Ms Bree Hobden

Research Associate

School of Medicine and Public Health (Health Behaviour Sciences)

Career Summary

Biography

Ms Breanne Hobden completed her Bachelor of Psychology with Honours (Class 1) from the University of Newcastle in 2012. Breanne began working as a full-time research assistant with the Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour at the University of Newcastle in 2013. During this time she worked on an array of projects examining health outcomes for people with chronic diseases. In 2015 Breanne began her PhD in mental health. Her thesis focused (submitted April 2018) on understanding and improving health care services for those with comorbid alcohol misuse and depression. Funded by an Ian Scott Mental Health Scholarship from Australian Rotary Health, Breanne accomplished much throughout her candidature. These achievements include presenting her research at the Society for Mental Health Research Conference; competing as a finalist in the University of Newcastle’s Three Minute Thesis competition; publishing 5 peer-reviewed publications for her thesis; and being awarded the Adam J Berry Junior Scientist award from the Australian Academy of Science to study at the National Institute Alcohol Abuse and Addiction in the US during 2016. 

Breanne now works as a full time Research Associate with the Health Behaviour Research Collaborative. Her current role has enabled her to take responsibility for managing a large multi-site cancer trial. The trial will establish, and then attempt to reduce, the evidence practice gap in relation to psychosocial cancer care using a step wedge design across six treatment centres in NSW. This trial has required her to form positive working collaborations with medical and radiation treatment units. Breanne was also involved in the development and testing of a new measure designed to assess patients’ experiences of care across their cancer pathway. This involved overseeing recruitment and data collection across four treatment centres, as well as the hiring, training and supervision of multiple research staff to establishing the characteristics, acceptability and feasibility of this measure. In addition, Breanne has been involved in projects examining the health and well-being of elderly people receiving aged care services; perceptions of advanced care planning among oncology nurses; and the well-being of social housing tenants. 


Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Alcohol misuse
  • Cancer care
  • Depression
  • Mental health

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Associate University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2016 Adam J Berry Memorial Fund
Australian Academy of Science
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (23 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Sanson-Fisher R, Hobden B, Watson R, Turon H, Carey M, Bryant J, Freund M, 'The new challenge for improving psychosocial cancer care: shifting to a system-based approach', Supportive Care in Cancer, 27 763-769 (2019) [C1]

© 2018, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature. Introduction: There is a need to improve the psychosocial well-being of cancer patients. To date, intervention resea... [more]

© 2018, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature. Introduction: There is a need to improve the psychosocial well-being of cancer patients. To date, intervention research has primarily focussed on improving psychosocial well-being through targeting singular aspects of care at the individual patient level. Sustainable, high-quality psychosocial care should address the issues faced by people diagnosed with cancer throughout the care pathway using a system-based approach. Aims: To examine the number of intervention trials attempting to improve psychosocial cancer care that have implemented a system-based approach. Method: Five journals were selected and relevant studies across all years were extracted. Four criteria, argued to be essential characteristics of system-based change, were assessed: (1) establishing a culture change within the healthcare system/organisation, through designated leaders who endorse organisational goals; (2) adopting a multidisciplinary approach to change; (3) mapping the system and identifying points of leverage; and (4) measuring the impact of change and adapting establish feedback loops. Results: The search strategy returned 1174 citations, of which five met the inclusion criteria. Of the intervention studies identified, three met none of the four defined criteria for a systems-based intervention, one study met criterion 2 only, and one study met all four criteria, however, was not a rigorous study design. Conclusions: This review of published psychosocial intervention trials in top-ranking psychosocial cancer care journals only found one study that met our criteria for evaluating system-based change. This is likely to be a consequence of the significant pragmatic and political barriers to conducting system-based intervention research.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-018-4568-4
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant, Megan Freund
2019 Sanson-Fisher RW, Hobden BT, Carey ML, Turon HE, Waller AE, Proietto AM, 'The System for Patient Assessment of Cancer Experiences (SPACE): a cross-sectional study examining feasibility and acceptability.', Support Care Cancer, (2019)
DOI 10.1007/s00520-019-04943-6
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Amy Waller
2019 Turon H, Carey M, Boyes A, Hobden B, Dilworth S, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Agreement between a single-item measure of anxiety and depression and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale: A cross-sectional study', PLOS ONE, 14 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0210111
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2019 Hobden B, Turon H, Bryant J, Wall L, Brown S, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Oncology patient preferences for depression care: A discrete choice experiment', Psycho-Oncology, 28 807-814 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Objective: Using a vignette-style DCE in a sample of oncology patients, this study explored: (1) the relative influence of the patient's ... [more]

© 2019 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Objective: Using a vignette-style DCE in a sample of oncology patients, this study explored: (1) the relative influence of the patient's level of concern about their depression on preferences for care, (2) the relative influence of depression severity according to a mental health checklist on preferred treatment-seeking options, and (3) whether patient age and gender were associated with depression care preference. Methods: A discrete choice experiment (DCE) survey of cancer patients was conducted. Hypothetical vignettes to elicit care preferences were created using two attributes: the cancer patient's level of concern about depression (a little or a great deal) and results of a mental health checklist (not depressed or very depressed). Three response options for care preferences were presented, including a self-directed approach, shared care approach, and clinician-directed referral approach. Participants chose their most and least preferred options. Results: A total of 281 cancer patients completed the survey. There was a significant association between level of concern and the most preferred option. Those with a great deal of concern about depression preferred to receive referral from their clinician more than those with a little concern about depression. Males were significantly more likely to select a self-directed approach as their most preferred option. Conclusions: An oncology patient's level of concern about depression may influence the type of care they want to receive from their cancer doctor for depression. This finding has implications for depression screening in clinical practice.

DOI 10.1002/pon.5024
Co-authors Scott Brown, Jamie Bryant, Laura Wall, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2019 Freund M, Hobden B, Deeming S, Noble N, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'Reducing alcohol-related harm in Australia: a simple data-based tool to assist prioritization of research and health care delivery in primary care', Family practice, 36 473-478 (2019) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. INTRODUCTION: The detection of harmf... [more]

© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. INTRODUCTION: The detection of harmful alcohol use and the delivery of brief advice in primary care are less than optimal. Given limited health care resources, deciding where best to allocate funding to optimize health outcomes is imperative. A simple data-based tool could be useful when access to specialist health economic advice is unavailable. This study aimed to examine the utility of a simple data-based calculator to facilitate priority setting in general practice for reducing alcohol-related harm. METHODS: A simple algorithm was developed within Microsoft Excel to allow comparison of hypothetical intervention scenarios that aimed to increase detection and brief advice for harmful alcohol use in general practice. The calculator accommodated varying implementation costs, size of effect and reach for each scenario created. The incremental costs of the intervention scenarios, the incremental number of successes (i.e. abstinence or drinking at safe levels) and the incremental costs-effectiveness ratio (ICER) were calculated for each hypothetical scenario and compared with a usual care scenario. RESULTS: In the hypothetical scenarios modelled, increasing both the detection of harmful alcohol consumption and the provision of brief advice produced the greatest number of incremental successes above baseline. Increasing detection alone produced fewer incremental successes but was the most cost-effective approach, as indicated by the lowest ICER. DISCUSSION: The data-based calculator provides a simple method of exploring reach and cost-effectiveness outcomes without the need for any specific skills. Although this approach has limitations, the calculator can be used by decision makers to guide intervention planning.

DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmy103
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Natasha Noble, Megan Freund, Jamie Bryant
2019 Hobden B, Carey M, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Oldmeadow C, 'Prevalence and Predictors of Symptoms of Depression Among Individuals Seeking Treatment from Australian Drug and Alcohol Outpatient Clinics.', Community Ment Health J, (2019)
DOI 10.1007/s10597-019-00451-3
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Christopher Oldmeadow, Jamie Bryant, Mariko Carey
2019 Sanson-Fisher R, Hobden B, Carey M, Mackenzie L, Hyde L, Shepherd J, 'Interactional skills training in undergraduate medical education: ten principles for guiding future research.', BMC Med Educ, 19 144 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s12909-019-1566-2
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie, Mariko Carey
2019 Sanson-Fisher R, Hobden B, Carey M, Mackenzie L, Hyde L, Shepherd J, 'Interactional skills training in undergraduate medical education: ten principles for guiding future research (vol 19, 144, 2019)', BMC MEDICAL EDUCATION, 19 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s12909-019-1695-7
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie
2018 Bryant J, Hobden B, Forshaw K, Oldmeadow C, Walsh J, Sanson-Fisher R, 'How accurately do general practitioners detect concurrent tobacco use and risky alcohol consumption? A cross-sectional study in Australian general practice', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 24 378-384 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 La Trobe University. The negative health consequences of tobacco and risky alcohol consumption are compounded when used concurrently. Australian preventative health guideli... [more]

© 2018 La Trobe University. The negative health consequences of tobacco and risky alcohol consumption are compounded when used concurrently. Australian preventative health guidelines recommend that general practitioners (GPs) assess and provide evidence-based intervention. No studies, however, have examined the accuracy of GP detection of concurrent tobacco use and risky alcohol consumption or the factors associated with accurate detection. This study aimed to examine the: (i) accuracy of GP detection of concurrent tobacco and risky alcohol use compared to patient self-report and (ii) GP and patient characteristics associated with accurate detection following a single clinical encounter. Patients attending 12 Australian general practices completed a survey assessing smoking and alcohol consumption. For each participating patient, GPs completed a checklist to indicate the presence of these risk factors. GP judgements were compared to patient self-report. Fifty-one GPs completed a health risk checklist for 1332 patients. Only 23% of patients who self-reported concurrent tobacco and risky alcohol use identified by their GP. Patients who visited their GP four to six times in the last year were most likely to have concurrent tobacco and risky alcohol use were identified. It is imperative to establish systems to increase detection of preventative health risks in general practice to enable the provision of evidence-based treatments.

DOI 10.1071/PY17122
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Christopher Oldmeadow, Kristy Fakes
2018 Hobden B, Bryant J, Forshaw K, Oldmeadow C, Evans TJ, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Prevalence and characteristics associated with concurrent smoking and alcohol misuse within Australian general practice patients', Australian Health Review, (2018)

© 2018 AHHA. Objectives: This study sought to determine, among a large sample of Australian general practice patients: (1) the prevalence of smoking among different levels of alco... [more]

© 2018 AHHA. Objectives: This study sought to determine, among a large sample of Australian general practice patients: (1) the prevalence of smoking among different levels of alcohol misuse; and (2) whether the associations between demographic characteristics and alcohol use differ according to smoking status. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was administered from 2010 to 2011 to 3559 patients from 12 Australian urban general practices. Patients reported their demographic details, smoking status and their alcohol intake. Results: The overall prevalence of reported concurrent smoking and alcohol misuse was 7.8%. Smokers were 3.81-fold more likely to have a higher level of alcohol consumption than non-smokers (95% confidence interval 3.13-4.63; P < 0.0001). There was evidence that smoking was an effect modifier of the relationship between alcohol misuse and chronic illness. Conclusions: There was an increasing prevalence of smoking with increasing level of alcohol consumption. In addition, those with chronic conditions who smoked had greater odds of higher levels of alcohol consumption. Preventative interventions for these substances are needed to reduce the burden associated with concurrent smoking and alcohol misuse. What is known about the topic?: Tobacco and alcohol are the most commonly used substances and contribute to over 10 million deaths annually. The risk of disease is high when using either of these substances, however, concurrent use is associated with a greatly compounded risk. Australian data is limited regarding the prevalence of concurrent tobacco and alcohol misuse, however, international studies suggest variation in prevalence rates between different clinical settings. What does this paper add?: This study examined the prevalence of concurrent smoking and alcohol misuse among different levels of alcohol misuse severity within an Australian general practice setting. Additionally it explored whether the associations between demographic characteristics and alcohol use differ according to smoking status. What are the implications for practitioners?: This study has important implications for disease prevention and the delivery of preventive health services by general practitioners. Considering one in 100 clinical treatments provided in general practice relate to preventative smoking or alcohol counselling, it is critical that efforts are made to ascertain risk factors such as smoking and alcohol misuse to increase treatment rates. General practitioners should consider screening for smoking and alcohol misuse opportunistically during routine clinical encounters, as well as screening for smoking or alcohol misuse if one or the other is present.

DOI 10.1071/AH18126
Co-authors Kristy Fakes, Jamie Bryant, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2018 Sanson-Fisher R, Hobden B, Waller A, Dodd N, Boyd L, 'Methodological quality of teaching communication skills to undergraduate medical students: a mapping review', BMC MEDICAL EDUCATION, 18 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12909-018-1265-4
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller
2018 Hobden B, Bryant J, Carey M, Baker AL, Farrell M, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Finding the optimal treatment model: A systematic review of treatment for co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 52 737-750 (2018) [C1]

© The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2018. Objectives: Alcohol misuse and depression are commonly co-occurring conditions. To date, no review has examin... [more]

© The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2018. Objectives: Alcohol misuse and depression are commonly co-occurring conditions. To date, no review has examined the most efficacious treatment model for psychosocial treatment of co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression. This systematic review determined the: (i) methodological quality of publications examining psychosocial treatment of co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression using a sequential, parallel or integrated treatment model; and (ii) effectiveness of each dual treatment model compared to single treatment for those with co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression. Methods: PubMed, Medline and PsycInfo databases were searched for studies which were included if they involved treatment for alcohol misuse and depression and could be classified into one of the three treatment models. Included studies were assessed using the Cochrane¿s Effective Practice and Organisation of Care risk of bias criteria. Relevant study characteristics and outcomes were extracted and are presented in a narrative review format. Results: Seven studies met inclusion criteria. None were categorised as low risk on the risk of bias criteria. No studies examined a sequential model of treatment, three examined a parallel model and four examined an integrated model of dual-focussed treatment. The studies examining the parallel model and two out of four studies examining the effectiveness of an integrated model demonstrated greater improvement for alcohol or depression outcomes compared to control conditions. Conclusion: Evidence for the psychosocial treatment of co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression is limited to a handful of studies. The evidence has several methodological limitations, which impact the interpretation of the findings. Therefore, while international guidelines recommend integrated dual-focussed treatment for co-occurring conditions, there is little evidence supporting the superiority of this treatment format for co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression. High-quality research demonstrating improvements in patient outcomes is required to ensure recommendations for clinical practice are based on strong empirical evidence.

DOI 10.1177/0004867418758922
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Mariko Carey, Christopher Oldmeadow, Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2018 Hobden B, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Oldmeadow C, Carey M, 'Co-occurring depression and alcohol misuse is under-identified in general practice: A cross-sectional study', Journal of Health Psychology, 23 1085-1095 (2018) [C1]

© 2016, The Author(s). Depression and alcohol misuse are common co-occurring conditions. This study aimed to determine the accuracy of general practitioner identification of depre... [more]

© 2016, The Author(s). Depression and alcohol misuse are common co-occurring conditions. This study aimed to determine the accuracy of general practitioner identification of depression and alcohol misuse. Participants from 12 Australian general practices reported demographic and health risk behaviour data. General practitioners were asked to indicate the presence or absence of six health risk factors for individual patients. Accuracy of general practitioner identification was low at 21 per cent. Those with severe alcohol misuse, no chronic diseases and lower education levels were more likely to be identified. Routine screening prior to patient appointments may be a simple and efficient way to increase identification rates.

DOI 10.1177/1359105316643855
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant, Christopher Oldmeadow
2017 Hobden B, Schwandt ML, Carey M, Lee MR, Farokhnia M, Bouhlal S, et al., 'The Validity of the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale in an Inpatient Sample with Alcohol Dependence', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 41 1220-1227 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/acer.13400
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Christopher Oldmeadow
2017 Hobden B, Bryant J, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Oldmeadow C, 'Computer tablet or telephone? A randomised controlled trial exploring two methods of collecting data from drug and alcohol outpatients', Addictive Behaviors, 71 111-117 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Objective Both computerised and telephone surveys have potential advantages for research data collection. The current study aimed to determine the: (i) feasibility, (ii) ac... [more]

© 2017 Objective Both computerised and telephone surveys have potential advantages for research data collection. The current study aimed to determine the: (i) feasibility, (ii) acceptability, and (iii) cost per completed survey of computer tablet versus telephone data collection for clients attending an outpatient drug and alcohol treatment clinic. Design Two-arm randomised controlled trial. Method Clients attending a drug and alcohol outpatient clinic in New South Wales, Australia, were randomised to complete a baseline survey via computer tablet in the clinic or via telephone interview within two weeks of their appointment. All participants completed a three-month follow-up survey via telephone. Results Consent and completion rates for the baseline survey were significantly higher in the computer tablet condition. The time taken to complete the computer tablet survey was lower (11¿min) than the telephone condition (17¿min). There were no differences in the proportion of consenters or completed follow-up surveys between the two conditions at the 3-month follow-up. Acceptability was high across both modes of data collection. The cost of the computer tablet condition was $67.52 greater per completed survey than the telephone condition. Conclusion There is a trade-off between computer tablet and telephone data collection. While both data collection methods were acceptable to participants, the computer tablet condition resulted in higher consent and completion rates at baseline, therefore yielding greater external validity, and was quicker for participants to complete. Telephone data collection was however, more cost-effective. Researchers should carefully consider the mode of data collection that suits individual study needs.

DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.03.009
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Mariko Carey, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2017 Grady A, Carey M, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Hobden B, 'A systematic review of patient-practitioner communication interventions involving treatment decisions', Patient Education and Counseling, 100 199-211 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd Objectives To examine the: 1) methodological quality of interventions examining strategies to improve patient-practitioner communication involving trea... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd Objectives To examine the: 1) methodological quality of interventions examining strategies to improve patient-practitioner communication involving treatment decisions; 2) effectiveness of strategies to improve patient-practitioner communication involving treatment decisions; and 3) types of treatment decisions (emergency/non-emergency) in the included studies. Methods Medline, PsychINFO, CINAHL, and Embase were searched to identify intervention studies. To be included, studies were required to examine patient-practitioner communication related to decision making about treatment. Study methodological quality was assessed using Cochrane's Effective Practice and Organisation of Care risk of bias criteria. Study design, sample characteristics, intervention details, and outcomes were extracted. Results Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. No studies were rated low risk on all nine risk of bias criteria. Two of the three interventions aimed at changing patient behaviour, two of the five practitioner directed, and one of the three patient-practitioner directed interventions demonstrated an effect on decision-making outcomes. No studies examined emergency treatment decisions. Conclusions Existing studies have a high risk of bias and are poorly reported. There is some evidence to suggest patient-directed interventions may be effective in improving decision-making outcomes. Practice implications It is imperative that an evidence-base is developed to inform clinical practice.

DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2016.09.010
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alice Grady, Jamie Bryant, Mariko Carey
2017 Hobden B, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Oldmeadow C, Carey M, 'Do rates of depression vary by level of alcohol misuse in Australian general practice?', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 23 263-267 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 La Trobe University. Limited data exist regarding co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression among general practice patients. This study examined the prevalence of depressi... [more]

© 2017 La Trobe University. Limited data exist regarding co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression among general practice patients. This study examined the prevalence of depression by level of alcohol misuse, and the sociodemographic factors associated with depression and increased alcohol misuse severity. A cross-sectional survey was administered to 3559 Australian general practice patients. Patients completed their demographic details, the Patient Health Questionnaire (9-item) and the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (Consumption items). The prevalence of alcohol misuse and depression was 6.7%, and depression prevalence varied significantly according to level of alcohol misuse (P<0.001). Age, gender, Aboriginality and number of chronic diseases were associated with depression and higher levels of alcohol misuse. These findings may assist General Practitioners in identifying those at risk of experiencing co-morbid depression and alcohol use, and aid in effective treatment and referral.

DOI 10.1071/PY16076
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2017 Hobden B, Carey M, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Oldmeadow C, 'Clinician identification of elevated symptoms of depression among individuals seeking treatment for substance misuse.', Drug and alcohol dependence, 181 71-76 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.09.013
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2016 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley E, Hobden B, Zucca A, Henskens F, et al., 'A consumer register: an acceptable and cost-effective alternative for accessing patient populations', BMC Medical Research Methodology, 16 1-10 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however, they have several limitations including low c... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however, they have several limitations including low consent and participation rates, and potential selection bias. To improve access to samples for research, the utility of a new model of recruitment termed the 'Consumer Register', that allows for direct patient recruitment from hospitals, was examined. This paper reports: (i) consent rates onto the register; (ii) preferred methods and frequency of contact; and (iii) the feasibility of establishing the register, including: (a) cost per person recruited to the register; (b) the differential cost and consent rates of volunteer versus paid data collectors; and (c) participant completion rates. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in five outpatient clinics in Australia. Patients were approached by volunteers or paid data collectors and asked to complete a touch-screen electronic survey. Consenting individuals were asked to indicate their willingness and preferences for enrolment onto a research register. Descriptive statistics were used to examine patient preferences and linear regression used to model the success of volunteer versus paid data collectors. The opportunity and financial costs of establishing the register were calculated. Results: A total of 1947 patients (80.6 %) consented to complete the survey, of which, 1486 (76.3 %) completed the questionnaire. Of the completers, the majority (69.4 %, or 1032 participants) were willing to be listed on the register and preferred to be contacted by email (50.3 %). Almost 39 % of completers were willing to be contacted three or more times in a 12 month period. The annual opportunity cost of resources consumed by the register was valued at $37,187, giving an opportunity cost per person recruited to the register of $36. After amortising fixed costs, the annual financial outlay was $23,004 or $22 per person recruited to the register. Use of volunteer data collectors contributed to an annual saving of $14,183, however paid data collectors achieved significantly higher consent rates. Successful enrolment onto the register was completed for 42 % of the sample. Conclusions: A Consumer Register is a promising and feasible alternative to population-based registries, with the majority of participants willing to be contacted multiple times via low-resource methods such as email. There is an effectiveness/cost trade off in the use of paid versus volunteer data collectors.

DOI 10.1186/s12874-016-0238-8
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant, Christopher Oldmeadow, Elizabeth Fradgley, Alison Zucca, Andrew Searles, Frans Henskens
2016 Waller A, Turon H, Mansfield E, Clark K, Hobden B, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Assisting the bereaved: A systematic review of the evidence for grief counselling', Palliative Medicine, 30 132-148 (2016) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2015. Background: Supporting people after bereavement is a priority area for many health services. Investment in bereavement care must be supported by a rigorous e... [more]

© The Author(s) 2015. Background: Supporting people after bereavement is a priority area for many health services. Investment in bereavement care must be supported by a rigorous evidence-base. Aim: To examine the (1) relative proportion of descriptive, measurement and intervention research in grief counselling and (2) quality and effectiveness of intervention studies. Design: Systematic review of studies published in the area of grief counselling. Data sources: MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library and PsycINFO databases were searched for studies published between 2000 and 2013. Eligible papers were categorised into descriptive, measurement, review, commentaries and intervention studies. Intervention studies were assessed against the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care methodological criteria, and papers meeting criteria were assessed for quality. The impact of interventions on grief, psychological morbidity and quality of life was examined. Results: A total of 126 data-based papers, including 47 descriptive, 3 measurement and 76 grief counselling intervention studies were included. Only 59% (n = 45) of intervention studies met Effective Practice and Organisation of Care design criteria. Overall, study quality was poor, with the majority of interventions showing a risk of bias in several key areas. The three studies that met all criteria showed mixed effectiveness. Conclusion: Grief counselling interventions require a strong rationale for design, and a systematic approach to development and evaluation. Descriptive research efforts should inform this process, focusing on homogeneity in sample, identification of risk factors for complicated grief and the impact of extraneous factors on intervention effects. Interventions should include comparisons to usual care, as well as replication to confirm positive findings.

DOI 10.1177/0269216315588728
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller, Elise Mansfield
2016 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley E, Hobden B, Zucca A, Henskens F, et al., 'A consumer register: an acceptable and cost-effective alternative for accessing patient populations', BMC medical research methodology, 16 134 (2016)

BACKGROUND: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however,¿they have several limitations including low consent and participati... [more]

BACKGROUND: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however,¿they have several limitations including low consent and participation rates, and potential selection bias. To improve access to samples for research, the utility of a new model of recruitment termed the 'Consumer Register', that allows for direct patient recruitment from hospitals, was examined. This paper reports: (i) consent rates onto the register; (ii) preferred methods and frequency of contact; and (iii) the feasibility of establishing the register, including: (a) cost per person recruited to the register; (b) the differential cost and consent rates of volunteer versus paid data collectors; and (c) participant completion rates. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in five outpatient clinics in Australia. Patients were approached by volunteers or paid data collectors and asked to complete a touch-screen electronic survey. Consenting individuals were asked to indicate their willingness and preferences for enrolment onto a research register. Descriptive statistics were used to examine patient preferences and linear regression used to model the success of volunteer versus paid data collectors. The opportunity and financial costs of establishing the register were calculated. RESULTS: A total of 1947 patients (80.6¿%) consented to complete the survey, of which, 1486 (76.3¿%) completed the questionnaire. Of the completers, the majority (69.4¿%, or 1032 participants) were willing to be listed on the register and preferred to be contacted by email (50.3¿%). Almost 39¿% of completers¿were willing to be contacted three or more times in a 12¿month period. The annual opportunity cost of resources consumed by the register was valued at $37,187, giving an opportunity cost per person recruited to the register of $36. After amortising fixed costs, the annual financial outlay was $23,004 or $22 per person recruited to the register. Use of volunteer data collectors contributed to an annual saving of $14,183, however paid data collectors achieved significantly higher consent rates. Successful enrolment onto the register was completed for 42 % of the sample. CONCLUSIONS: A Consumer Register is a promising and feasible alternative to population-based registries, with the majority of participants willing to be contacted multiple times via low-resource methods such as email. There is an effectiveness/cost trade off in the use of paid versus volunteer data collectors.

Co-authors Frans Henskens, Andrew Searles, Elizabeth Fradgley, Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Christopher Oldmeadow, Alison Zucca
2016 Jayakody A, Bryant J, Carey M, Hobden B, Dodd N, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Effectiveness of interventions utilising telephone follow up in reducing hospital readmission within 30 days for individuals with chronic disease: a systematic review', BMC HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, 16 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1650-9
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant, Mariko Carey
2015 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley E, Regan T, Hobden B, Ackland SP, 'Oncology patients overwhelmingly support tissue banking.', BMC Cancer, 15 413 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1416-5
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Elizabeth Fradgley, Stephen Ackland, Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher
Show 20 more journal articles

Conference (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Lynam J, Hall A, Ayoola A, Sridharan S, Henskens F, Smith A, et al., 'DECISION-MAKING PREFERENCES AND SATISFACTION OF STAGE ONE TESTICULAR CANCER PATIENTS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Frans Henskens, Nick Zdenkowski
2016 Hall A, Lynam J, Ayoola A, Sridharan S, Henskens F, Smith A, et al., 'ASSESSING THE INFORMATION NEEDS OF STAGE ONE TESTICULAR CANCER PATIENTS AND THEIR CARERS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, Newcastle, Australia (2016)
Co-authors Frans Henskens, Nick Zdenkowski
2014 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley L, Regan T, Hobden B, Ackland S, Turon H, 'ONCOLOGY PATIENTS OVERWHELMINGLY SUPPORT TISSUE BANKING', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Elizabeth Fradgley, Stephen Ackland, Jamie Bryant
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $951,307

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20192 grants / $951,307

Improving implementation of Health Assessments for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients in mainstream general practice: a cluster randomised controlled trial $745,057

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Professor Sandra Eades, Nicholas Zwar, Doctor Megan Freund, Ms Bree Hobden, Mr Simon Deeming, Mr Chris Oldmeadow, Mr Bob Davis
Scheme Targeted Call for Research into Healthy Ageing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2023
GNo G1801014
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Examining the comorbidity of mental health problems and alcohol and other drug use within Aboriginal and Torres Strait People: a neglected area$206,250

Funding body: Australian Rotary Health

Funding body Australian Rotary Health
Project Team Ms Bree Hobden
Scheme Postdoctoral Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G1801108
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y
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Ms Bree Hobden

Position

Research Associate
PRC Health Behaviour Research Group
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Health Behaviour Sciences

Contact Details

Email bree.hobden@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4042 0474
Fax (02) 4042 0044

Office

Room Public Health/HBRG
Building HMRI Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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