Dr Sarah Hiles

Dr Sarah Hiles

Research Associate

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Sarah Hiles is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Faculty of Health. Her research focus is psychosomatic medicine: the intersection between mental and physical health. Sarah's research career to date has focused primarily on relationships between depression, inflammatory biomarkers and cardiometabolic risk factors. Most recently, she has taken a new direction, working on projects in severe asthma and COPD.  

At the heart of her research is a desire to conduct studies that lay a solid evidence-base from which we can efficiently create effective and economical interventions. Her research demonstrates the places we should focus on to get "bang for buck" when we conduct clinical trials or implement scientific innovations into the clinic or public policy.

Sarah is a former EU Marie Sklodowska-Curie Research Fellow and an Australian Endeavour Research Fellow. She spent her fellowships working in a premier psychiatric epidemiology research group at VU University Medical Centre in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. 

Sarah was awarded her PhD in 2014 at the University of Newcastle, under the supervision of Professors Amanda Baker and John Attia. Her thesis explored the epidemiological evidence for the inflammatory hypothesis of depression. 


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Psychology, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Asthma
  • Biostatistics
  • Cohort study
  • Depression
  • Epidemiology
  • Inflammatory biomarkers
  • Lifestyle
  • Meta-analysis
  • Psychology
  • Risk factors
  • Suicide

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111714 Mental Health 10
110203 Respiratory Diseases 60
111706 Epidemiology 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Associate University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
Casual Academic University of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/02/2017 - 30/06/2017 Research Associate School of Medicine & Public Health, Faculty of Health & Medicine, University of Newcastle | Australia
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2018 Priority Research Centre for Healthy Lungs Early Career Award (Translational Clinical)
PRC For Healthy Lungs, University of Newcastle
2018 Jennie Thomas Medical Research Travel Grant
Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
2018 School of Nursing and Midwifery School Collaboration and Engagement Excellence Award
School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle
2018 School of Nursing and Midwifery Early Career Research and Innovation Excellence Award
School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle
2018 Priority Research Centre for Healthy Lungs Travel Grant
PRC For Healthy Lungs, University of Newcastle
2017 Centre of Excellence in Severe Asthma Travel Grant
Centre for Research Excellence in Severe Asthma
2016 Young Investigator Scholar
American Psychosomatic Society
2012 Best Research Higher Degree Publication
Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
2012 Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) PhD Student Travel Award
Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
2010 Highly commended presentation
Australasian Society for Psychiatric Research
2010 Travel Award, Annual Meeting of the Psychoneuroimmunology Research Society
Psychoneuroimmunology Research Society (PNIRS)
2009 Australian Postgraduate Award
Australian Government
2009 Vice Chancellor’s Scholarship for Outstanding Candidates
The University of Newcastle

Invitations

PhD Examiner

Year Title / Rationale
2016 The interplay between biological stress and cellular aging. An epidemiological perspective
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Baker A, Hiles S, Thornton L, Searl A, Kelly P, Kay-Lambkin F, 'From Comorbidity to Multiple Health Behaviour Change', Emerging Perspectives on Substance Misuse, Wiley, Oxford 152-169 (2013) [B1]
DOI 10.1002/9781118306604.ch9
Co-authors Amanda Baker

Journal article (24 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 McGill K, Hiles SA, Handley TE, Page A, Lewin TJ, Whyte I, Carter GL, 'Is the reported increase in young female hospital-treated intentional self-harm real or artefactual?', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 53 663-672 (2019) [C1]

© The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2018. Background: The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare has reported an increased rate of hospital-treated... [more]

© The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2018. Background: The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare has reported an increased rate of hospital-treated intentional self-harm in young females (2000¿2012) in Australia. These reported increases arise from institutional data that are acknowledged to underestimate the true rate, although the degree of underestimation is not known. Objective: To consider whether the reported increase in young females¿ hospital-treated intentional self-harm is real or artefactual and specify the degree of institutional underestimation. Methods: Averages for age- and gender-standardised event rates for hospital-treated intentional self-harm (national: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare; state: New South Wales Ministry of Health) were compared with sentinel hospital event rates for intentional self-poisoning (Hunter Area Toxicology Service, Calvary Mater Newcastle) in young people (15¿24 years) for the period 2000¿2012. A time series analysis of the event rates for the sentinel hospital was conducted. Results: The sentinel hospital event rates for young females of 444 per 100,000 were higher than the state (378 per 100,000) and national (331 per 100,000) rates. There was little difference in young male event rates ¿ sentinel unit: 166; state: 166 and national: 153 per 100,000. The sentinel hospital rates showed no change over time for either gender. Conclusion: There was no indication from the sentinel unit data of any increase in rates of intentional self-poisoning for young females. The sentinel and state rates were higher than the national rates, demonstrating the possible magnitude of underestimation of the national data. The reported increases in national rates of hospital-treated self-harm among young females might be due to artefactual factors, such as changes in clinical practice (greater proportion admitted), improved administrative coding of suicidal behaviours or possibly increased hospital presentations of community self-injury cases, but not intentional self-poisoning. A national system of sentinel units is needed for the accurate and timely monitoring of all hospital-treated self-harm.

DOI 10.1177/0004867418815977
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Katherine Mcgill, Gregory Carter, Terry Lewin
2019 Cordova-Rivera L, Gibson PG, Gardiner PA, Hiles SA, McDonald VM, 'Extrapulmonary associations of health status in severe asthma and bronchiectasis: Comorbidities and functional outcomes', Respiratory Medicine, 154 93-101 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd Background: Severe asthma and bronchiectasis are heterogeneous diseases that contribute to disability beyond the pulmonary system. The magnitude of the impact ... [more]

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd Background: Severe asthma and bronchiectasis are heterogeneous diseases that contribute to disability beyond the pulmonary system. The magnitude of the impact that these extrapulmonary features has on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is unknown. Methods: We analysed the cross-sectional relationships between HRQoL (St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire; SGRQ) and extrapulmonary characteristics, including physical activity (steps/day), anxiety and depression, isometric leg strength, systemic inflammation, and several comorbidities in adults with severe asthma (n = 70) and bronchiectasis (n = 61). Results: Participants with severe asthma and bronchiectasis had similar SGRQ total scores (mean scores 43.7 and 37.8 for severe asthma and bronchiectasis; p > 0.05), and similar pulmonary and extrapulmonary characteristics. The associations between extrapulmonary variables and HRQoL did not differ according to diagnosis (all interactions p > 0.05). Greater anxiety and depressive symptoms, fewer steps/day and greater systemic inflammation were statistically associated with poorer HRQoL in both diseases (p < 0.05). Lower isometric leg strength in severe asthma, and greater Charlson Comorbidity Index in bronchiectasis were also associated with poorer HRQoL (p < 0.05). In the multivariable regression model performed in the combined disease groups, anxiety and depression, steps/day, systemic inflammation and isometric leg strength remained independently associated with HRQoL. Associations between extrapulmonary characteristics and SGRQ domains were stronger for the activity and impact domains, than symptoms. Conclusion: In severe asthma and bronchiectasis, extrapulmonary features including physical activity and leg strength have a significant impact on HRQoL, especially within the activity and impact domains. These features should be considered as part of the assessment of these conditions, and they may represent additional treatment targets to improve HRQoL.

DOI 10.1016/j.rmed.2019.06.010
Co-authors Vanessa Mcdonald, Peter Gibson
2019 Schuch FB, Stubbs B, Meyer J, Heissel A, Zech P, Vancampfort D, et al., 'Physical activity protects from incident anxiety: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.', Depress Anxiety, 36 846-858 (2019)
DOI 10.1002/da.22915
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
2019 McDonald VM, Fingleton J, Agusti A, Hiles SA, Clark VL, Holland AE, et al., 'Treatable traits: a new paradigm for 21st century management of chronic airway diseases: Treatable Traits Down Under International Workshop report.', The European respiratory journal, 53 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1183/13993003.02058-2018
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Vanessa Mcdonald, Andrew Searles, Peter Gibson, Peter Wark, Vanessa Clark
2019 McDonald VM, Hiles SA, Godbout K, Harvey ES, Marks GB, Hew M, et al., 'Treatable traits can be identified in a severe asthma registry and predict future exacerbations', Respirology, 24 37-47 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology Background and objective: A new taxonomic and management approach, termed treatable traits, has been proposed for airway diseases inclu... [more]

© 2018 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology Background and objective: A new taxonomic and management approach, termed treatable traits, has been proposed for airway diseases including severe asthma. This study examined whether treatable traits could be identified using registry data and whether particular treatable traits were associated with future exacerbation risk. Methods: The Australasian Severe Asthma Web-Based Database (SAWD) enrolled 434 participants with severe asthma and a comparison group of 102 participants with non-severe asthma. Published treatable traits were mapped to registry data fields and their prevalence was described. Participants were characterized at baseline and every 6 months for 24 months. Results: In SAWD, 24 treatable traits were identified in three domains: pulmonary, extrapulmonary and behavioural/risk factors. Patients with severe asthma expressed more pulmonary and extrapulmonary treatable traits than non-severe asthma. Allergic sensitization, upper-airway disease, airflow limitation, eosinophilic inflammation and frequent exacerbations were common in severe asthma. Ten traits predicted exacerbation risk; among the strongest were being prone to exacerbations, depression, inhaler device polypharmacy, vocal cord dysfunction and obstructive sleep apnoea. Conclusion: Treatable traits can be assessed using a severe asthma registry. In severe asthma, patients express more treatable traits than non-severe asthma. Traits may be associated with future asthma exacerbation risk demonstrating the clinical utility of assessing treatable traits.

DOI 10.1111/resp.13389
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Peter Wark, Peter Gibson, Vanessa Mcdonald, Erin Harvey
2019 Hiles SA, McDonald VM, Guilhermino M, Brusselle GG, Gibson PG, 'Does maintenance azithromycin reduce asthma exacerbations? An individual participant data meta-analysis.', The European respiratory journal, 54 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1183/13993003.01381-2019
Co-authors Vanessa Mcdonald, Michelle C Guilhermino, Peter Gibson
2018 Hiles SA, Harvey ES, McDonald VM, Peters M, Bardin P, Reynolds PN, Upham JW, 'Working while unwell: Workplace impairment in people with severe asthma', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, 48 650-662 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/cea.13153
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Peter Wark, Peter Gibson, Erin Harvey, Vanessa Mcdonald
2018 Wassink-Vossen S, Collard RM, Penninx BW, Hiles SA, Oude Voshaar RC, Naarding P, 'The reciprocal relationship between physical activity and depression: Does age matter?', European Psychiatry, 51 9-15 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS Background: The level of physical activity (PA) and the prevalence of depression both change across the lifespan. We examined whether the association be... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS Background: The level of physical activity (PA) and the prevalence of depression both change across the lifespan. We examined whether the association between PA and depression is moderated by age. As sense of mastery and functional limitations have been previously associated with low PA and depression in older adults, we also examined whether these are determinants of the differential effect of age on PA and depression. Methods: 1079 patients with major depressive disorder (aged 18¿88 years) were followed-up after two-years; depression diagnosis and severity as well as PA were re-assessed. Linear and logistic regression analyses were used to test reciprocal prospective associations between PA and depression outcomes. In all models the interaction with age was tested. Results: PA at baseline predicted remission of depressive disorder at follow-up (OR = 1.43 [95% CI: 1.07¿1.93], p =.018). This effect was not moderated by age. PA predicted improvement of depression symptom severity in younger (B = -2.03; SE =.88; p =.022), but not in older adults (B = 2.24; SE = 1.48; p =.128) (p =.015 for the interaction PA by age in the whole sample). The level of PA was relatively stable over time. Depression, sense of mastery and functional limitation were for all ages not associated with PA at follow-up. Conclusions: Age did not moderate the impact of PA on depressive disorder remission. Only in younger adults, sufficient PA independently predicts improvement of depressive symptom severity after two-year follow-up. Level of PA rarely changed over time, and none of the determinants tested predicted change in PA, independent of age.

DOI 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2017.12.029
2018 McDonald VM, Hiles SA, Jones KA, Clark VL, Yorke J, 'Health-related quality of life burden in severe asthma', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 209 S28-S33 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.5694/mja18.00207
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Vanessa Mcdonald, Vanessa Clark
2017 Hiles SA, Lamers F, Milaneschi Y, Penninx BWJH, 'Sit, step, sweat: longitudinal associations between physical activity patterns, anxiety and depression', PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE, 47 1466-1477 (2017)
DOI 10.1017/S0033291716003548
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 21
2017 Clark VL, Gibson PG, Genn G, Hiles SA, Pavord ID, McDonald VM, 'Multidimensional assessment of severe asthma: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Respirology, 22 1262-1275 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology The management of severe asthma is complex. Multidimensional assessment (MDA) of specific traits has been proposed as an effective stra... [more]

© 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology The management of severe asthma is complex. Multidimensional assessment (MDA) of specific traits has been proposed as an effective strategy to manage severe asthma, although it is supported by few prospective studies. We aimed to systematically review the literature published on MDA in severe asthma, to identify the traits included in MDA and to determine the effect of MDA on asthma-related outcomes. We identified 26 studies and classified these based on study type (cohort/cross-sectional studies; experimental/outcome studies; and severe asthma disease registries). Study type determined the comprehensiveness of the assessment. Assessed traits were classified into three domains (airways, co-morbidities and risk factors). The airway domain had the largest number of traits assessed (mean ± SD = 4.2 ± 1.7) compared with co-morbidities (3.6 ± 2.2) and risk factors (3.9 ± 2.1). Bronchodilator reversibility and airflow limitation were assessed in 92% of studies, whereas airway inflammation was only assessed in 50%. Commonly assessed co-morbidities were psychological dysfunction, sinusitis (both 73%) and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD; 69%). Atopic and smoking statuses were the most commonly assessed risk factors (85% and 86%, respectively). There were six outcome studies, of which five concluded that MDA is effective at improving asthma-related outcomes. Among these studies, significantly more traits were assessed than treated. MDA studies have assessed a variety of different traits and have shown evidence of improved outcomes. This promising model of care requires more research to inform which traits should be assessed, which traits should be treated and what effect MDA has on patient outcomes.

DOI 10.1111/resp.13134
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Vanessa Mcdonald, Vanessa Clark
2016 Hu MX, Lamers F, Hiles SA, Penninx BWJH, de Geus EJC, 'Basal autonomic activity, stress reactivity, and increases in metabolic syndrome components over time', PSYCHONEUROENDOCRINOLOGY, 71 119-126 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2016.05.018
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
2016 Hiles SA, Révész D, Lamers F, Giltay E, Penninx BWJH, 'BIDIRECTIONAL PROSPECTIVE ASSOCIATIONS OF METABOLIC SYNDROME COMPONENTS WITH DEPRESSION, ANXIETY, AND ANTIDEPRESSANT USE', Depression and Anxiety, 33 754-764 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/da.22512
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 21
2016 Lai JS, Oldmeadow C, Hure AJ, McEvoy M, Hiles SA, Boyle M, Attia J, 'Inflammation mediates the association between fatty acid intake and depression in older men and women', Nutrition Research, 36 234-245 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. Antioxidants and fatty acids are associated with depression and inflammation, and inflammation appears to predict depression risk; hence, the associations bet... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. Antioxidants and fatty acids are associated with depression and inflammation, and inflammation appears to predict depression risk; hence, the associations between these nutrients and depression may be mediated by inflammation. We hypothesized that inflammatory markers interleukin (IL)-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) mediate the associations between antioxidant and fatty acid intakes, and depression. Participants were from the Hunter Community Study, a longitudinal cohort of adults aged 55-85 years. Dietary intake was assessed using the Older Australian's Food Frequency Questionnaire. Fasting blood samples were drawn for analysis of nutrient and inflammatory biomarkers. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the 20-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale at baseline and at 5-year follow-up. Linear mixed models were used to investigate longitudinal associations between dietary intakes and depression, and mediation analyses were carried out to determine if IL-6 and/or CRP were the mediators. Analyses were conducted on men and women separately and adjusted for potential confounders. Fruit and monounsaturated fat intakes were negatively associated with depression, whereas total fat and saturated fat intakes were positively associated with depression in both sexes. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fat was inversely associated with depression in men only. IL-6 was a significant mediator of the association between fruits with low carotenoid content and depression in women. CRP significantly mediated the relationship between total fat, saturated fat, and monounsaturated fat intakes and depression in women, and saturated fat intake and depression in men. Our findings raise the possibility that the association between fatty acid intake and depression is partially mediated by inflammatory markers.

DOI 10.1016/j.nutres.2015.11.017
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Mark Mcevoy, Alexis Hure, John Attia, Christopher Oldmeadow
2015 Hiles SA, Baker AL, de Malmanche T, McEvoy M, Boyle M, Attia J, 'Unhealthy lifestyle may increase later depression via inflammation in older women but not men', Journal of Psychiatric Research, 63 65-74 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Depression and inflammatory markers have a reliable cross-sectional association although less is known about the prospective relationship. The current study i... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Depression and inflammatory markers have a reliable cross-sectional association although less is known about the prospective relationship. The current study investigated whether pro-inflammatory markers are prospectively associated with depression, and whether indicators of unhealthy lifestyle, physical health and psychosocial functioning may drive this association. Participants were drawn from the Hunter Community Study, a community-dwelling cohort of individuals aged 55-85 years (N=1410). Participants completed baseline physiological assessment, health-related questionnaires, and blood sampling for the analysis of inflammatory markers, C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin (IL)-6. Participants completed the same depressive symptom questionnaire again after 3.5-5.5 years. Depression outcomes at follow-up were analysed dichotomously using established scale cut-off scores and continuously as a "residual score", representing the variation in follow-up depressive symptoms not explained by baseline symptoms and age. Analyses were conducted on males and females separately. At baseline, indicators of unhealthy lifestyle, physical health and psychosocial functioning were associated with depressive symptoms and inflammatory markers. For males, there were no relationships between inflammatory markers and follow-up depression outcomes. In females, IL-6 was significantly associated with depression outcomes in univariate, but not multivariate analyses. However, IL-6 significantly mediated the association between the predictors of waist-to-hip ratio, smoking and psychological coping at baseline, and follow-up depression outcomes. The results support the inflammatory hypothesis of depression, although females may be more vulnerable to effects. The findings raise the possibility that unhealthy lifestyle and psychosocial stress may drive inflammation and subsequent depressive symptoms.

DOI 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.02.010
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Mark Mcevoy, John Attia
2015 Hiles S, Bergen H, Hawton K, Lewin T, Whyte I, Carter G, 'General hospital-treated self-poisoning in England and Australia: Comparison of presentation rates, clinical characteristics and aftercare based on sentinel unit data', Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 78 356-362 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Objective: Hospital-treated deliberate self-poisoning (DSP) is common and the existing national monitoring systems are often deficient. Clinical Practice Guid... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Objective: Hospital-treated deliberate self-poisoning (DSP) is common and the existing national monitoring systems are often deficient. Clinical Practice Guidelines (UK and Australia) recommend universal psychosocial assessment within the general hospital as standard care. We compared presentation rates, patient characteristics, psychosocial assessment and aftercare in UK and Australia. Methods: We used a cross sectional design, for a ten year study of all DSP presentations identified through sentinel units in Oxford, UK (n. = 3042) and Newcastle, Australia (n. = 3492). Results: Oxford had higher presentation rates for females (standardised rate ratio 2.4: CI 99% 1.9, 3.2) and males (SRR 2.5: CI 99% 1.7, 3.5). Female to male ratio was 1.6:1, 70% presented after-hours, 95% were admitted to a general hospital and co-ingestion of alcohol occurred in a substantial minority (Oxford 24%, Newcastle 32%). Paracetamol, minor tranquilisers and antidepressants were the commonest drug groups ingested, although the overall pattern differed. Psychosocial assessment rates were high (Oxford 80%, Newcastle 93%). Discharge referral for psychiatric inpatient admission (Oxford 8%, Newcastle 28%), discharge to home (Oxford 80%, Newcastle 70%) and absconding (Oxford 11%, Newcastle 2%) differed between the two units. Conclusions: Oxford has higher age-standardised rates of DSP than Newcastle, although many other characteristics of patients are similar. Services can provide a high level of assessment as recommended in clinical guidelines. There is some variation in after-care. Sentinel service monitoring routine care of DSP patients can provide valuable comparisons between countries.

DOI 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2015.01.006
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Gregory Carter
2015 Hiles SA, Baker AL, de Malmanche T, McEvoy M, Boyle M, Attia J, 'The role of inflammatory markers in explaining the association between depression and cardiovascular hospitalisations', Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 38 609-619 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York. This study investigated whether inflammation may explain the relationship between depression and incident cardiovascular hospital... [more]

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York. This study investigated whether inflammation may explain the relationship between depression and incident cardiovascular hospitalisations. Participants (55¿85¿years) completed baseline depression and physical assessment. Those without self-reported cardiovascular events were followed prospectively for hospital admissions for angina, myocardial infarction and cerebral infarction (median 937¿days). Across 5140 person-years of risk (N¿=¿1692), there were 47 incident cardiovascular hospitalisations (2.8¿%). Controlling for age and gender, interleukin (IL)-6, C-reactive protein (CRP), body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio were associated with future cardiovascular events. Mediation analysis showed that CRP accounted for 8.1¿% and IL-6 10.9¿% of the effect of depression on cardiovascular events, and including the indirect effect in the model substantially reduced the direct relationship between depression and cardiovascular hospitalisations. BMI and waist-to-hip ratio accounted for indirect effects of 7.7 and 10.4¿%, respectively. Inflammatory markers partly explain the association between depression and cardiovascular events, although other shared factors also likely contribute.

DOI 10.1007/s10865-015-9637-2
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Amanda Baker, John Attia, Mark Mcevoy
2014 Lai JS, Hiles S, Bisquera A, Hure AJ, McEvoy M, Attia J, 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of dietary patterns and depression in community-dwelling adults', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION, 99 181-197 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3945/ajcn.113.069880
Citations Scopus - 265Web of Science - 236
Co-authors Mark Mcevoy, John Attia, Alexis Hure
2014 Handley TE, Hiles SA, Inder KJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Kelly BJ, Lewin TJ, et al., 'Predictors of Suicidal Ideation in Older People: A Decision Tree Analysis', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY, 22 1325-1335 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jagp.2013.05.009
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Roseanne Peel, Frances Kaylambkin, Kerry Inder, Mark Mcevoy, Terry Lewin, John Attia
2012 Baker AL, Hiles SA, Thornton LK, Hides L, Lubman DI, 'A systematic review of psychological interventions for excessive alcohol consumption among people with psychotic disorders', Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 126 243-255 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2012 Hiles SA, Baker AL, De Malmanche T, Attia JR, 'Interleukin-6, C-reactive protein and interleukin-10 after antidepressant treatment in people with depression: A meta-analysis', Psychological Medicine, 42 2015-2026 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S0033291712000128
Citations Scopus - 111Web of Science - 101
Co-authors Amanda Baker, John Attia
2012 Baker AL, Thornton LK, Hiles SA, Hides L, Lubman DI, 'Psychological interventions for alcohol misuse among people with co-occurring depression or anxiety disorders: A systematic review', Journal of Affective Disorders, 139 217-229 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 50Web of Science - 46
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2012 Hiles SA, Baker AL, De Malmanche T, Attia JR, 'A meta-analysis of differences in IL-6 and IL-10 between people with and without depression: Exploring the causes of heterogeneity', Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 26 1180-1188 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 130Web of Science - 122
Co-authors Amanda Baker, John Attia
2011 Walker AK, Hiles SA, Sominsky Bar L, McLaughlin EA, Hodgson DM, 'Neonatal lipopolysaccharide exposure impairs sexual development and reproductive success in the Wistar rat', Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 25 674-684 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Deborah Hodgson, Eileen Mclaughlin
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Conference (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 McDonald V, Cordova-Rivera L, Gibson P, Gardiner P, Hiles S, 'EXTRAPULMONARY DISEASE CHARACTERISTICS AND HEALTH-STATUS IN SEVERE ASTHMA AND BRONCHIECTASIS', RESPIROLOGY (2019)
Co-authors Vanessa Mcdonald, Peter Gibson
2019 Hiles S, Gibson P, McDonald V, 'TREATABLE TRAITS PREDICT HEALTH STATUS AND TREATMENT RESPONSE IN AIRWAYS DISEASE', RESPIROLOGY (2019)
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Vanessa Mcdonald
2018 McDonald VM, Hiles SA, Godbout K, Harvey ES, Marks GB, Hew M, et al., 'Identification of treatable traits in a severe asthma registry: prevalence and exacerbation predictors', EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, Paris, FRANCE (2018)
DOI 10.1183/13993003.congress-2018.PA5043
Co-authors Vanessa Mcdonald, Peter Wark, Erin Harvey, Peter Gibson
2018 Mcdonald V, Godbout K, Hiles S, Harvey E, Gibson P, 'SEVERE ASTHMA TREATABLE TRAITS: PREVALENCE AND EXACERBATION PREDICTION', RESPIROLOGY (2018)
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Vanessa Mcdonald
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 6
Total funding $267,407

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20182 grants / $27,267

Novel activity management in severe asthma - tailored exercise (NAMASTE): yoga and mindfulness$17,307

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust
Project Team Professor Vanessa McDonald, Doctor Sarah Hiles, Conjoint Professor Peter Gibson
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800318
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Jennie Thomas Medical Research Travel Grant$9,960

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Sarah Hiles
Scheme Jennie Thomas Medical Research Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800706
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

20152 grants / $213,140

Genetic and Lifestyle Origins of Inflammation in Depression – GLOID$196,140

Funding body: European Commission, European Union

Funding body European Commission, European Union
Project Team

Prof. Brenda WJH Penninx; Dr Sarah A Hiles

Scheme Horizon 2020
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Endeavour Research Fellowship$17,000

Funding body: Australian Government Department of Education

Funding body Australian Government Department of Education
Project Team

Dr Sarah A Hiles

Scheme Endeavour Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20131 grants / $6,000

HMRI PhD Student Travel Award$6,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Sarah Hiles
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300227
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20101 grants / $21,000

A longitudinal investigation of the temporal relationships between depression and immune functioning in an older Hunter cohort$21,000

Funding body: John Hunter Charitable Trust Grant

Funding body John Hunter Charitable Trust Grant
Project Team

Dr Sarah A Hiles, Prof Amanda Baker, Dr Michael J Boyle, Dr Theo De Malmanche, Prof Brian Kelly, Prof John Attia

Scheme John Hunter Charitable Trust Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Prescription of acute oxygen therapy in patients at risk of type 11 respiratory failure PhD (Nursing), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 25
Netherlands 6
United Kingdom 5
Canada 4
New Zealand 4
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Dr Sarah Hiles

Positions

Research Associate
Psychosomatic medicine
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Casual Academic
Psychosomatic medicine
School of Psychology
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email sarah.hiles@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4042 0060
Fax (02) 4042 0046

Office

Room Level 2, West Wing
Building HMRI Building
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