce Psychosocial Distress', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Frans Henskens, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Boyes A, Jones K, Carey M, 'The Evidence-Practice Gap in Oncology: Are We Contributing to Implementation Science?', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Allison Boyes, Mariko Carey
2012 Bonevski B, Shakeshaft A, Paul C, Tzelepis F, Bryant J, Salmon A, Hull P, 'PRESENTATION 2-ORGANISATIONAL CHANGE INTERVENTIONS TO ENHANCE SMOKING CESSATION TREATMENT PROVISION IN THE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT SETTING', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Billie Bonevski
2012 Bonevski B, Shakeshaft A, Paul CL, Tzelepis F, Bryant JL, Salmon A, Hull P, 'Organisational change interventions to enhance smoking cessation treatment provision in the drug and alcohol treatment setting', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012, Melbourne, Vic (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Billie Bonevski
2010 Bonevski B, Bryant JL, Paul CL, O'Brien J, 'Addressing social inequalities in smoking by partnering with community social services: The Tackling Tobacco Research Project', 12th Annual Meeting of the SRNT Europe Programme, Bath, UK (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2010 Bryant JL, Bonevski B, Paul CL, O'Brien J, Oakes W, 'The potential of community service organisations for delivering smoking cessation support to disadvantaged smokers', 12th Annual Meeting of the SRNT Europe Programme, Bath, UK (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2010 Paul CL, Bonevski B, Bryant JL, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'Approaches to tobacco control and population effects: how good is the evidence that standard approaches are equitable', 12th Annual Meeting of the SRNT Europe Programme, Bath, UK (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
Show 24 more conferences

Report (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Bonevski B, Bryant J, Carey M, Considine R, D'Este C, Doran C, et al., 'Chronic care service enhancements program evaluation. Final report.', NSW Ministry of Health (2016)
Co-authors Amy Waller, Billie Bonevski, John Hall, Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Liz Holliday, Mariko Carey
2016 Bonevski B, Bryant J, Carey M, Considine R, D'Este C, Doran C, et al., 'Chronic care service enhancements program evaluation. Summary report.', NSW Ministry of Health (2016)
Co-authors Amy Waller, Mariko Carey, Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul, Liz Holliday, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste, John Hall
2012 Bryant J, Zucca A, Bonevski B, 'Sun Protection Attitudes and Behaviours among First Generation Australians with Darker Skin Types: Focus Group Results', Cancer Council NSW (2012)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski
2009 Bonevski B, Bryant J, Paul C, 'The smoking and quitting experiences in a disadvantaged population: a qualitative study', Cancer Council NSW (2009)
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2009 Bonevski B, Paul C, Bryant J, 'Smoking and tobacco control attitudes and behaviours in NSW Technical and Further Education (TAFE)', South Western Sydney Institute (SWSI) of TAFE NSW (2009)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul
Show 2 more reports
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 13
Total funding $6,215,500

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $3,046,293

Addressing health and care needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living with dementia and their communities: A cluster RCT$3,046,293

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Professor Gail Garvey, Mr Steve Blunden, Assoicate Professor Alan Clough, Professor Michael Lowe, Doctor Megan Freund, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Dr Megan Passey, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Associate Professor Nola Ries
Scheme Targeted Call for Research - Dementia in Indigenous Australians
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G1700852
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20171 grants / $594,268

Increasing rates of Advance Care Planning for individuals with Dementia$594,268

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Jamie Bryant
Scheme NHMRC-ARC Dementia Research Development Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1500282
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20152 grants / $298,002

Evaluating the Quit for New Life $270,908

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Lisa Mackenzie, Mr Justin Walsh, Doctor Josephine Gwynn, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Professor Peter Radoll, Professor Ian Symonds, Professor Sandra Eades
Scheme Evaluation of Quit for New Life
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1401375
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

Health Exchange: acceptability of an electronic tailored chronic disease needs assessment tool$27,094

Funding body: NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation (ACI)

Funding body NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation (ACI)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Mrs Amanda Jayakody, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Ms Eunice Simons
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401380
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20142 grants / $1,545,879

Improving alcohol treatment outcomes$1,525,879

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Associate Professor Anthony Shakeshaft, Professor Michael Farrell, Professor Richard Mattick, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Conjoint Professor Cate d'Este, Professor Paul Haber
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1300166
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Develop and evaluate a three-year strategic plan addressing sun exposure, skin cancer prevention and vitamin D$20,000

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Amy Waller, Mrs Elizabeth Tracey, Dr ALIX Hall
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1400744
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

20132 grants / $184,455

Proof of Concept Study Examining the Impact of Introducing the National Safety and Quality Health Service (NSQHS) Standards from the Perspective of Patients and Healthcare Consumers$108,357

Funding body: Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care

Funding body Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Mrs Robyn Considine, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Amy Waller
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301048
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Cost-effectiveness of a systems change intervention for smoking cessation in drug and alcohol treatment centres$76,098

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Professor Billie Bonevski, Associate Professor Anthony Shakeshaft, Professor Christine Paul, Doctor Flora Tzelepis, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Associate Professor Peter Kelly
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1300120
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

20123 grants / $490,738

Improving cancer treatment systems: An RCT of a consumer action model for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy$318,274

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Ms A Tang, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Flora Tzelepis, Ms Kathryn Chapman, Ms Paula Vallentine, Conjoint Professor Christopher Doran, Doctor Patrick McElduff
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1100618
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Improving cancer treatment systems: evaluation of a consumer action model for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy$133,140

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Ms A Tang, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Flora Tzelepis, Ms Kathryn Chapman, Ms Paula Vallentine, Conjoint Professor Christopher Doran, Doctor Patrick McElduff
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1100721
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Multiple substance use, mental health and other health risk behaviours among patients of Aboriginal Medical Services: Patient priorities for change and preferences for models of support$39,324

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Professor Christine Paul, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Mr Steve Blunden, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Associate Professor Kate Conigrave, Ms Natasha Noble
Scheme Drug and Alcohol Grants Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200697
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20111 grants / $20,000

Sun Protection attitudes and behaviours among first generation Australians with Skin Type lV$20,000

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Doctor Jamie Bryant, Professor Billie Bonevski
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100775
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20101 grants / $35,865

A qualitative study assessing the factors associated with consumer's understanding of the vitamin D message and sun exposure across select indoor settings$35,865

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Professor Billie Bonevski, Conjoint Professor Afaf Girgis, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Sylvie Lambert
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000948
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current6

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD The Right Time and the Right Tools for the Right Outcome. PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD Why Don’t Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Youth Feel the Need to Actively Engage In and Monitor Their Health and Wellbeing, Given the Disproportionate Levels of Premature Deaths Experienced by Their Family and Community Members? PhD (Public Health & BehavSci), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD A Memory Wellness Program PhD (Public Health & BehavSci), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD The Pathway to Diagnosis: Experiences of Caregivers of People With Dementia PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Co-occurring Depression and Alcohol Misuse: An Epidemiological Investigation PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Reducing High Rates of Unplanned Hospital Readmissions Among Aboriginal People with Chronic Disease PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Multiple and Severe Forms of Socioecomonmic Disadvantage and Tobacco Use: Exploring the Factors that Contribute to Smoking Amongst Clients of Community Service Organisations PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Understanding Consumers' Preferences for Health Service Change: Measures to Inform the Development of Patient-centred Interventions in Chronic Disease Ambulatory Clinics PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD The Provision of Best-Practice Care: Examining Modifiable Barriers Along the Care Pathway for Stroke PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 107
United Kingdom 15
United States 8
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News

UON awarded $3.2 million in funding for dementia research

August 3, 2017

UON has been awarded more than $3.2 million by the NHMRC to improve the wellbeing and outcomes for people living with dementia.

Dr Jamie Bryant

Position

NHMRC-ARC Research Development Fellow
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email jamie.bryant@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40420709

Office

Room W4-147
Building HMRI
Location HMRI

,
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