Dr Katie McGill

Dr Katie McGill

Conjoint Lecturer

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Katie is a clinical psychologist who has extensive clinical, research and project management experience. She currently holds two positions- Suicide Prevention Research Manager with the Hunter New England Health MH-READ (Mental Health Research, Evaluation, Analysis and Dissemination) unit and Suicide Prevention Coordinator (Clinical Lead)- Newcastle for the Lifespan project administered locally by the Hunter Institute of Mental Health. Prior to these roles, Katie was Program Manager for the Families, Workplaces and Targeted Preventions team with Hunter Institute of Mental Health; and coordinator of the Mental Health and GP Partnerships Program for Hunter New England Mental Health Service.  

 

Research interests

Katie is actively involved in suicide prevention research, including treatment and intervention trials, epidemiological and public health data analysis, assessment and service evaluations, and systematic reviews and meta-analyses. She has a particular interest in the translation and dissemination of evidence into practice, and implementation science. Katie works closely with Professor Greg Carter on his suicide prevention projects.

Current projects include investigation of the efficacy of the Newcastle Way Back Support Service, evaluation of the NSW Accredited Persons program, and systematic reviews and meta-analyses of the positive and negative predictive values of suicide risk assessment instruments and clinician judgements in predicting who will go on to engage in repeated self-harm or suicide.   

 

Previously, Katie has worked across a variety of suicide prevention and mental health projects. She led the national dissemination of the Partners in Depression program 2009-2012 funded by the philanthropic nib foundation, worked on the development of the beyondblue The Way Back information resources for people who have attempted suicide and their family and friends, and has led and managed the development and dissemination of mental health resources, training packages and evaluations for a variety of other sectors, including for the mining sector, emergency services, schools, and general and primary health care providers.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Psychology (Clinical Psychology), Macquarie University

Keywords

  • mental health promotion
  • suicide prevention
  • translation of evidence into practice

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 35
110319 Psychiatry (incl. Psychotherapy) 35
111708 Health and Community Services 30

Professional Experience

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
3/10/2016 -  Lifespan Newcastle coordinator Hunter Institute of Mental Health
1/10/2015 - 1/11/2016 Student Counsellor (part time), University Counselling, Student Central The University of Newcastle
Australia
3/03/2014 -  Suicide Prevention Research Manager Hunter New England Mental Health
Centre for Brain and Mental Health Research (CBMHR) and MH-READ Unit
Australia
1/04/2012 - 1/06/2013 Clinical Psychologist (secondment), Community Health Hunter New England Local Health District
1/07/2008 - 3/03/2014 Program Manager Hunter Institute of Mental Health
2/08/2006 - 1/07/2008 Mental Health & GP Partnerships Program Coordinator Hunter New England Mental Health
Australia
1/06/2003 - 1/05/2007 Research and Clinical Psychologist, CAMHS Hunter New England Mental Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 McGill K, Hiles SA, Handley TE, Page A, Lewin TJ, Whyte I, Carter GL, 'Is the reported increase in young female hospital-treated intentional self-harm real or artefactual?', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 53 663-672 (2019) [C1]

© The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2018. Background: The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare has reported an increased rate of hospital-treated... [more]

© The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2018. Background: The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare has reported an increased rate of hospital-treated intentional self-harm in young females (2000¿2012) in Australia. These reported increases arise from institutional data that are acknowledged to underestimate the true rate, although the degree of underestimation is not known. Objective: To consider whether the reported increase in young females¿ hospital-treated intentional self-harm is real or artefactual and specify the degree of institutional underestimation. Methods: Averages for age- and gender-standardised event rates for hospital-treated intentional self-harm (national: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare; state: New South Wales Ministry of Health) were compared with sentinel hospital event rates for intentional self-poisoning (Hunter Area Toxicology Service, Calvary Mater Newcastle) in young people (15¿24 years) for the period 2000¿2012. A time series analysis of the event rates for the sentinel hospital was conducted. Results: The sentinel hospital event rates for young females of 444 per 100,000 were higher than the state (378 per 100,000) and national (331 per 100,000) rates. There was little difference in young male event rates ¿ sentinel unit: 166; state: 166 and national: 153 per 100,000. The sentinel hospital rates showed no change over time for either gender. Conclusion: There was no indication from the sentinel unit data of any increase in rates of intentional self-poisoning for young females. The sentinel and state rates were higher than the national rates, demonstrating the possible magnitude of underestimation of the national data. The reported increases in national rates of hospital-treated self-harm among young females might be due to artefactual factors, such as changes in clinical practice (greater proportion admitted), improved administrative coding of suicidal behaviours or possibly increased hospital presentations of community self-injury cases, but not intentional self-poisoning. A national system of sentinel units is needed for the accurate and timely monitoring of all hospital-treated self-harm.

DOI 10.1177/0004867418815977
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Sarah Hiles, Gregory Carter, Terry Lewin
2019 Woodford R, Spittal MJ, Milner A, McGill K, Kapur N, Pirkis J, et al., 'Accuracy of Clinician Predictions of Future Self-Harm: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Predictive Studies', Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 49 23-40 (2019) [C1]

© 2017 The American Association of Suicidology Assessment of a patient after hospital-treated self-harm or psychiatric hospitalization often includes a risk assessment, resulting ... [more]

© 2017 The American Association of Suicidology Assessment of a patient after hospital-treated self-harm or psychiatric hospitalization often includes a risk assessment, resulting in a classification of high risk versus low risk for a future episode of self-harm. Through systematic review and a series of meta-analyses looking at unassisted clinician risk classification (eight studies; N¿=¿22,499), we found pooled estimates for sensitivity 0.31 (95% CI: 0.18¿0.50), specificity 0.85 (0.75¿0.92), positive predictive value 0.22 (0.21¿0.23), and negative predictive value 0.89 (0.86¿0.92). Clinician classification was too inaccurate to be clinically useful. After-care should therefore be allocated on the basis of a needs rather than risk assessment.

DOI 10.1111/sltb.12395
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Gregory Carter
2019 McGill K, Hackney S, Skehan J, 'Information needs of people after a suicide attempt: A thematic analysis', Patient Education and Counseling, 102 1119-1124 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Objective: This study aimed to identify the information that people who have attempted suicide and those who support them believed to be helpful to receive after an attempt... [more]

© 2019 Objective: This study aimed to identify the information that people who have attempted suicide and those who support them believed to be helpful to receive after an attempt. Methods: Thirty-seven people with lived experience of suicide attempt(s) (suicide attempt survivors and family members/friends of survivors) were recruited through two national lived experience community groups in Australia. Participants completed a semi-structured telephone interview that included questions about the types of information they believed important to receive after an attempt. Results: Using thematic analysis, the key information participants identified was helpful to receive following a suicide attempt was that which could challenge stigma and address negative community attitudes towards suicide. Participants spoke of a need for practical information and information that provided hope. Personal stories of recovery were identified as an important way of communicating this sort of health information. Conclusions: People who have attempted suicide and their family members and friends want information that challenges stigma and supports recovery expectations. Practice implications: Providing people with accurate information about recovery and using personal stories to communicate health information is one way people affected by suicide attempt identify can challenge stigma, and address information needs after a suicide attempt.

DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2019.01.003
2017 Brady P, Kangas M, McGill K, ' Family Matters : A Systematic Review of the Evidence For Family Psychoeducation For Major Depressive Disorder', Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 43 245-263 (2017)

© 2016 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy The first aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence for family psychoeducation (FPE) interventions for... [more]

© 2016 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy The first aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence for family psychoeducation (FPE) interventions for major depressive disorder (MDD). A second aim was to compare the efficacy of different modes of delivering face-to-face FPE interventions. Ten studies (based on nine distinct samples) were identified comprising four single-family studies, four multifamily studies, one single versus multifamily comparative study, and one peer-led, mixed-diagnosis study. Seven studies measured patient functioning and six reported positive outcomes. Six studies measured carer's well-being and four reported positive outcomes. Results provide preliminary evidence that FPE leads to improved outcomes for patient functioning and family¿carer's well-being for persons with depression. The implications for future development and delivery of FPE interventions for MDD are discussed.

DOI 10.1111/jmft.12204
Citations Scopus - 7
2017 Carter G, Milner A, McGill K, Pirkis J, Kapur N, Spittal MJ, 'Predicting suicidal behaviours using clinical instruments: Systematic review and meta-analysis of positive predictive values for risk scales', British Journal of Psychiatry, 210 387-395 (2017) [C1]

© The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017. Background Prediction of suicidal behaviour is an aspirational goal for clinicians and policy makers; with patients classified as '... [more]

© The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017. Background Prediction of suicidal behaviour is an aspirational goal for clinicians and policy makers; with patients classified as 'high risk' to be preferentially allocated treatment. Clinical usefulness requires an adequate positive predictive value (PPV). Aims To identify studies of predictive instruments and to calculate PPV estimates for suicidal behaviours. Method A systematic review identified studies of predictive instruments. A series of meta-analyses produced pooled estimates of PPV for suicidal behaviours. Results For all scales combined, the pooled PPVs were: suicide 5.5% (95% CI 3.9-7.9%), self-harm 26.3% (95% CI 21.8-31.3%) and self-harm plus suicide 35.9% (95% CI 25.8-47.4%). Subanalyses on self-harm found pooled PPVs of 16.1% (95% CI 11.3-22.3%) for high-quality studies, 32.5% (95% CI 26.1-39.6%) for hospital-treated self-harm and 26.8% (95% CI 19.5-35.6%) for psychiatric in-patients. Conclusions No 'high-risk' classification was clinically useful. Prevalence imposes a ceiling on PPV. Treatment should reduce exposure to modifiable risk factors and offer effective interventions for selected subpopulations and unselected clinical populations.

DOI 10.1192/bjp.bp.116.182717
Citations Scopus - 62Web of Science - 56
Co-authors Gregory Carter
2014 Wirrell J, McGill K, Kelly PJ, Bowman J, 'Caring for Someone with Depression: Attitudes and Clinical Practices of Australian Mental Health Workers', AUSTRALIAN PSYCHOLOGIST, 49 403-411 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ap.12058
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jenny Bowman
2014 Hamall KM, Heard TR, Inder KJ, McGill KM, Kay-Lambkin F, 'The Child Illness and Resilience Program (CHiRP): a study protocol of a stepped care intervention to improve the resilience and wellbeing of families living with childhood chronic illness', BMC Psychology, 2 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/2050-7283-2-5
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin, Kerry Inder
2009 Hazell P, Martin G, McGill K, Wood TK, Trainor G, Harrington R, 'Group therapy for repeated deliberate self-harm in adolescents: Failure of replication of a randomized trial', Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 48 662-670 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 80
2006 Cooper RJ, Todd J, McGill KM, Michie PT, 'Auditory sensory memory and the aging brain: A mismatch negativity study', Neurobiology of Aging, 27 752-762 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2005.03.012
Citations Scopus - 77Web of Science - 75
Co-authors Pat Michie, Juanita Todd
2003 Aldrich R, Kemp L, Stewart Williams JA, Harris E, Simpson S, Wilson AJ, et al., 'Using Socioeconomic evidence in clinical practice guidelines', BMJ, 327 1283-1285 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmj.327.7426.1283
Citations Scopus - 49Web of Science - 40
Co-authors Jenny Stewartwilliams, Julie Byles, Amanda Wilson
Show 7 more journal articles

Report (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2003 Lowe J, Wilson A, McGill K, Bonevski B, 'An Evaluation of the 2001 LHS of the HAHS Organisational Restructure', Hunter Area Health Service (2003)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Amanda Wilson
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 8
Total funding $1,698,000

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20141 grants / $150,000

The Way Back Information Resources Project: Development of information resources for people who have attempted suicide and their family members and friends$150,000

Funding body: Beyond Blue Ltd

Funding body Beyond Blue Ltd
Project Team

Jaelea Skehan, Katie McGill, Sue Hackney, Todd Heard

Scheme Suicide Prevention Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON N

20112 grants / $180,000

NSW Health Mental Health Promotion, Mental Illness Prevention and Early Intervention Framework Development$120,000

Funding body: NSW Department of Health | Australia

Funding body NSW Department of Health | Australia
Project Team

Trevor Hazell, Jaelea Skehan, Karen Stafford, Katie McGill, Gavin Hazel

Scheme Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

OzHelp Graduates Program Evaluation$60,000

Funding body: Commonwealth Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (former)

Funding body Commonwealth Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (former)
Project Team

Lee Riddoutt, Victoria Pilbeam, Trevor Hazell, Katie McGill, Emma Cother

Scheme Unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON N

20101 grants / $120,000

Queensland Emergency Services Mental Health Literacy Project$120,000

Funding body: Queensland Department of Health

Funding body Queensland Department of Health
Project Team

Katie McGill, Victoria Clack

Scheme Mental Health Branch
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

20092 grants / $1,078,000

"Partners in Depression" National Dissemination Project$1,000,000

Funding body: nib Foundation

Funding body nib Foundation
Project Team

Trevor Hazell, Katie McGill, Emma Cother, Aneta Iloska, Tania Ewin

Scheme Multi-Year Partnerships
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

GP's role in supporting the employment of people with mental illness$78,000

Funding body: Commonwealth Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (former)

Funding body Commonwealth Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (former)
Project Team

Trevor Hazell, Katie McGill, Emma Cother

Scheme Unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON N

20081 grants / $50,000

Queensland Adaptation of MIND Essentials$50,000

Funding body: Queensland Department of Health

Funding body Queensland Department of Health
Project Team

Katie McGill, Emma Cother, Trevor Hazell

Scheme Mental Health Branch
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

20071 grants / $120,000

Early Childhood and Parenting Support Scoping Study$120,000

Funding body: Department of Health and Ageing

Funding body Department of Health and Ageing
Project Team

Trevor Hazell, Katie McGill, Emma Cother

Scheme Mental Health Branch
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current0

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 Professional Doctorate "Family matters" What works in family psychoeducation for depressive disorder? Psychology, Macquarie University Principal Supervisor
2014 Professional Doctorate "Caring for someone with depression": Attitudes and practices of Australian mental health workers Psychology, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 Masters Coping with caring for a person with depression: A qualitative examination of partners' experiences Psychology, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
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Dr Katie McGill

Position

Conjoint Lecturer
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email katherine.mcgill@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4924 6923 Mo-Tu (02) 4014 4929 We- Fr

Office

Room .
Building Hunter New England Mental Health Service
Location Hunter Institute of Mental Health - Mental Health- Research, Evaluation, Analysis and Dissemination

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