Dr Sally Hunt

Dr Sally Hunt

Senior Lecturer

School of Psychology (Psychology)

Sally Hunt - Cheers to better mental health

Dr Sally Hunt is helping to curb our nation’s alcohol addictions through evidence-based interventions—and by understanding and addressing the reasons people turn to drink in the first place.

Sally Hunt headshot

A few beers at the pub. A glass of wine with dinner. In Australia, alcohol consumption has arguably become embedded in our social culture. But what happens when drinking behaviours get out of hand?

Dr Sally Hunt is investigating the interconnected nature of mental health and substance abuse. Her work is driving innovative new prevention programs and interventions for Australians, with a focus on women’s health. It’s also sparking important, yet sometimes difficult, conversations about how much we drink and why.

“Ultimately, I would like to change the way that Australians think about alcohol so that we can make informed choices about when and how much to consume.”

The cost of alcohol abuse

As a clinical psychologist, Sally has seen the ugly side of alcohol consumption firsthand.

While she doesn’t oppose the odd glass of wine, she also understands how alcohol can become a crutch for people dealing with mental illnesses such as anxiety, or with the stresses of work and life.

But in a culture where excessive alcohol consumption is often normalised, identifying and managing alcohol abuse poses a national challenge.

“In Australia, there is a tendency to downplay the impact and associated harms of alcohol abuse—such as its contribution to around one-third of road traffic injuries—especially in comparison to known harms of other abusive substances.

“Additionally, many people downplay or aren’t aware of how much alcohol constitutes hazardous use. For example, as little as three drinks per week increases a woman’s risk of breast cancer by around 15 per cent.”

Underlying stress factors

To help combat alcohol abuse among women, Sally is investigating the primary reasons why many choose to drink in the first place. Understanding these key drivers is the first step to helping people recover their mental health and wellbeing long-term.

“My research work aims to raise awareness of the pressures experienced by many women and the role that hazardous alcohol consumption has come to play in coping with this stress.”

Sally’s research is helping to develop and implement evidence-based interventions for mental health and substance use problems that can reach a broad audience. At the same time, she’s also supporting training for early-career psychologists who treat people dealing with addictions.

“I get an enormous sense of joy from teaching early-career psychologists and providing them with the support they need to become clinicians of whom our profession can be proud.

“Alongside my role as educator, my clinical work in mental health and research settings is helping to deliver specialised psychological care for comorbid mental health and substance use problems.

“I plan to develop an evidence-based intervention specifically for women to help them manage the pressures of their lives in a healthy and sustainable way—without needing alcohol as a stress reliever.”

Getting the nation talking

As a clinical psychologist, researcher, and educator, Sally has always been passionate about helping people to regain their mental health and wellbeing. Initially, this was achieved one-by-one in the therapy room. Today, Sally’s work is reaching a much larger audience.

“Nationally, my research is starting to make an impact. I’ve been invited to speak to large audiences through radio and newspaper interviews, podcasts and conference keynote lectures.

“I am hopeful that the narrative around alcohol use—especially women’s use of alcohol—has started to change in recent years, and that my voice has contributed to that.”

So, exactly how much is too much when it comes to drinking alcohol? For those looking to prioritise their health, the age-old adage ‘everything in moderation’ is a great starting point.

“A great many alcohol related health and mental health harms would be reduced if we thought of alcohol in the same way we think about sugar—as a ‘sometimes food’. It can be enjoyable in small doses, but it’s not ideal to consume in large amounts every day.”

Sally Hunt headshot

Sally Hunt - Cheers to better mental health

Dr Sally Hunt is helping to curb our nation’s alcohol addictions through evidence-based interventions—and by understanding and addressing the reasons people turn to drink in the first place.

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Career Summary

Biography

Dr Sally Hunt is a Clinical Psychologist and Senior Lecturer. Since 2019 Sally has been the inaugural Convenor of the Master of Professional Psychology Program at the University of Newcastle, training provisionally registered psychologists.

She has worked both clinically and in a research capacity in the field of mental health for almost 20 years, focusing on comorbidly occurring conditions including affective disorders, psychosis, personality disorders, and alcohol/other drug use problems. Sally has experience in the use of neuropsychological assessment, cognitive behaviour therapy, motivational interviewing and mindfulness-based stress reduction techniques among these populations.

Sally completed her PhD in 2015 under the supervision of Professor Amanda Baker and Emeritus Professor Pat Michie in the Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health at the University of Newcastle. Sally’s PhD examined the neuropsychological profiles of people presenting with comorbid depression and alcohol use disorders. She was awarded a NSW Department of Health, Project – Drug and Alcohol Council Research Grant to support this research.

Sally’s research interests include developing and building an evidence base for e-Health interventions for co-occurring disorders and the wider dissemination of these evidence based treatments into practice. Her post-doctoral focus has been on problematic alcohol use by women, and developing assessment tools and interventions to better identify and intervene in this population.

More recently, her translational work has been recognised with a UoN School of Medicine and Public Health Staff Award for Early Career Research and Innovation Excellence (2017), and the Australian Rotary Health Impact Award (formerly the Knowledge Dissemination Award) 2018.



Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts (Psychology) Honours, University of Newcastle
  • Master of Psychology (Clinical), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Alcohol & Other Drug Use
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Cognitive Behaviour Therapy
  • Counselling
  • Depression
  • Developmental Psychology
  • Mental Health
  • Psychosis

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 50
170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/07/2016 - 31/12/2016 Senior Lecturer & Course Co-ordinator University of Newcastle
Australia

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/08/2013 -  Member - APS College of Clinical Psychologists Australian Psychological Society College of Clinical Psychologists
Australia
1/07/2006 -  Member - AACBT Australian Association for Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (AACBT)
Australia
1/12/2005 -  Member - Society for Mental Health Research (SMHR; formerly ASPR)

Member of the Early Career Researcher Committee 2016-2017

Society for Mental Health Research
Australia
1/08/2003 -  Member - Australian Psychological Society Australian Psychological Society
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2017 - 3/08/2018 Project Manager Priority Research Centre for Brain and Mental Health | The University of Newcastle
Australia
1/09/2014 - 1/06/2016 Clinical Supervisor The University of Newcastle
Psychology
Australia
1/01/2013 - 31/12/2016 Project Manager The University of New South Wales
National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre
Australia
1/07/2005 - 1/04/2014 Clinical Psychologist & Clinical Research Manager Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience & Mental Health
Australia
1/01/2003 - 1/06/2005 Clinical Psychologist Hunter New England Health
Australia
1/01/2001 - 1/12/2002 Psychologist Hunter Area Health Service

Awards

Award

Year Award
2018 Australian Rotary Health - Mental Health Impact Award
Australian Rotary Health
2017 School of Medicine and Public Health Staff Award for Early Career Research and Innovation Excellence
The Faculty of Health, The University of Newcastle

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
PSYC6401 Psychological Treatments and Interventions
The University of Newcastle
I am the Course Coordinator and Lecturer for PSCY6401. This course introduces students to therapeutic interactions with patients, including the establishment and maintenance of therapeutic alliances, history taking, counselling, motivational interviewing, cognitive behaviour therapy, and treatment termination. Teaching methods utilise skills workshops and seminar.
Course Coordinator and Lecturer 18/02/2019 - 31/07/2019
PSYC6526 Professional Psychology Placement 1
The University of Newcastle
I am the Course Coordinator and a Clinical Supervisor for PSYC6526.
Course Coordinator and Lecturer 18/02/2019 - 31/07/2019
PSYC6527 Professional Psychology Placement 2
The University of Newcastle
I am the Course Coordinator of PSYC6527
Course Coordinator 2/07/2019 - 30/11/2019
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (13 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Killackey E, Allott K, Jackson HJ, Scutella R, Tseng YP, Borland J, et al., 'Individual placement and support for vocational recovery in first-episode psychosis: Randomised controlled trial', British Journal of Psychiatry, 214 76-82 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 The Royal College of Psychiatrists. Background High unemployment is a hallmark of psychotic illness. Individual placement and support (IPS) may be effective at assisting th... [more]

© 2018 The Royal College of Psychiatrists. Background High unemployment is a hallmark of psychotic illness. Individual placement and support (IPS) may be effective at assisting the vocational recoveries of young people with first-episode psychosis (FEP).Aims To examine the effectiveness of IPS at assisting young people with FEP to gain employment (Australian and Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12608000094370).Method Young people with FEP (n = 146) who were interested in vocational recovery were randomised using computer-generated random permuted blocks on a 1:1 ratio to: (a) 6 months of IPS in addition to treatment as usual (TAU) or (b) TAU alone. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 6 months (end of intervention), 12 months and 18 months post-baseline by research assistants who were masked to the treatment allocations.Results At the end of the intervention the IPS group had a significantly higher rate of having been employed (71.2%) than the TAU group (48.0%), odds ratio 3.40 (95% CI 1.17-9.91, z = 2.25, P = 0.025). However, this difference was not seen at 12-and 18-month follow-up points. There was no difference at any time point on educational outcomes.Conclusions This is the largest trial to our knowledge on the effectiveness of IPS in FEP. The IPS group achieved a very high employment rate during the 6 months of the intervention. However, the advantage of IPS was not maintained in the long term. This seems to be related more to an unusually high rate of employment being achieved in the control group rather than a gross reduction in employment among the IPS group.Declaration of interest None.

DOI 10.1192/bjp.2018.191
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin
2019 Hunt S, 'Building Motivational Interviewing Skills: A Practitioner Workbook', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 38 111-111 (2019)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12879
2016 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Thornton L, Lappin JM, Hanstock T, Sylvia L, Jacka F, et al., 'Study protocol for a systematic review of evidence for lifestyle interventions targeting smoking, sleep, alcohol/other drug use, physical activity, and healthy diet in people with bipolar disorder', SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, 5 (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s13643-016-0282-9
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Tanya Hanstock, Amanda Baker, Christopher Oldmeadow, Frances Kaylambkin, Robin Callister, Simon Dennis
2016 Thornton L, Batterham PJ, Fassnacht DB, Kay-Lambkin F, Calear AL, Hunt S, 'Recruiting for health, medical or psychosocial research using Facebook: Systematic review', Internet Interventions, 4 72-81 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Published by Elsevier B.V. Recruiting participants is a challenge for many health, medical and psychosocial research projects. One tool more frequently being used to improv... [more]

© 2016 Published by Elsevier B.V. Recruiting participants is a challenge for many health, medical and psychosocial research projects. One tool more frequently being used to improve recruitment is the social networking website Facebook. A systematic review was conducted to identify studies that have used Facebook to recruit participants of all ages, to any psychosocial, health or medical research. 110 unique studies that used Facebook as a recruitment source were included in the review. The majority of studies used a cross-sectional design (80%) and addressed a physical health or disease issue (57%). Half (49%) of the included studies reported specific details of the Facebook recruitment process. Researchers paid between $1.36 and $110 per completing participants (Mean = $17.48, SD = $23.06). Among studies that examined the representativeness of their sample, the majority concluded (86%) their Facebook-recruited samples were similarly representative of samples recruited via traditional methods. These results indicate that Facebook is an effective and cost-efficient recruitment method. Researchers should consider their target group, advertisement wording, offering incentives and no-cost methods of recruitment when considering Facebook as a recruitment source. It is hoped this review will assist researchers to make decisions regarding the use of Facebook as a recruitment tool in future research.

DOI 10.1016/j.invent.2016.02.001
Citations Scopus - 38
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin
2015 Hunt SA, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Michie PT, 'Systematic review of neurocognition in people with co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression', Journal of Affective Disorders, 179 51-64 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Background Alcohol misuse and depression represent two major social and health problems globally. These conditions commonly co-occur and both are associated w... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Background Alcohol misuse and depression represent two major social and health problems globally. These conditions commonly co-occur and both are associated with significant cognitive impairment. Despite this, few studies have examined the impact on cognitive functioning of co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression. This study aims to critically review findings from peer-reviewed published articles examining neuropsychological test performance among samples of people with co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression. Method A comprehensive literature search was conducted, yielding six studies reporting neuropsychological profiles of people with co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression. Results comparing cognitive functioning of people with this comorbidity to those with alcohol misuse alone, depression alone, healthy controls and published norms were examined as well as those describing the correlation between depressive symptoms and cognitive functioning in people with alcohol use disorders. Results In the majority of instances, the comorbid groups did not differ significantly from those with depression only or alcohol misuse only, nor from healthy controls or published norms. In the cases where a difference in neuropsychological test scores between groups was found, it was not consistently identified across studies. However, visual memory was identified in two studies as being impaired in comorbid samples and is worthy of inclusion in future studies. Limitations Due to the small number of included studies and the large variation in inclusion criteria as well as differing assessment tools and methodologies between studies, the review did not include a quantitative synthesis. Conclusions Research into cognitive deficits among people with singly occurring versus co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression is accumulating. Evidence suggests that the neuropsychological performance among samples with this comorbidity is generally not severely impaired and is unlikely to preclude benefit from treatment.

DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2015.03.024
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Frances Kaylambkin, Pat Michie
2015 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Geddes J, Hunt SA, Woodcock KL, Teesson M, et al., 'The iTreAD project: A study protocol for a randomised controlled clinical trial of online treatment and social networking for binge drinking and depression in young people Health behavior, health promotion and society', BMC Public Health, 15 (2015) [C3]

© 2015 Kay-Lambkin et al. Background: Depression and binge drinking behaviours are common clinical problems, which cause substantial functional, economic and health impacts. These... [more]

© 2015 Kay-Lambkin et al. Background: Depression and binge drinking behaviours are common clinical problems, which cause substantial functional, economic and health impacts. These conditions peak in young adulthood, and commonly co-occur. Comorbid depression and binge drinking are undertreated in young people, who are reluctant to seek help via traditional pathways to care. The iTreAD project (internet Treatment for Alcohol and Depression) aims to provide and evaluate internet-delivered monitoring and treatment programs for young people with depression and binge drinking concerns. Methods: Three hundred sixty nine participants will be recruited to the trial, and will be aged 18-30 years will be eligible for the study if they report current symptoms of depression (score 5 or more on the depression subscale of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale) and concurrent binge drinking practices (5 or more standard drinks at least twice in the prior month). Following screening and online baseline assessment, participants are randomised to: (a) online monthly self-assessments, (b) online monthly self-assessments¿+¿12-months of access to a 4 week online automated cognitive behaviour therapy program for binge drinking and depression (DEAL); or (c) online monthly assessment¿+¿DEAL¿+¿12-months of access to a social networking site (Breathing Space). Independent, blind follow-up assessments occur at 26, 39, 52 and 64-weeks post-baseline. Discussion: The iTreAD project is the first randomised controlled trial combining online cognitive behaviour therapy, social networking and online monitoring for young people reporting concerns with depression and binge drinking. These treatments represent low-cost, wide-reach youth-appropriate treatment, which will have significantly public health implications for service design, delivery and health policy for this important age group. Trial registration: Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12614000310662. Date registered 24 March 2014.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2365-2
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Frances Kaylambkin, Terry Lewin, Christopher Oldmeadow
2014 Hunt SA, Baker AL, Michie PT, Kay-Lambkin F, 'Change in neurocognition in people with co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression: 12-month follow-up', Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy, S10:004 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.4172/2155-6105.S10-004
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Frances Kaylambkin, Pat Michie
2014 Baker AL, Kavanagh DJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Hunt SA, Lewin TJ, Carr VJ, McElduff P, 'Randomized controlled trial of MICBT for co-existing alcohol misuse and depression: Outcomes to 36-months', Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 46 281-290 (2014) [C1]

Integrated psychological treatment addressing co-existing alcohol misuse and depression has not been compared with single-focused treatment. This trial evaluates changes over 36. ... [more]

Integrated psychological treatment addressing co-existing alcohol misuse and depression has not been compared with single-focused treatment. This trial evaluates changes over 36. months following randomization of 284 outpatients to one of four motivational interviewing and cognitive-behavior therapy (MICBT) based interventions: (1) brief integrated intervention (BI); or BI plus 9 further sessions with (2) an integrated-, (3) alcohol-, or (4) depression-focus. Outcome measures included changes in alcohol consumption, depression (BDI-II: Beck Depression Inventory) and functioning (GAF: Global Assessment of Functioning), with average improvements from baseline of 21.8 drinks per week, 12.6 BDI-II units and 8.2 GAF units. Longer interventions tended to be more effective in reducing depression and improving functioning in the long-term, and in improving alcohol consumption in the short-term. Integrated treatment was at least as good as single-focused MICBT. Alcohol-focused treatment was as effective as depression-focused treatment at reducing depression and more effective in reducing alcohol misuse. The best approach seems to be an initial focus on both conditions followed by additional integrated- or alcohol-focused sessions. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsat.2013.10.001
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Patrick Mcelduff, Terry Lewin, Frances Kaylambkin
2013 Killackey E, Allott K, Cotton SM, Jackson H, Scutella R, Tseng Y, et al., 'A randomized controlled trial of vocational intervention for young people with first-episode psychosis: method', Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 7 329-337 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/eip.12066
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin
2010 Baker AL, Kavanagh DJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Hunt SA, Lewin TJ, Carr VJ, Connolly J, 'Randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioural therapy for coexisting depression and alcohol problems: Short-term outcome', Addiction, 105 87-99 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2009.02757.x
Citations Scopus - 78Web of Science - 72
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin, Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker
2009 Hunt SA, Baker AL, Michie PT, Kavanagh DJ, 'Neurocognitive profiles of people with comorbid depression and alcohol use: Implications for psychological interventions', Addictive Behaviors, 34 878-886 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2009.03.036
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Pat Michie, Amanda Baker
2006 Hunt SA, 'Neuroscience of psychoactive substance use and dependence (Book review)', Drug and Alcohol Review, 25 656-657 (2006) [C3]
2005 Hunt S, 'ABC of alcohol', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 24 570-571 (2005)
Show 10 more journal articles

Conference (20 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Kay-Lambkin F, Hunt SA, Geddes J, Baker AL, Deady M, Teesson M, 'AN RCT OF ONLINE AND SOCIAL NETWORKING INTERVENTIONS IN YOUTH WITH ALCOHOL USE DISORDERS AND COMORBID DEPRESSION', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2018)
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Frances Kaylambkin
2018 Denham A, Baker A, Spratt N, Hunt S, Sharma R, Bonevski B, 'YouTube as a source of information on the needs and concerns of caregivers of stroke survivors', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2018)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Neil Spratt, Amanda Baker
2015 Hunt SA, Baker A, Michie PT, 'How does change in alcohol misuse and depression comorbidity impact on neuropsychological test performance after 12 months?', Drug and Alcohol Dependence (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Pat Michie, Amanda Baker
2011 Baker AL, Kavanagh DJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Hunt SA, Lewin TJ, Carr VJ, McElduff P, 'Randomised controlled trial of CBT for co-existing depression and alcohol problems: 6-, 12-, 24-and 36-month outcomes', Drug and Alcohol Review, Hobart, Australia (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Patrick Mcelduff, Amanda Baker, Frances Kaylambkin
2010 Atkinson RJ, Schall UA, Stojanov WM, Inkpen RM, Hunt SA, Helmbold K, et al., 'Impairment of duration mismatch negativity in the schizophrenia prodrome', Clinical EEG and Neuroscience, Newcastle, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Juanita Todd, Pat Michie, Ulrich Schall
2010 Baker AL, 'Randomised controlled trial of CBT for co-existing depression and alcohol problems: 6-12 month outcomes', Proceedings of the Australasian Society for Psychiatric Research (ASPR) 2010 Conference, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Patrick Mcelduff, Amanda Baker, Frances Kaylambkin
2010 Atkinson RJ, Michie PT, Hunt SA, Inkpen RM, Stojanov WM, Halpin SA, Schall UA, 'Mismatch negativity to duration deviants in first episode psychosis and individuals at ultra-high risk of psychosis', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Sydney, Australia (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Pat Michie, Ulrich Schall, Sean Halpin
2010 Michie PT, Atkinson RJ, Hunt SA, Inkpen RM, Stojanov WM, Halpin SA, Schall UA, 'Mismatch negativity to duration deviants in first episode psychosis and in the prodome', Schizophrenia Research, Florence, Italy (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Pat Michie, Sean Halpin, Ulrich Schall
2008 Creek R, Killackey E, Cotton S, Hunt S, 'The relationship of unstable accommodation to readmission and functional recovery in young people with first episode psychosis', EARLY INTERVENTION IN PSYCHIATRY (2008) [E3]
2008 Atkinson RJ, Schall UA, Stojanov WM, Inkpen R, Hunt S, Helmbold K, et al., 'Auditory sensory memory deficit in prodromal schizophrenia', Early Intervention in Psychiatry, Melbourne, VIC (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Ulrich Schall, Pat Michie, Juanita Todd
2008 Atkinson RJ, Schall UA, Stojanov WM, Inkpen R, Hunt SA, Helmbold K, et al., 'Impaired mismatch negativity in the schizophrenia prodrome', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Newcastle, NSW (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Juanita Todd, Pat Michie, Sean Halpin, Ulrich Schall
2008 Hunt SA, Baker AL, Kavanagh D, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Lewin TJ, Carr VJ, 'A randomised controlled trial of integrated and single focused interventions for co-morbid depression and alcohol use disorders', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Newcastle, NSW (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin, Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin
2008 Schall UA, Atkinson RJ, Hunt SA, Inkpen R, Stojanov WM, Helmbold K, et al., 'Mismatch negativity and prepulse inhibition in the prodrome', Schizophrenia Research, Venice, Italy (2008) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/s0920-9964(08)70072-0
Co-authors Ulrich Schall, Pat Michie
2006 Hanstock T, Clayton EH, Hunt SA, Hazell P, 'The tripartite mood rating scale (TMRS): a new self-report mood instrument for children and adolescents with bipolar', Proceedings of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Pediatric Bipolar Conference, Chicago, Illinois, USA (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Tanya Hanstock
2006 Beckmann CJ, Lewin TJ, Halpin SA, Hunt SA, Schall UA, Chenoweth B, Carr VJ, 'Dissociative experiences and transition to psychosis', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Fremantle, Western Australia (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Sean Halpin, Ulrich Schall
2005 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Lewin (Ext) T, Kelly BJ, Carr VJ, Hunt SA, Baker AL, Kavanagh DJ, 'Combined versus single focused interventions for comorbid depression and alcohol problems: introduction to the daisi project', Abstracts for The Royal Australian & NZ College of Psychiatrists Joint CINP/ASPR Scientific Meeting, Brisbane (2005) [E3]
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Frances Kaylambkin, Amanda Baker
2005 Hunt SA, Schall U, Halpin SA, Beckmann CJ, Carr V, 'Neurocognitive profiles of prodromal psychosis', SCHIZOPHRENIA BULLETIN, Savannah, GA (2005)
Co-authors Ulrich Schall, Sean Halpin
2004 Beckmann C, Lewin T, Halpin S, Hunt S, Schall U, Chenoweth B, Carr V, 'Dissociative experiences and transition to psychosis', SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH, Vancouver, CANADA (2004)
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Ulrich Schall, Terry Lewin
2003 Schall UA, Halpin SA, Hunt SA, Beckmann J, Chenoweth B, Mah BL, et al., 'Neurocognitive profiles of young people at high-risk versus first episode psychosis: A follow-up study', Schizophrenia Research, Colorado Springs, CO (2003) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Terry Lewin, Ulrich Schall
1999 Hunt SA, Hayes BK, 'Context reinstatement procedures and suggestibility in children's eyewitness reports', Australian Journal of Psychology Supplement, The University of Sydney, Australia (1999) [E3]
Show 17 more conferences

Thesis / Dissertation (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Hunt SA, Neuropsychological profiles of people receiving Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for co-occurring depression and alcohol misuse, University of Newcastle (2015)
2003 Hunt SA, Children s Eyewitness Memory: Context Reinstatement and Suggestibility, University of Newcastle (2003)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 5
Total funding $1,746,594

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20191 grants / $57,500

Interdisciplinary student-led intensive stuttering treatment program for adults$57,500

This program aims to investigate the outcomes of a student-led intensive speech therapy training program for adults who stutter that also involves cognitive behaviour therapy delivered by psychology students.

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team

Associate Professor Sally Hewat, Doctor Tanya Hanstock, Doctor Rachael Unicomb, Ms Yasmina Nasstasia, Mrs Sonja Pohlman, Doctor Sally Hunt

Scheme Research Funds
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON N

20161 grants / $733,734

Checkmate: An online intervention and support package for families/friends supporting lived ones using methamphetamine$733,734

Funding body: Australian Government Department of Health

Funding body Australian Government Department of Health
Project Team

Frances Kay-Lambkin, Catherine Chapman, Sally Hunt, Jenny Geddes, Maree Teesson

Scheme Consultancy/tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON N

20131 grants / $909,585

A randomised clinical trial of internet-based treatment for binge drinking and depression in young Australians$909,585

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Frances Kay-Lambkin, Amanda Baker, Maree Teesson, Kathleen Brady, Terry Lewin, Mark Deady, Bonnie Spring, Louise Thornton, Sally Hunt.

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20091 grants / $20,775

LDX analyser (fingerprick unit) x4, piCo Smokerlyzer (Carboxymeter)x4, Universal cardboard disposable mouthpieces for piCo smokerlyzer x4 and Universal d pieces for piCo Smokerlyzer x4$20,775

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Amanda Baker, Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Doctor Alyna Turner, Professor Juanita Todd, Professor Robin Callister, Doctor Sally Hunt, Professor Brian Kelly, Professor John Attia, Professor Jennifer Bowman, Doctor Paula Wye
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189849
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20061 grants / $25,000

Neurocognitive profiles of people receiving cognitive behaviour therapy$25,000

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Doctor Sally Hunt, Professor Amanda Baker, Emeritus Professor Patricia Michie, Conjoint Professor Vaughan Carr, Professor David Kavanagh, Mr Terry Lewin, Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin
Scheme Drug and Alcohol Council Research Grants Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186724
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 PhD A Trauma-Focused Adaptation for Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: Outcomes for Children in Child Protection and Out of Home Care with a History of Complex Trauma PhD (Psychology - Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2019 PhD Psychological and Behavioural Features of Children of Australian Defence Force Veterans diagnosed with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder. PhD (Psychiatry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2019 Honours Does a traumatic childbirth experience contribute to risky or hazardous alcohol use? Psychology, The University of Newcastle Sole Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 24
United Kingdom 2
United States 2
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Dr Sally Hunt

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Psychology - Master of Professional Psychology
School of Psychology
Faculty of Science

Focus area

Psychology

Contact Details

Email sally.hunt@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 49854305

Office

Room W118
Building Behavioural Sciences Building
Location Behavioural Sciences Building

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