Professor Alison Hutton

Professor Alison Hutton

Professor

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Career Summary

Biography

Professor Hutton has extensive experience in education and research. Her work revolves around young people, health promotion and harm reduction. Professor Hutton has established credible research into strategies to provide safe and supportive environments for young people during youth events which is important to promote community safety. Youth events including outdoor music festivals, and Schoolies comprise a significant proportion of all mass gatherings in Australia each year. Her research has shown that a combination of strategies such as dry zones, on-site first aid, supportive volunteer presence, free water and pastoral care can support young people to party safely and reduce hospitalisations.

Professor Hutton is recognised as a world leader in mass gathering health and research. She is the current chair of the Mass Gathering section of the World Association for Disaster Emergency Medicine (WADEM) and also the Vice President Special Interests and Activities. She is a member of the World Health Organisation (WHO) Mass Gathering Collaborating centre for High Visibility/High Risk Events and is a member of the VIAG – the WHOs, virtual inter-disciplinary advisory group, which is invitation only to mass gathering experts around the globe.

One of Professor Hutton’s many strengths is her collaboration with many community groups to develop and implement her work. In the paediatric space she is the President of the Association for the wellbeing of children in health care based in Sydney, an NGO which advocates for the rights of children and their family. Professor Hutton believes that nurses are in a great position to make a positive difference in the lives of young people and the wider community.  


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Flinders University
  • Certificate of Paediatric Nursing, Adelaide Medical Centre for Woman and Children
  • Diploma of Nursing, South Australian College of Advanced Education
  • Bachelor of Nursing, Flinders University
  • Master of Nursing, Flinders University

Keywords

  • Adolescent Health
  • Alcohol and other drugs
  • Mass Gatherings
  • Outdoor Music Festivals
  • Schoolies

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified 50
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Professor University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
4/07/2015 - 24/03/2017 Associate Dean (research) Flinders University
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
9/06/2009 - 9/07/2015 Honours Coordinator Flinders University
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2017 Excellence in Innovation and Clinical Research
The Government of South Australia

Professional

Year Award
2013 Endeavour Fellowship
Australian Government

Grant Reviews

Year Grant Amount
2017 Promoting responsible drinking practices to drinkers to reduce the risk of alcohol-related harm
Aust Competitive - Commonwealth - 1CS, Aust Competitive - Commonwealth - 1CS
$0
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Hutton AER, Brown S, 'Psychological considerations', Public Health for Mass Gatherings: Key Considerations, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland 151-160 (2015)

Journal article (65 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Lines LE, Hutton AE, Grant J, 'Integrative review: nurses' roles and experiences in keeping children safe', JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, 73 302-322 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/jan.13101
Citations Web of Science - 1
2017 Ranse J, Hutton A, Keene T, Lenson S, Luther M, Bost N, et al., 'Health service impact from mass gatherings: A systematic literature review', Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, 32 71-77 (2017)

© World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine 2016. Background During a mass gathering, some participants may receive health care for injuries or illnesses that occur d... [more]

© World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine 2016. Background During a mass gathering, some participants may receive health care for injuries or illnesses that occur during the event. In-event first responders provide initial assessment and management at the event. However, when further definitive care is required, municipal ambulance services provide additional assessment, treatment, and transport of participants to acute care settings, such as hospitals. The impact on both ambulance services and hospitals from mass-gathering events is the focus of this literature review. Aim This literature review aimed to develop an understanding of the impact of mass gatherings on local health services, specifically pertaining to in-event and external health services. Method This research used a systematic literature review methodology. Electronic databases were searched to find articles related to the aim of the review. Articles focused on mass-gathering health, provision of in-event health services, ambulance service transportation, and hospital utilization. Results Twenty-four studies were identified for inclusion in this review. These studies were all case-study-based and retrospective in design. The majority of studies (n=23) provided details of in-event first responder services. There was variation noted in reporting of the number and type of in-event health professional services at mass gatherings. All articles reported that patients were transported to hospital by the ambulance service. Only nine articles reported on patients presenting to hospital. However, details pertaining to the impact on ambulance and hospital services were not reported. Conclusions There is minimal research focusing on the impact of mass gatherings on in-event and external health services, such as ambulance services and hospitals. A recommendation for future mass-gathering research and evaluation is to link patient-level data from in-event mass gatherings to external health services. This type of study design would provide information regarding the impact on health services from a mass gathering to more accurately inform future health planning for mass gatherings across the health care continuum.

DOI 10.1017/S1049023X16001199
2017 Liu T, Fuller J, Hutton A, Grant J, 'Consequence-based communication about adolescent romantic experience between parents and adolescents: A qualitative study underpinned by social constructionism', Nursing and Health Sciences, 19 176-182 (2017)

© 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd. Chinese adolescents are increasingly engaging in romantic experiences and high-risk sexual behaviors within a rapidly-changing cult... [more]

© 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd. Chinese adolescents are increasingly engaging in romantic experiences and high-risk sexual behaviors within a rapidly-changing cultural and socio-economic context. Parental communication about sexuality has been recognized as protective for adolescents to make informed decisions about sexual practice. In this study, we explored what was discussed about adolescent romantic experience between parents and adolescents in China. Twenty-seven parents and 38 adolescents from a northern¿eastern city of China were interviewed. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed using a social constructionism framework. Four themes were identified: (i) detriments of romantic experience to education and future prospect; (ii) health and sociocultural risks of romantic and sexual engagement; (iii) ways of handling romantic experience; and (iv) marriage and family building. The messages were mainly prohibitive and consequence oriented in nature, and lacked specific romantic and sexual information. These messages reflected sociocultural beliefs in education, sexuality, marriage, and family in China, but did not meet the needs of current adolescents. External support from health professionals, such as nurses, is important for parents and adolescents to improve their sexual knowledge and communication skills.

DOI 10.1111/nhs.12335
2017 Liu T, Fuller J, Hutton A, Grant J, 'Factors shaping parent¿adolescent communication about sexuality in urban China', Sex Education, 17 180-194 (2017)

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Within a rapidly changing cultural and socio-economic context, young people in China are increasingly engaging... [more]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Within a rapidly changing cultural and socio-economic context, young people in China are increasingly engaging in romantic experiences and sexual behaviours with consequences such as unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections. Across a range of contexts, parental communication about sexuality has been recognised as protective in terms of increasing the likelihood of sexual abstinence and safer sexual practice. This study focuses on the factors shaping parent¿adolescent communication about sexuality. Thirty-eight young people and twenty-seven parents, recruited from two high schools in a Northern-Eastern city of China, were interviewed. Thematic analysis of their interview responses was conducted using a social constructionist framework. Four main themes were identified: timing; discomfort and uncertainty; assumptions; and the parent¿adolescent relationship. Findings suggest that communication between parents and children is influenced by individual as well as interpersonal factors and factors relating to the broader Chinese sociocultural context. To facilitate communication, both parents and young people need support from health and other professionals, while parents need more help and support in overcoming historical, social and cultural barriers to open communication about sex.

DOI 10.1080/14681811.2016.1276897
2017 Irwin K, Hill P, Hutton A, 'Parental Concern: Parents Discuss How They Support Their Adolescents Attending Schoolies Events in Australia.', Compr Child Adolesc Nurs, 1-14 (2017)
DOI 10.1080/24694193.2017.1330369
2017 Hutton A, Whitehead D, Ullah S, 'Can positive faith-based encounters influence Australian young people's drinking behaviours?', HEALTH EDUCATION JOURNAL, 76 423-431 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0017896916688712
2017 Mediani HS, Duggan R, Chapman R, Hutton A, Shields L, 'An exploration of Indonesian nurses¿ perceptions of barriers to paediatric pain management', Journal of Child Health Care, 21 273-282 (2017) [C1]

© 2017, © The Author(s) 2017. There is a dearth of research in Indonesia regarding pain management in children. Previous studies have identified that although a variety of resea... [more]

© 2017, © The Author(s) 2017. There is a dearth of research in Indonesia regarding pain management in children. Previous studies have identified that although a variety of research and clinical studies on all aspects of pain have been conducted in many countries, children continue to experience moderate to severe pain during hospitalization. Greater research efforts are needed to identify and explore the factors that impede effective pain management in children. To address this gap, the researchers conducted an exploratory descriptive qualitative study to capture Indonesian nurses¿ perceptions of barriers to paediatric pain management in two hospitals. Using purposive sampling, data were collected from 37 nurses through semi-structured, in-depth interviews. Findings indicated that nurses working in Indonesian paediatric wards felt that they were not able to provide effective pain care to hospitalized children. Nurses identified several organizational structural and cultural factors that were thought to hinder their provision of effective pain care to paediatric patients. These factors are embedded in nurses¿ clinical practice. The study findings can assist to inform relevant initiatives and strategies to improve clinical nurses¿ performance and competency in providing effective pain care to paediatric patients.

DOI 10.1177/1367493517715146
2016 Hutton A, Veenema TG, Gebbie K, 'Review of the International Council of Nurses (ICN) Framework of Disaster Nursing Competencies', PREHOSPITAL AND DISASTER MEDICINE, 31 680-683 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1049023X1600100X
2016 Peoples K, Gebbie K, Hutton AER, 'An exploration of perceptions of disaster nursing and disaster preparedness among Australian nursing undergraduates', Health Emergency and Disaster Nursing, 3 28-35 (2016) [C1]
2016 Martland J, Chamberlain D, Hutton A, Smigielski M, 'Communication and general concern criterion prior to activation of the rapid response team: A grounded theory', Australian Health Review, 40 477-483 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/AH15123
2016 Steenkamp M, Hutton AE, Ranse JC, Lund A, Turris SA, Bowles R, et al., 'Exploring International Views on Key Concepts for Mass-gathering Health through a Delphi Process', Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, 31 443-453 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1049023X1600042X
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2016 Turris SA, Steenkamp M, Lund A, Hutton A, Ranse J, Bowles R, et al., 'International consensus on key concepts and data definitions for mass-gathering health: Process and progress', Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, 31 220-223 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1049023X1600011X
Citations Scopus - 2
2015 Ranse J, Hutton A, Wilson R, Usher K, 'Leadership Opportunities for Mental Health Nurses in the Field of Disaster Preparation, Response, and Recovery', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 36 391-394 (2015)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2015.1017062
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2015 Hutton A, Savage C, Ranse J, Finnell D, Kub J, 'The Use of Haddon's Matrix to Plan for Injury and Illness Prevention at Outdoor Music Festivals', PREHOSPITAL AND DISASTER MEDICINE, 30 175-183 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1049023X15000187
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2015 Lund A, Turris SA, Bowles R, Steenkamp M, Hutton A, Ranse J, Arbon P, 'Mass-gathering Health Research Foundational Theory: Part 1 - Population Models for Mass Gatherings (vol 29, pg 648, 2014)', PREHOSPITAL AND DISASTER MEDICINE, 30 223-223 (2015)
DOI 10.1017/S1049023X15000072
2015 Witt RR, Kotlhar MK, Mesquita MO, Dias da Silva Lima MA, Marin SM, Day CB, et al., 'Developing Legacy: Health Planning in the Host City of Porto Alegre for the 2014 Football World Cup', PREHOSPITAL AND DISASTER MEDICINE, 30 613-617 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1049023X15005233
Citations Web of Science - 1
2015 Irwin K, Hutton A, Hill P, 'Parental concern for their adolescent attending Schoolies: A literature review', Neonatal, Paediatric and Child Health Nursing, 18 2-7 (2015) [C1]

This paper reviews the literature around the Schoolies experience and concern that parents may have with adolescents undertaking risk-taking behaviour at this event. A systematic ... [more]

This paper reviews the literature around the Schoolies experience and concern that parents may have with adolescents undertaking risk-taking behaviour at this event. A systematic search of Ovid, Medline, Pub Med, Pro Quest and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) were undertaken. Keywords in these searches included: Schoolies, school leavers, adolescents and parental attitudes. Four major themes identified were: substance use at Schoolies; expectations, previous experience and peers' influence on behaviour, and parental influences. Reducing harm in this cohort as a result of risk-taking behaviours could have far-reaching impacts: reducing alcohol and drug-related injury at these events could have an impact on health care as the burden on the country's health care system and resources may be reduced. In 2010 there were a reported 214,542 students undertaking Year 12 and it is estimated that in total 60,000 young people (36%) attend an organised Schoolies event, highlighting the importance of gaining insight into this topic.

Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Hutton A, Cusack L, Zannettino L, Shaefer SJM, Verdonk N, Arbon P, 'What are school leavers' priorities for festival preparation?', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 21 249-253 (2015) [C1]

© La Trobe University 2015. This paper reports on the findings from a qualitative research study that explored how young people prepared to minimise and/or avoid alcohol-related ... [more]

© La Trobe University 2015. This paper reports on the findings from a qualitative research study that explored how young people prepared to minimise and/or avoid alcohol-related harm while attending a Schoolies Festival (SF). SFs are mass gatherings at which young people (schoolies) celebrate their graduation from high school. The attendance of schoolies, in various Australian communities, ranges between 10000 and 30000 individuals during the event. The literature suggests that schoolies are at higher than normal risk of harm at SF from misuse of alcohol, unsafe sex, aggressive behaviour, and other risk-taking factors. As a result of these concerns, SF organisers developed an infrastructure that treats alcohol-related harm, and provides on-site care (first aid stations) by St John Ambulance staff. This study used focus groups to identify strategies used by schoolies to avoid alcohol-related harm during SFs. Data revealed that schoolies did not actively seek health information before attending the event and did not display an interest in doing so. It is important to note that schoolies planned to use alcohol to celebrate and have a good time. Therefore a harm minimisation approach with a focus on providing the necessary infrastructure at SFs to minimise the dangers associated with excess alcohol use is important. Schoolies indicated that they had no desire for information about the hazards of alcohol ingestion. If any health messages were to be used by health authorities, it would be far more appropriate to promote the message of 'take care of your mate', to contribute to building a supportive environment at the event. This may be of more benefit to minimise harm at SFs than funding other health messages.

DOI 10.1071/PY13094
Citations Scopus - 5
2015 Hutton AER, 'Cochrane review summary: Family and carer smoking control programmes for reducing children's exposure to environmental tobacco smoke', Neonatal, Paediatric & Child Health Nursing, 18 24-25 (2015)
2014 Hutton A, Ranse J, Verdonk N, Ullah S, Arbon P, 'Understanding the characteristics of patient presentations of young people at outdoor music festivals', Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, 29 160-166 (2014) [C1]

Outdoor music festivals are unique events given that they are, for the most part, bounded and ticketed, and alcohol is served. They frequently have a higher incidence of patient p... [more]

Outdoor music festivals are unique events given that they are, for the most part, bounded and ticketed, and alcohol is served. They frequently have a higher incidence of patient presentations when compared with similar types of mass gatherings. Often, however, single events are reported in the literature, making it difficult to generalize the findings across multiple events and limiting the understanding of the typical patient presentations at these mass gatherings. The aim of this paper was to understand the characteristics of young people who have presented as patients to on-site health care at outdoor music festivals in Australia, and the relative proportion and type of injury and illness presentations at these events. This research used a nonexperimental design, utilizing a retrospective review of patient report forms from outdoor music festivals. Data were collected from 26 outdoor music festivals across four States of Australia during the year 2010. Females presented at greater numbers than males, and over two-thirds presented with minor illnesses, such as headaches. Males presented with injuries, in particular lacerations to their face and their hands, and alcohol and substance use made up 15% of all presentations.

DOI 10.1017/S1049023X14000156
Citations Scopus - 8
2014 Ranse J, Hutton A, Jeeawody B, Wilson R, 'What Are the Research Needs for the Field of Disaster Nursing? An International Delphi Study', Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, (2014) [C1]

Background: Internationally there is an increasing amount of peer-reviewed literature pertaining to disaster nursing. The literature includes personal anecdotes, reflections, and ... [more]

Background: Internationally there is an increasing amount of peer-reviewed literature pertaining to disaster nursing. The literature includes personal anecdotes, reflections, and accounts of single case studies. Furthermore, issues such as the willingness of nurses to assist in disasters, the role of nurses in disasters, leadership, competencies, and educational preparedness for nurses have been the focus of the literature. Aim: The aim of this research was to determine the international research priorities for disaster nursing. Method: This research used a three-round Delphi technique. The first round used a face-to-face workshop to generate research statements with nursing members of the World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WADEM). The second and third rounds included the ranking of statements on a 5-point Likert scale with nursing members of WADEM and the World Society of Disaster Nursing (WSDN). Statements that achieved a mean of four or greater were considered a priority and progressed. Results: Participants were from multiple countries. Research statements were generated in the areas of: education, training, and curriculum; psychosocial; strategy, relationship, and networking; and clinical practice. Psychosocial aspects of disaster nursing ranked the highest, with five statements appearing in the top ten research areas, followed by statements relating to: education, training, and curriculum; clinical practice; and finally, strategy, relationship, and networking. Conclusions: Future disaster nursing research should focus on the area of psychosocial aspects of disaster nursing, in particular, both the psychosocial needs of a disaster-affected community and the psychosocial wellbeing of nurses who assist in disaster health activities. Copyright © World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine 2014.

DOI 10.1017/S1049023X14000946
Citations Scopus - 4
2014 Ranse J, Hutton A, Turris SA, Lund A, 'Enhancing the minimum data set for mass-gathering research and evaluation: An integrative literature review', Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, 29 280-289 (2014) [C1]

Copyright © 2014 World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine. Introduction: In 2012, a minimum data set (MDS) was proposed to enable the standardized collection of biom... [more]

Copyright © 2014 World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine. Introduction: In 2012, a minimum data set (MDS) was proposed to enable the standardized collection of biomedical data across various mass gatherings. However, the existing 2012 MDS could be enhanced to allow for its uptake and usability in the international context. The 2012 MDS is arguably Australian-centric and not substantially informed by the literature. As such, an MDS with contributions from the literature and application in the international settings is required. Methods: This research used an integrative literature review design. Manuscripts were collected using keyword searches from databases and journal content pages from 2003 through 2013. Data were analyzed and categorized using the existing 2012 MDS as a framework. Results: In total, 19 manuscripts were identified that met the inclusion criteria. Variation in the patient presentation types was described in the literature from the mass-gathering papers reviewed. Patient presentation types identified in the literature review were compared to the 2012 MDS. As a result, 16 high-level patient presentation types were identified that were not included in the 2012 MDS. Conclusion: Adding patient presentation types to the 2012 MDS ensures that the collection of biomedical data for mass-gathering health research and evaluation remains contemporary and comprehensive. This review proposes the addition of 16 high-level patient presentation categories to the 2012 MDS in the following broad areas: gastrointestinal, obstetrics and gynecology, minor illness, mental health, and patient outcomes. Additionally, a section for self-treatment has been added, which was previously not included in the 2012 MDS, but was widely reported in the literature.

DOI 10.1017/S1049023X14000429
Citations Scopus - 7
2014 Lund A, Turris SA, Bowles R, Steenkamp M, Hutton A, Ranse J, Arbon P, 'Mass-gathering health research foundational theory: Part 1 - Population models for mass gatherings', Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, 29 648-654 (2014) [C1]

© World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine 2014. Background The science underpinning the study of mass-gathering health (MGH) is developing rapidly. Current knowledg... [more]

© World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine 2014. Background The science underpinning the study of mass-gathering health (MGH) is developing rapidly. Current knowledge fails to adequately inform the understanding of the science of mass gatherings (MGs) because of the lack of theory development and adequate conceptual analysis. Defining populations of interest in the context of MGs is required to permit meaningful comparison and meta-analysis between events. Process A critique of existing definitions and descriptions of MGs was undertaken. Analyzing gaps in current knowledge, the authors sought to delineate the populations affected by MGs, employing a consensus approach to formulating a population model. The proposed conceptual model evolved through face-to-face group meetings, structured breakout sessions, asynchronous collaboration, and virtual international meetings. Findings and Interpretation Reporting on the incidence of health conditions at specific MGs, and comparing those rates between and across events, requires a common understanding of the denominators, or the total populations in question. There are many, nested populations to consider within a MG, such as the population of patients, the population of medical services providers, the population of attendees/audience/participants, the crew, contractors, staff, and volunteers, as well as the population of the host community affected by, but not necessarily attending, the event. A pictorial representation of a basic population model was generated, followed by a more complex representation, capturing a global-health perspective, as well as academically- and operationally-relevant divisions in MG populations. Conclusions Consistent definitions of MG populations will support more rigorous data collection. This, in turn, will support meta-analysis and pooling of data sources internationally, creating a foundation for risk assessment as well as illness and injury prediction modeling. Ultimately, more rigorous data collection will support methodology for evaluating health promotion, harm reduction, and clinical-response interventions at MGs. Delineating MG populations progresses the current body of knowledge of MGs and informs the understanding of the full scope of their health effects.

DOI 10.1017/S1049023X14001216
Citations Scopus - 6
2014 Turris SA, Lund A, Hutton A, Bowles R, Ellerson E, Steenkamp M, et al., 'Mass-gathering health research foundational theory: Part 2-event modeling for mass gatherings', Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, 29 655-663 (2014) [C1]

© World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine 2014. Background Current knowledge about mass-gathering health (MGH) fails to adequately inform the understanding of mass ... [more]

© World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine 2014. Background Current knowledge about mass-gathering health (MGH) fails to adequately inform the understanding of mass gatherings (MGs) because of a relative lack of theory development and adequate conceptual analysis. This report describes the development of a series of event lenses that serve as a beginning MG event model, complimenting the MG population model reported elsewhere. Methods Existing descriptions of MGs were considered. Analyzing gaps in current knowledge, the authors sought to delineate the population of events being reported. Employing a consensus approach, the authors strove to capture the diversity, range, and scope of MG events, identifying common variables that might assist researchers in determining when events are similar and might be compared. Through face-to-face group meetings, structured breakout sessions, asynchronous collaboration, and virtual international meetings, a conceptual approach to classifying and describing events evolved in an iterative fashion. Findings Embedded within existing literature are a variety of approaches to event classification and description. Arising from these approaches, the authors discuss the interplay between event demographics, event dynamics, and event design. Specifically, the report details current understandings about event types, geography, scale, temporality, crowd dynamics, medical support, protective factors, and special hazards. A series of tables are presented to model the different analytic lenses that might be employed in understanding the context of MG events. Interpretation The development of an event model addresses a gap in the current body of knowledge vis a vis understanding and reporting the full scope of the health effects related to MGs. Consistent use of a consensus-based event model will support more rigorous data collection. This in turn will support meta-analysis, create a foundation for risk assessment, allow for the pooling of data for illness and injury prediction, and support methodology for evaluating health promotion, harm reduction, and clinical response interventions at MGs.

DOI 10.1017/S1049023X14001228
Citations Scopus - 2
2014 Hutton A, Jackson N, 'The voice of the adolescent: Perceptions of general practice and accessing other health care services', Neonatal, Paediatric and Child Health Nursing, 17 10-15 (2014) [C1]

Objective To review literature from Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United Kingdom to: gain insight into the adolescent perception of the general practice environment; iden... [more]

Objective To review literature from Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United Kingdom to: gain insight into the adolescent perception of the general practice environment; identify areas of concern that prevent adolescents accessing health care services; and to establish which factors have a negative effect on their general practice experience. Method A thematic analysis was the method selected for this literature review. The articles were read and similar concepts combined to form 18 common themes. These 18 themes were then condensed down to three focal themes: personal, organisational, and external factors. Results Principal areas of concern for adolescents accessing health services and the general practice were confidentiality, privacy and trust. These concerning factors were voiced by adolescents of all ages, both genders and across studies from all four countries. Conclusion A review of the literature has revealed that not all adolescents face problems when using general practice facilities, or have concerns regarding accessing services, but for those that do confidentiality, privacy and trust are the main areas of concern.

2013 Wallis C, Hutton A, Brown S, Challans R, Gardner-Stephen P, 'Distributed Sensor Logging: As Easy as a Mesh of Yoyos', International Journal of Communications, Network and System Sciences, 6 309-315 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.4236/ijcns.2013.66033
2013 Pront L, Kelton M, Munt R, Hutton A, 'Living and learning in a rural environment: A nursing student perspective', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 33 281-285 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2012.05.026
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2013 Cusack L, Arbon P, Hutton A, Starr L, Verdonk N, 'Exploring nursing students' understanding of being regulated', CONTEMPORARY NURSE, 44 232-241 (2013) [C1]
2013 Ranse J, Hutton A, 'Author reply: Minimum data set for mass-gatherings health research and evaluation: The beginning of an international dialogue', Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, 28 193 (2013)
DOI 10.1017/S1049023X12001707
Citations Scopus - 2
2013 Hutton A, Brown S, Verdonk N, 'Exploring culture: Audience predispositions and consequent effects on audience behavior in a mass-gathering setting', Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, 28 292-297 (2013) [C1]

Introduction The purpose of this critical review is to look at the current literature regarding mass gatherings and to create further understanding of this area with a particular ... [more]

Introduction The purpose of this critical review is to look at the current literature regarding mass gatherings and to create further understanding of this area with a particular focus on what the audience brings with them to the event, particularly in a planned event with a cultural theme or focus. Through an understanding of these predispositions and consequent effects on audience behavior in a mass-gathering setting, a more complete understanding of motivation factors of crowds and audiences can also be found. Methods A critical review of mass-gathering literature was undertaken by searching various online academic databases. Peer-reviewed scholarly articles relevant to the cultural aspects associated with religious, sporting and music mass gatherings were also analyzed. Results Results from the review show that the word culture is often used to explain what happens at the event without reflecting how the motivations or behaviors of audiences at an event are influenced by the cultural predispositions of the audience. Conclusions By understanding the cultural predispositions of the audience, event planners and designers, event risk managers and event safety personnel are able to better understand the motivation of the audience and how this might impact on audience behavior at the event. Further work needs to be done, however, to investigate the broader range of predispositions. The ultimate aim of developing this understanding is to better inform the health promotion and public health messages that can be developed for a particular type of event based on the likely composition of the audience in attendance.

DOI 10.1017/S1049023X13000228
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Zannettino L, Grant J, Hutton A, 'Meeting the sexual heath care needs of young refugee women.', Australian nursing journal (July 1993), 20 49 (2013)
2013 Zander M, Hutton A, King L, 'Exploring resilience in paediatric oncology nursing staff', COLLEGIAN, 20 17-25 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2012.02.002
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 8
2013 Hutton A, Cusack L, 'The perspectives of young people on their use of alcohol and risks at school leavers festivals', Neonatal, Paediatric and Child Health Nursing, 16 16-20 (2013) [C1]

Schools leavers festivals (SLFs) are common across Australia. The SLF is an organised event where young people go to celebrate the end of their schooling. Past research has shown ... [more]

Schools leavers festivals (SLFs) are common across Australia. The SLF is an organised event where young people go to celebrate the end of their schooling. Past research has shown that school leavers often drink alcohol as a form of celebration during this time. This paper presents the findings from a study undertaken to explore the way in which young people prepared to minimise and/or be free from alcohol-related harm at the Adelaide SLF, in South Australia. Data was generated through the retrospective accounts of 38 young people during seven separate focus groups. Our study demonstrated that young people did not access health information to minimise alcohol-related harm. However, the data gained showed that young people plan what type of alcohol they intend to drink and who they are going to drink alcohol with to celebrate the SLF. This study highlights the great length that participants went to planning and budgeting for their purchase of alcohol. For participants in this study peers were people that they could trust. As well as valuing peers, on-site volunteers, mainly made up of other young people, were also valued in supporting their health care needs at the SLF.

Citations Scopus - 6
2013 Brown S, Hutton A, 'Developments in the real-time evaluation of audience behaviour at planned events', International Journal of Event and Festival Management, 4 43-55 (2013) [C1]

Purpose ¿ The purpose of this paper is to explore recent technological and methodological developments in the evaluation of audience behaviour at planned events and discuss the i... [more]

Purpose ¿ The purpose of this paper is to explore recent technological and methodological developments in the evaluation of audience behaviour at planned events and discuss the implications for researchers in this field, particularly the advantages of evaluating in real-time. The creation and staging of the event experience ¿ the realm of event design ¿ is predicated on an understanding of the psychosocial domain of the audience. By understanding the motivations, the behaviours and the predispositions that the audience brings to the event, and how event design principles and techniques can be applied to influence audience behaviour in real time, the event designer is able to more successfully create and stage the event experience to meet the aims and objectives of the event. Design/methodology/approach ¿ The paper discusses international developments in the evaluation of the psychosocial domain of audiences at planned events and the range of research methodologies being used from a practitioner academic perspective. The paper will look at current research being undertaken in Sweden, Austria and Australia and identify trends internationally in this nascent field of research. Findings ¿ The paper argues that real time data collection of audiences provides insights into the effective design and management of planned events, particularly from the event risk management perspective. Practical implications ¿ Drawing on work being undertaken in the mass gatherings, tourism and service fields, the paper examines and synthesises these into a proposed model for the effective evaluation of the event audience. Originality/value ¿ This paper argues for an increase in ¿ and a model for ¿ research on audience behaviour, specifically in the real time capture and analysis of data of audiences at events as a means of developing and understanding of the effects of event design techniques applied at planned events. © 2013, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

DOI 10.1108/17582951311307502
Citations Scopus - 4
2013 Hall A, Wotton K, Hutton A, 'Bystander experiences at and after a motor vehicle accident: A review of the literature', Australasian Journal of Paramedicine, 10 (2013) [C1]

Background To explore what was known about the experiences of bystanders both at the scene, and following a motor vehicle accident (MVA). Understanding these experiences will furt... [more]

Background To explore what was known about the experiences of bystanders both at the scene, and following a motor vehicle accident (MVA). Understanding these experiences will further elucidate the knowledge underpinning bystander's action and their needs at the scene and in the hours, days, weeks and months following this event. Methods A search of Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), MedLine (OVID) and Informit was undertaken using a combination of the keywords: bystander, first aid, motor vehicle accidents, car crash, car collision, lay people and witness. Thirteen articles met the selection criteria and were included in the analysis. The World Wide Web (web) was subsequently searched in response to a gap in current research on bystanders' experiences at and following a MVA. Systematic thematic coding was used in the extraction of patterns regarding bystander experiences during and after witnessing a MVA. Results In the exploration of bystanders' experiences during and after attending a MVA this review confirmed the presence of physical, emotional, cognitive and situational factors associated with bystander responses. Bystanders demonstrated that their response behaviours were determined by the nature of the emergency and the severity of perceived injury. In addition, bystanders weighed up the costs of helping and many felt morally responsible to offer assistance. Although there were no studies of long-term negative consequences exemplars from the web provided insight into ongoing psychological affects for bystanders. Conclusion This thematic literature analysis demonstrated the need for further research into the experiences of bystanders both during and following an MVA. Understanding bystander assistance in emergencies will allow health policy decision-makers to address the needs of both potential bystanders and those of actual bystanders during and post event. © 2013.

Citations Scopus - 2
2013 Cusack L, Arbon P, Hutton A, Starr L, Verdonk N, 'Exploring nursing students' understanding of being regulated', Contemporary Nurse, 2917-2937 (2013)
DOI 10.5172/conu.2013.2917
2012 Gebbie KM, Hutton A, Plummer V, 'Update on Competencies and Education', Annual Review of Nursing Research, 30 169-192 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1891/0739-6686.30.169
2012 Munt R, Hutton A, 'Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) self management in hospital; is it possible?: A literature review', Contemporary Nurse, 40 179-193 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2012 Ranse J, Hutton A, 'Minimum data set for mass-gathering health research and evaluation: A discussion paper', Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, 27 543-550 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1049023X12001288
Citations Scopus - 21
2012 Hutton A, Roderick A, Munt R, Mayner L, Kako M, Arbon P, 'Celebrating the end of school life: A pilot study', Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, 27 13-17 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1049023X11006765
Citations Scopus - 4
2012 Hutton A, Munt R, Aylmer C, Deatrick JA, 'Using the family management measure in Australia', Neonatal, Paediatric and Child Health Nursing, 15 17-25 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
2012 Hutton A, Cusack L, Zannettino L, 'Building public policy to support young people in reducing alcohol-related harm when partying at Schoolies Festivals', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 18 96-100 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/PY11067
Citations Scopus - 8
2012 Hammad KS, Arbon P, Gebbie K, Hutton A, 'Nursing in the emergency department (ED) during a disaster: A review of the current literature', Australasian Emergency Nursing Journal, 15 235-244 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.aenj.2012.10.005
Citations Scopus - 13
2012 Hutton A, 'Health messages not enough to protect harm at Schoolies Festivals.', Australian nursing journal (July 1993), 19 41 (2012)
Citations Scopus - 1
2012 Arabi R, Neill J, Hutton AER, 'Neonatal intensive care unit in Malaysia: Staff nurses' positive experiences', Journal of Nursing & Care, 1 109-5-109-5 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.4172/2167-1168.1000109
2011 Grant JM, Hutton A, 'Supporting adolescents in a rapidly urbanising China', Contemporary Nurse, 40 5-14 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.5172/conu.2011.40.1.5
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2011 Hutton A, Zeitz K, Brown S, Arbon P, 'Assessing the psychosocial elements of crowds at mass gatherings', Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, 26 414-421 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1049023X12000155
Citations Scopus - 8
2011 Willis R, Crowley S, Hutton A, 'Paediatric extended emergency care (PEEC): Establishing and evaluating a paediatric short-stay ward: A pilot study', Neonatal, Paediatric and Child Health Nursing, 14 3-8 (2011) [C1]
2010 Hutton A, 'How adolescent patients use ward space', JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, 66 1802-1809 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2010.05333.x
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2010 Zander M, Hutton A, King L, 'Coping and Resilience Factors in Pediatric Oncology Nurses', JOURNAL OF PEDIATRIC ONCOLOGY NURSING, 27 94-108 (2010)
DOI 10.1177/1043454209350154
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 32
2010 Hutton A, Roderick A, Munt R, 'Lessons learned at World Youth Day: Collecting data and using postcards at mass gatherings', Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, 25 273-277 (2010)

Introduction: World Youth Day (WYD) and its associated activities were held in Sydney, Australia from 15-20 July 2008. The aims of this research were to pilot the use of postcards... [more]

Introduction: World Youth Day (WYD) and its associated activities were held in Sydney, Australia from 15-20 July 2008. The aims of this research were to pilot the use of postcards at mass gatherings and to collect baseline data of how young people (age 16-25 years) identify factors that may affect their health and safety when attending mass gatherings.Hypothesis: The concerns of young people in relation to their health and safety at mass gatherings are poorly understood. It was decided that postcards would be an effective method of data collection in the mobile mass gathering environment.Methods: The research setting was the Pilgrim Walk at WYD. Participants on this walk were young people. To measure their health and safety concerns, a postcard was developed using a Likert scale to rank their attitudes on a continuum.Results: Young people stated that staying hydrated, having enough to eat, and being safe in a crowd were important to them. They also indicated that they perceived, overcrowding, getting to and from an event, and violent behavior as the greatest risks to their health and safety at a mass gathering.Conclusions: The problems with postcard distribution at a "mobile" mass gathering have been identified. Even so, results gathered showed that young people were focused on "in the moment" aspects of their health; such as access to food and water. They also had concerns for their safety due to potential overcrowding and/or violent behavior. © 2010 World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine.

DOI 10.1017/S1049023X00008153
Citations Scopus - 9
2010 Hutton A, Munt R, Zeitz K, Cusack L, Kako M, Arbon P, 'Piloting a mass gathering conceptual framework at an Adelaide Schoolies Festival', COLLEGIAN, 17 183-191 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2010.09.005
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 7
2010 Puckridge D, Higgins M, Hutton A, 'Nurse-initiated x-rays: A leap forward for children and nurses', Neonatal, Paediatric and Child Health Nursing, 13 7-12 (2010)

Paediatric emergency nurses can accurately and suitably order x-rays for paediatric patients with isolated extremity injuries. Secondary aims of this study were to decrease patien... [more]

Paediatric emergency nurses can accurately and suitably order x-rays for paediatric patients with isolated extremity injuries. Secondary aims of this study were to decrease patient emergency department (ED) time and improve satisfaction for patients, parents, nursing and medical staff. This initiative has many benefits, including decreased patient ED waiting time as well as improving satisfaction for patients, parents and nursing staff. Data was obtained through audits and surveys. The study was conducted in a major Australian metropolitan hospital. Audit data was extracted from the PED's information system (EDIS) and radiology reporting systems that are generated by way of the x-ray request forms and completed by nurses. Further information was obtained from two surveys: one completed by emergency nursing staff, which provided information on parents' views about the x-ray process. The other survey was completed by the PED's doctors. Nurse-initiated x-rays (NIXR) audit forms were available for 147 presentations during the study period of April to June 2000. Fractures were detected in 74 (51%) of the x-rays ordered by nurses. This number compared favourably with doctors' x-rays over the same period, where 56% of the x-rays ordered detected fractures. The study has demonstrated that nursing staff can accurately and effectively order NIXR for children with isolated limb injuries in our ED. The study also showed that as a direct result of NIXR, waiting time was reduced for children with these injuries.

Citations Scopus - 1
2010 Hutton A, Harrison D, 'Editorial: Reflections from the INANE conference coolum 11-13 August 2010', Neonatal, Paediatric and Child Health Nursing, 13 1 (2010)
2010 Hutton A, 'Commentary on the standards for the care of children and adolescents in health services, by Women's hospitals Australasia (WHA) and the children's hospital Australasia (CHA)', Neonatal, Paediatric and Child Health Nursing, 13 13-14 (2010)
2009 Zander M, Hutton A, 'Paediatric oncology nursing: Working and coping when kids have cancer- A thematic review', Neonatal, Paediatric and Child Health Nursing, 12 15-27 (2009)

It is well established that nursing can be a stressful occupation. In particular, paediatric oncology, as a setting, is perceived as both personally and professionally demanding, ... [more]

It is well established that nursing can be a stressful occupation. In particular, paediatric oncology, as a setting, is perceived as both personally and professionally demanding, due to additional stressors that are unique to its speciality. This thematic review examines 18 articles to identify effective internal mechanisms for dealing with stressors associated with working in paediatric oncology and methods for managers and colleagues to enhance paediatric oncology nurses' coping strategies. Following an analysis of the literature, a theoretical model of effective coping was conceptualised. Implications for nursing practice and recommendations for further research into the resilience of paediatric oncology nurses are also addressed.

Citations Scopus - 3
2009 Hutton AER, Rudge T, Barnes L, 'The effect of labelling practices in an adolescent facility', APORIA - The Nursing Journal, 1 12-19 (2009)
2008 Hutton A, 'An adolescent ward; 'in name only?'', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 17 3142-3149 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2007.01977.x
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
2008 Hutton A, 'Commentary on Hutton A (2008) An adolescent ward 'in name only 'Journal of Clinical Nursing 17, 3142-3149 Response', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 17 3247-3248 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2008.02298.x
2008 Hutton AER, 'Privacy, independence and peer interaction on an adolescent ward', Childrenz Issues: Journal of the Children's Issues Centre, 12 36-39 (2008)
2005 Hutton A, 'Consumer perspectives in adolescent ward design', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 14 537-545 (2005)

Aims. The aim of the study was to gain an understanding of the environment and facilities that adolescents require in a purpose-built adolescent ward. Background. People who are h... [more]

Aims. The aim of the study was to gain an understanding of the environment and facilities that adolescents require in a purpose-built adolescent ward. Background. People who are hospitalized have limited control over their care and environment. The experience of hospitalization is also considered a highly stressful event. It is essential that patients have an opportunity to participate in the planning and design of ward environments in order to reduce their stress and better accommodate their treatment needs. Methods. An interpretative qualitative design was used. Seven chronically ill adolescents were asked to design their own ward in order to obtain consumer input about what the perceived necessary facilities for adolescent wards. Findings. The adolescents provided clear information about the facilities that should be incorporated into an adolescent ward to maintain their privacy and independence. Further research needs to be conducted seeking consumer input, especially if it can enhance the stay of adolescent patients while they are hospitalized. Relevance to clinical practice. Adolescent voice is more often than not represented by nurses, or other healthcare professionals in the patients' best interest. This practice acts on the assumption that the adult knows best and/or that adolescents are unable to articulate their own needs. Adolescent consumers contribute worthwhile recommendations to how a ward is run providing insight about their needs in the ward environment. © 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2004.01106.x
Citations Scopus - 24
2003 Hutton A, 'Activities in the adolescent ward environment.', Contemporary nurse : a journal for the Australian nursing profession, 14 312-319 (2003)

Adolescent patients within the acute hospital setting require activities which allow for identity development and interaction with other patients. Adolescent patients in a study p... [more]

Adolescent patients within the acute hospital setting require activities which allow for identity development and interaction with other patients. Adolescent patients in a study performed by Hutton in 1999, discuss what type of activities they would like to do while in hospital and describe the environment in which they would like these activities to take place. There were seven patients in Hutton's study. All of these adolescent patients had chronic medical conditions and had been in and out of hospital for most of their lives. These adolescent patients where able to articulate who they wanted to perform activities with and the reasons for both quiet and noisy activities within a busy ward environment. The use of televisions in the ward environment is also included in this discussion.

Citations Scopus - 3
2003 Hutton AER, 'Adolescents discuss sharing space in an adolescent ward', Neonatal, Paediatric and Child Health Nursing, 2 24-29 (2003)
2002 Hutton A, 'The private adolescent: Privacy needs of adolescents in hospitals', Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 17 67-72 (2002)

This report is based on an interpretative study that explored the meaning of space to adolescents in the hospital environment. Through designing their own adolescent ward and disc... [more]

This report is based on an interpretative study that explored the meaning of space to adolescents in the hospital environment. Through designing their own adolescent ward and discussing their designs in an interview, participants articulated their spatial needs in the ward environment. This paper addresses the private space issues of the adolescent patient in the ward environment. Issues that are discussed include the use of the telephone, the bathroom, and the bedroom, and additional facilities needed to enhance privacy in the ward. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1053/jpdn.2002.16718
Citations Scopus - 16
2001 De Bellis A, Longson D, Glover P, Hutton A, 'The enculturation of our nursing graduates.', Contemporary nurse : a journal for the Australian nursing profession, 11 84-94 (2001)

The transition from undergraduate nursing student to employment as a registered nurse is fraught with difficulties for a neophyte. This qualitative study used interviews and focus... [more]

The transition from undergraduate nursing student to employment as a registered nurse is fraught with difficulties for a neophyte. This qualitative study used interviews and focus groups with graduate nurses from the Flinders University of South Australia in their first year of practice to ascertain their experiences as new graduates. The results reveal an enculturation of graduates not conducive to ongoing learning, consolidation of skills and application to practice. A rushed environment that was unpredictable, together with a lack of support, were recurrent themes from the graduates' perspective. Graduate nurse programs are run by institutions focused on outcomes and expenditure. There is little or no collaboration with the tertiary sector in providing appropriate programs according to graduates' needs. The graduates, as beginning practitioners, focused on not having the time to nurse holistically, an unrealistic workload, and the need for backup and continuous support on an individual basis. The wards, although possibly efficient and effective in providing health care, provided a culture where the graduates felt inadequate, rushed, overworked and unsupported, which is contrary to the aims and objectives of the graduate nurse programs. The nursing profession as a whole needs to develop a culture that is nurturing, enabling, supportive and protective of our young.

Citations Scopus - 40
Show 62 more journal articles

Conference (29 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Roderick AB, Hutton AER, 'The imaginary line: An ethnography of nurses everyday infection control practices', 11th Annual Ethnography Symposium (2016)
2016 Ranse JC, Hutton AER, Lenson SA, 'Health service impact from mass-gatherings: A systematic literature review' (2016)
2016 Hutton AER, 'Association for the Wellbeing of Children in Healthcare - Past present and future' (2016)
2015 Ranse JC, Hutton AER, Wilson R, 'What are the research needs for the field of disaster nursing? An international Delphi study' (2015)
2015 Mediani HS, Duggan R, Chapman R, Hutton AER, Shields L, 'Barriers to provide effective pain care: Indonesian nurses' perceptions and experiences when caring for hospitalized children experiencing pain in two hospitals in Indonesia' (2015)
2015 Steenkamp M, Ranse JC, Hutton AER, Lund A, Turris S, Arbon PA, 'Findings from phase 1 of an international Delphi project to establish a minimum data set for mass gathering health' (2015)
2015 Goodwin-Veenema T, Hutton AER, Bell SA, Mackenzie W, 'Exploring the use of the ICN disaster competencies' (2015)
2015 Bell SA, Hutton AER, Wybrecht M, Mackenzie W, Goodwin-Veenema T, 'Use of competencies in disaster global response: An integrative review' (2015)
2015 Arbon PA, Steenkamp M, Lund A, Turris S, Ranse JC, Hutton AER, 'Describing an international Delphi project on mass gathering health data collection' (2015)
2015 Steenkamp M, Ramsey I, Ranse JC, Hutton AER, Lund A, Turris S, 'Data for mass gathering health: What is on your shopping list?' (2015)
2013 Hutton AER, Brown SJ, Verdonk N, 'Exploring culture: Audience predispositions and consequent effects on audience behaviour in a mass gathering setting' (2013)
2013 Lund A, Turris S, Bowles R, Gutman S, Hutton AER, Ranse J, 'Progressing towards an international consensus on data modeling for mass gathering and mass participation events' (2013)
2013 Ranse J, Hutton AER, 'Biomedical data collection for mass gathering research and evaluation: a review of the literature' (2013)
2013 Hammad K, Arbon P, Gebbie K, Hutton AER, 'How the Emergency Department (ED) changes during a disaster response' (2013)
2011 Hutton AER, Cusack L, 'Building public policy to support young people party safely at mass-gathering events' (2011)
2011 Siegloff L, Cusack L, Arbon P, Hutton AER, Mayner L, 'Health workforce and disaster preparedness of rural hospitals' (2011)
2011 Cusack L, Siegloff L, Arbon P, Hutton AER, Mayner L, 'Tension between emergency management policy decisions and aged care facilities in Australia: A case study' (2011)
2011 Hutton AER, 'Young people at mass gathering events: Data collection tools and findings' (2011)
2010 Hutton AER, 'Understanding schoolies using a mass gathering framework' (2010)
2010 Hutton AER, Deatrick J, 'Family management of children with chronic conditions within an Australian context' (2010)
2009 Hutton AER, Roderick AB, Munt RL, Arbon PA, 'Schoolies Festival- a pilot study: What do young people do to stay safe and healthy at crowded events?' (2009)
2008 Hutton AER, 'Adolescent stories: Using adolescent spaces to break down barriers in care' (2008)
2008 Hutton AER, 'Opportunities for young people to be part of their own treatment in a mental health setting' (2008)
2007 Henderson JA, Hutton AER, 'Providing collaborative research education for undergraduate nursing students: Critical reflection on practice', Enhancing Higher Education, Theory ans Scholarship: Proceedings of the 30th HERDSA Annual Conference. Milperra, NSW: Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia, Inc. (HERDSA). 30th HERDSA Annual Conference (2007)
2007 Hutton AER, 'Labelling: A method of patient classification?' (2007)
2007 Hutton AER, 'Labelling: A method of patient classification?' (2007)
2006 Hutton AER, 'Adolescent ward design' (2006)
2006 Hutton AER, Quested BK, Roderick A, Rudge TK, Toffoli L, 'Unproblematic access? Troubling the notion of 'ease of access' in field research in the clinical arena' (2006)
2001 Hutton AER, 'Constructing social space in an adolescent ward' (2001)
Show 26 more conferences

Report (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2007 Rudge TK, Henderson JA, Hutton AER, Byrnes TJ, 'Evaluating Noarlunga towards a safe community', - (2007)
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 22
Total funding $415,350

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20172 grants / $19,650

Men’s Violence: Health, Education, Relationships, Change, Hutton, $17,650

Funding body: Sammy D Foundation

Funding body Sammy D Foundation
Project Team

Hutton, A and Wadham, B.

Scheme Discretionary Funding Scheme - Sammy D Foundation
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

How do social networking sites influence the drinking behaviour of emerging adults?$2,000

Funding body: Strategic Research Pilot Grant

Funding body Strategic Research Pilot Grant
Project Team

Ivanka Prichard

Scheme 2017 Strategic Research Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20164 grants / $183,272

Domestic violence against older women: Developing networks to improve service provision’$149,475

Funding body: Department of Social Serivces

Funding body Department of Social Serivces
Project Team

Zannettino, L. Hutton, A Fuller, J and Parry Y.

Scheme Building Safe Communities for Women
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Tailor Made Project - living with early onset dementia$25,000

Funding body: ACH Group

Funding body ACH Group
Project Team

A Hutton

Scheme ACH Group
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

Young adults’ experiences in relation to alcohol-related preplanning and decision-making at planned social events. $8,797

Funding body: Flinders University Establishment Grant

Funding body Flinders University Establishment Grant
Project Team

Whitehead, D Hutton A. Zannettino, L Prichard, I and Drummond, C.

Scheme Flinders University Establishment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Developing a Virtual Learning Platform for Nursing Studnets$0

Funding body: Faculty Teaching and Learning Grant

Funding body Faculty Teaching and Learning Grant
Project Team

Amanda Muller, Alison Hutton and Leeanne Pront

Scheme School of Health Sciences Faculty Teaching and Learning Award
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20142 grants / $25,000

Understanding the use of service learning in schools – Johns Hopkins School of Nursing$20,000

Funding body: Endeavour Foundation

Funding body Endeavour Foundation
Project Team

Hutton, A.

Scheme Australian Government Endeavour Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

School of Nursing Start Up Grant. Virtual learning to assist in clinical decision making for undergraduate nursing students $5,000.00 $5,000

Funding body: School of Nursing and Midwifery Start Up Grant

Funding body School of Nursing and Midwifery Start Up Grant
Project Team

L. Pront, A. Hutton, A Muller, and J Murphy

Scheme Flinders University
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20133 grants / $17,000

Faculty Seeding Grant Investigating adolescent girls disengagement with physical activity C. Drummond (CI), L. Norton, J. Gunson, Y Parry and A Hutton $12,000.00 $12,000

Funding body: Faculty Seeding Grant

Funding body Faculty Seeding Grant
Project Team

C. Drummond (CI), L. Norton, J. Gunson, Y Parry and A Hutton

Scheme School of Health Science Faculty Seeding Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Developing theory and predictive models for audience behaviour at mass gatherings $5,000

Funding body: Medium Research Project Grant

Funding body Medium Research Project Grant
Project Team

S Brown and A Hutton

Scheme Faculty of Education Humanities and Law, Medium Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Patient characteristic to onsite health providers, ambulance paramedics and hospitals from mass gathering.$0

Funding body: St John Ambulance Australia

Funding body St John Ambulance Australia
Project Team

Ranse, J. Hutton, A. Lenson, S. and Keene, T.

Scheme St John Ambulance Australia
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20122 grants / $52,000

Mass Gathering Infrastructure $32,000

Funding body: Infrastruture Grant

Funding body Infrastruture Grant
Project Team

A. Hutton and P. Arbon

Scheme School of Health Science Faculty Infrastructure Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Binge Drinking Initiative – to reduce binge drinking in Adelaide’s West End, $20,000

Funding body: Australian Binge Drinking Initative

Funding body Australian Binge Drinking Initative
Project Team

A Hutton

Scheme Australian Government Binge Drinking Initative
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20114 grants / $46,344

Building the capacity of health care professionals to deliver culturally appropriate safe sex education of younger women –$14,000

Funding body: Ian Potter Foundation

Funding body Ian Potter Foundation
Project Team

L. Zannettino, J Grant and A. Hutton

Scheme Ian Potter Foundation
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Developing theory and predictive models for audience behaviour at mass gatherings $12,000

Funding body: Faculty of Health Science Seeding Grant

Funding body Faculty of Health Science Seeding Grant
Project Team

A. Hutton and Dr Steve Brown

Scheme Faculty of Health Science Seeding Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

The role of St John on-site care in hospital avoidance $11,660

Funding body: St John Ambulance Australia

Funding body St John Ambulance Australia
Project Team

Hutton, A Aimers, B. Ranse, J. and Arbon, P.

Scheme St John Ambulance Australia
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Identifying the number of patient presentations of young people at music festivals $8,684

Funding body: St John Ambulance Australia

Funding body St John Ambulance Australia
Project Team

A. Hutton, P Arbon and J Ranse

Scheme St John Ambulance Australia
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20103 grants / $64,976

Exploring students’ understanding of being regulated $30,000

Funding body: Nurses Memorial Fund

Funding body Nurses Memorial Fund
Project Team

Arbon, L. Cusack, A. Hutton, L Starr and M. Kako

Scheme Nurses Memorial Fund
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON N

Funding to support the development of mass gathering research in the Flinders University Centre for Disaster Resilience and Health$18,000

Funding body: Infrastructure Grant

Funding body Infrastructure Grant
Project Team

A. Hutton

Scheme School of Health Science Infrastructure Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Celebration not hospitalisation!: Reducing the number of young people requiring hospitalisation during Schoolies $16,976

Funding body: Faculty of Health Science Seeding Grant

Funding body Faculty of Health Science Seeding Grant
Project Team

A. Hutton,(CI), L. Cusack, L. Zannettino, P. Arbon and J. Schaefer

Scheme Faculty of Health Science Seeding Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20082 grants / $7,109

Family Management Model in the Australian setting $4,331

Funding body: Flinders University Establishment Grant

Funding body Flinders University Establishment Grant
Project Team

A. Hutton , R.Munt and C.Aylmer

Scheme Flinders University Establishment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Staying safe and healthy at World Youth Day$2,778

Funding body: St John Ambulance Australia

Funding body St John Ambulance Australia
Project Team

A Hutton (CI), R Munt and A Roderick

Scheme St John Ambulance Australia
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed8
Current6

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 Honours Are emergency nurses prepared for work in the disaster setting? Nursing, The Faculty of Health Science / The University of Newcastle / Australia Principal Supervisor
2017 Honours Are emergency nurses prepared for work in the disaster setting? Nursing, The Faculty of Health Science / The University of Newcastle / Australia Principal Supervisor
2017 Honours Are emergency nurses prepared for work in the disaster setting? Nursing, The Faculty of Health Science / The University of Newcastle / Australia Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD The role of paediatric nurses as HIV advocates Nursing, Flinders University Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD The role of paediatric nurses as child advocates Nursing, Flinders University Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD How do people with T1DM self manage in the acute hospital setting? Nursing, Flinders University Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD The lived experience of Nursing of in the Emergency Department during a disaster Nursing, Flinders University Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Communicating adolescent sexual health needs in China Nursing, Flinders University Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Nurse’s perception of pain management in the paediatric setting Nursing, Curtin University Co-Supervisor
2014 Masters Exploring Indonesian student nurses perspectives of participating in a disaster Nursing, Flinders University Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Using infection control to illustrate the spaces of nursing care Nursing, Flinders University Co-Supervisor
2011 Masters What skills do childcare workers need to promote child growth and development in Indonesia? Nursing, Flinders University Principal Supervisor
2010 Masters The detection of unintentional child hood injury in Indonesia Nursing, Flinders University Principal Supervisor
2009 Masters The role of families in asthma prevention in Indonesia Nursing, Flinders University Principal Supervisor
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Professor Alison Hutton

Position

Professor
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email alison.hutton@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5264
Links Twitter
Research Networks
Research Networks

Office

Room RW-2-18
Building Richardson Wing
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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