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Dr Tanya Hanstock

Senior Lecturer

School of Psychology (Psychology)

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
My research has been focused on the understanding, assessment and treatment of mental health disorders. Also I have focused on bipolar disorder particularly the onset in young people.

Teaching Expertise
I teach in all areas of Clinical Psychology and have a particular interest in teaching students about the developmental and mental health issues that occur in children and adolescents.

Administrative Expertise
I have been the Director and Convenor of Clinical psychology Programs.

Collaborations
I collaborate with a number of psychologists and psychiatrists in the area of mental health issues, bipolar disorder in particular.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Clinical Psychology, University of New England
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of New England
  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), University of New England

Keywords

  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Child Development
  • Child and Adolescent Mental Health
  • Children and Adolescents
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Ethics and Professional Pratice
  • Mental Health Disorders

Languages

  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified 80
170299 Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/10/2010 - 31/01/2013 Associate Professor

Director of The Clinical Psychology Program (Masters of Clinical Psychology and the Doctor of Philosophy of Clinical Psychology Degrees)

The University of New England
Faculty of Cognitive, Behaviour and Social Sciences
Australia

Awards

Recipient

Year Award
2008 The Young Distinguished Amuni Award
The University of New England

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
PSYC6510 Advanced Clinical Psychology with Children and Adolescents
Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle
Course Coordinator 10/03/2017 - 10/04/2017
PSYC6530 Clinical Research Project
Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle
Course Coordinator 10/03/2017 - 10/04/2017
PSYC6506 Clinical Psychology with Children and Families
Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle
Course Coordinator 10/03/2017 - 10/04/2017
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


(51 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Hanstock T, Tse S, 'Bipolar Disorders', Abnormal Psychology in Context The Australian and New Zealand Handbook, Cambridge University Press, New York 106-115 (2017)
2016 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Thornton L, Lappin JM, Hanstock T, Sylvia L, Jacka F, et al., 'Study protocol for a systematic review of evidence for lifestyle interventions targeting smoking, sleep, alcohol/other drug use, physical activity, and healthy diet in people with bipolar disorder', Systematic Reviews, 5 (2016)

© 2016 Kay-Lambkin et al. Background: People with bipolar disorder (BD) have a mortality gap of up to 20 years compared to the general population. Physical conditions, such as ca... [more]

© 2016 Kay-Lambkin et al. Background: People with bipolar disorder (BD) have a mortality gap of up to 20 years compared to the general population. Physical conditions, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer, cause the majority of excess deaths in psychiatric populations and are the leading causes of mortality in people with BD. However, comparatively little attention has been paid to reducing the risk of physical conditions in psychiatric populations. Unhealthy lifestyle behaviors are among the potentially modifiable risk factors for a range of commonly comorbid chronic medical conditions, including CVD, diabetes, and obesity. This systematic review will identify and evaluate the available evidence for effective interventions to reduce risk and promote healthy lifestyle behaviors in BD. Methods/design: We will search MEDLINE, Embase, PsychINFO, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and CINAHL for published research studies (with at least an abstract published in English) that evaluate behavioral or psychosocial interventions to address the following lifestyle factors in people with BD: tobacco use, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, overweight or obesity, sleep-wake disturbance, and alcohol/other drug use. Primary outcomes for the review will be changes in tobacco use, level of physical activity, diet quality, sleep quality, alcohol use, and illicit drug use. Data on each primary outcome will be synthesized across available studies in that lifestyle area (e.g., tobacco abstinence, cigarettes smoked per day), and panel of research and clinical experts in each of the target lifestyle behaviors and those experienced with clinical and research with individuals with BD will determine how best to represent data related to that primary outcome. Seven members of the systematic review team will extract data, synthesize the evidence, and rate it for quality. Evidence will be synthesized via a narrative description of the behavioral interventions and their effectiveness in improving the healthy lifestyle behaviors in people with BD. Discussion: The planned review will synthesize and evaluate the available evidence regarding the behavioral or psychosocial treatment of lifestyle-related behaviors in people with BD. From this review, we will identify gaps in our existing knowledge and research evidence about the management of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors in people with BD. We will also identify potential opportunities to address lifestyle behaviors in BD, with a view to reducing the burden of physical ill-health in this population. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42015019993

DOI 10.1186/s13643-016-0282-9
Co-authors Robin Callister, Christopher Oldmeadow, Sally Hunt, Simon Dennis, Amanda Baker, Frances Kaylambkin
2016 Clark GI, Hanstock TL, Clark LH, 'Psychological Treatment of Co-occurring Anxiety Disorders in Clinical Practice: A Vignette Study', Australian Psychologist, (2016)

© 2016 The Australian Psychological Society. Background and Objectives: Many individuals with anxiety difficulties present with co-occurring anxiety disorders yet no evidence-bas... [more]

© 2016 The Australian Psychological Society. Background and Objectives: Many individuals with anxiety difficulties present with co-occurring anxiety disorders yet no evidence-based guidelines exist on how to treat this presentation. The present study investigated how Australian psychologists approach treating co-occurring anxiety disorders. Methods: A total of 169 psychologists practicing in Australia undertook an online survey consisting of open-questions relating to the treatment of DSM-IV anxiety disorder diagnoses and reported practice in relation to two clinical vignettes. Participant responses were coded using a directed content analysis approach. Results: The majority of psychologists reported utilising cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) interventions in the treatment of single and co-occurring anxiety disorders but not specific evidence-based treatment guides or protocols. The majority of the psychologists surveyed reported that they adopt a transdiagnostic approach to addressing co-occurring anxiety disorders. Conclusions: Psychologists typically do not follow a specific treatment guide in the treatment of anxiety disorders and judge a transdiagnostic approach incorporating CBT techniques as the best way to treat comorbidity. More effort may be needed to disseminate evidence-based interventions for anxiety disorders and for authors of empirically supported treatments to provide clear guidelines regarding treating co-occurring anxiety disorders.

DOI 10.1111/ap.12214
2015 Hirneth SJ, Hazell PL, Hanstock TL, Lewin TJ, 'Bipolar disorder subtypes in children and adolescents: Demographic and clinical characteristics from an Australian sample', Journal of Affective Disorders, 175 98-107 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Background Bipolar disorder (BD) phenomenology in children and adolescents remains contentious. The study investigated Australian childr... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Background Bipolar disorder (BD) phenomenology in children and adolescents remains contentious. The study investigated Australian children and adolescents with bipolar I disorder (BD-I), bipolar II disorder (BD-II), or BD not otherwise specified (BD-NOS). Methods Index episode demographics, symptomatology, functioning and diagnostic data were compared for 88 participants (63 female) aged 8-18 years (M=14.8, SD=2.5) meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for BD-I (n=24), BD-II (n=13) or BD-NOS (n=51). Results BD-I had higher rates of previous episodes, psychotropic medication (compared to BD-II but not BD-NOS), rates of inpatient admissions (compared to BD-NOS), and number of inpatient admissions (compared to BD-II). BD-II had lower rates of lifetime depression and anxiety disorders, higher frequency of hypomania, shorter duration of illness, and fewer previous episodes. BD-NOS had younger age of onset, chronic course, irritability and mixed presentation. All BD subtypes had high rates of self-harm (69.3%), suicidal ideation (73.9%), suicide attempts (36.4%), psychiatric admission (55.7%), and psychosis (36.4%). Limitations There were relatively small numbers of BD-I and BD-II. Diagnoses were based on retrospective recall. Conclusions All BD subtypes had high levels of acuity and clinical risk. In accord with previous results, BD-I and BD-II participants' phenomenology was consistent with classical descriptions of these subtypes. BD-NOS participants were younger, with less euphoric mania but otherwise phenomenologically on a continuum with BD-I, suggesting that child and adolescent BD-NOS may be an early and less differentiated phase of illness of BD-I or BD-II and hence a target for early intervention.

DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2014.12.021
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Terry Lewin
2015 Hirneth SJ, Hazell PL, Hanstock TL, Lewin TJ, 'Bipolar disorder subtypes in an Australian sample of children and adolescents: rating scale data at time of first service presentation', BIPOLAR DISORDERS (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Terry Lewin
2015 Hirneth SJ, Hazell PL, Hanstock TL, Lewin TJ, 'Bipolar disorder subtypes in an Australian sample of children and adolescents: rating scale data at time of first service presentation', BIPOLAR DISORDERS (2015) [O1]
Co-authors Terry Lewin
2014 Scott N, Hanstock TL, Thornton C, 'Dysfunctional self-talk associated with eating disorder severity and symptomatology.', J Eat Disord, 2 14 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/2050-2974-2-14
2014 Scott N, Hanstock TL, Thornton C, 'Dysfunctional self-talk associated with eating disorder severity and symptomatology', Journal of Eating Disorders, 2 (2014)

Background: While self-talk has been argued to play a crucial role in the development and maintenance of eating disorders (EDs), it has received limited research attention. This s... [more]

Background: While self-talk has been argued to play a crucial role in the development and maintenance of eating disorders (EDs), it has received limited research attention. This study aimed to explore the relationship of ED self-talk with ED severity and symptomatology.Methods: Analysis of the existing literature, supplemented with a small-scale pilot study, identified 24 distinct categories of ED self-talk. The main study involved the completion of on-line questionnaires by 172 women aged 18-49, recruited through clinical services, ED websites, and the general population. Participants were assigned to clinical (n = 83) and non-clinical (n = 89) samples, using the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire to screen for ED psychopathology.Results: Substantial differences in the levels of ED self-talk were found between the clinical and non-clinical populations. Principal components analysis, conducted within the clinical sample, revealed ED self-talk to have a two-component structure. Self-talk reflecting an 'abusive relationship' between the sufferer and the ED strongly predicted overall severity and several aspects of symptomatology. 'Ascetic attitudes' towards thinness were linked with compulsive exercising and lower BMIs but not with overall severity.Conclusions: Close examination of the 'abusive relationship' component suggests a need to loosen the connection between negative appraisals of the abused self and the abusive voice of the ED so that the former can fulfil their potential as a force for change. Further, in seeking to counter the impact of the ED voice, it is suggested that the seducer and abuser roles require primary clinical focus. © 2014 Scott et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/2050-2974-2-14
Citations Scopus - 2
2014 Pullin MA, Webster RA, Hanstock TL, 'Psychoform and Somatoform Dissociation in a Clinical Sample of Australian Adolescents', Journal of Trauma and Dissociation, 15 66-78 (2014) [C1]

Psychoform dissociation has been researched more than somatoform dissociation. The Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ-20), a commonly used adult measure of somatoform diss... [more]

Psychoform dissociation has been researched more than somatoform dissociation. The Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ-20), a commonly used adult measure of somatoform dissociation, is increasingly being used with adolescents internationally. We compared psychoform and somatoform dissociation in a mixed clinical adolescent sample. A total of 71 adolescents (12-18 years old) attending Australian community mental health and counseling services completed the SDQ-20 and the Adolescent Dissociative Experiences Scale, a commonly used measure of adolescent psychoform dissociation. The participants' treating clinicians provided participants' demographic details and mental health diagnoses. We found that 41% of participants reported high levels of psychoform dissociation and 21% reported high levels of somatoform dissociation. Both dissociation types were positively correlated. Neither was significantly related to participants' age, gender, or mental health diagnoses. Participants with more than 1 Axis I mental health diagnosis had higher levels of somatoform dissociation than participants with only 1 or no Axis I mental health diagnosis. This study is the first to examine somatoform dissociation in Australian adolescents and enables initial international comparisons. © 2014 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/15299732.2013.828149
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Lehmann CA, Marks ADG, Hanstock TL, 'Age and synchrony effects in performance on the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test', International Psychogeriatrics, 25 657-665 (2013) [C1]

Background: There is evidence that individuals perform better on some memory tasks when tested at their preferred time of day, a phenomenon named the synchrony effect. There is al... [more]

Background: There is evidence that individuals perform better on some memory tasks when tested at their preferred time of day, a phenomenon named the synchrony effect. There is also evidence of a predictable change from evening to morning preference during the adult life span. Together, these findings suggest that age effects on memory measures may be overestimated when time of testing is ignored. The aim of this study was to investigate whether synchrony effects could partially explain the well-documented age-related decline in performance on the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT). Methods: Groups of 42 younger adults (aged 18-33 years) and 42 older adults (aged 55-71 years) were administered the RAVLT at either their optimal (n = 21) or non-optimal (n = 21) time of day. Results: Although both age groups benefited moderately from being tested at their optimal time, this effect was greater for older participants and extended to all facets of RAVLT performance except proactive interference. However, younger adults outperformed older adults on three of the five RAVLTs. Conclusions: These findings add to existing evidence of synchrony effects, particularly in memory functioning of older adults, and highlight the need for clinicians to consider optimal time of testing when administering and interpreting the RAVLT. © International Psychogeriatric Association 2012.

DOI 10.1017/S1041610212002013
Citations Scopus - 4
2013 Scott N, Hanstock TL, Patterson-Kane L, 'Using narrative therapy to treat eating disorder not otherwise specified', Clinical Case Studies, 12 307-321 (2013) [C3]

Eating disorders have proved resistant to therapy with high relapse rates. Enhanced cognitive behavior therapy (CBT-E) is the favored treatment of choice but has been criticized f... [more]

Eating disorders have proved resistant to therapy with high relapse rates. Enhanced cognitive behavior therapy (CBT-E) is the favored treatment of choice but has been criticized for placing a similar emphasis on controlling eating behavior as the psychopathology it seeks to counter. In contrast, narrative therapy focuses on the development of an anti-eating disorder lifestyle and values. Evidence for this approach primarily consists of informal case study material. This case study describes a 28-year-old woman with a recurring history of anorexia nervosa, who self-referred to a university psychology clinic, due to fears of imminent relapse. The client received 10 sessions of narrative therapy and made significant progress in externalizing her eating disorder, in lessening her adherence to the ascetic values underpinning it, and in developing/expressing her non-eating disorder character and values. This case study provides evidence of the potential effectiveness of narrative therapy and contains valuable learning for clinicians regarding its implementation. © 2013 The Author(s).

DOI 10.1177/1534650113486184
Citations Scopus - 3
2013 Hanstock TL, Caldwell JM, 'Australian clinical psychologists' diagnosis of bipolar disorder in child and adolescent clinical vignettes', BIPOLAR DISORDERS (2013) [E3]
2012 Ferris TS, Mills JP, Hanstock TL, 'Exposure and response prevention in the treatment of distressing and repugnant thoughts and images', Clinical Case Studies, 11 140-151 (2012) [C1]

Repugnant thoughts are often described as intrusive and distressing thoughts that are not acceptable to one's own, and society's, morals and values. They can occur in a small numb... [more]

Repugnant thoughts are often described as intrusive and distressing thoughts that are not acceptable to one's own, and society's, morals and values. They can occur in a small number of sufferers with obsessive-compulsive disorder. The following case study describes a young woman who experienced a number of distressing and repugnant thoughts and images. Her presenting most distressing obsessive thought was about committing suicide when she had no desire or intent to do so; however, her most repugnant thoughts centered around thoughts of harming her children. Psychological treatment sessions initially focused on psychoeducation and relaxation to prepare the client for more intense therapy. Exposure and response prevention methods were then used in a graded exposure method to help the client confront her feared obsessions and to help the client to overcome her subsequent strong emotional responses. Following 11 psychological treatment sessions, the client demonstrated significant improvements, including decreased distress from her obsessions, as well as a general decline in stress and anxiety. © The Author(s) 2012.

DOI 10.1177/1534650112439240
Citations Scopus - 3
2012 Spencer S, Stone TE, McMillan M, Hanstock T, 'When life unravels: Adolescent mental health therapeutic interventions', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Teresa Stone
2010 Hanstock TL, Mallet PE, Clayton EH, 'Increased plasma D-lactic acid associated with impaired memory in rats', PHYSIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR, 101 653-659 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.physbeh.2010.09.018
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
2009 Clayton EH, Hanstock T, Watson JF, 'Estimated intakes of meat and fish by children and adolescents in Australia and comparison with recommendations', British Journal of Nutrition, 101 1731-1735 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/s0007114508135887
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
2009 Cooper KL, Hanstock T, 'Confusion between depression and autism in a high functioning child', Clinical Case Studies, 8 59-71 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1534650108327012
2009 Clayton EH, Hanstock T, Hirneth SJ, Kable CJ, Garg ML, Hazell P, 'Reduced mania and depression in juvenile bipolar disorder associated with long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation', European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 63 1037-1040 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/ejcn.2008.81
Citations Scopus - 70Web of Science - 55
Co-authors Manohar Garg
2009 Clayton EH, Watson JF, Hazell P, Hirneth SJ, Kable CJ, Hanstock T, 'The Gastrointestinal Symptoms Evaluation for Nutritional Supplements (GSENS): Preliminary development and validation', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia (2009) [E3]
2009 Hanstock T, Hirneth SJ, Hazell P, Kable CJ, Clayton EH, 'Improvement in digit span in juvenile bipolar disorder following supplementation with long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids', Biopolar Disorders (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1399-5618.2009.00751.x
2009 Hirneth SJ, Hazell P, Hanstock T, Clayton EH, 'Evaluation of treatment outcomes from an Australian juvenile bipolar disorder clinic', Biopolar Disorders (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1399-5618.2009.00751.x
2009 Clayton EH, Hirneth SJ, Hazell P, Kable C, Hanstock T, 'Validity of a paediatric quality of life questionnaire for participants with juvenile bipolar disorder', Biopolar Disorders (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1399-5618.2009.00751.x
2008 Nunn K, Hanstock T, Lask B, Who's Who of the Brain: A Guide to its Inhabitants, Where They Live and What They Do, Jessica Kingsley Publishers, London, United Kingdom, 270 (2008) [A1]
2008 Clayton EH, Hanstock T, Hirneth SJ, Kable CJ, Garg ML, Hazell P, 'Long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the blood of children and adolescents with juvenile bipolar disorder', Lipids, 43 1031-1038 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11745-008-3224-z
Citations Scopus - 46Web of Science - 38
Co-authors Manohar Garg
2008 Jairam R, Hanstock T, Cahill CM, Hazell P, Walter GJ, Malhi GS, 'The changing face of bipolar disorder: Adolescence to adulthood', Minerva Pediatrica, 60 59-68 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3
2008 Moss KL, Cahill C, Hanstock T, Jairam R, Hazell P, Walter G, Malhi GS, 'A hitchhikers guide to guidelines: Diagnosing juvenile bipolar disorder', Bipolar Disorders (2008) [E3]
2008 Cahill CM, Hanstock T, Malhi GS, 'The neuropsychological profile of bipolar disorder in adolescents', Bipolar Disorders (2008) [E3]
2008 Hirneth SJ, Hazell P, Hanstock T, 'A clinical program for juvenile bipolar disorder: Preliminary data and future research directions', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2008) [E3]
2008 Hanstock T, Hirneth SJ, Kable CJ, Garg ML, Hazell P, Clayton EH, 'Omega-3 supplementation in juvenile bipolar disorder', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Manohar Garg
2008 Clayton EH, Hanstock T, Hirneth SJ, Kable CJ, Garg ML, Hazell P, 'Blood concentrations of omega-3 in participants with juvenile bipolar disorder compared to healthy controls', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Manohar Garg
2008 Clayton EH, Hanstock T, Hazell PL, Hirneth SJ, Kable CJ, Garg ML, 'Reduced erythrocyte concentration of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Manohar Garg
2007 Hanstock T, 'Bipolar affective disorder and dissociation: A potentially lethal combination', Clinical Case Studies, 6 131-142 (2007) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 2
2007 Clayton EH, Hanstock T, Garg ML, Hazell P, 'Long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the treatment of psychiatric illnesses in children and adolescents', Acta Neuropsychiatrica, 19 92-103 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1601-5215.2007.00189.x
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Manohar Garg
2007 Cahill C, Hanstock T, Jairam R, Hazell P, Walter G, Malhi GS, 'Comparison of diagnostic guidelines for juvenile bipolar disorder', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 41 479-484 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/00048670701342200
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2007 Cahill CM, Hanstock T, Hazell P, Walter G, Jairam R, Malhia GS, 'Preliminary data describing cognitive compromise in adolescents with bipolar disorder', Bipolar Disorders (2007) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1399-5618.2007.00541.x
2007 Hanstock T, Hazell P, Garg ML, Hirneth SJ, Morrison SDL, Kable CJ, Clayton EH, 'Omega-3 blood levels in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder', Bipolar Disorders (2007) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1399-5618.2007.00542.x
Co-authors Manohar Garg
2007 Cahill CM, Hanstock T, Malhi GS, 'Diagnostic guidelines for juvenile bipolar disorder', Bipolar Disorders (2007) [E3]
2007 Hirneth SJ, Clayton EH, Hanstock T, 'Clinical categories of the child behaviour checklist - parent report in juvenile bipolar disorder', Bipolar Disorders (2007) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1399-5618.2007.00541.x
2007 Morrison S, Kable C, Hanstock T, 'Children and adolescents with bipolar disorder: Their experiences and opinions of lithium treatment', Bipolar Disorders (2007) [E3]
2006 Hanstock T, 'Brainwaves: the cerebellum', The Clinician (Child & Adolescent Mental Health Statewide Network), 3 223-227 (2006) [C3]
2006 Hanstock T, 'Book review: Thinking in pictures and other reports from my life with autism by Temple Grandin', The Clinician (Child & Adolescent Mental Health Statewide Network), 3 251-252 (2006) [C3]
2006 Hanstock T, Hazell P, 'A new bipolar clinic for children and adolescents: who is being referred?', Proceedings of the Australasian Society for Bipolar Disorders Conference (2006) [E3]
2006 Hanstock T, 'Diagnostic boundaries in juvenile bipolar disorder', Proceedings of the Bipolar Disorder Scientific Meeting (2006) [E3]
2006 Hanstock T, Clayton EH, Hunt SA, Hazell P, 'The tripartite mood rating scale (TMRS): a new self-report mood instrument for children and adolescents with bipolar', Proceedings of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Pediatric Bipolar Conference (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Sally Hunt
2004 Hanstock TL, Clayton EH, Li KM, Mallet PE, 'Anxiety and aggression associated with the fermentation of carbohydrates in the hindgut of rats', Physiology and Behavior, 82 357-368 (2004)

Lactic acid accumulation in the caecum and colon resulting from the fermentation of carbohydrates can lead to deleterious effects in ruminant and monogastric animals, including hu... [more]

Lactic acid accumulation in the caecum and colon resulting from the fermentation of carbohydrates can lead to deleterious effects in ruminant and monogastric animals, including humans. In the present study, we examined the behavioural effects of two types of commonly consumed foods: soluble and fermentable carbohydrates (FCs). Thirty-six male Wistar rats were fed either a commercial rat and mouse chow, a soluble carbohydrate (SC)-based diet or an FC-based diet. Social interaction, anxiety, aggression and locomotor activity were examined by employing a social interaction test and a light/dark emergence test, while physical parameters of hindgut fermentation were examined after sacrifice, either 3 or 21 h after feeding. Results showed that anxiety (spending less time in the light compart ment during the light/dark emergence test) and aggression (increased fighting during the social interaction test) were increased following raised concentrations of fermentation end products, such as lactic acid and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in the caecum of rats. These associations occurred regardless of dopamine and 5-HT concentrations in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and provide evidence supporting a general effect of FCs on behaviour. Possible mechanisms of action along with similarities between a rat and human model of acidosis are discussed. © 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.physbeh.2004.04.002
Citations Scopus - 28
2004 Hanstock T, Nunn KP, 'Early identification of the prodromal phase of bipolar', BIPOLAR DISORDERS (2004)
2004 Maxwell P, Hanstock T, Nunn KP, 'Lamotrigine as effective treatment in young people with bipolar affective disorder', BIPOLAR DISORDERS (2004)
2003 Hanstock TL, O'Mahony JF, 'Treatment seeking in young women with acne', Dermatology and Psychosomatics, 4 194-199 (2003)

Background: It is important that acne sufferers seek medical treatment to alleviate physical and possible psychological effects as early as possible. Treatment seeking behaviour a... [more]

Background: It is important that acne sufferers seek medical treatment to alleviate physical and possible psychological effects as early as possible. Treatment seeking behaviour amongst acne sufferers, however, is poorly understood. Objectives: To examine which type of personality variables can predict those who will seek medical treatment. To also examine what type of help seeking is associated with better acne related quality of life. Methods: Participants were 165 female students from an Australian University (82.5% response rate) aged between 17 and 28 years. All participants had their acne objectively rated as well as provided their own subjective rating. The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), Acne Related Quality of Life Questionnaire (Acne QoL), The Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (MPS) and The Dysmorphic Concerns Questionnaire (DCQ) were used to assess participants' general psychopathology, acne related quality of life, type and level of perfectionism and dysmorphic concerns, respectively. Results: Binomial logistic regression analysis revealed that a greater level of objective rated acne severity was associated with seeking treatment from non-medical help (p < 0.05). ANOVAs revealed (p < 0.01) that those participants seeking treatment from nonmedical professionals had less psychopathology, greater acne severity and a high level of socially prescribed perfectionism and dysmorphic concerns. Furthermore, ANOVA revealed that those participants who were currently seeking help from a medical professional had a greater acne quality of life (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Those young women experiencing more severe acne severity seek help from non-physicians. Less distress due to acne is associated with seeking medical help.

DOI 10.1159/000075906
Citations Scopus - 3
2003 Hanstock TL, Claytons EH, Mallet PE, 'Anxiety following increased hind-gut fermentation.', Asia Pac J Clin Nutr, 12 Suppl S12 (2003)
2002 Hanstock TL, O'Mahony JF, 'Perfectionism, acne and appearance concerns', Personality and Individual Differences, 32 1317-1325 (2002)

This study investigated the relationship between perfectionism and two aspects of appearance worry: acne-related concerns and dysmorphic concerns. One-hundred and sixty five femal... [more]

This study investigated the relationship between perfectionism and two aspects of appearance worry: acne-related concerns and dysmorphic concerns. One-hundred and sixty five female university students completed measures of three facets of perfectionism: self-oriented, other-oriented and socially prescribed [Hewitt, P. L., & Flett, G. L. (1991a). Perfectionism in the self and social contexts: conceptualization. assessment and association with psychopathology. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 60, 456-470], general psychopathology (GHQ-28), acne health related quality of life [Girman, C. J., Hartmaier, S., Thiboutot, D., Johnson, J., Barter, B., DeMunro-Mercon, & Waldstreicher, J. (1996). Evaluating health-related quality of life in patients with facial acne: development of a self-administered questionnaire for clinical trials. Quality of Life Research, 5, 481-490] and dysmorphic concerns [Oostuizen, P., Lambert, T., & Castle, D.J. (1998). Dysmorphic concern: prevalence and associations with clinical variables. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 32, 129-132]. Multiple regression analyses showed that, after controlling for general psychopathology, a high level of socially prescribed perfectionism was associated with a greater tendency to be concerned about acne in particular and appearance in general. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/S0191-8869(01)00120-9
Citations Scopus - 17
2002 Hanstock TL, Clayton EH, 'Changes in the pattern of fermentation in the caecum of rats', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 11 (2002)
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2012 PhD Nursing Responses and Interventions for Episodes of Adolescent Distress in an Acute Child and Adolescent Mental Health Inpatient Unit: An Ethnographic Study PhD (Nursing), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Tanya Hanstock

Position

Senior Lecturer
Clinical Psychology Program
School of Psychology
Faculty of Science

Focus area

Psychology

Contact Details

Email tanya.hanstock@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5641
Fax (02) 4921 6980

Office

Room W120
Building Behavioural Sciences Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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