Dr Gary Crowfoot

Dr Gary Crowfoot

Lecturer

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Gary Crowfoot is a registered nurse and an early career researcher working in stroke prevention and rehabilitation. He holds the position of Lecturer within the School of Nursing and Midwifery. He is also a research fellow within the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation and The University of Newcastle Priority Research Centre for Stroke and Brain Injury.

Dr Crowfoot was awarded his PhD in Nursing in 2016. His thesis focused on a deep narrative exploration of the experiences and help seeking behaviours of people with transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or minor stroke. Since then, he has been heavily involved in projects related to exploring exercise after stroke, lifestyle and activity modification after TIA, patient and carer experiences of sitting behaviours after stroke, and people’s expectations and experiences for risk-reduction education after TIA.

His current research interests are diverse including: 

  • People’s experiences post TIA, minor stroke, and stroke
  • Stroke Prevention
  • Stroke rehabilitation
  • How stroke survivors and clinicians define their condition
  • The effect of interrupting prolonged sitting on stroke risk reduction
  • Qualitative inquiries into the human experience

Dr Crowfoot has always had a passion for working to help support and understand the experiences of stroke survivors, promote primary and secondary stroke prevention, and what drives help-seeking behaviour in response to the onset of stroke symptoms. He hopes that his work can lead to beneficial and improved programs to enable timely, individualised, and effective community stroke prevention programs.



Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Nursing, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Nursing (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Minor Stroke
  • Qualitative methods
  • Stroke
  • Stroke Prevention
  • Transient Ischaemic Attack (TIA)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111002 Clinical Nursing: Primary (Preventative) 30
111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified 70

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/08/2012 -  Registered Nurse Hunter New England Health
Emergency Department, Belmont District Hospital
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
NURS6900 NURS6900: Introduction to Research In Health Care
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Course Coordinator 28/01/2020 - 12/06/2020
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Mackie P, Weerasekara I, Crowfoot G, Janssen H, Holliday E, Dunstan D, English C, 'What is the effect of interrupting prolonged sitting with frequent bouts of physical activity or standing on first or recurrent stroke risk factors? A scoping review', PLoS ONE, 14 1-24 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0217981
Co-authors Ishankamadhurangani Rajapakshamudiyanselage Uon, Liz Holliday, Coralie English
2019 Hanna E, Janssen H, Crowfoot G, Mason G, Vyslysel G, Sweetapple A, et al., 'Participation, Fear of Falling, and Upper Limb Impairment are Associated with High Sitting Time in People with Stroke.', Occupational therapy in health care, 33 181-196 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/07380577.2019.1587675
Co-authors Robin Callister, Coralie English
2019 Geldens N, Crowfoot G, Sweetapple A, Vyslysel G, Mason G, English C, Janssen H, 'Patient readiness for risk-reduction education and lifestyle change following transient ischemic attack.', Disabil Rehabil, 1-6 (2019)
DOI 10.1080/09638288.2019.1626918
Co-authors Coralie English
2019 Mackie P, Crowfoot G, Janssen H, Dunstan DW, Bernhardt J, Walker FR, et al., 'Breaking up sitting time after stroke - How much less sitting is needed to improve blood pressure after stroke (BUST-BP-Dose): Protocol for a dose-finding study', CONTEMPORARY CLINICAL TRIALS COMMUNICATIONS, 13 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.conctc.2018.100310
Co-authors Robin Callister, Amanda Patterson, Liz Holliday, Rohan Walker, Neil Spratt, Coralie English
2018 English C, Janssen H, Crowfoot G, Bourne J, Callister R, Dunn A, et al., 'Frequent, short bouts of light-intensity exercises while standing decreases systolic blood pressure: Breaking Up Sitting Time after Stroke (BUST-Stroke) trial', International Journal of Stroke, 13 932-940 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 World Stroke Organization. Background: Stroke survivors sit for long periods each day. Uninterrupted sitting is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Br... [more]

© 2018 World Stroke Organization. Background: Stroke survivors sit for long periods each day. Uninterrupted sitting is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Breaking up uninterrupted sitting with frequent, short bouts of light-intensity physical activity has an immediate positive effect on blood pressure and plasma clotting factors in healthy, overweight, and type 2 diabetic populations. Aim: We examined the effect of frequent, short bouts of light-intensity physical activity on blood pressure and plasma fibrinogen in stroke survivors. Methods: Prespecified secondary analyses from a three-armed randomized, within-participant, crossover trial. Participants were 19 stroke survivors (nine female, aged 68 years old, 90% able to walk independently). The experimental conditions were sitting for 8 h uninterrupted, sitting with 3 min bouts of light-intensity exercise while standing every 30 min, or sitting with 3 min of walking every 30 min. Blood pressure was measured every 30 min over 8 h and plasma fibrinogen at the beginning, middle, and end of each day. Intention-to-treat analyses were performed using linear mixed models including fixed effects for condition, period, and order, and a random intercept for participant to account for repeated measures and missing data. Results: Sitting with 3 min bouts of light-intensity exercise while standing every 30 min decreased systolic blood pressure by 3.5 mmHg (95% CI 1.7¿5.4) compared with sitting for 8 h uninterrupted. For participants not taking antihypertensive medications, sitting with 3 min of walking every 30 min decreased systolic blood pressure by 5.0 mmHg (95% CI -7.9 to 2.0) and sitting with 3 min bouts light-intensity exercise while standing every 30 min decreased systolic blood pressure by 4.2 mmHg (95% CI -7.2 to -1.3) compared with sitting for 8 h uninterrupted. There was no effect of condition on diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.45) or plasma fibrinogen levels (p = 0.91). Conclusion: Frequent, short bouts of light-intensity physical activity decreases systolic blood pressure in stroke survivors. However, before translation into clinical practice, the optimal duration and timing of physical activity bouts needs to be determined. Clinical trial registration: Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry http://www.anzctr.org.au ANZTR12615001189516.

DOI 10.1177/1747493018798535
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Neil Spratt, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rohan Walker, Linkooi Ong, Amanda Patterson, Robin Callister, Coralie English
2018 English C, Janssen H, Crowfoot G, Callister R, Dunn A, Mackie P, et al., 'Breaking up sitting time after stroke (BUST-stroke)', International Journal of Stroke, 13 921-931 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 World Stroke Organization. Objectives: People with stroke sit for long periods each day, which may compromise blood glucose control and increase risk of recurrent stroke. S... [more]

© 2018 World Stroke Organization. Objectives: People with stroke sit for long periods each day, which may compromise blood glucose control and increase risk of recurrent stroke. Studies in other populations have found regular activity breaks have a significant immediate (within-day) positive effect on glucose metabolism. We examined the effects of breaking up uninterrupted sitting with frequent, short bouts of light-intensity physical activity in people with stroke on post-prandial plasma glucose and insulin. Methods: Randomized within-participant crossover trial. We included people between 3 months and 10 years post-stroke, ambulant with minimal assistance and not taking diabetic medication other than metformin. The three experimental conditions (completed in random order) were: sitting for 8 h uninterrupted, sitting with 3 min bouts of light-intensity exercise while standing every 30 min, or sitting with 3 min of walking every 30 min. Meals were standardized and bloods were collected half- to one-hourly via an intravenous cannula. Results: A total of 19 participants (9 female, mean [SD] age 68.2 [10.2]) completed the trial. The majority (n = 12, 63%) had mild stroke symptoms (National Institutes of Stroke Scale score 0¿13). There was no significant effect of experimental condition on glucose (mean [SD] positive incremental area [+iAUC] mmol·L·h-1 under the curve during sitting 42.3 [29.5], standing 47.4 [23.1], walking 44.6 [26.5], p = 0.563) or insulin (mean + iAUC pmol·L·h-1 sitting 14,161 [7,560], standing 14,043 [8,312], walking 14,008 [8,269], p = 0.987). Conclusion: Frequent, short bouts of light-intensity physical activity did not have a significant effect on post-prandial plasma glucose and insulin in this sample of people with stroke. Further studies are needed to identify strategies that improve inactivity-related glucose metabolism after stroke.

DOI 10.1177/1747493018801222
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Robin Callister, Amanda Patterson, Linkooi Ong, Rohan Walker, Neil Spratt, Christopher Oldmeadow, Coralie English
2018 Crowfoot G, van der Riet P, Maguire J, 'Real-life experiences of people with transient ischaemic attack or minor stroke: A qualitative literature review', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 27 1381-1398 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Aims and objectives: To explore and present findings of qualitative studies exploring real-life experiences of people with transient ischaemic a... [more]

© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Aims and objectives: To explore and present findings of qualitative studies exploring real-life experiences of people with transient ischaemic attack or minor stroke. Background: Transient ischaemic attack and minor stroke significantly increase the risk of stroke. Primarily, literature has examined healthcare pathways, patient outcomes and models of care through quantitative methodologies. Several studies have explored patient experiences using qualitative approaches. However, these findings have not been systematically collated or critically appraised to better understand the experiences of this population. Design: A literature review of the qualitative evidence. Method: A systematic literature search was conducted in CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO between January 2005¿October 2016 to identify qualitative studies that explored real-life experiences of people with transient ischaemic attack or minor stroke. The relevant EQUATOR guidelines were followed. Findings of relevant studies were critically appraised and collated using a thematic approach. Results: The search retrieved 709 articles. Twelve articles were included after critical review. Three themes emerged including recognition, awareness and action; the vulnerable self; and social and personal life change. Participants experienced ongoing vulnerability and change in their personal and social lives. Specifically, people believed that their condition did not reflect their physical appearance and led to their needs being unmet by health professionals. Conclusions: This is the first review of the literature to collate the thoughts, perspectives and experiences of people living with transient ischaemic attack or minor stroke. They reveal a complex, life-altering experience characterised by vulnerability, instability and change. Education that assists clinicians to connect with these experiences may alleviate the patient-reported disconnection with health professionals. Relevance to clinical practice: Physical and psychosocial dysfunctions were consistently reported to be overlooked or undetected by clinicians. Educating clinicians might enable them to better understand patient experiences, improve therapeutic interactions and meet the needs of this population.

DOI 10.1111/jocn.14271
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Pamela Vanderriet
2017 Butler S, Crowfoot G, Quain D, Davey A, Magin P, Maguire J, 'Opening the door to funny turns: A constructivist thematic analysis of patient narratives after TIA', Public Health Research, 7 62-72 (2017)
DOI 10.5923/j.phr.20170703.02.
Co-authors Parker Magin
2016 Crowfoot GM, van der Riet PJ, Maguire JM, 'Living within stories: Exploring the experiences of people with transient ischemic attack', Nursing and Health Sciences, 18 52-57 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd. A transient ischemic attack (TIA) significantly increases a person's risk of ischemic stroke. However, little is known about th... [more]

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd. A transient ischemic attack (TIA) significantly increases a person's risk of ischemic stroke. However, little is known about the experiences of these people or what influences their decision to access care. This article explores the stories of three people who experienced a TIA. All participants were interviewed after receiving a diagnosis of TIA by a specialist neurologist. By utilizing a framework of narrative inquiry, several storylines were revealed across temporal, social, and geographical landscapes. The main storylines include: bodily disruption, time stasis, altered temporal perceptions, the roles of others, and help-seeking behavior. The primary author also reflects upon his own origin and explores how this inquiry has influenced his perceptions, career, and nursing practice. This inquiry may assist healthcare workers to gain insight into the experiences of people with TIA and suggests how involvement of significant others is beneficial when educating people at risk of TIA.

DOI 10.1111/nhs.12227
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Pamela Vanderriet
2016 Ingles M, Crowfoot G, Smelaya TV, Kuzovlev AN, Salnikova LE, Bhikoo R, et al., 'Sepsis 2016 Paris', Critical Care, 20 (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s13054-016-1518-8
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Conference (13 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Mackie P, Weerasekara I, Crowfoot G, Janssen H, Holliday E, Dunstan D, English C, 'Interrupting prolonged sitting with frequent bouts of physical activity or standing on first or recurrent stroke risk factors: Scoping review', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2019)
Co-authors Coralie English
2019 Hanna E, Janssen H, Crowfoot G, Mason G, Vyslysel G, Sweetapple A, et al., 'Participation, Fear of Falling, and Upper Limb Impairment are Associated with High Sitting Time in People with Stroke', OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY IN HEALTH CARE (2019)
DOI 10.1080/07380577.2019.1587675
Co-authors Robin Callister, Coralie English
2018 Mackie P, Crowfoot G, Janssen H, Dunstan D, Bernhardt J, Walker R, et al., 'Breaking Up Sitting Time After Stroke - Reducing blood pressure through sitting less (BUST-BP-Dose): A trial protocol', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2018)
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Rohan Walker, Neil Spratt, Robin Callister, Coralie English
2018 Geldens N, Janssen H, Crowfoot G, Mason G, Sweetapple A, English C, 'Readiness for education and addressing modifiable risk factors after Transient Ischemic Attack', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2018)
Co-authors Coralie English
2018 English C, Janssen H, Crowfoot G, Callister R, Dunn A, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'BREAKING UP SITTING TIME AFTER STROKE IMPROVES BLOOD PRESSURE (BUST-STROKE)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2018)
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Robin Callister, Coralie English, Neil Spratt, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rohan Walker
2018 Crowfoot G, van der Riet P, Maguire J, 'Concern, not symptoms, drives help-seeking behaviour following transient ischaemic attack or minor stroke', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2018)
Co-authors Pamela Vanderriet
2017 English C, Janssen H, Crowfoot G, Walker R, Patterson A, Callister R, et al., 'Does breaking up sitting time after stroke improve glucose control? (bust-stroke)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2017)
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Rohan Walker, Christopher Oldmeadow, Coralie English, Neil Spratt, Amanda Patterson, Robin Callister
2017 Crowfoot G, van der Riet P, Maguire J, 'The influence of non-professional others on the help-seeking behaviours of people with TIA or minor stroke', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2017)
Co-authors Pamela Vanderriet
2017 English C, Janssen H, Crowfoot G, Walker R, Patterson A, Callister R, et al., 'Breaking up sitting time after stroke improves blood pressure (bust-stroke)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2017)
Co-authors Robin Callister, Linkooi Ong, Amanda Patterson, Rohan Walker, Christopher Oldmeadow, Coralie English, Neil Spratt
2016 Crowfoot G, Van der Riet P, Maguire J, Magin P, Levi C, 'RESHAPING DELIVERY OF THE FAST MESSAGE: AN ALTERNATE APPROACH TO EMPOWER PEOPLE TO SEEK HELP', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2016)
Co-authors Parker Magin, Pamela Vanderriet, Christopher Levi
2016 Crowfoot G, Van der Riet P, Maguire J, Magin P, Levi C, 'LIFE AFTER TRANSIENT ISCHAEMIC ATTACK OR MINOR STROKE: GRIEF, LOSS AND LIMINAL SPACES', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2016)
Co-authors Parker Magin, Christopher Levi, Pamela Vanderriet
2016 Crowfoot G, Van der Riet P, Maguire J, Magin P, Levi C, 'UNSEEN CONVERSATIONS: RENEGOTIATING MIND-BODY RELATIONSHIPS FOLLOWING A TRANSIENT ISCHAEMIC ATTACKOR MINOR STROKE', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2016)
Co-authors Christopher Levi, Parker Magin, Pamela Vanderriet
2013 Crowfoot GM, Van Der Riet P, Maguire J, 'From symptom onset to doorway: Capturing the stories of patients with Transient Ischaemic Attack', International Journal of Stroke, Queensland (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Pamela Vanderriet
Show 10 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $118,969

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20182 grants / $109,073

Breaking up sitting time to reduce hypertension and secondary stroke risk. BUST-BP- Dose$74,828

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Associate Professor Coralie English, Professor David Dunstan, Professor Neil Spratt, Doctor Gary Crowfoot
Scheme Vanguard Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1700810
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Service change and Supporting Lifestyle and Activity Modification after TIA (S+SLAM-TIA)$34,245

Funding body: The Nancy and Vic Allen Stroke Prevention Fund

Funding body The Nancy and Vic Allen Stroke Prevention Fund
Project Team Doctor Heidi Janssen, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Ms Gillian Mason, Doctor Gary Crowfoot, Associate Professor Coralie English, Professor John Attia
Scheme Stroke Prevention Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1801093
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

20171 grants / $9,896

Assessment for stroke recovery$9,896

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Doctor Lin Kooi Ong, Doctor Gary Crowfoot, Doctor Heidi Janssen, Doctor Dianne Marsden, Doctor Jodie Marquez, Associate Professor Coralie English, Professor Rohan Walker
Scheme Medical Research Support Program (MRSP)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701224
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON Y
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Dr Gary Crowfoot

Positions

Lecturer
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Casual Research Assistant
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Casual Academic
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Casual Web Learn Tutor Nursing & Midwifery
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email gary.crowfoot@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4042 1619
Link Twitter
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