Dr Amanda Wilson

Dr Amanda Wilson

Senior Lecturer

School of Nursing and Midwifery (Health Behaviour Sciences)

Hospital bedsheets and accountable broadsheets

Passionate about health literacy, Dr Amanda Wilson is at the international forefront of the critical analysis of media reporting on new health treatments.  

Originally qualified as a nurse, Amanda transitioned early into respiratory clinical research.

A Masters in Creative Writing and PhD in Public Health followed, with Amanda bridging the traditionally distinct hemispheres of humanities and science with great success.

Amanda has worked in a variety of health care environments including general practice, the community, and tertiary teaching hospitals, while also cumulating years of experience in clinical and public health research.

At UON, she is attached to the Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour and a senior lecturer in Nursing and Midwifery.

With her personal research interests in clinical reasoning for person-centred care, preventative health and health literacy, Amanda is much sought as a researcher and involved in several wider studies across the fields of nursing, medicine, and public health.

But her focus is on assessing the dissemination of facts regarding medical research, especially as they relate to new treatments.

“In particular I am interested in the quality of health media in Australia and the impact of this information on the health literacy of the general population,” says Amanda.

MEDIA DOCTOR

While working at Newcastle Institute of Public Health in 2002, Amanda developed a standardised rating scale for quantitatively evaluating the quality of health reporting in the Australian media, with Conjoint Professor David Henry.

The Media Doctor Australia (MDA) website was launched to make these assessments public.

In 2005, Amanda and Professor David Henry were awarded the Australian Museum Eureka Prize for ‘Critical Thinking’ for their work on the Media Doctor model.

The MDA project reviewed health news stories published in the general media, including newspapers, online news and transcripts of television and radio broadcasts.

Stories were eligible for review if they covered new health interventions for humans, including drugs, surgical procedures, diagnostic tests, and complementary therapies.

Using a set of ten criteria that look both at the information and the way it is presented, the MDA model is based on recommendations set by the Australian Press Council with input from medical media researchers in Canada, the United States, and Australia.

Assessment criteria include recommendations to consult a doctor; whether the advice is acceptable and easy to understand; whether the benefits, harms, and costs of recommended treatments are included; and the evidence behind the advice.

GOING GLOBAL

Unfortunately, domain name issues and lack of funding forced the MDA website into hiatus in 2012, but the model itself, and Amanda’s work on it, have been steadily spreading around the globe.

The MDA model has been adopted in The United States, Canada, Japan, Hong Kong, India, Sweden, and Germany.

“We assisted in the customisation of an Indian Media Doctor model and now what we are helping validating the tool in different languages in India,” Amanda says.

In 2016, Amanda was awarded Australia Japan Emerging Research Leaders Exchange Program funding from the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering.

In Tokyo to meet the Media Doctor Japan team, Amanda was inspired by their ability to maintain content and integrity of the site with minimal funding.

In 2017, Amanda was awarded funding from the Gladys M Brawn Career Development Teaching Assist Scheme.

Invigorated by the Media Doctor Japan model, Amanda is now working with UON Information Communication Technology experts to develop a crowdsourcing platform for a new MDA web presence.

DOLLY DOCTOR

Although outsourcing media reviews to the public to increase quality may seem like a counterintuitive risk, Amanda is convinced training and the review process will maintain the integrity of content.

She is no stranger to bucking convention.

Amanda gained notoriety in 2016 for publishing a piece in The Conversation declaring that Dolly Doctor was the most reliable Australian magazine source for news relating to medical treatments.

Interestingly, using the MDA ten point criteria, Amanda says, “any magazine with health in the title is generally rubbish.”

But apparently we can’t always blame the media for not letting facts get in the way of a good headline.

Researchers are being taught to “sex up” press releases, to raise their profile and increase funding opportunities says Amanda.

By including examples of both quality and poor reporting, the aim is to ultimately improve journalistic practice across the area of health reporting.

Using the MDA model, cumulative scores for the major media outlets will also be presented, providing ongoing feedback on performance compared with other outlets.

PREVENTATIVE HEALTH

Amanda has published a number of well-cited papers in international and Australian peer-review journals, presented at international conferences, and produced several industry reports including the Clinical Service Framework for Respiratory Disease for NSW Department of Health.

She has been a member of many research teams covering topics from suicide to stroke, dementia to rural rehab.

As well as a long professional partnership with Professor David Henry, Amanda has worked closely with UON’s Professor Kypros Kypri looking at alcohol use, and Professor Billie Bonevski on studies related to smoking.

“Even though I teach acute care to nursing students, I make sure that a lot of preventative care and primary health care is incorporated,” Amanda says.

“The majority of our health care takes place in the community preventing disease, rather than trying to put a band-aid over it.”

And that is why Amanda is so focused on how health interventions are presented in the media.

“Research shows that consumers make significant changes to health behaviours based on what they see and hear in the media,” Amanda says.

“So, it is important for individuals to have access to comprehensive and informed health reporting.”

In turn, public opinion influences policy.

“Informing opinion on health can change the long term outcomes for all consumers of the health system, so it’s vital that it is done right.”

amanda-wilson

Hospital bedsheets and accountable broadsheets

Dr Amanda Wilson is at the international forefront of the critical analysis of media reporting on new health treatments

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Career Summary

Biography

Amanda Wilson has a strong research background having worked in both clinical and public health research for many years. She has worked in a variety of health care environments including general practice, the community and tertiary teaching hospitals. While completing a Bachelor of Arts (Hons) in English, Amanda began working part-time in clinical trials on asthma. This led to full-time employment in clinical respiratory research, involving asthma, COPD and sleep disorders. Her position involved trial design, implementation, data collection, analysis, writing and presentation of results. Amanda was a reviewer with the Cochrane Airways Group and developed and co-authored the first comprehensive report on evidence-based asthma management (Australian Asthma Management Plan 2000).

She published a number of well cited papers in international and Australian peer-review journals, presented at international conferences, produced several industry reports and co-authored of a chapter in "Understanding Asthma: A Management Companion" edited by Dr Christine Jenkins. In 2000, Amanda joined the Newcastle Institute of Public Health (NIPH) as a Research Officer with a research focus on health services research. She produced several papers and reports including the NHMRC “Using Socioeconomic Evidence in Clinical Practice Guidelines Handbook” and the Clinical Service Framework for Respiratory Disease for NSW Department of Health.

As part of her role, she tutored Medical Students at the University of Newcastle. While at NIPH, Amanda co-founded the Media Doctor website (mediadoctor.org.au) with Professor David Henry and has worked on the site as a reviewer and data manager since its inception in 2002. In 2005, Amanda and Professor David Henry were awarded the Australian Museum Eureka Prize for ‘Critical Thinking’ for their work on Media Doctor. During this period (2001 - 2005) Amanda also completed a Master of Creative Arts in writing. She was awarded a full Postgraduate Research Scholarship and began a PhD in the Discipline of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health. Using data from the Media Doctor website, Amanda examined how the media deals with various aspects of health and the impact of the website on the quality of this reporting. Her thesis is one of only a handful worldwide in the area of health reporting and, probably the only one which uses an evidence-based appraisal of the quality of content.

In 2010, her thesis “Assessing the Quality of Health News Stories in the Australian Media Using the Media Doctor Website” was examined with no changes required and PhD awarded. Five papers have been published based on her PhD work, all in high quality peer-review journals, including PLoS Medicine, PLoS One and Medical Journal of Australia. Amanda is currently working with A/Prof Kyp Kypri, as a Research Academic using her research and web skills to perform online studies examining methodology and social desirability bias in the area of alcohol. She also continues her work in the area of health literacy and media content with the Media Doctor website.

Research Expertise
My research background involves expertise in both the humanities and health. I have explored the quality of health media in Australia and impact of this information of health literacy. My ongoing research with mediadoctor.org.au will examine ways of improving the quality of medical and scientific information that is transmitted through the media to the general public and the potential of raising health literacy. I am also exploring the use of web based platforms in health research including the most effective way to employ this medium for participant recruitment, online study data collection and database management. This research involves interventions examining social desirability bias and study methodology in the context of changes in social behaviour such as alcohol use.


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts (Honours), University of Newcastle
  • Master of Creative Arts, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Health Journalism
  • Health literacy
  • Media
  • Web-based research
  • critical thinking
  • interprofessional education
  • primary health care
  • public health

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
130209 Medicine, Nursing and Health Curriculum and Pedagogy 20
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 50
111002 Clinical Nursing: Primary (Preventative) 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2014 - 1/05/2016 Lecturer School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle
Australia
16/06/2010 - 1/12/2013 Research Fellow University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2005 - 3/05/2010 Research Officer Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
Australia
1/01/2000 - 1/12/2005 Research Officer Newcastle Institute of Public Health
Australia
1/01/1993 - 1/01/2000 Research Nurse Hunter New England Area Health Service
John Hunter Hospital
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2016 Gladys M Brawn Career Development Fellowship - Teaching Assist Scheme
Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle

Prize

Year Award
2011 Highest Impact Factor for 2010, Priority Research Centre of Health Behaviour
University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health
2005 Australian Museum Eureka Prize for Critical Thinking
The Australian Museum Society

Recipient

Year Award
2017 OnPrime
CSIRO
2016 Australia Japan Emerging Research Leaders Exchange Program
ATSE (Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering)
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2001 Wilson A, The Medical Office, Tertiary Press, Melbourne, 235 (2001)
2001 Wilson AJ, Medical Terminology, Tertiary Press, Melbourne, 96 (2001)
2001 Wilson AJ, Medical Terminology, Tertiary Press, Melbourne, 96 (2001)

Chapter (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Wilson AJ, Hoffman K, McDonald V, 'Chapter 4: Caring for a person with a respiratory condition', Clinical Reasoning 2nd edition, Pearson, Sydney (2017)
Co-authors Vanessa Mcdonald
2017 Hoffman K, Wilson AJ, 'Caring for a person with a cardiac condition', Clinical Reasoning 2nd edition, Pearson, Sydney (2017)
Co-authors Kerry Hoffman
2017 Hoffman K, Wilson A, 'Chapter 6: Caring for a person with a neurological condition', Clinical Reasoning 2nd edition, Pearson, Sydney (2017)
2016 Wilson AJ, Levett-Jones T, 'Chapter 2: Health and Illness in Adults', Medical Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking for Person Centred Care, Pearson, Sydney Australia (2016)
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones
Show 1 more chapter

Journal article (99 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Ang SM, O'Brien A, Wilson AJ, 'Shifting the concern for older persons falls to carers in light of changing health policy focusing on families providing care at home', SINGAPORE MEDICAL JOURNAL, (2017)
Co-authors Senggiapmarcus Ang Uon, Tony Obrien
2017 Wilson AJ, 'S-adenosyl methionine (SAMe) for depression in adults', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, (2017)
DOI 10.1080/01612840.2017.1392161
2017 Wilson AJ, 'Acupuncture for Stroke Rehabilitation', International Journal of Nursing Practice, (2017)
DOI 10.1111/ijn.12539
2017 Wilson A, 'Assistive devices, hip precautions, environmental modifications and training to prevent dislocation and improve function after hip arthroplasty', International Journal of Nursing Studies, (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2017.08.007
2017 Wilson AJ, Smith D, Peel R, Robertson J, Kypri K, 'Response to Letter to the Editor ¿The communication of health information through the media: public health opportunity¿ Journal: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, (2017)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12673
Co-authors Kypros Kypri, Roseanne Peel
2017 Wilson AJ, Milan S, Frame H, Powell C, Bax L, 'Anti-IL5 therapies for asthma', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD010834.pub3
2017 Wilson AJ, 'Cardiotocography versus intermittent auscultation of foetal heart on admission to labour ward for assessment of foetal wellbeing', International Journal of Nursing Practice, (2017)
DOI 10.1111/ijn.12613
2017 O'Brien AP, McNeil K, Fletcher R, Conrad A, Wilson A, Jones D, Chan W, 'New fathers¿ perinatal depression & anxiety - treatment options: an integrative review', American Journal of Men's Health, 11 863-876 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1557988316669047
Co-authors Tony Obrien, Donovan Jones, Sally Chan, Richard Fletcher, Agatha Conrad
2017 Wilson A, 'Does Chewing Gum Promote Bowel Function After Cesarean Section?', AJN, American Journal of Nursing, 117 21-21 (2017)
DOI 10.1097/01.NAJ.0000520940.23976.94
2017 Wilson A, Guillaumier A, George J, Denham A, Bonevski B, 'A systematic narrative review of the effectiveness of behavioural smoking cessation interventions in selected disadvantaged groups (2010-2017)', Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine, 11 617-630 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Introduction: Tobacco remains the key modifiable risk factor for the development of a number of diseases, incl... [more]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Introduction: Tobacco remains the key modifiable risk factor for the development of a number of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, lower respiratory infections, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, tuberculosis and cancer. Among priority populations, smoking prevalence remains high, smokers tend to relapse more often and earlier and fewer are able to sustain quit attempts. This systematic review provides an update on the literature. Areas covered: Twenty-four randomized controlled trials published from 2010¿2017, in English language, were identified after searching on Medline, Ovid, Embase and PsycINFO databases. Studies reported on the effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions among six disadvantaged groups known to have high smoking rates: (i) homeless, (ii) prisoners, (iii) indigenous populations, (iv) at-risk youth, (v) people with low income, and (vi) those with a mental illness. Narrative review and assessment of methodological quality of included papers was undertaken. Expert commentary: There is a growing evidence base of methodologically robust studies evaluating a variety of behavioural smoking cessation interventions for priority populations. Multi-component interventions and those examining behavioural interventions incorporating mindfulness training, financial incentives, motivational interviewing and extended telephone-delivered counseling may be effective in the short-term, particularly for smokers on low incomes and people with a mental illness.

DOI 10.1080/17476348.2017.1340836
Co-authors Billie Bonevski
2016 Wilson AJ, Palmer L, Levett-Jones T, Gilligan C, Outram S, 'Interprofessional collaborative practice for medication safety: Nursing, pharmacy, and medical graduates¿ experiences and perspectives', Journal of Interprofessional Care, 30 649-654 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis. Medication errors are the second most prevalent cause of adverse patient incidents in Australian hospital settings. Although numerous strategies to... [more]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis. Medication errors are the second most prevalent cause of adverse patient incidents in Australian hospital settings. Although numerous strategies to address this patient safety issue have been implemented, the impact of interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP) on medication safety has received limited attention. The aim of this article is to report the perspectives and experiences of recently graduated, currently practicing Australian nurses, pharmacists, and doctors in relation to IPCP and medication safety. Sixty-eight graduates from three Australian states participated in focus groups. Thematic analysis of transcripts was conducted using an iterative process. The findings from this study illustrate how knowing about and valuing the skills and responsibilities of other team members and respecting each person¿s unique contribution to the work of the team can lead to more effective communication and collaboration in the context of medication safety. Although collaborative practice is critical to safe medication prescribing, dispensing, and administration, there are recurring and pervasive challenges to its achievement. This study indicated the need for improved preparation of graduates to equip them with the knowledge and skills needed to participate in an interprofessional team; and we advocate that deliberate, structured, and meaningful interprofessional clinical education initiatives are required.

DOI 10.1080/13561820.2016.1191450
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Conor Gilligan, Sue Outram, Tracy Levett-Jones, Lorinda Palmer
2016 Wilson AJ, Bonevski B, Dunlop A, Shakeshaft A, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., ''The lesser of two evils': A qualitative study of staff and client experiences and beliefs about addressing tobacco in addiction treatment settings', Drug and Alcohol Review, 35 92-101 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs. Introduction and Aims: The aim of this study was to explore beliefs about tobacco dependence treatment from t... [more]

© 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs. Introduction and Aims: The aim of this study was to explore beliefs about tobacco dependence treatment from the perspective of staff and clients in addiction treatment settings.Design and Methods: A qualitative study was conducted between August and November 2013 using grounded theory methodology. Participants were recruited from four government-funded drug and alcohol services in a regional centre of New South Wales, Australia. Treatment centre staff (n=10) were interviewed using a semistructured interview guide and two focus groups (n=5 and n=6) were held with clients of the same treatment centres.Results: Both clients and staff wish to do more about tobacco use in addiction treatment services, but a number of barriers were identified. Staff barriers included lack of time, tobacco-permissive organisational culture, lack of enforcement of smoke-free policies, beliefs that tobacco is not a treatment priority for clients and that clients need to smoke as a coping strategy, and perceptions that treatment was either ineffective or not used by clients. Clients reported smoking as a habit and for enjoyment or stress relief, seeing staff smoking, nicotine replacement therapy unaffordability and perceptions that nicotine replaceme nt therapy may be addictive, and inability to relate to telephone cessation counselling as barriers to quitting smoking.Discussion and Conclusions: Client and staff perceptions and attitudes about the treatment of tobacco, particularly those relating telephone support and nicotine replacement therapy, provided information, which will inform the design of smoking cessation programs for addiction treatment populations. [Wilson AJ, Bonevski B., Dunlop A., Shakeshaft A, Tzelepis F., Walsberger S., Farrell M., Kelly PJ, Guillaumier A. 'The lesser of two evils': A qualitative study of staff and client experiences and beliefs about addressing tobacco in addiction treatment settings. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015].

DOI 10.1111/dar.12322
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, A Dunlop, Flora Tzelepis
2016 Zhang MWB, Chan S, Wynne O, Jeong S, Hunter S, Wilson AJ, Ho RCM, 'Conceptualization of an evidence-based smartphone innovation for caregivers and persons living with dementia', Technology and Health Care, 24 769-773 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 -IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved. Recent statistics released by Alzheimer's Disease International has highlighted how prevalent dementia will become in... [more]

© 2016 -IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved. Recent statistics released by Alzheimer's Disease International has highlighted how prevalent dementia will become in the next couple of years. Along with the increased incidence of individuals being diagnosed with dementia, there has also been an increment in the number of informal carers for people living with dementia. A recent report highlighted that in Australia, there are an estimated of 200,000 informal carers as of 2011. Caring for people who are living with dementia is not an easy task. Previous studies have highlighted that as much as 65% of caregivers do experience symptoms suggestive of depressive symptoms in the process of care. With the rapid advances in technology, it is of no surprise that information technology and its related innovations have been used in dementia care. A review of the existing literature shows that much of these innovations are focused on the care of patients affiliated with dementia. However, clearly interventions focusing on the needs of the dementia cohort of patient are limited. There are currently more emerging studies demonstrating the efficacy of web-based interventional toolkits for carers who are caring for individuals with dementia. Whilst there are previous studies demonstrating the effectiveness of smartphone interventions for dementia patients, there remains a paucity of smartphone based interventions for caregivers who are living with people with dementia. This technical note describes the conceptualization of an evidence based smartphone intervention for patients living with dementia, as well as for carers of these patients.

DOI 10.3233/THC-161165
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Sally Chan, Olivia Wynne, Sharyn Hunter, Sarah Jeong
2016 Wilson AJ, Smith D, Peel R, Robertson J, Kypri K, 'A quantitative analysis of the quality and content of the health advice in popular Australian magazines', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, (2016)
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Kypros Kypri, Roseanne Peel
2016 Kypri K, Wilson A, Attia J, Sheeran P, Miller P, McCambridge J, 'Social desirability bias in the reporting of alcohol consumption: A randomized trial', Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 77 526-531 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Alcohol Research Documentation Inc. All rights reserved. Objective: To investigate reporting of alcohol consumption, we manipulated the contexts of questions in ways desi... [more]

© 2016, Alcohol Research Documentation Inc. All rights reserved. Objective: To investigate reporting of alcohol consumption, we manipulated the contexts of questions in ways designed to induce social desirability bias. Method: We undertook a two-arm, parallel-group, individually randomized trial at an Australian public university. Students were recruited by email to a web-based ¿Research Project on Student Health Behavior.¿ Respondents answered nine questions about their physical activity, diet, and smoking. They were unknowingly randomized to a group presented with either (A) three questions about their alcohol consumption or (B) seven questions about their alcohol dependence and problems (under a prominent header labeled ¿Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test¿), followed by the same three alcohol consumption questions from (A). Results: A total of 3,594 students (mean age = 27, SD = 10) responded and were randomized: 1,778 to Group A and 1,816 to Group B. Outcome measures were the number of days they drank alcohol, the typical number of drinks they consumed per drinking day, and the number of days they consumed six or more drinks. The primary analysis included participants with any alcohol consumption in the preceding 4 weeks (1,304 in Group A; 1,340 in Group B) using between-group, two-tailed t tests. Results: In Groups A and B, respectively, means (and SDs) of the number of days drinking were 5.89 (5.92) versus 6.06 (6.12), p = .49; typical number of drinks per drinking day: 4.02 (3.87) versus 3.82 (3.76), p = .17; and number of days consuming six or more drinks: 1.69 (2.94) versus 1.67 (3.25), p = .56. Conclusions: We could not reject the null hypothesis because earlier questions about alcohol dependence and problems showed no sign of biasing the respondents¿ subsequent reports of alcohol consumption. These data support the validity of university students¿ reporting of alcohol consumption in web-based studies.

DOI 10.15288/jsad.2016.77.526
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Kypros Kypri, John Attia
2015 Kypri K, Wilson A, Attia J, Sheeran PJ, McCambridge J, 'Effects of study design and allocation on self-reported alcohol consumption: Randomized trial', Trials, 16 (2015) [C1]

© Kypri et al. Background: What participants think about the nature of a study might affect their behaviour and bias findings. We tested two hypotheses: (1) participants told the... [more]

© Kypri et al. Background: What participants think about the nature of a study might affect their behaviour and bias findings. We tested two hypotheses: (1) participants told they were in an intervention trial would report lower alcohol consumption at follow-up than those told they were in a cohort study; (2) participants told they were in the intervention group in a trial would have lower alcohol consumption at follow-up than those told they were in the control group. Methods: Students from four universities (N = 72,903) were invited to participate in a 'research project on student drinking'. Of 10,415 respondents, 6,788 were moderate to heavy drinkers and were randomized. Group A ('cohort') were informed their drinking would be assessed at baseline and again in one month. Group B ('control') were told the study was an intervention trial and they were in the control group. Group C ('intervention') were told the study was an intervention trial and they were to receive the intervention. All were assessed and directed to read identical online alcohol education material. Whether and how long they accessed the material were recorded. One month later, alcohol intake was reassessed. Results: In relation to hypothesis 1, there were no differences between the groups on the prespecified outcome measures. In relation to hypothesis 2, there were no differences though all point estimates were in the hypothesized direction (that is, 'intervention' < 'control'). The 'cohort' and 'control' groups accessed the material to a similar extent (59% versus 57%) while the 'intervention' group were more likely to access it (78%) and to read it for longer (median 35 s (25th and 75th percentiles: 6, 97) versus medians of 7 s (0, 28) and 8 s (4, 42) for the 'cohort' and 'control' groups, respectively). Conclusions: Although the context given to the research participants significantly influenced access to the online information and reading time, this did not translate into any effect on drinking behaviour, for either hypothesis. This might be because of failure in the experimental paradigm or the possibility of weaker effects using the online approach.

DOI 10.1186/s13063-015-0642-0
Co-authors John Attia, Kypros Kypri
2015 Nair BKR, Parvathy MS, Wilson A, Smith J, Murphy B, 'Workplace-based assessment; learner and assessor perspectives.', Advances in medical education and practice, 6 317-321 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.2147/amep.s79968
Citations Web of Science - 1
2012 Wilson AJ, Robertson J, Ewald BD, Henry D, 'What the public learns about screening and diagnostic tests through the media', Medical Journal of Australia, 197 324-326 (2012) [C2]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Ben Ewald
2012 Durrheim DN, 'Author's response', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 48 1107 (2012) [C3]
Co-authors D Durrheim, Roseanne Peel
2012 McCambridge J, Kypri K, Wilson AJ, 'How should debriefing be undertaken in web-based studies? Findings from a randomized controlled trial', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 14 e157 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Kypros Kypri
2011 Kypri K, McCambridge J, Wilson AJ, Attia JR, Sheeran P, Bowe S, Vater T, 'Effects of study design and allocation on participant behaviour- ESDA: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial', Trials, 12 42 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1745-6215-12-42
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Kypros Kypri, John Attia
2011 Wilson AJ, Robertson J, 'Health news in the media: A dose of critical thinking is the best treatment', Issues, - 18-22 (2011) [C3]
2011 Bryant JL, Bonevski B, Paul CL, McElduff P, Attia JR, 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of behavioural smoking cessation interventions in selected disadvantaged groups', Addiction, 106 1568-1585 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2011.03467.x
Citations Scopus - 47Web of Science - 49
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski, John Attia
2010 Wilson AJ, Robertson J, McElduff P, Jones AL, Henry DA, 'Does it matter who writes medical news stories?', PLoS Medicine, 7 1-5 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pmed.1000323
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Mddah01, Patrick Mcelduff
2010 Wilson AJ, Bonevski B, Jones AL, Henry DA, 'Deconstructing cancer: What makes a good-quality news story?', Medical Journal of Australia, 193 702-706 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Mddah01, Billie Bonevski
2009 Wilson AJ, Bonevski B, Jones AL, Henry D, 'Media reporting of health interventions: Signs of improvement, but major problems persist', PLoS ONE, 4 e4831 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0004831
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 36
Co-authors Billie Bonevski
2009 Sallis JF, Linton LS, Kraft MK, Cutter CL, Kerr J, Weitzel J, et al., 'The Active Living Research Program. Six Years of Grantmaking', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 36 (2009)

Changes in policies and built environments are advocated as part of efforts to increase physical activity, but in 2001 the knowledge base to inform these changes was limited. The ... [more]

Changes in policies and built environments are advocated as part of efforts to increase physical activity, but in 2001 the knowledge base to inform these changes was limited. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation addressed this deficit by initiating Active Living Research (ALR). The mission of ALR was to stimulate and support research that could guide the improvement of environments, policies, and practices to promote active living. The program's goals were to (1) build the evidence base about environmental and policy factors related to physical activity, (2) build the capacity of researchers in multiple fields to collaborate, and (3) inform and facilitate policy change. To build the evidence base, 121 grants were supported with $12.5 million. Efforts were made to support new investigators, fund investigators from numerous disciplines, and increase the demographic diversity of researchers. Activities to build capacity to conduct collaborative research included annual conferences, journal supplements, seminars for multiple disciplines, and the posting of environmental measures. Coordination with Active Living Leadership was a primary means of communicating research to policymakers. Other activities to facilitate the application of research included research summaries written for nonresearchers, collaborations with Active Living by Design, several components of the website (www.activelivingresearch.org), and using policy relevance as a funding criterion. Two independent evaluations were accomplished, and they concluded that ALR made progress on all three goals. ALR has been renewed through 2012. The new mission is to use a $15.4 million research budget to contribute to reversing the childhood obesity epidemic, especially among youth in the highest-risk groups. © 2009 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2008.10.007
Citations Scopus - 40
2009 Wilson AJ, Kirkwood I, Henry D, Jones AL, 'Medicine in the news', Issues, 33-36 (2009) [C2]
2008 Bonevski B, Wilson AJ, Henry DA, 'An analysis of news media coverage of complementary and alternative medicine', PLoS ONE, 3 e2406 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0002406
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Billie Bonevski
2007 Tee AKH, Koh MS, Gibson PG, Lasserson TJ, Wilson AJ, Irving LB, 'Long-acting beta2-agonists versus theophylline for maintenance treatment of asthma', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (2007)

Background: Theophylline and long acting beta-2 agonists are bronchodilators used for the management of persistent asthma symptoms, especially nocturnal asthma. They represent dif... [more]

Background: Theophylline and long acting beta-2 agonists are bronchodilators used for the management of persistent asthma symptoms, especially nocturnal asthma. They represent different classes of drug with differing side-effect profiles. Objectives: To assess the comparative efficacy, safety and side-effects of long-acting beta-2 agonists and theophylline in the maintenance treatment of adults and adolescents with asthma. Search strategy: We searched the Cochrane Airways Group trials register and reference lists of articles. We also contacted authors of identified RCTs for other relevant published and unpublished studies and pharmaceutical manufacturers. Most recent search: November 2006. Selection criteria: All included studies were RCTs involving adults and children with clinical evidence of asthma. These studies must have compared oral sustained release and/or dose adjusted theophylline with an inhaled long-acting beta-2 agonist. Data collection and analysis: In original review, two reviewers independently assessed trial quality and extracted data, similarly in this update two reviewers undertook this. Study authors were contacted for additional information. Main results: Thirteen studies with a total of 1344 participants met the inclusion criteria of the review. They were of varying quality. There was no significant difference between salmeterol and theophylline in FEV1 predicted (6.5%; 95% CI -0.84 to 13.83). However, salmeterol treatment led to significantly better morning PEF (mean difference 16.71 L/min, 95% CI 8.91 to 24.51) and evening PEF (mean difference 15.58 L/min, 95% CI 8.33 to 22.83). Salmeterol also reduced the use of rescue medication. Formoterol, used in two studies was reported to be as effective as theophylline. Bitolterol, used in only one study, was reported to be less effective than theophylline. Participants taking salmeterol experienced fewer adverse events than those using theophylline (Parallel studies: Relative Risk 0.44; 95% CI 0.30 to 0.63, Risk Difference -0.11; 95% CI -0.16 to -0.07, Numbers Needed to Treat (NNT) 9; 95% CI 6 to 14). Significant reductions were reported for central nervous system adverse events (Relative Risk 0.50; 95% CI 0.29 to 0.86, Risk Difference -0.07; 95% CI -0.12 to -0.02, NNT 14; 95% CI 8 to 50) and gastrointestinal adverse events (Relative Risk 0.30; 95% CI 0.17 to 0.55, Risk Difference -0.11; 95% CI -0.16 to -0.06, NNT 9; 95% CI 6 to 16). Authors' conclusions: Long-acting beta-2 agonists, particularly salmeterol, are more effective than theophylline in improving morning and evening PEF, but are not significantly different in their effect on FEV1. There is evidence of decreased daytime and nighttime short-acting beta-2 agonist requirement with salmeterol. Fewer adverse events occurred in participants using long-acting beta-2 agonists (salmeterol and formoterol) as compared to theophylline. Copyright © 2008 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD001281.pub2
Citations Scopus - 17
Co-authors Peter Gibson
2007 Tee AK, Koh MS, Gibson PG, Lasserson TJ, Wilson AJ, Irving LB, 'Long-acting beta2-agonists versus theophylline for maintenance treatment of asthma.', Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online), (2007)

BACKGROUND: Theophylline and long acting beta-2 agonists are bronchodilators used for the management of persistent asthma symptoms, especially nocturnal asthma. They represent dif... [more]

BACKGROUND: Theophylline and long acting beta-2 agonists are bronchodilators used for the management of persistent asthma symptoms, especially nocturnal asthma. They represent different classes of drug with differing side-effect profiles. OBJECTIVES: To assess the comparative efficacy, safety and side-effects of long-acting beta-2 agonists and theophylline in the maintenance treatment of adults and adolescents with asthma. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Airways Group trials register and reference lists of articles. We also contacted authors of identified RCTs for other relevant published and unpublished studies and pharmaceutical manufacturers. Most recent search: November 2006. SELECTION CRITERIA: All included studies were RCTs involving adults and children with clinical evidence of asthma. These studies must have compared oral sustained release and/or dose adjusted theophylline with an inhaled long-acting beta-2 agonist. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: In original review, two reviewers independently assessed trial quality and extracted data, similarly in this update two reviewers undertook this. Study authors were contacted for additional information. MAIN RESULTS: Thirteen studies with a total of 1344 participants met the inclusion criteria of the review. They were of varying quality. There was no significant difference between salmeterol and theophylline in FEV(1) predicted (6.5%; 95% CI -0.84 to 13.83). However, salmeterol treatment led to significantly better morning PEF (mean difference 16.71 L/min, 95% CI 8.91 to 24.51) and evening PEF (mean difference 15.58 L/min, 95% CI 8.33 to 22.83). Salmeterol also reduced the use of rescue medication. Formoterol, used in two studies was reported to be as effective as theophylline. Bitolterol, used in only one study, was reported to be less effective than theophylline. Participants taking salmeterol experienced fewer adverse events than those using theophylline (Parallel studies: Relative Risk 0.44; 95% CI 0.30 to 0.63, Risk Difference -0.11; 95% CI -0.16 to -0.07, Numbers Needed to Treat (NNT) 9; 95% CI 6 to 14). Significant reductions were reported for central nervous system adverse events (Relative Risk 0.50; 95% CI 0.29 to 0.86, Risk Difference -0.07; 95% CI -0.12 to -0.02, NNT 14; 95% CI 8 to 50) and gastrointestinal adverse events (Relative Risk 0.30; 95% CI 0.17 to 0.55, Risk Difference -0.11; 95% CI -0.16 to -0.06, NNT 9; 95% CI 6 to 16). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Long-acting beta-2 agonists, particularly salmeterol, are more effective than theophylline in improving morning and evening PEF, but are not significantly different in their effect on FEV1. There is evidence of decreased daytime and nighttime short-acting beta-2 agonist requirement with salmeterol. Fewer adverse events occurred in participants using long-acting beta-2 agonists (salmeterol and formoterol) as compared to theophylline.

Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Peter Gibson
2006 Aldrich R, Bonevski B, Wilson AJ, 'A case study on determining and responding to health managers' priorities for research to assist health service decision making', Australian Health Review, 30 435-441 (2006) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Billie Bonevski
2005 Smith DE, Wilson AJ, Henry DA, 'Monitoring the quality of medical news reporting: Early experience with media doctor', Medical Journal of Australia, 183 190-193 (2005) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 37
Co-authors Mddah01
2005 Chiarelli PE, Bower W, Wilson AJ, Attia JR, Sibbritt DW, 'Estimating the prevalence of urinary and faecal incontinence in Australia: systematic review', Australasian Journal on Ageing, 24 19-27 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1741-6612.2005.00063.x
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, John Attia
2005 Schwitzer G, Mudur G, Henry DA, Wilson AJ, Goozner M, Simbra M, et al., 'What are the roles and responsibilities of the media in disseminating health information?', Plos Medicine, 2 576-582 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pmed.0020215
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 48
Co-authors Mddah01
2004 Wark P, Gibson PG, Wilson A, 'Azoles for allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis associated with asthma', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2004)
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD001108.pub2
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Peter Wark, Peter Gibson
2004 Constantinou M, Wilson A, 'Traumatic tear of tibialis anterior during a Gaelic football game: a case report.', British journal of sports medicine, 38 (2004)

Reports of traumatic injury to the anterior lower leg muscles are scarce, with only a handful of reports of traumatic injury to the tibialis anterior. A database search of Medline... [more]

Reports of traumatic injury to the anterior lower leg muscles are scarce, with only a handful of reports of traumatic injury to the tibialis anterior. A database search of Medline, Cinhal, and Sports Discus only revealed three such cases, and they did not result from a direct sporting injury. This report documents the case of a traumatic rupture of tibialis anterior muscle in a young female Gaelic football player. It details the surgical repair and management of tibialis anterior muscle and the physiotherapy rehabilitation to full function.

Citations Scopus - 7
2004 Wark P, Gibson PG, Wilson A, 'Azoles for allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis associated with asthma', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2017 (2004)

© 2017 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd. Background: Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is hypersensitivity to the fungus Aspergillus fu... [more]

© 2017 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Background: Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is hypersensitivity to the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus that complicates patients with asthma and cystic fibrosis. The mainstay of treatment for allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis remains oral corticosteroids, though this does not completely prevent exacerbations and may not prevent the decline in lung function. Objectives: The purpose of this review was to determine the efficacy of azoles in the treatment of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Asthma trials register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE. Searches are current as of May 2008. Selection criteria: All controlled trials that assessed the effect of azole antifungal agents compared to placebo or other standard therapy for allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis were reviewed. Patients with cystic fibrosis were not included. Data collection and analysis: Two reviewers independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for additional information. Adverse effects information was collected from the trials. Main results: Twelve trials were identified, but only three were prospective, randomised and controlled. A total of 94 participants were included. One demonstrated a reduction in immunological markers of disease activity and symptom scores using ketoconazole 400 mg daily for 12 months. There was no significant improvement in lung function. The other two examined the use of itraconazole for 16 weeks. In one there was a reduction in sputum eosinophils by 35% compared to 19% with placebo (p < 0.01). In the same trial, the number of exacerbations requiring oral corticosteroids was 0.4 per patient with itraconazole compared with 1.3 per patient with placebo (p < 0.03). Meta-analysis of data from both trials showed that itraconazole treated patients were more likely to have decline in serum IgE over 25% or more (Peto OR 3.30; 95% confidence intervals 1.30 to 8.15). Authors' conclusions: Itraconazole modifies the immunologic activation associated with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and improves clinical outcome, at least over the period of 16 weeks. Adrenal suppression with inhaled corticosteroids and itraconazole is a potential concern.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD001108.pub2
Citations Scopus - 48
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Peter Wark
2003 Chiarelli PE, Bower W, Wilson AJ, Sibbritt DW, Attia JR, 'The prevalence of urinary incontinence in the community: a systematic review', Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care, (2003) [C3]
Co-authors John Attia, Pauline Chiarelli
2003 Chiarelli PE, Bower W, Wilson AJ, Sibbritt DW, Attia JR, 'The prevalence of faecal incontinence: a systematic review', Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care, (2003) [C3]
Co-authors John Attia, Pauline Chiarelli
2003 Shah L, Wilson AJ, Gibson PG, Coughlan J, 'Long acting beta-agonists versus theophylline for maintenance treatment of asthma.', Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online), (2003)

BACKGROUND: Theophylline and long acting beta-2 agonists are bronchodilators used for the management of persistent asthma symptoms, especially nocturnal asthma. They represent dif... [more]

BACKGROUND: Theophylline and long acting beta-2 agonists are bronchodilators used for the management of persistent asthma symptoms, especially nocturnal asthma. They represent different classes of drug with differing side-effect profiles. OBJECTIVES: To assess the comparative efficacy, safety and side-effects of long-acting beta-2 agonists and theophylline in the maintenance treatment of asthma. SEARCH STRATEGY: Randomised, controlled trials (RCTs) were identified using the Cochrane Airways Group register. The register was searched using the following terms: asthma and theophylline and long acting beta-agonist or formoterol or foradile or eformoterol or salmeterol or bambuterol or bitolterol. Date of last search was April 2003.Titles and abstracts were then screened to identify potentially relevant studies. The bibliography of each RCT was searched for additional RCTs. Authors of identified RCTs were contacted for other relevant published and unpublished studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: All included studies were RCTs involving adults and children with clinical evidence of asthma. These studies must have compared oral sustained release and/or dose adjusted theophylline with an inhaled long-acting beta-2 agonist. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Potentially relevant trials, identified by screening titles and/or abstracts, were obtained. Two reviewers independently assessed full text versions of these trials to decide whether the trial should be included in the review, and assessed its methodological quality. Where there was disagreement between reviewers, this was resolved by consensus, or reference to a third party.Data were extracted by two independent reviewers. Inter-rater reliability was assessed by simple agreement. Study authors were contacted to clarify randomisation methods, provide missing data, verify the data extracted and identify unpublished studies. Relevant pharmaceutical manufacturers were also contacted. MAIN RESULTS: Six trials originally met the inclusion criteria. Five used salmeterol and one, bitolterol. In an updated version of the review, six more trials were included. Four trials used salmeterol and two used formoterol. They were of varying quality. Salmeterol improved FEV1 significantly more than theophylline in five studies and salmeterol use was associated with significantly more symptom free nights in all the studies comparing these agents. Formoterol, used in two studies was reported to be as effective as theophylline. Bitolterol, used in only one study, was reported to be less effective than theophylline. Subjects taking salmeterol experienced fewer adverse events than those using theophylline (Parallel studies: Relative Risk 0.44; 95% CI: 0.30 to 0.63), Risk Difference -0.11 (95%CI: -0.16 to -0.07), NNT 9 (6, 14). Significant reductions were reported for central nervous system adverse events (Relative Risk 0.50; 95%Confidence Intervals 0.29, 0.86), Risk Difference -0.07(95% CI -0.12, -0.02), NNT 14(8, 50) and gastrointestinal adverse events (Relative Risk 0.30; 95%Confidence Intervals 0.17, 0.55), Risk Difference -0.11(-0.16, -0.06), NNT 9(6, 16). REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: Long-acting beta-2 agonists are at least as effective than theophylline in reducing asthma symptoms including night waking and improving lung function. Fewer adverse events occurred in subjects using long-acting beta-2 agonists(salmeterol and formoterol) as compared to theophylline.

Citations Scopus - 27
Co-authors Peter Gibson
2003 Wark PA, Gibson PG, Wilson AJ, 'Azoles for allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis associated with asthma.', Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online), (2003)

BACKGROUND: Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is hypersensitivity to the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus that complicates patients with asthma and cystic fibrosis. The mainstay... [more]

BACKGROUND: Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is hypersensitivity to the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus that complicates patients with asthma and cystic fibrosis. The mainstay of treatment for allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis remains oral corticosteroids, though this does not completely prevent exacerbations and may not prevent the decline in lung function. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this review was to determine the efficacy of azoles in the treatment of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Asthma trials register using the terms: (allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis OR aspergillosis OR allergic pulmonary aspergillosis OR allergic fungal and disease OR allergic mycotic and disease) AND (azole OR triazole OR itraconazole OR ketoconazole). Date of last search January 2003. SELECTION CRITERIA: All controlled trials that assessed the effect of azole antifungal agents compared to placebo or other standard therapy for allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis were reviewed. Patients with cystic fibrosis were not included. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for additional information. Adverse effects information was collected from the trials. MAIN RESULTS: Twelve trials were identified, but only three were prospective, randomised and controlled. A total of 94 participants were included. One demonstrated a reduction in immunological markers of disease activity and symptom scores using ketoconazole 400 mg daily for 12 months. There was no significant improvement in lung function. The other two examined the use of itraconazole for 16 weeks. In one there was a reduction in sputum eosinophils by 35% compared to 19% with placebo (p < 0.01). In the same trial, the number of exacerbations requiring oral corticosteroids was 0.4 per patient with itraconazole compared with 1.3 per patient with placebo (p < 0.03). Meta-analysis of data from both trials showed that itraconazole treated patients were more likely to have decline in serum IgE over 25% or more (Peto OR 3.30; 95% confidence intervals 1.30 to 8.15). REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: Itraconazole modifies the immunologic activation associated with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and improves clinical outcome, at least over the period of 16 weeks. Adrenal suppression with inhaled corticosteroids and itraconazole is a potential concern.

Citations Scopus - 22
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Peter Wark
2003 Aldrich R, Kemp L, Stewart Williams JA, Harris E, Simpson S, Wilson AJ, et al., 'Using Socioeconomic evidence in clinical practice guidelines', BMJ, 327 1283-1285 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmj.327.7426.1283
Citations Scopus - 46Web of Science - 36
Co-authors Julie Byles, Jenny Stewartwilliams, Katherine Mcgill
2002 Gibson PG, Coughlan J, Wilson A, Hensley MJ, Abramson M, Bauman A, Walters E, 'Limited (information only) patient education programs for adults with asthma', The Cochrane Library, 2 CD001005 (2002) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 17
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Michael Hensley
2002 Gibson PG, Powell H, Coughlan J, Wilson AJ, Hensley MJ, Abramson M, et al., 'Limited (information only) patient education programs for adults with asthma.', Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online), (2002)

BACKGROUND: A key component of many asthma management guidelines is the recommendation for patient education and regular medical review. A number of controlled trials have been co... [more]

BACKGROUND: A key component of many asthma management guidelines is the recommendation for patient education and regular medical review. A number of controlled trials have been conducted to measure the effectiveness of asthma education programmes. These programmes improve patient knowledge, but their impact on health outcomes is less well established. At its simplest level, education is limited to the transfer of information about asthma, its causes and its treatment. This review focused on the effects of limited asthma education. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to assess the effects of limited (i.e. information only) asthma education on health outcomes in adults with asthma. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Airways Group trials register and reference lists of articles. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised and controlled trials of individual asthma education involving information transfer only in adults over 16 years of age. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Trial quality was assessed and two reviewers extracted data independently. Study authors were contacted for missing information. MAIN RESULTS: Twelve trials were included. They were of variable quality. Limited asthma education did not reduce hospitalisation for asthma (weighted mean difference -0.03 average hospitalisations per person per year, 95% confidence interval -0.09 to 0.03). There was no significant effect on doctor visits, lung function and medication use. The effects on asthma symptoms were variable. There was no reduction in days lost from normal activity, but in two studies, perceived asthma symptoms did improve after limited asthma education (odds ratio 0.44, 95% confidence interval 0.26 to 0.74). In one study, limited asthma education was associated with reduced emergency department visits (reduction of -2.76 average visits per person per year, 95% confidence interval -4.34 to 1.18). REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: Use of limited asthma education as it has been practiced does not appear to improve health outcomes in adults with asthma although perceived symptoms may improve. Provision of information in the emergency department may be effective, but this needs to be confirmed.

Citations Scopus - 99
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Michael Hensley
2001 Suzuki T, Li W, Zhang Q, Novak EK, Sviderskaya EV, Wilson A, et al., 'The gene mutated in cocoa mice, carrying a defect of organelle biogenesis, is a homologue of the human hermansky-pudlak syndrome-3 gene', Genomics, 78 30-37 (2001)

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is a group of human disorders of organelle biogenesis characterized by defective synthesis of melanosomes, lysosomes, and platelet dense granules. ... [more]

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is a group of human disorders of organelle biogenesis characterized by defective synthesis of melanosomes, lysosomes, and platelet dense granules. In the mouse, at least 15 loci are associated with mutant phenotypes similar to human HPS. We have identified the gene mutated in cocoa (coa) mice, which is associated with an HPS-like mutant phenotype and thus represents a strong candidate for human HPS. Analysis of coa-mutant mice and cultured coa-mutant mouse melanocytes indicates that the normal coa gene product is involved in early stages of melanosome biogenesis and maturation.

DOI 10.1006/geno.2001.6644
Citations Scopus - 57
2001 Gibson PG, Simpson J, Chalmers AC, Toneguzzi R, Wark PA, Wilson AJ, Hensley MJ, 'Airway Eosinophilia is associated with Wheeze but is uncommon in Children with Persistent Cough and Frequent Chest Colds', American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 164 977-981 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 45Web of Science - 36
Co-authors Michael Hensley, Jodie Simpson, Peter Gibson, Anita Chalmers, Peter Wark
2001 Wark P, Wilson AJ, Gibson PG, 'Azoles for allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis', Praxis, 90 1780 (2001)
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Peter Wark
2000 Wilson A, Evans S, Frost G, 'A comparison of the amount of food served and consumed according to meal service system', Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 13 271-275 (2000)

Background: Malnutrition affects between 25 and 40% of all hospitalized patients, the majority of whom receive their main nutritional intake from the food provided by the hospital... [more]

Background: Malnutrition affects between 25 and 40% of all hospitalized patients, the majority of whom receive their main nutritional intake from the food provided by the hospital catering system. There is currently very little published information concerning the nutritional impact on patients of different methods of catering service. Objective: In the current study the effects of two catering service systems, plated and bulk service, on food and nutrient intake of hospital patients were compared. Methods: One-hundred and eight patient meals were surveyed, 51 on the plated meal and 57 on the bulk meal services. Patients were either on a general medical or an orthopaedic ward. Weighed food intake data were collected by weighing food served and comparing it to the weight of food left on the plate. Equal numbers of lunch and supper dishes were weighed. Also, a number of weekend surveys were carried out to take into account variation in service at weekends. Results: Food wastage was greater with the plated system. Comparing the amount of energy and nutrients consumed by patients according to meal system: energy intakes were significantly lower with the plated system (414 ± 23 kcal vs. 319 ± 22 kcal, P < 0.004). Protein, fat and carbohydrate intakes were also significantly lower. The main reason for the observed differences was the higher total food intake of the main course of the bulk service meals. Energy intake from the main course was significantly higher among patients receiving bulk service meals (227 ± 10 kcal vs. 165 ± 14 kcal, P < 0.006). Conclusion: Catering service systems can have a major impact on the nutritional intake of hospitalized patients.

DOI 10.1046/j.1365-277X.2000.00235.x
Citations Scopus - 30
2000 Mein CA, Barratt BJ, Dunn MG, Siegmund T, Smith AN, Esposito L, et al., 'Evaluation of single nucleotide polymorphism typing with invader on PCR amplicons and its automation', Genome Research, 10 330-343 (2000)

Large-scale pharmacogenetics and complex disease association studies will require typing of thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in thousands of individuals. Such p... [more]

Large-scale pharmacogenetics and complex disease association studies will require typing of thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in thousands of individuals. Such projects would benefit from a genotyping system with accuracy > 99% and a failure rate < 5% on a simple, reliable, and flexible platform. However, such a system is not yet available for routine laboratory use. We have evaluated a modification of the previously reported Invader SNP-typing chemistry for use in a genotyping laboratory and tested its automation. The Invader technology uses a Flap Endonuclease for allele discrimination and a universal fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporter system. Three hundred and eighty-four individuals were genotyped across a panel of 36 SNPs and one insertion/deletion polymorphism with Invader assays using PCR product as template, a total of 14,208 genotypes. An average failure rate of 2.3% was recorded, mostly associated with PCR failure, and the typing was 99.2% accurate when compared with genotypes generated with established techniques. An average signal-to-noise ratio (9:1) was obtained. The high degree of discrimination for single base changes, coupled with homogeneous format, has allowed us to deploy liquid handling robots in a 384-well microtitre place format and an automated end-point capture of fluorescent signal. Simple semiautomated data interpretation allows the generation of ~25,000 genotypes per person per week, which is 10-fold greater than gel-based SNP typing and microsatellite typing in our laboratory. Savings on labor costs are considerable. We conclude that Invader chemistry using PCR products as template represents a useful technology for typing large numbers of SNPs rapidly and efficiently.

DOI 10.1101/gr.10.3.330
Citations Scopus - 170
2000 Wark PA, Wilson A, Gibson PG, 'Azoles for allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis', The Cochrane Library, 1-9 (2000) [C1]
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Peter Wark
2000 Gibson PG, Coughlan J, Wilson AJ, Abramson M, Bauman A, Hensley MJ, Walters EH, 'Self-management education and regular practitioner review for adults with asthma.', Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online : Update Software), CD001117 (2000)

BACKGROUND: A key component of many asthma management guidelines is the recommendation for patient education and regular medical review. A number of controlled trials have been co... [more]

BACKGROUND: A key component of many asthma management guidelines is the recommendation for patient education and regular medical review. A number of controlled trials have been conducted to measure the effectiveness of asthma education programmes. These programmes improve patient knowledge, but their impact on health outcomes is less well established. This review was conducted to examine the strength of evidence supporting Step 6 of the Australian Asthma Management Plan: "Educate and Review Regularly"; to test whether health outcomes are influenced by education and self-management programmes. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to assess the effects of asthma self-management programmes, when coupled with regular health practitioner review, on health outcomes in adults with asthma. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Airways Group trials register and reference lists of articles. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials of self-management education in adults over 16 years of age with asthma. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Trial quality was assessed and data were extracted independently by two reviewers. Study authors were contacted for confirmation. MAIN RESULTS: Twenty-five trials were included. Self-management education was compared with usual care in 22 studies. Self-management education reduced hospitalisations (odds ratio 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.38 to 0.88); emergency room visits (odds ratio 0.71, 95% confidence interval (0.57 to 0.90); unscheduled visits to the doctor (odds ratio 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.40 to 0.82); days off work or school (odds ratio 0.55, 95% confidence interval 0.38 to 0. 79); and nocturnal asthma (odds ratio 0.53, 95% confidence interval 0.39 to 0.72). Measures of lung function were little changed. Self-management programmes that involved a written action plan showed a greater reduction in hospitalisation than those that did not (odds ratio 0.35, 95% confidence interval 0.18 to 0.68). People who managed their asthma by self-adjustment of their medications using an individualised written plan had better lung function than those whose medications were adjusted by a doctor. REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: Training in asthma self-management which involves self-monitoring by either peak expiratory flow or symptoms, coupled with regular medical review and a written action plan appears to improve health outcomes for adults with asthma. Training programmes which enable people to adjust their medication using a written action plan appear to be more effective than other forms of asthma self-management.

Citations Scopus - 62
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Michael Hensley
2000 Gibson PG, Coughlan J, Wilson AJ, Hensley MJ, Abramson M, Bauman A, Walters EH, 'Limited (information only) patient education programs for adults with asthma.', Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online : Update Software), (2000)

BACKGROUND: A key component of many asthma management guidelines is the recommendation for patient education and regular medical review. A number of controlled trials have been co... [more]

BACKGROUND: A key component of many asthma management guidelines is the recommendation for patient education and regular medical review. A number of controlled trials have been conducted to measure the effectiveness of asthma education programmes. These programmes improve patient knowledge, but their impact on health outcomes is less well established. At its simplest level, education is limited to the transfer of information about asthma, its causes and its treatment. This review focused on the effects of limited asthma education. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to assess the effects of limited (i.e. information only) asthma education on health outcomes in adults with asthma. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Airways Group trials register and reference lists of articles. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised and controlled trials of individual asthma education involving information transfer only in adults over 16 years of age. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Trial quality was assessed and data were extracted independently by two reviewers. Study authors were contacted for missing information. MAIN RESULTS: Eleven trials were included. They were of variable quality. Limited asthma education did not reduce hospitalisation for asthma (weighted mean difference -0.03 average hospitalisations per person per year, 95% confidence interval -0.09 to 0.03). There was no effect on doctor visits, lung function and medication use. The effects on asthma symptoms were variable. There was no reduction in days lost from normal activity, but perceived asthma symptoms did improve after limited asthma education (odds ratio 0.40, 95% confidence interval 0.18 to 0.86). In one study, limited asthma education was associated with reduced emergency department visits (weighted mean difference -2.76 average visits per person per year, 95% confidence interval -4.34 to 1.18). REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: Use of limited asthma education as it has been practiced does not appear to improve health outcomes in adults with asthma. However the use of information in the emergency department may be effective, but this needs to be confirmed.

Citations Scopus - 31
Co-authors Michael Hensley, Peter Gibson
2000 Gibson PG, Coughlan J, Wilson AJ, Hensley MJ, Abramson M, Bauman A, Walters EH, 'Limited (information only) patient education programs for adults with asthma.', Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online), (2000)

BACKGROUND: A key component of many asthma management guidelines is the recommendation for patient education and regular medical review. A number of controlled trials have been co... [more]

BACKGROUND: A key component of many asthma management guidelines is the recommendation for patient education and regular medical review. A number of controlled trials have been conducted to measure the effectiveness of asthma education programmes. These programmes improve patient knowledge, but their impact on health outcomes is less well established. At its simplest level, education is limited to the transfer of information about asthma, its causes and its treatment. This review focused on the effects of limited asthma education. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to assess the effects of limited (i.e. information only) asthma education on health outcomes in adults with asthma. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Airways Group trials register and reference lists of articles. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised and controlled trials of individual asthma education involving information transfer only in adults over 16 years of age. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Trial quality was assessed and data were extracted independently by two reviewers. Study authors were contacted for missing information. MAIN RESULTS: Eleven trials were included. They were of variable quality. Limited asthma education did not reduce hospitalisation for asthma (weighted mean difference -0.03 average hospitalisations per person per year, 95% confidence interval -0.09 to 0.03). There was no effect on doctor visits, lung function and medication use. The effects on asthma symptoms were variable. There was no reduction in days lost from normal activity, but perceived asthma symptoms did improve after limited asthma education (odds ratio 0.40, 95% confidence interval 0.18 to 0.86). In one study, limited asthma education was associated with reduced emergency department visits (weighted mean difference -2.76 average visits per person per year, 95% confidence interval -4.34 to 1.18). REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: Use of limited asthma education as it has been practiced does not appear to improve health outcomes in adults with asthma. However the use of information in the emergency department may be effective, but this needs to be confirmed.

Citations Scopus - 20
Co-authors Michael Hensley, Peter Gibson
2000 Gibson PG, Coughlan J, Wilson AJ, Abramson M, Bauman A, Hensley MJ, Walters EH, 'Self-management education and regular practitioner review for adults with asthma.', Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online), (2000)

BACKGROUND: A key component of many asthma management guidelines is the recommendation for patient education and regular medical review. A number of controlled trials have been co... [more]

BACKGROUND: A key component of many asthma management guidelines is the recommendation for patient education and regular medical review. A number of controlled trials have been conducted to measure the effectiveness of asthma education programmes. These programmes improve patient knowledge, but their impact on health outcomes is less well established. This review was conducted to examine the strength of evidence supporting Step 6 of the Australian Asthma Management Plan: "Educate and Review Regularly"; to test whether health outcomes are influenced by education and self-management programmes. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to assess the effects of asthma self-management programmes, when coupled with regular health practitioner review, on health outcomes in adults with asthma. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Airways Group trials register and reference lists of articles. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials of self-management education in adults over 16 years of age with asthma. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Trial quality was assessed and data were extracted independently by two reviewers. Study authors were contacted for confirmation. MAIN RESULTS: Twenty-five trials were included. Self-management education was compared with usual care in 22 studies. Self-management education reduced hospitalisations (odds ratio 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.38 to 0.88); emergency room visits (odds ratio 0.71, 95% confidence interval (0.57 to 0.90); unscheduled visits to the doctor (odds ratio 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.40 to 0.82); days off work or school (odds ratio 0.55, 95% confidence interval 0.38 to 0. 79); and nocturnal asthma (odds ratio 0.53, 95% confidence interval 0.39 to 0.72). Measures of lung function were little changed. Self-management programmes that involved a written action plan showed a greater reduction in hospitalisation than those that did not (odds ratio 0.35, 95% confidence interval 0.18 to 0.68). People who managed their asthma by self-adjustment of their medications using an individualised written plan had better lung function than those whose medications were adjusted by a doctor. REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: Training in asthma self-management which involves self-monitoring by either peak expiratory flow or symptoms, coupled with regular medical review and a written action plan appears to improve health outcomes for adults with asthma. Training programmes which enable people to adjust their medication using a written action plan appear to be more effective than other forms of asthma self-management.

Citations Scopus - 95
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Michael Hensley
2000 Wilson AJ, Gibson PG, Coughlan J, 'Long acting beta-agonists versus theophylline for maintenance treatment of asthma.', Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online), (2000)

BACKGROUND: Theophylline and long acting beta2-agonists are bronchodilators used for the management of persistent asthma symptoms, especially nocturnal asthma. They represent diff... [more]

BACKGROUND: Theophylline and long acting beta2-agonists are bronchodilators used for the management of persistent asthma symptoms, especially nocturnal asthma. They represent different classes of drug with differing side-effect profiles. OBJECTIVES: To assess the comparative efficacy, safety and side-effects of long-acting beta-agonists and theophylline in the maintenance treatment of asthma. SEARCH STRATEGY: Randomised, controlled trials (RCTs) were identified using the Cochrane Airways Group register. The register was searched using the following terms: asthma and theophylline and long acting beta-agonist or formoterol or foradile or eformoterol or salmeterol or bambuterol or bitolterol. Titles and abstracts were then screened to identify potentially relevant studies. The bibliography of each RCT was searched for additional RCTs. Authors of identified RCTs were contacted for other relevant published and unpublished studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: All included studies were RCTs involving adults and children with clinical evidence of asthma. These studies must have compared oral sustained release and/or dose adjusted theophylline with an inhaled long-acting beta-agonist. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Potentially relevant trials, identified by screening titles and/or abstracts, were obtained. Two reviewers independently assessed full text versions of these trials to decided whether the trial should be included in the review, and assessed its methodological quality. Where there was disagreement between reviewers, this was resolved by consensus, or reference to a third party. Data were extracted by two independent reviewers. Inter-rater reliability was assessed by simple agreement. Study authors were contacted to clarify randomisation methods, provide missing data, verify the data extracted and identify unpublished studies. Relevant pharmaceutical manufacturers were also contacted. MAIN RESULTS: Six trials met the inclusion criteria. Five used salmeterol and one, biltoterol. They were of varying quality. There was a trend for salmeterol to improve FEV1 more than theophylline in three studies and salmeterol use was associated with more symptom free nights. Bitolterol, used in only one study, was reported to be less effective than theophylline. Subjects taking salmeterol experienced fewer adverse events than those using theophylline (Relative Risk 0.38; 95%Confidence Intervals 0.25, 0.57). Significant reductions were reported for central nervous system adverse events (Relative Risk 0.51; 95%Confidence Intervals 0.30, 0.88) and gastrointestinal adverse events (Relative Risk 0.32; 95%Confidence Intervals 0.17, 0.59). REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: Salmeterol may be more effective than theophylline in reducing asthma symptoms including night waking and improving lung function. More adverse events occurred in subjects using theophylline when compared to salmeterol.

Citations Scopus - 31
Co-authors Peter Gibson
2000 Wark P, Wilson AW, Gibson PG, 'Azoles for allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.', Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online), (2000)

BACKGROUND: Allergic Broncho-pulmonary Aspergillosis (ABPA) is hypersensitivity to the fungus Aspergillus Fumigatus that complicates patients with asthma and cystic fibrosis. The ... [more]

BACKGROUND: Allergic Broncho-pulmonary Aspergillosis (ABPA) is hypersensitivity to the fungus Aspergillus Fumigatus that complicates patients with asthma and cystic fibrosis. The condition usually results in an increase in symptoms, a greater reliance on corticosteroids to control the disease process and may lead to a progressive decline in lung function. The mainstay of treatment for ABPA remains oral corticosteroids, though this does not completely prevent exacerbations and may not prevent the decline in lung function. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this review is to determine the efficacy of azoles in the treatment of ABPA SEARCH STRATEGY: An initial search was carried out using the Cochrane Airways Group Asthma RCT register. The register was searched using the following terms: (asthma or wheeze) and (allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis or aspergillosis or allergic pulmonary aspergillosis or allergic fungal and disease or allergic mycotic and disease) and (azole or triazole or itraconazole or ketoconazole). SELECTION CRITERIA: All controlled trials that assessed the effect of azole antifungal agents compared to placebo or other standard, for any duration or dose regimen in subjects with ABPA of any age or severity were reviewed. Studies in languages other than English were included. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: All identified trials were independently reviewed by both reviewers & all data collected. Trial quality was scored by the Cochrane assessment of allocation concealment & the Jadad scale of methodological quality. MAIN RESULTS: A total of 11 trials were identified concerning the use of azoles in ABPA. Only two prospective controlled trials were identified. The first trial examined the use of Ketoconazole 400 mg daily for 12 months and demonstrated a reduction in immunological markers of disease activity and symptom scores, there was no significant improvement in lung function. The other trial examined the use of itraconazole for 16 weeks. This demonstrated a reduction in corticosteroid usage, an improvement in immunological markers, an improvement in pulmonary function and exercise tolerance. This study was only available as an abstract and limited details were available. REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: There is insufficient information available to recommend the use of azole anti-fungal agents in the routine treatment of patients with ABPA.

Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Peter Wark
2000 Wilson AJ, Gibson PG, Coughlan J, 'Long acting beta-agonist versus theophylline for maintenance treatment of asthma', Praxis, 89 1305-1305 (2000)
Co-authors Peter Gibson
1999 Eaves IA, Bennett ST, Forster P, Ferber KM, Ehrmann D, Wilson AJ, et al., 'Transmission ratio distortion at the INS-IGF2 VNTR [2]', Nature Genetics, 22 324-325 (1999)
DOI 10.1038/11890
Citations Scopus - 57
1999 Wilson AJ, Gibson PG, Coughlan J, 'Comparative efficacy and safety of long-acting ß 2-agonists versus theophylline: A systematic review', Respirology, 4 (1999)

Both theophylline and long-acting ß 2 -agonists are recommended as effective treatment for nocturnal asthma in Australian Asthma Management Plan. This review sought to assess th... [more]

Both theophylline and long-acting ß 2 -agonists are recommended as effective treatment for nocturnal asthma in Australian Asthma Management Plan. This review sought to assess the comparative efficacy and safety of long-acting s-agonists and theophylline in the maintenance treatment of asthma. Methods: The Cochrane Airways Group Clinical Trials Register was searched for relevant studies and randomised controlled trials (RCTs) reporting more than one asthma outcome were included. Interventions were defined as inhaled long-acting ß 2 -agonists: salmeterol; eformoterol; bambuterol or bitolterol versus ingested sustained-release and/or doseadjusted theophylline. Data on methodological quality, study characteristics, interventions and outcomes were extracted by two independent reviewers and agreement was assessed. Results: Theophylline versus a long-acting ß 2 -agonist was reviewed in 6 RCTs of varying quality conducted over a period of 8 years. There was a trend for salmeterol to improve FEV1 more than theophylline (3 studies). More symptom free nights also tended to occur with salmeterol. Bitolterol (1 study) was less efficacious than theophylline. Subjects taking salmeterol experienced fewer adverse events than those using theophylline (RR 0.37;95%CI 0.23,0.60). Significant reductions were reported for central nervous system adverse events (RR 0.54;95%CI 0.31,0.93) and gastrointestinal adverse events (RR 0.29;95%CI 0.14, 0.60). Conclusions: Salmeterol may be more effective than theophylline in reducing asthma symptoms, including night waking and the need for rescue medication. More adverse events occurred in patients using theophylline when compared to salmeterol.

Co-authors Peter Gibson
1999 Gibson PG, Coughlan J, Wilson AJ, Hensley MJ, Abramson M, Bauman A, Walters EH, 'Limited (information only) patient education programs for adults with asthma', Praxis, 88 1570 (1999)
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Michael Hensley
1999 Gibson PG, Coughlan J, Wilson AJ, Abramson M, Bauman A, Hensley MJ, Walters EH, 'Self-management education and regular practitioner review for adults with asthma', Praxis, 88 1571-1572 (1999)
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Michael Hensley
1999 Simpson J, Wilson A, Fakes K, Burgess H, Saltos N, Gibson PG, 'Neutrophil activation in symptomatic asthma without eosinophilia', Respirology, 4 (1999)

In mild asthma there is typically an infiltrate with eosinophils, which improves with corticosteroid therapy. Asthma can persist despite high dose inhaled corticosteroid therapy (... [more]

In mild asthma there is typically an infiltrate with eosinophils, which improves with corticosteroid therapy. Asthma can persist despite high dose inhaled corticosteroid therapy (ICS). Aim: The aim of this study was to establish the characteristics of airway inflammation in asthma, which persists despite high dose inhaled corticosteroids. Method: Adults (n=73) with asthma and persistent symptoms who were taking =1000g ICS underwent hypertonic saline challenge and sputum induction. Sputum was dispersed using dithiothreitol and assayed for total cell count, cellular differential, supernatant eosinophil cationic protein (ECP ng/mL), myeloperoxidase (MPO ng/mL) and interleukin-8 (IL-8 ng/mL). Subjects were categorised into 4 groups based upon the presence or absence of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and increased sputum eosinophils (E; being > 5%). Results: Subjects with eosinophilic AHR (EAR n=16) had 22% E, compared to those with noneosinophilic AHR (NEAR, n=40) who had 1.5% E. Those with asthma in remission (normal AHR and E; n=14) had 1.2% E. Neutrophil % was similar in all 3 groups (p > 0.05). ECP was highest in the EAR positive group (7572) compared with NEAR (2834) and remission (504; p = 0.001). MPO was elevated in NEAR (275) and EAR (253) compared with remission (189; p = 0.05). IL-8 levels were highest in NEAR (86.2) compared to EAR (36.5) and remission (12.9; p = 0.03). Conclusion: Asthma which remains symptomatic despite high dose ICS consists of 2 different inflammatory patterns. While some have typical eosinophil inflammation, the most common pattern is cellular (neutrophil and eosinophil) activation, with suppressed eosinophil counts. This may be mediated by IL-8 secretion. There is heterogeneity of airway inflammation in symptomatic asthma.

Co-authors Peter Gibson, Jodie Simpson
1998 Nakagawa Y, Kawaguchi Y, Twells RCJ, Muxworthy C, Hunter KMD, Wilson A, et al., 'Fine mapping of the diabetes-susceptibility locus, IDDM4, on chromosome 11q13', American Journal of Human Genetics, 63 547-556 (1998)

Genomewide linkage studies of type 1 diabetes (or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus [IDDM]) indicate that several unlinked susceptibility loci can explain the clustering of the ... [more]

Genomewide linkage studies of type 1 diabetes (or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus [IDDM]) indicate that several unlinked susceptibility loci can explain the clustering of the disease in families. One such locus has been mapped to chromosome 11q13 (IDDM4). In the present report we have analyzed 707 affected sib pairs, obtaining a peak multipoint maximum LOD score (MLS) of 2.7 (¿(s) = 1.09) with linkage (MLS = 0.7) extending over a 15-cM region. The problem is, therefore, to fine map the locus to permit structural analysis of positional candidate genes. In a two-stage approach, we first scanned the 15-cM linked region for increased or decreased transmission, from heterozygous parents to affected siblings in 340 families, of the three most common alleles of each of 12 microsatellite loci. One of the 36 alleles showed decreased transmission (50% expected, 45.1% observed [P = .02, corrected P = .72] ) at marker D11S1917. Analysis of an additional 1,702 families provided further support for negative transmission (48%) of D11S1917 allele 3 to affected offspring and positive transmission (55%) to unaffected siblings (test of heterogeneity P = 3 x 10 -4 , corrected P = .01]). A second polymorphic marker, H0570polyA, was isolated from a cosmid clone containing D11S1917, and genotyping of 2,042 families revealed strong linkage disequilibrium between the two markers (15 kb apart), with a specific haplotype, D11S1917*03-H0570polyA*02, showing decreased transmission (46.4%) to affected offspring and increased transmission (56.6%) to unaffected siblings (test of heterogeneity P = 1.5 x 10 -6 , corrected P = 4.3 x 10 -4 ). These results not only provide sufficient justification for analysis of the gene content of the D11S1917 region for positional candidates but also show that, in the mapping of genes for common multifactorial diseases, analysis of both affected and unaffected siblings is of value and that both predisposing and nonpredisposing alleles should be anticipated.

DOI 10.1086/301974
Citations Scopus - 58
1998 Cucca F, Esposito L, Goy JV, Merriman ME, Wilson AJ, Reed PW, et al., 'Investigation of linkage of chromosome 8 to type 1 diabetes: Multipoint analysis and exclusion mapping of human chromosome 8 in 593 affected sib- pair families from the U.K. and U.S.', Diabetes, 47 1525-1527 (1998)
Citations Scopus - 10
1998 Esposito L, Hill NJ, Pritchard LE, Cucca F, Muxworthy C, Merriman ME, et al., 'Genetic analysis of chromosome 2 in type 1 diabetes: Analysis of putative loci IDDM7, IDDM12, and IDDM13 and candidate genes NRAMP1 and IA-2 and the interleukin-1 gene cluster', Diabetes, 47 1797-1799 (1998)
DOI 10.2337/diabetes.47.11.1797
Citations Scopus - 65
1998 Hu W, Hasan A, Wilson A, Stanford MR, Li-Yang Y, Todryk S, et al., 'Experimental mucosal induction of uveitis with the 60-kDa heat shock protein-derived peptide 336-351', European Journal of Immunology, 28 2444-2455 (1998)

Subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization of rats with the human 60-kDa heat shock protein (HSP)-derived peptide 336-351 induced clinical and/or histological uveitis in 80% of rats. Subseq... [more]

Subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization of rats with the human 60-kDa heat shock protein (HSP)-derived peptide 336-351 induced clinical and/or histological uveitis in 80% of rats. Subsequent experiments to prevent the development of uveitis by oral or nasal administration of the peptide have failed. Instead, uveitis was induced in 74.6% of rats given the peptide orally (5 times), in 75% given the peptide nasally (5 times) or 91.7% of those administered the peptide by both routes (10 times). Histological examination showed that any one route of administration of the peptide elicited iridocyclitis in 42.2% but loss of photoreceptors only in 4.9% of rats. In contrast, sequential administrations of the peptide by a combined mucosal-s.c. route resulted in iridocyclitis in only 25% but loss of photoreceptors in 40% of animals. Examination of mRNA from CD4-enriched splenic cells by reverse transcription-PCR failed to yield significant differences in Th1 or Th2 cytokines. Treatment with monoclonal antibody (mAb) to CD4 yielded a dose-dependent decrease in uveitis from 82% to 25%. Similarly, treatment with IL-4 significantly decreased the development of uveitis from 68% to 30.4%. Conversely treatment of the rats with mAb to CD8 greatly enhanced the onset of uveitis (from about 22 days in the controls to 11 days) and all the rats developed uveitis by day 24. Thus, CD4 + cells mediate, whereas CD8 + cells suppress the development of uveitis. We suggest that this novel experimental mucosal model of induction of uveitis by the human 60-kDa HSP-derived peptide 336-351, which is specific in stimulating T cell responses in Behcet's disease, is consistent with the oro-genital onset of this disease and the development of uveitis.

DOI 10.1002/(SICI)1521-4141(199808)28:08&amp;lt;2444::AID-IMMU2444&amp;gt;3.0.CO;2-N
Citations Scopus - 52
1998 Rosemblat S, Sviderskaya EV, Easty DJ, Wilson A, Kwon BS, Bennett DC, Orlow SJ, 'Melanosomal defects in melanocytes from mice lacking expression of the pink-eyed dilution gene: Correction by culture in the presence of excess tyrosine', Experimental Cell Research, 239 344-352 (1998)

Mutations in the murine pink-eyed dilution (p) gene, or its human homologue P, result in oculocutaneous albinism. Melanocytes cultured from mice lacking p gene expression exhibit ... [more]

Mutations in the murine pink-eyed dilution (p) gene, or its human homologue P, result in oculocutaneous albinism. Melanocytes cultured from mice lacking p gene expression exhibit defective melanogenesis, but following culture in the presence of high concentrations of L-tyrosine, increased melanin deposition is observed. Electron microscopy and image analysis demonstrated that untreated p mutant melanocytes exhibited small melanosomes, largely of stages I-II. Following tyrosine treatment, increased proportions of stage III-IV melanosomes, almost normal in size, were observed. Levels of tyrosinase protein and to a lesser extent of tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1) were subnormal but rose dramatically following stimulation by tyrosine. Levels of TRP-2 and Pmel17/silver gene product were not altered, nor were the levels of mRNA for tyrosinase, TRP-1, TRP-2, or the Pmel17/silver gene product. As expected, the 110-kDa product of the p gene was absent from both stimulated and unstimulated p mutant cells. In a melanoblast line derived from the same mice, excess tyrosine failed to stimulate visible melanogenesis or increase the low levels of tyrosinase. The melanosomes in these cells were smaller still than those in the mutant melanocytes even when cultured in the presence of excess tyrosine. Thus, absence of the p gene product affects melanosomal structure and protein composition at the posttranscriptional level. These defects are correctable at least in part by supplementation with L-tyrosine.

DOI 10.1006/excr.1997.3901
Citations Scopus - 45
1998 Chow JWM, Wilson AJ, Chambers TJ, Fox SW, 'Mechanical loading stimulates bone formation by reactivation of bone lining cells in 13-week-old rats', Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, 13 1760-1767 (1998)

The hone formation that occurs in response to mechanical stimulation is generally considered to be a means by which bone adapts to changes in its mechanical environment. We have p... [more]

The hone formation that occurs in response to mechanical stimulation is generally considered to be a means by which bone adapts to changes in its mechanical environment. We have previously shown that the expression of genes for bone matrix proteins is maximal 72 h after a single 5-minute episode of loading of tail vertebrae of 13-week-old female rats, that the predominant increase in mineralization occurs after 3 days, and that the osteogenic response to mechanical stimulation is not dependent on prior bone resorption. We have now investigated the cellular correlates of this osteogenic response. No proliferation was detected, by pulse or flash labeling, in the trabecular bone surface cells of animals killed 1 h to 10 days after the loading episode. Ultrastructural examination revealed that most of the cells covering the trabecular bone surface of control vertebrae were flat bone lining cells. After mechanical stimulation, the trabecular bone surface cells developed ultrastructural features of osteoblastic differentiation and activity, with acquisition of an increasingly cuboidal shape, rounded nuclei, and abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum. Morphometric analysis of the mean cell area, mean nuclear area, and cell and nuclear height showed that they were all maximal 48 h after loading. By 120 h after loading, the appearances of bone surface cells had reverted to those of control vertebrae. Thus, mechanical loading appears to activate lining cells, with a temporal sequence that correlates with bone matrix production.

DOI 10.1359/jbmr.1998.13.11.1760
Citations Scopus - 69
1998 Cucca F, Goy JV, Kawaguchi Y, Esposito L, Merriman ME, Wilson AJ, et al., 'A male-female bias in type 1 diabetes and linkage to chromosome Xp in MHC HLA-DR3-positive patients', Nature Genetics, 19 301-302 (1998)

It is generally assumed that the male:female (M:F) ratio in patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is 1. A recent survey, however, revealed that high in... [more]

It is generally assumed that the male:female (M:F) ratio in patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is 1. A recent survey, however, revealed that high incidence countries (mainly European) have a high M:F ratio and low incidence ones (Asian and African) have a low M:F ratio. We have now analysed the M:F ratio according to genotype at the major locus, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC; IDDM1). There are two main IDDM1 susceptibility haplotypes, HLA-DR3 and -DR4, which are present in 95% of Caucasian cases. We report here that in medium/high incidence Caucasian populations from the United States of America, United Kingdom and Sardinia (1307 cases), the bias in male incidence is largely restricted to the DR3/X category of patients (X¿DR4) with a M:F ratio of 1.7 (P=9.3x10 - 7 ), compared with a ratio of 1.0 in the DR4/Y category (Y¿DR3). This is additional evidence for significant heterogeneity between the aetiology of 'DR4associated' and 'DR3-associated' diabetes. We analysed linkage of type 1 diabetes to chromosome X, and as expected, most of the linkage to Xp13-p11 was in the DR3/X affected sibpair families (n=97; peak multipoint MLS at DXS1068=3.5, P=2.7x10 -4 ; single point MLS=4.5, P=2.7x10 -5 ). This is evidence for aetiological heterogeneity at the IDDM1/MHC locus and, therefore, in the search for non-MHC loci in type 1 diabetes, conditioning of linkage data by HLA type is advised.

DOI 10.1038/995
Citations Scopus - 110
1998 Mein CA, Esposito L, Dunn MG, Johnson GCL, Timms AE, Goy JV, et al., 'A search for type 1 diabetes susceptibility genes in families from the United Kingdom', Nature Genetics, 19 297-300 (1998)

Genetic analysis of a mouse model of major histocompatability complex (MHC)-associated autoimmune type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) has shown that the disease is... [more]

Genetic analysis of a mouse model of major histocompatability complex (MHC)-associated autoimmune type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) has shown that the disease is caused by a combination of a major effect at the MHC and at least ten other susceptibility loci elsewhere in the genome. A genome-wide scan of 93 affected sibpair families (ASP) from the UK (UK93) indicated a similar genetic basis for human type 1 diabetes, with the major genetic component at the MHC locus (IDDM1) explaining 34% of the familial clustering of the disease (¿(s)=2.5; refs 3.4). In the present report, we have analysed a further 263 multiplex families from the same population (UK263) to provide a total UK data set of 356 ASP families (UK356). Only four regions of the genome outside IDDM1/MHC, which was still the only major locus detected, were not excluded at ¿(s)=3 and lod=-2, of which two showed evidence of linkage: chromosome 10p13-p11 (maximum lod score (MLS)=4.7, P=3x10 -6 , ¿(s)=1.56) and chromosome 16q22-16q24 (MLS=3.4, P=6.5x10 -5 , ¿(s)= 1.6). These and other novel regions, including chromosome 14q12-q21 and chromosome 19p1319q13, could potentially harbour disease loci but confirmation and fine mapping cannot be pursued effectively using conventional linkage analysis. Instead, more powerful linkage disequilibrium-based and haplotype mapping approaches must be used; such data is already emerging for several type 1 diabetes loci detected initially by linkage.

DOI 10.1038/991
Citations Scopus - 302
1998 Gibson PG, 'Severe exacerbation of chronic obstructive airways disease: Health resource use in general practice and hospital', Journal of Quality in Clinical Practice, 18 125-133 (1998)

The objective of this study is to examine the treatment of exacerbations of chronic obstructive airways disease (COAD) in the hospital and in the community setting using a retrosp... [more]

The objective of this study is to examine the treatment of exacerbations of chronic obstructive airways disease (COAD) in the hospital and in the community setting using a retrospective study of patients admitted to a major teaching hospital combined with a general practice chart audit. The admission records for 248 admissions from 128 patients were reviewed. Most patients (70%) had visited their GP within 2 weeks of admission, antibiotics were prescribed for 30% of the exacerbations while 51% were treated with ingested corticosteroids. During hospitalization, features of infection were present in 64% (n = 159) of exacerbations and 79% (n = 196) received antibiotics. Patients were also treated with nebulized bronchodilators, oxygen and corticosteroids (82%). The median length of stay was 10 days (range 0-55). There was a high readmission rate (70%) at 1 year for exacerbation of COAD during the study period. Exacerbations of COAD frequently demonstrated the clinical features of infection. Treatment in general practice was less intensive than in hospital, and there is a need to reconcile these differences with studies of early therapy with antibiotics and corticosteroids. Although corticosteroids were used less often in general practice, the literature in this area is not conclusive and the evidence supporting guideline recommendations is not explicit. There are opportunities to examine the role of early therapy and early discharge programmes to minimize the cost burden from exacerbations of COAD.

Citations Scopus - 42
Co-authors Peter Gibson
1998 Gibson PG, Coughlan J, Wilson AJ, Shekelle PG, 'Review: Limited asthma education reduces emergency department visits but does not improve patient outcomes', Evidence-Based Medicine, 3 121 (1998)
Co-authors Peter Gibson
1997 Warr K, Fortune F, Namie S, Wilson A, Shinnick T, Van Der Zee R, et al., 'T-cell epitopes recognized within the 65 000 MW hsp in patients with IgA nephropathy', Immunology, 91 399-405 (1997)

IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the commonest cause of glomerulonephritis and clinical exacerbation of IgAN is frequently associated with mucosal infection, T-cell receptor¿d (TCR¿d +... [more]

IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the commonest cause of glomerulonephritis and clinical exacerbation of IgAN is frequently associated with mucosal infection, T-cell receptor¿d (TCR¿d + ) cells are increased in both the circulation and in renal biopsies of patients with progressive IgAN. We examined the hypothesis that specific peptides within the 65000 MW heat-shock protein (hsp) might stimulate TCR¿d cells and play a part in the immunopathogenesis of IgAN. We studied T-cell proliferative responses stimulated by overlapping peptides derived from the sequence of mycobacterial 65000 MW hsp. Three T-cell epitopes have been identified (peptides 51-65, 71-85 and 281-295). The three peptides have a synergistic effect and they stimulate significantly higher proliferation of T cells in patients with IgAN than in disease or healthy controls. This response was inhibited by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to TCR¿d + and human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I, but not by mAb to HLA class II. The involvement of TCR¿d + cells was confirmed by up-regulation of the proportion of TCR¿d + cells when stimulated with the three specific peptides. We suggest that IgAN might be associated with mucosal infection by a variety of micro-organisms and that peptides within the microbial hsp cross-react with the homologous human hsp which may stimulate TCR¿d + cells and play a part in the pathogenesis of IgAN.

Citations Scopus - 9
1997 Reed P, Cucca F, Jenkins S, Merriman M, Wilson A, McKinney P, et al., 'Evidence for a type 1 diabetes susceptibility locus (IDDM10) on human chromosome 10p11-q11', Human Molecular Genetics, 6 1011-1016 (1997)

A region of linkage to type 1 diabetes has been defined on human chromosome 10p11-q11 (IDDM10; P= 0.0007) using 236 UK and 76 US affected sibpairs and a 1 cM resolution microsatel... [more]

A region of linkage to type 1 diabetes has been defined on human chromosome 10p11-q11 (IDDM10; P= 0.0007) using 236 UK and 76 US affected sibpairs and a 1 cM resolution microsatellite marker map. Analysis by the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) in 1159 families with at least one diabetic child, from the UK, the US, Norway Sardinia and Italy provided additional support for linkage at D10S193 (P = 0.006, P(c) = 0.17). Notably, 5.1 cM distal to D10S193, marker D10S588 also provided positive TDT results (P = 0.009, P(c) = 0.25) but the allele under analysis was also preferentially transmitted to nonaffected siblings (P= 0.0008, P(c)= 0.02). This allele was positively associated in an independent UK case control study and, importantly, was neutrally transmitted in control CEPH families. These results suggest a type 1 diabetes susceptibility locus on chromosome 10p11-q11 (provisionally designated IDDM10) and demonstrate the necessity of analysis of non affected siblings in disease families, as well as analysis of control families.

DOI 10.1093/hmg/6.7.1011
Citations Scopus - 64
1997 Bennett ST, Wilson AJ, Esposito L, Bouzekri N, Undlien DE, Cucca F, et al., 'Insulin VNTR allele-specific effect in type 1 diabetes depends on identity of untransmitted paternal allele', Nature Genetics, 17 350-352 (1997)

The IDDM2 type 1 diabetes susceptibility locus was mapped to and identified as allelic variation at the insulin gene (INS) VNTR regulatory polymorphism. In Caucasians; INS VNTR al... [more]

The IDDM2 type 1 diabetes susceptibility locus was mapped to and identified as allelic variation at the insulin gene (INS) VNTR regulatory polymorphism. In Caucasians; INS VNTR alleles divide into two discrete size classes. Class I alleles (26 to 63 repeats) predispose in a recessive way to type 1 diabetes, while class III alleles (140 to more than 200 repeats) are dominantly protective. The protective effect may be explained by higher levels of class III VNTR-associated INS mRNA in thymus such that elevated levels of preproinsulin protein enhance immune tolerance to preproinsulin, a key autoantigen in type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. The mode of action of IDDM2 is complicated, however, by parent-of-origin effects and possible allelic heterogeneity within the two defined allele classes. We have now analysed transmission of specific VNTR alleles in 1,316 families and demonstrate that a particular class I allele does not predispose to disease when paternally inherited, suggestive of polymorphic imprinting. But this paternal effect is observed only when the father's untransmitted allele is a class III. This allelic interaction is reminiscent of epigenetic phenomena observed in plants (for example, paramutation; ref. 17) and in yeast (for example, trans- inactivation; ref. 18). If untransmitted chromosomes can have functional effects on the biological properties of transmitted chromosomes, the implications for human genetics and disease are potentially considerable.

DOI 10.1038/ng1197-350
Citations Scopus - 147
1997 Wolley KL, Gibson PG, Carty K, Wilson AJ, Twaddell SH, Woolley MJ, 'Eosinophil apoptosis and the resolution of airway inflammation in asthma', Pediatric Pulmonology, 23 320 (1997)

Asthma is accompanied by the accumulation of potentially damaging eosinophils within inflamed airways. How eosinophils may be removed from the airways is not clear. The phagocytic... [more]

Asthma is accompanied by the accumulation of potentially damaging eosinophils within inflamed airways. How eosinophils may be removed from the airways is not clear. The phagocytic removal of eosinophils in vitro requires that they undergo apoptosis, a form of cell death. We postulated that eosinophil apoptosis may occur in vivo, promoting the removal of airway eosinophils and the resolution of inflammation in asthma. We examined eosinophil apoptosis in sputum samples obtained from 11 subjects during an asthma exacerbation and 2 wk after corticosteroid treatment of the exacerbation. Airway function improved following corticosteroid treatment, and eosinophilic inflammation subsided, with significant decreases occurring in the number of airway eosinophils and the percentage of activated eosinophils. The proportion of apoptotic airway eosinophils increased significantly following corticosteroid treatment, and eosinophil products were apparent within macrophages. Our findings indicate that eosinophil apoptosis is clinically relevant in asthma. Apoptosis may represent a mechanism that promotes the resolution of eosinophilic inflammation in asthma. Comments. Apoptosis, a programmed form of cell death appears to be an important mechanism responsible for the removal of airway eosinophils in the resolution of acute asthma. This is the first report of apoptosis of airway eosinophils.

Co-authors Peter Gibson
1996 Hasan A, Fortune F, Wilson A, Warr K, Shinnick T, Mizushima Y, et al., 'Role of ¿d T cells in pathogenesis and diagnosis of Behçet's disease', Lancet, 347 789-794 (1996)

Background: Behçet&apos;s disease (BD) is a multisystem disorder of unknown pathogenesis. The diagnosis is based on a set of international clinical criteria. Previous investigati... [more]

Background: Behçet's disease (BD) is a multisystem disorder of unknown pathogenesis. The diagnosis is based on a set of international clinical criteria. Previous investigations have suggested that immunological cross-reactivity between peptides within streptococcal heat-shock proteins and human peptides might be involved in the pathogenesis of BD. We tested four peptides from mycobacterial heat-shock proteins to see if they specifically stimulated ¿d T cells from BD patients. We then investigated this response to see whether it could be used as a laboratory test to diagnose BD. Methods: We used a T-cell proliferative test to assay responses to four mycobacterial 65 kDa heat-shock-protein peptides and to four homologous peptides derived from the sequence of the human 60 kDa heat-shock protein. Findings: We elicited significant ¿d T-cell responses to the mycobacterial peptides in 25 (76%) of 33 patients with BD, compared with 2 (3·6%) of 55 controls with recurrent oral ulcers, systemic disease, or no disorders. The proportion of BD patients who had false-negative results decreased if the test was done during cl inical manifestation of disease activity. There was a correlation between disease activity and T-cell responses. Four homologous peptides from human 60 kDa heat-shock protein also specifically stimulated T cells from patients with BD but with lower stimulation indices. Interpretation: Activation of peripheral-blood mononuclear cells with the four heat-shock-protein peptides elicited significant T-cell proliferative responses by the ¿d subset of T cells, which may regulate aß T cells. Because these peptides have a high specificity for BD, this assay can be used as a laboratory diagnostic test for BD.

Citations Scopus - 147
1996 Gaston JSH, Hasan A, Fortune F, Wilson A, Lehner T, 'Role of ¿d T cells in Behcet's disease [16]', Lancet, 347 1631-1632 (1996)
Citations Scopus - 3
1996 Davies JL, Cucca F, Goy JV, Atta ZAA, Merriman ME, Wilson A, et al., 'Saturation multipoint linkage mapping of chromosome 6q in type 1 diabetes', Human Molecular Genetics, 5 1071-1074 (1996)

Linkage analysis of type 1 diabetes sib pair families (n = 334) has suggested two separate regions of human chromosome 6q are linked to disease (designated IDDM5 and IDDM8). To te... [more]

Linkage analysis of type 1 diabetes sib pair families (n = 334) has suggested two separate regions of human chromosome 6q are linked to disease (designated IDDM5 and IDDM8). To test if these are false positive results, all available sib pair families (n = 429) were typed using a 92% informative map of chromosome 6q and multipoint analysis. The two regions still showed positive evidence of linkage, most notably the proterminal region, 6q27, corresponding to IDDM8 (MLS = 2.57, p = 0.0006; ¿(s) = 1.17). In addition, some evidence of transmission disequilibrium was seen with marker a046xa9 (IDDM5).

DOI 10.1093/hmg/5.7.1071
Citations Scopus - 62
1996 Davies JL, Cucca F, Goy JV, Atta ZAA, Merriman ME, Wilson A, et al., 'Linkage of chromosome 6 and type 1 diabetes', Mitochondrial DNA, 7 25-26 (1996)
DOI 10.3109/10425179609015641
1996 Woolley KL, Gibson PG, Carty K, Wilson AJ, Woolley MJ, 'Eosinophil apoptosis and the resolution of airway inflammation in asthma', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, 154 237-243 (1996)
Citations Scopus - 222Web of Science - 197
Co-authors Peter Gibson
1996 Gibson PG, 'The use of continuous quality improvement methods to implement practice guidelines in asthma', Journal of Quality in Clinical Practice, 16 87-102 (1996)

National asthma management guidelines have improved awareness of the rising morbidity and mortality from asthma but have not been widely implemented at a local level. This paper d... [more]

National asthma management guidelines have improved awareness of the rising morbidity and mortality from asthma but have not been widely implemented at a local level. This paper describes the use of continuous quality improvement techniques to facilitate the implementation of asthma management guidelines within a tertiary hospital setting. A baseline audit demonstrated satisfactory emergency assessment and treatment, but identified poor compliance with the patient education aspects of the asthma management plan. An evaluation of the literature demonstrated that programs combining asthma education and management were effective when directed towards adults with a recent severe asthma exacerbation. An asthma education and management service was developed to address these deficits. A repeat audit was conducted which identified improvements in asthma control and management skills for patients attending the education program, together with reductions in asthma re-admission rates for patients referred to the service. Ongoing quality assessments will target nonattenders to the service and the maintenance of asthma skills. An area Asthma Health Outcomes Council was formed to address the issues of asthma management throughout the area health service.

Citations Scopus - 27
Co-authors Peter Gibson
1994 Robbins RA, Barnes PJ, Springall DR, Warren JB, Kwon OJ, Buttery LDK, et al., 'Expression of inducible nitric oxide in human lung epithelial cells', Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 203 209-218 (1994)

Nitric oxide (NO) is increased in the exhaled air of subjects with several airway disorders. To determine if cytokines could stimulate epithelial cells accounting for the increase... [more]

Nitric oxide (NO) is increased in the exhaled air of subjects with several airway disorders. To determine if cytokines could stimulate epithelial cells accounting for the increased NO, the capacity of the proinflammatory cytokines (cytomix: tumor necrosis factor-a, interleukin-1ß, and interferon-¿) to increase inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS ) was investigated in A549 and primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells. Cytomix induced a time-dependent increase in nitrite levels in culture supernatant fluids (p < 0.05). Increased numbers of cells stained for iNOS and increased iNOS mRNA was detected in the cytokine-stimulated cells compared to control (p < 0.05). Dexamethasone diminished the cytokine-induced increase in nitrite, iNOS by immunocytochemistry, and iNOS mRNA. These data demonstrate that cytokines, such as those released by mononuclear cells, can induce lung epithelial iNOS expression and NO release, and that this is attenuated by dexamethasone. © 1994 Academic Press, Inc.

DOI 10.1006/bbrc.1994.2169
Citations Scopus - 303
1994 Robbins RA, Springall DR, Warren JB, Kwon OJ, Buttery LDK, Wilson AJ, et al., 'Inducible nitric oxide synthase is increased in murine lung epithelial cells by cytokine stimulation', Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 198 835-843 (1994)

Nitric oxide (NO) is detectable in exhaled air. To elucidate whether airway epithelial cells could be a source of NO, we investigated the expression of inducible nitric oxide synt... [more]

Nitric oxide (NO) is detectable in exhaled air. To elucidate whether airway epithelial cells could be a source of NO, we investigated the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by the murine lung epithelial cell line, LA-4, in response to cytokine stimulation and the ability of corticosteroids to modulate this effect. Stimulation with cytomix, a combination of interleukin-1ß, tumor necrosis factor-a, and interferon-gamma, elevated nitrite levels by 873% in the culture supernatants and enhanced the conversion of arginine to citrulline by 273% at 24 h. An increased number of cells stained for iNOS and an increase in iNOS mRNA was also observed. Dexamethasone decreased the cytokine-induced increase in nitrite levels, NOS activity, iNOS immunoreactivity, and mRNA but did not change the half life of iNOS mRNA. These results show that lung epithelial cells can release NO, a process which can be inhibited by dexamethasone. © 1994 Academic Press, Inc.

DOI 10.1006/bbrc.1994.1119
Citations Scopus - 157
1994 Warren JB, Loi RK, Wilson AJ, 'PGD

We investigated the role of endogenous prostaglandins and NO in the blood flow response of skin microcirculation in vivo. Test agents were injected intradermally in anesthetized r... [more]

We investigated the role of endogenous prostaglandins and NO in the blood flow response of skin microcirculation in vivo. Test agents were injected intradermally in anesthetized rabbits and changes in skin blood flow measured with a laser-Doppler flow probe. Skin blood flow increased 75% at 7.33, 6.77, 11.63, 10.30, 10.55, 8.20, and < 7 -log mol/site with acetylcholine, ATP, bradykinin, prostaglandin D 2 (PGD 2 ), prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ), NO gas in solution, and nitroprusside respectively. Co-injection of indomethacin (3 x 10 -9 mol/site) or N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10 -7 mol/site) with either acetylcholine or bradykinin abolished the effects. This suggests a link between NO and prostaglandin release. Arachidonic acid increased blood flow, which was inhibited by indomethacin, L-NAME, or the PGD 2 -receptor antagonist BW-A868C. Blood flow responses to either intradermal acetylcholine or bradykinin, but not to NO in solution, were abolished by co-injection with BW-A868C. PGD 2 -mediated vasodilation was abolished by L-NAME or BW-A868C, but not by indomethacin. There was no evidence of a link between NO and prostaglandin release in precontracted rabbit aortic rings in vitro. The results suggest that, in the microcirculation of rabbit skin, acetylcholine- and bradykinin-mediated vasodilation involve the arachidonic acid-PGD 2 -NO pathway.

Citations Scopus - 18
1993 Wilson AJ, Warren JB, 'Adenylate cyclase-mediated vascular responses of rabbit aorta, mesenteric artery and skin microcirculation', British Journal of Pharmacology, 110 633-638 (1993)

The importance of adenylate cyclase-mediated vascular relaxation in the macro and microcirculation was assessed in rabbit aortic and coeliac artery bioassay rings in vitro and ski... [more]

The importance of adenylate cyclase-mediated vascular relaxation in the macro and microcirculation was assessed in rabbit aortic and coeliac artery bioassay rings in vitro and skin microvessels in vivo. The neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP38), the ß-agonist, isoprenaline, and the prostaglandins, PGE 1 and PGE 2 , were compared with the activity of nitroprusside, which acts by stimulating guanylate cyclase. In aortic tissue the relative relaxant potencies were (-log m EC 50 , 100% = response to nitroprusside 10 -6 m): nitroprusside 7.0, PACAP38 6.8, isoprenaline 6.3; PGE 1 and PGE 2 were weak constrictors. In coeliac artery rings relative potencies were (-log m EC 50 , 100% = response to nitroprusside 10 -5 m): PACAP38 6.6, PGE 1 6.6, nitroprusside 6.5, PGE 2 4.9, and isoprenaline 4.3. Comparative potencies when injected into anaesthetized rabbit skin in vivo were (-log mol/site required to increase blood red cell flux by 75%): PACAP38 13.0, PGE 2 10.7, isoprenaline 9.7, PGE 1 9.1, nitroprusside < 7. Nitroprusside, the most effective relaxant tested in the aorta, was 10 7 fold less potent than PACAP in its effect on skin blood flow. PGE 1 and PGE 2 were constrictors of the aorta, of intermediate effect in the coeliac artery, but potent vasodilators of the microcirculation. In this model, the importance of adenylate cyclase-mediated vascular relaxation increases with decreasing vessel size. 1993 British Pharmacological Society

DOI 10.1111/j.1476-5381.1993.tb13858.x
Citations Scopus - 23
1993 Keeling DM, Wilson AJG, Mackie IJ, Isenberg DA, Machin SJ, 'Lupus anticoagulant activity of some antiphospholipid antibodies against phospholipid bound ß

Aims-To determine whether P, glycoprotein I (ß 2 GPI) dependent anticardiolipin (aCL) antibodies detected in solid phase enzyme linked immunosorbent assays can also have lupus an... [more]

Aims-To determine whether P, glycoprotein I (ß 2 GPI) dependent anticardiolipin (aCL) antibodies detected in solid phase enzyme linked immunosorbent assays can also have lupus anticoagulant activity. Methods-Six anticardiolipin antibodies were affinity purified from patients with these antibodies and lupus anticoagulant activity in their plasma. Results-The anticardiolipin antibodies bound only to anionic phospholipids in the presence of ß 2 GPI and bound to ß 2 GPI in the absence of phospholipids. Four out of six had lupus anticoagulant activity in the dilute Russell viper venom time test. Conclusions-The results show that some ß 2 GPI dependent aCL are lupus anticoagulants. It is unclear why only some should have lupus anticoagulant activity while others do not.

DOI 10.1136/jcp.46.7.665
Citations Scopus - 13
1993 Keeling DM, Wilson AJG, Mackie IJ, Isenberg DA, Machin SJ, 'Role of ß2-glycoprotein I and anti-phospholipid antibodies in activation of protein C in vitro', Journal of Clinical Pathology, 46 908-911 (1993)

Aims-To investigate the effect of ß 2 - glycoprotein I (ß 2 GPI) on the thrombin/ thrombomodulin dependent activation of protein C; and to determine whether ß 2 GPI dependent ... [more]

Aims-To investigate the effect of ß 2 - glycoprotein I (ß 2 GPI) on the thrombin/ thrombomodulin dependent activation of protein C; and to determine whether ß 2 GPI dependent anticardiolipin antibodies have any effect. Methods-Protein C was activated by thrombin in the presence of thrombomodulin and phospholipid vesicles in an in vitro system. The effect of adding purified ß 2 GPI to this system was observed. Affinity purified anticardiolipin antibodies and total IgG from patients with anticardiolipin antibodies and the lupus anticoagulant were studied for their effects on protein C activation in the presence and absence of ß 2 GPI. Results-ß 2 -Glycoprotein I had no effect on the activity of preformed activated protein C. When the phospholipid vesicles were incubated with ß 2 GPI before the addition of protein C, the activation of protein C was inhibited in a dose dependent manner. With phosphatidylserine: phosphatidylcholine vesicles at a concentration of 1 4µM:2 µM, ß 2 GPI began to inhibit the reaction at a concentration of 15 nM, and at 4µM (the normal plasma concentration) the activation of protein C was reduced to 40%. Anticardiolipin antibodies had no demonstrable effect. Conclusions-ß 2 -Glycoprotein I inhibits protein C activation in an in vitro system. Its physiological role is unknown but it has potential procoagulant as well as anticoagulant properties. An effect of antiphospholipid antibodies on protein C activation, which might explain their association with thrombosis, could not be shown.

DOI 10.1136/jcp.46.10.908
Citations Scopus - 40
1993 Fuller K, Owens JM, Jagger CJ, Wilson A, Moss R, Chambers TJ, 'Macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates survival and chemotactic behavior in isolated osteoclasts', Journal of Experimental Medicine, 178 1733-1744 (1993)

Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-C3F) is known to play an important role in osteoclast formation. However, its actions on mature cells have not been fully characterized. We... [more]

Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-C3F) is known to play an important role in osteoclast formation. However, its actions on mature cells have not been fully characterized. We now report that M-CSF dramatically stimulates osteoclastic motility and spreading; osteoclasts responded to a gradient of M-CSF with orientation, and random cell polarization occurred after isotropic exposure. M-CSF also supported the survival of osteoclasts by preventing apoptosis. Paradoxically, M-CSF inhibits bone resorption by isolated osteoclasts. We found that this was effected predominantly by reduction in the number of excavations. Thus, M-CSF showed a propensity to suppress resorption through a reduction in the proportion of cells that were resorbing bone. Our data suggest that apart from the established role of M-CSF in the provision of precursors for osteoclastic induction, a major role for M-CSF in bone resorption is to enhance osteoclastic survival, migration, and chemotaxis. It seems appropriate that during these processes resorptive functions should be suppressed. We suggest that M-CSF continues to modulate osteoclastic activity once osteoclasts are on resorptive sites, through regulation of the balance between resorption and migration, such that not only the quantity, but the spatial pattern of resorption can be controlled by adjacent M-CSF-secreting cells of osteoblastic lineage. © 1993, Rockefeller University Press., All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1084/jem.178.5.1733
Citations Scopus - 280
1993 Warren JB, Wilson AJ, Loi RK, Coughlan ML, 'Opposing roles of cyclic AMP in the vascular control of edema formation', FASEB Journal, 7 1394-1400 (1993)

Eight agents that increase the intracellular concentration of cyclic AMP were tested for their effect on edema formation. The specificity of the agents for vascular smooth muscle ... [more]

Eight agents that increase the intracellular concentration of cyclic AMP were tested for their effect on edema formation. The specificity of the agents for vascular smooth muscle or the endothelium was determined by measuring vasodilation with a laser Doppler flow probe and cAMP production by endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells in culture. The agents were injected intradermally in anesthetized rabbit skin and the local accumulation of 125 I-labeled albumin in response to intradermal bradykinin was measured. Iloprost, prostaglandin E 1 , prostaglandin E 2 , pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) potentiated bradykinin-induced edema. These same agents also increased blood flow and vascular smooth muscle cAMP concentrations, but did not increase endothelial cell cAMP production. Albuterol suppressed edema formation, did not cause vasodilation, but did increase endothelial cell cAMP concentrations. The phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram did not cause vasodilation, but suppressed edema and potentiated the cAMP response to albuterol in cultured endothelial cells. L-Isoproterenol affected both cell types. At a lower concentration L-isoproterenol was a potent stimulus to endothelial cell cAMP production and inhibited edema formation; a higher dose had additional effects on vascular smooth muscle and significantly increased blood flow. These findings support the hypothesis that increasing intracellular cAMP concentrations in vascular smooth muscle promotes edema via increased blood flow. In contrast, increasing cAMP concentrations in endothelium may suppress edema by enhancing the permeability barrier.

Citations Scopus - 54
1992 Keeling DM, Wilson AJG, Mackie IJ, Machin SJ, Isenberg DA, 'Some ¿antiphospholipid antibodies¿ bind to ß

Summary. Some antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) only bind to anionic phospholipids in the presence of a serum cofactor, ß 2 -glycoprotein I (ß 2 GPI). Whether these aPL can bin... [more]

Summary. Some antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) only bind to anionic phospholipids in the presence of a serum cofactor, ß 2 -glycoprotein I (ß 2 GPI). Whether these aPL can bind to ß 2 GPI in the absence of phospholipid is controversial. We have purified anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) from the plasma of four patients and ß 2 GPI from normal plasma by solid phase affinity methods. All four aCL bound to cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine in the presence of ß 2 GPI but not in its absence. The binding of two of the antibodies to cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine at various concentrations of human ß 2 GPI was compared with that obtained using 10% bovine serum. The two antibodies responded differently to increasing ß 2 GPI concentrations, and binding to phosphatidylserine was relatively greater than to cardiolipin using human ß 2 GPI. All four aCL bound to plastic plates coated with ß 2 GPI in the absence of phospholipid, and ß 2 GPI in the fluid phase had no effect on binding. Binding to ß 2 GPI coated plates was increased equally when bovine serum or bovine albumin were used as the sample diluent in place of gelatine. These findings and those of others have important implications for the design of assays for antiphospholipid antibodies. Copyright © 1992, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved

DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2141.1992.tb06469.x
Citations Scopus - 57
1992 WILSON A, HENRY DA, 'PRINCIPLES BEHIND PRACTICE .10. METAANALYSIS .2. ASSESSING THE QUALITY OF PUBLISHED META-ANALYSES', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 156 173-& (1992)
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 32
1992 Henry DA, Wilson A, '9 Meta-analysis Part 1: An assessment of its aims, validity and reliability', Medical Journal of Australia, 156 31-38 (1992)
Citations Scopus - 19
1985 Jones VA, Workman E, Freeman AH, Dickinson RJ, Wilson AJ, Hunter JO, 'CROHN'S DISEASE: MAINTENANCE OF REMISSION BY DIET', The Lancet, 326 177-180 (1985)

20 patients with Crohn&apos;s disease took part in a controlled trial in which remission was maintained by either an unrefined carbohydrate fibre rich diet or a diet which exclude... [more]

20 patients with Crohn's disease took part in a controlled trial in which remission was maintained by either an unrefined carbohydrate fibre rich diet or a diet which excluded specific foods to which a patient was intolerant. 7 out of the 10 patients on the exclusion diet remained in remission for 6 months compared with none out of the 10 on an unrefined carbohydrate fibre rich diet (p < 0·05, Fisher's exact test). In an uncontrolled study an exclusion diet allowed 51 out of 77 patients to remain well on the diet alone for periods of up to 51 months, and with an average annual relapse rate of less than 10%. © 1985.

DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(85)91497-7
Citations Scopus - 146
1985 Chesner IM, Alun Jones V, Dickinson RJ, Workman E, Wilson AJ, Freeman AH, Hunter JO, 'DIET AND CROHN'S DISEASE', The Lancet, 326 899-900 (1985)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(85)90170-9
1984 Alun-Jones V, Wilson AJ, Hunter JO, Robinson RE, 'The aetiological role of antibiotic prophylaxis with hysterectomy in irritable bowel syndrome', Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 5 (1984)

Irritable bowel syndrome is said to affect 14 per cent of the population (Thompson and Heaton, 1978) and affects women more frequently than men. We have shown (Alun Jones et al., ... [more]

Irritable bowel syndrome is said to affect 14 per cent of the population (Thompson and Heaton, 1978) and affects women more frequently than men. We have shown (Alun Jones et al., 1982; Hunter et al., 1984) that in two-thirds of cases presenting in East Anglia the symptoms can be controlled, both in the short and the long term, by the detection of specific food intolerances. © 1984 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted.

DOI 10.3109/01443618409075757
Citations Scopus - 25
1984 Holdsworth MD, Davies L, Wilson A, 'Simultaneous use of four methods of estimating food consumption.', Human nutrition. Applied nutrition, 38 132-137 (1984)

As part of a four-year longitudinal study examining changes in nutrient intakes, eating patterns, lifestyle and health on individuals before and after retirement from work, accura... [more]

As part of a four-year longitudinal study examining changes in nutrient intakes, eating patterns, lifestyle and health on individuals before and after retirement from work, accurate assessments of customary food and beverage intakes were essential. This paper shows that by using four techniques simultaneously, a number of discrepancies were exposed, even though the subjects had filled in their records meticulously. Together they provide data more truly representative of what each individual eats. The techniques included: a week's weighed dietary record; a recall of customary food and beverages consumed throughout a typical day; key questions relating to foods and drinks (including alcohol) within a general questionnaire; and lists giving the frequency of consumption of specific foods and drinks.

Citations Scopus - 1
1984 Workman EM, Alun Jones V, Wilson AJ, Hunter JO, 'Diet in the management of Crohn's disease.', Human nutrition. Applied nutrition, 38 469-473 (1984)

Thirty-three patients with Crohn&apos;s Disease were studied to see if their symptoms were related to food intolerances. Initial treatment to produce remission of symptoms was tot... [more]

Thirty-three patients with Crohn's Disease were studied to see if their symptoms were related to food intolerances. Initial treatment to produce remission of symptoms was total parenteral nutrition (20), elemental diet (2) or elimination diet (11). Twenty-nine patients reported specific food intolerances, and 21 of these remained in remission on diet alone, the mean length of remission being 15.2 months. The most important foods provoking symptoms were wheat and dairy products.

Citations Scopus - 24
Show 96 more journal articles

Review (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 O'Brien AP, McNeil K, Fletcher R, Conrad A, Wilson A, Jones D, Chan S, 'Should fathers¿ postnatal depression be part of maternal and newborn health services? (2017)
Co-authors Richard Fletcher, Agatha Conrad, Donovan Jones, Tony Obrien
2004 Wark PA, Gibson PG, Wilson AJ, 'Azoles for Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis Associated With Asthma', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2004) [D1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD001108
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Peter Wark, Peter Gibson
2004 Shah S, Wilson AJ, Gibson PG, Coughlan J, 'Long Acting Beta-Agonists Versus Theophylline for Maintenance Treatment of Asthma', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2004) [D1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD001281
Citations Scopus - 13
Co-authors Peter Gibson
2004 Gibson PG, Powell HG, Coughlan J, Wilson AJ, Abramson M, Haywood P, et al., 'Self-Management Education and Regular Practitioner Review for Adults With Asthma', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2004) [D1]
Citations Scopus - 227
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Michael Hensley
Show 1 more review

Conference (12 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Ang SG, O'Brien AP, Chan SWC, Wilson A, 'An integrative review on falls efficacy among older persons.', An integrative review on falls efficacy among older persons., Crown Perth, Western Australia (2017)
Co-authors Senggiapmarcus Ang Uon, Tony Obrien
2017 Ang SG, O'Brien AP, Wilson A, 'Caregivers¿ falls concern for older persons in the Singapore community', Global Science and Technology Forum, Hotel Fort Canning, Signapore (2017) [E1]
DOI 10.5176/2315-4330_WNC17.82
2017 Wilson AJ, 'A Quantitative Analysis Of The Quality And Content Of Health Advice In Popular Australian Magazines', Melbourne (2017)
2017 Ang SM, O'Brien AP, Wilson A, 'Caregivers¿ falls concern for older persons in the Singapore community', Singapore (2017)
DOI 10.5176/2315-4330_WNC17.82
Co-authors Senggiapmarcus Ang Uon, Tony Obrien
2016 Chan S, Zhang M, Wynne O, Jeong S, Hunter S, Wilson A, Ho R, 'A SMARTPHONE APP FOR PSYCHOEDUCATION FOR FAMILY CAREGIVERS OF PEOPLE LIVING WITH DEMENTIA: A FEASIBILITY STUDY.', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Hong Kong (2016)
Co-authors Olivia Wynne, Sharyn Hunter, Sarah Jeong
2016 Chan S, Jeong S, Hunter S, Wilson A, Zhang M, Ho R, 'A feasibility study on smartphone psychoeducation application for family caregivers of people living with dementia.', Cape Town, South Africa. (2016)
Co-authors Sally Chan, Sharyn Hunter, Sarah Jeong
2014 Bonevski B, Wilson A, Dunlop A, Shakeshaft A, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., 'SMOKING CESSATION IN DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT SETTINGS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY OF STAFF AND CLIENT BARRIERS AND FACILITATORS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, A Dunlop, Billie Bonevski
2010 Wilson AJ, Robertson J, Henry D, 'Assessing the Quality of Health News Stories in the Australian Media Using the Media Doctor Website', University of Sydney (2010)
2006 Wilson AJ, Henry D, 'Disease mongering in Australian news stories about pharmaceutical products', Melbourne (2006)
2006 Wilson AJ, Henry D, 'Media Doctor - Assessing the Quality of Health News Reporting in the Australian Media', Sydney (2006)
1999 Gibson PG, Wilson AJ, Wlodarczyk JH, Fakes K, Hensley MJ, 'Different patterns of airway inflammation during asthma exacerbation: a controlled dose reduction study.', JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY (1999)
Co-authors Michael Hensley, Peter Gibson
1996 Bennett ST, Wilson AJ, Cucca F, Nerup J, Pociot F, McKinney PA, et al., 'IDDM2-VNTR-encoded susceptibility to type 1 diabetes: Dominant protection and parental transmission of alleles of the insulin gene-linked minisatellite locus', Journal of Autoimmunity (1996)

IDDM2-encoded predisposition to type 1 diabetes has recently been mapped to the minisatellite or variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) locus upstream of the insulin and insulin-... [more]

IDDM2-encoded predisposition to type 1 diabetes has recently been mapped to the minisatellite or variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) locus upstream of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor II genes on human chromosome 11p15.5. In a UK case-control study (n=228 sporadic diabetics; n=441 healthy controls), we show here that the genotype homozygous for VNTR class I alleles is predisposing to disease (RR=2.68), and VNTR class III alleles are dominantly protective (RR=0.37). In 722 diabetic families from the UK (n=356), USA (n=173), Denmark (n=55) and Sardinia (n=138), we have analysed the transmission of class I alleles to diabetic offspring from class I/III heterozygous parents. We confirm that in families from the USA, class I alleles are transmitted preferentially from fathers. However, in family data sets from the UK, Denmark and Sardinia, the reverse is true and maternal transmission is stronger. Furthermore, in the UK family data set, the difference between maternal and paternal transmissions is significant (P < 0.05). It is therefore unlikely that 'maternal imprinting' alone explains the parent-of-origin effects in IDDM2-encoded predisposition to type 1 diabetes, at least not in the UK. There is a relationship between VNTR class (allele length) and insulin gene expression, though some results from different studies are conflicting. In the human adult cadaveric pancreas, we confirm our preliminary results that class III alleles are associated with lower levels of insulin mRNA in vivo. Similar results have been obtained independently in human foetal pancreas samples. It is difficult to explain how these marginally lower levels of insulin expression could account for the observed VNTR class III-encoded protective effect. Perhaps the site of action of IDDM2, mediated by VNTR allelic variation, is not the pancreas but some other organ such as the thymus.

DOI 10.1006/jaut.1996.0057
Citations Scopus - 132
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Report (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2003 Lowe J, Wilson A, McGill K, Bonevski B, 'An Evaluation of the 2001 LHS of the HAHS Organisational Restructure', Hunter Area Health Service (2003)
Co-authors Katherine Mcgill, Billie Bonevski
2001 Lowe J, Wilson A, Bonevski B, 'Draft Clinical Service Framework for Respiratory Disease', NSW Department of Health (2001)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski

Thesis / Dissertation (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Wilson AJ, Assessing the quality of health news stories in the Australian media using the Media Doctor website, University of Newcastle (2010) [T3]
2005 Wilson AJ, The body inside, University of Newcastle (2005)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 16
Total funding $296,763

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20173 grants / $24,798

Targeting mental healthcare services to meet the needs of suicidal young men$17,698

Funding body: Mid North Coast Local Health District

Funding body Mid North Coast Local Health District
Project Team Professor Sally Chan, Doctor Graeme Browne, Professor Tony O'Brien, Doctor Amanda Wilson, Dr Joanne Rowley
Scheme Research Support Grant Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1600658
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Media Doctor Citizen Science$6,350

Funding body: Pozible Crowd Funding

Funding body Pozible Crowd Funding
Project Team

Amanda Wilson, Craig Hight, Caitlin Parr, Peter Sinclair, Judith Sandner

Scheme Crowd Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON N

A Quantitative Analysis of the Quality and Content Of Health Advice in Popular Australian Magazines$750

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Scheme Faculty Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20163 grants / $122,188

Gladys M Brawn Career Development Fellowship - Teaching Assist Scheme$75,000

Funding body: The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team

Wilson, A.

Scheme Gladys M Brawn Career Development Fellowship - Teaching Assist Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Supporting family carers of people living with dementia: an RCT of a new mobile application$46,188

Funding body: Dementia Collaborative Research Centres

Funding body Dementia Collaborative Research Centres
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Professor Sally Chan, Ms Viki Brummell, Doctor Amanda Wilson, Doctor Sharyn Hunter, Doctor Sarah Jeong, Professor Kichu Nair, Conjoint Associate Professor Frans Henskens
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600156
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

The Implementation and evaluation of an innovative and immersive disability empathy simulation$1,000

Funding body: The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team

Amanda Wilson, Natalie Govind, Tracy Levett-Jones

Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20151 grants / $395

ANZAHPE?AMEA 2015, Newcastle Australia, 29 March-1 April 2015$395

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Amanda Wilson
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500416
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20111 grants / $500

Highest Impact Factor for 2010$500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health
Project Team

Wilson, Amanda

Scheme Priority Research Centre
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20101 grants / $50,000

HMRI Post-Doctoral Fellowship$50,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
Scheme HMRI Post-Doctoral Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20072 grants / $28,702

Improving the quality of health news reports in the Australian media$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Professor David Henry, Doctor Amanda Wilson
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187253
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

The quality of health news reports about complementary and alternative medicine in Australian lay media$8,702

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Conjoint Professor Alison Jones, Professor Billie Bonevski, Conjoint Professor David Henry, Doctor Amanda Wilson
Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187836
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20051 grants / $10,000

Australian Museum Eureka Prize for Critical Thinking$10,000

Funding body: The Australian Museum Society

Funding body The Australian Museum Society
Project Team

David Henry and Amanda Wilson

Scheme Australian Museum Eureka Prizes
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20021 grants / $33,000

An Evaluation of the Rural Rehab Program, Hunter Area Health Service$33,000

Funding body: Hunter Area Health Service

Funding body Hunter Area Health Service
Project Team

Bonevski, B; Lowe, J; Wilson AJ.

Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2003
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

20011 grants / $25,180

Developing a Draft Clinical Service Framework for Respiratory Disease in NSW$25,180

Funding body: NSW Health

Funding body NSW Health
Project Team

Aldrich, R; Bonevski, B; Wilson, A.

Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2001
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

19991 grants / $1,000

Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand Annual Meeting Travel Grant$1,000

Funding body: The Thoracic Society of Australia & New Zealand

Funding body The Thoracic Society of Australia & New Zealand
Scheme TSANZ Annual Meeting Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1999
Funding Finish 1999
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

19921 grants / $1,000

Undergraduate Summer Vacation Scholarship$1,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Scheme Special Scholarship Initiative Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 1992
Funding Finish 1993
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current8

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD1.63

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Carers Concerns About The Older Person (Carees) At Risk Of Falling PhD (Nursing), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 Honours Electronic interventions for reducing medication errors in hospitalised adults Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 Honours A Multisite Clinical Audit of Health Care Professional Management in Addressing Smoking Cessation During Pregnancy Midwifery, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Burdens, Challenges, Coping and Resilience in Caring for a Child with Disability among Immigrant Parents ¿ A mixed methods study PhD (Nursing), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Health Professions Education Research PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Exploring the Development and Implementation of a Model of Midwifery Continuity of Care in a Regional Australian City PhD (Midwifery), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Intra-Individual Variability and the Expression of Resilience: Researching, Evaluating and Re-Configuring the Measurement Strategy Used to Assess Personal Resilience PhD (Nursing), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Promoting active ageing in older people with mental disorders in Thai Primary Care Units: the development and psychometric testing of an assessment tool PhD (Nursing), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 Honours A Comparison of maternal and neonatal outcomes for vaginal breech birth from Mid North Coast Area Health Services and John Hunter Breech Clinic: An observational retrospective comparative study Midwifery, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Projects

Media Doctor Student Rating Tool 2017 - 2020


Citizen Science Media Doctor 2017 - 2019


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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 52
United Kingdom 41
United States 14
Canada 7
Italy 5
More...
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News

Globally recognised Hunter health group seeks pledges

August 11, 2017

A globally recognised public health initiative founded at the University of Newcastle (UON) and since adopted internationally is embracing the world of crowdfunding and crowdsourcing to re-establish itself in Australia.

Dr Amanda Wilson

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Health Behaviour Sciences

Contact Details

Email amanda.wilson@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 49216635
Links Twitter
Facebook

Office

Room RW235
Building Richardson Wing
Location Callaghan Campus
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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