Dr Mieko Omura

Dr Mieko Omura

Lecturer

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Career Summary

Biography

Mieko is a registered nurse who holds registrations and clinical experiences both in Australia and Japan. She was awarded the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Nursing, in the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health and Medicine, the University of Newcastle on 28 November 2018. Her thesis was to design and evaluate the assertiveness communication training program in the form of a series of seven papers using a mixed-methods design. After being sessional academic in 2019, Mieko was appointed to the position of lecturer at the School of Nursing and Midwifery at the University of Newcastle in January 2020.

Mieko’s research interests include assertive communication in healthcare, interprofessional education, cultural studies, health beliefs, healthy ageing and mental health literacy among university academics. She is currently involved in research in collaboration with mental health researchers at a Japanese university to explore university academics’ perceptions of students with mental health issues (funded by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research), and a research analysing the health beliefs of nursing academics and clinicians across four countries.


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Nursing, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Nursing (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • assertive communication
  • cross-cultural study
  • health belief
  • mental health literacy
  • nursing

Languages

  • Japanese (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified 60
200209 Multicultural, Intercultural and Cross-cultural Studies 20
200105 Organisational, Interpersonal and Intercultural Communication 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia

Teaching appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
4/2/2019 - 6/12/2019 Sessional Academic School of Nursing and Midwifery University of Newcastle
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
NURS6900 Introduction to Research in Health Care
School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle
Tutor 14/1/2020 - 8/5/2020
JAPN1110 Elementary Japanese 1
School of Humanities and Social Science - Faculty of Education and Arts - The University of Newcastle
Tutor 29/7/2019 - 25/11/2019
NURS3103 Healthy Ageing Across Contexts and Communities
School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle
Tutor 13/1/2020 - 3/7/2020
NURS6900 Introduction to Research in Health Care
School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle
Tutor 4/2/2019 - 10/5/2019
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Omura M, Stone TE, Petrini MA, Cao R, 'Nurses health beliefs about paper face masks in Japan, Australia and China: a qualitative descriptive study', International Nursing Review, (2020)

© 2020 International Council of Nurses Aim: To explore the health beliefs of clinical and academic nurses from Japan, Australia and China regarding wearing paper masks to protect ... [more]

© 2020 International Council of Nurses Aim: To explore the health beliefs of clinical and academic nurses from Japan, Australia and China regarding wearing paper masks to protect themselves and others, and to identify differences in participants' health beliefs regarding masks. Background: The correct use of face masks and consensus among health professionals across the globe is essential for containing pandemics, and nurses need to act according to policy to protect themselves, educate the public and preserve resources for frontline health workers. Paper masks are worn by health professionals and the general public to avoid the transmission of respiratory infections, such as COVID-19, but there appear to be differences in health beliefs of nurses within and between countries regarding these. Methods: This qualitative descriptive study used content analysis with a framework approach. Findings: There were major differences in nurse participants¿ beliefs between and within countries, including how nurses use paper masks and their understanding of their efficacy. In addition, there were cultural differences in the way that nurses use masks in their daily lives and nursing practice contexts. Conclusion: Nurses from different working environments, countries and areas of practice hold a variety of health beliefs about mask wearing at the personal and professional level. Implications for nursing policy and health policy: The COVID-19 pandemic has sparked much discussion about the critical importance of masks for the safety of health professionals, and there has been considerable discussion and disagreement about health policies regarding mask use by the general public. Improper use of masks may have a role in creating mask shortages or transmitting infections. An evidence-based global policy on mask use for respiratory illnesses for health professionals, including nurses, and the general public needs to be adopted and supported by a wide-reaching education campaign.

DOI 10.1111/inr.12607
Co-authors Teresa Stone
2020 Stone TE, Kunaviktikul W, Omura M, Petrini M, 'Facemasks and the Covid 19 pandemic: What advice should health professionals be giving the general public about the wearing of facemasks?', Nurs Health Sci, 22 339-342 (2020)
DOI 10.1111/nhs.12724
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Teresa Stone
2019 Omura M, Levett-Jones T, Stone TE, 'Evaluating the impact of an assertiveness communication training programme for Japanese nursing students: A quasi-experimental study', NURSING OPEN, 6 463-472 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/nop2.228
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Teresa Stone
2019 Omura M, Levett-Jones T, Stone TE, 'Design and evaluation of an assertiveness communication training programme for nursing students', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 28 1990-1998 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Aims: The aims of this paper are to (a) outline the design and implementation of an evidence-based assertiveness communication workshop for Japa... [more]

© 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Aims: The aims of this paper are to (a) outline the design and implementation of an evidence-based assertiveness communication workshop for Japanese nursing students; and (b) report on the evaluation of nursing students¿ satisfaction with the workshop using the Satisfaction with Assertiveness Communication Training Program Survey. Background: A body of research attests to the relationship between assertive communication and patient safety. This paper reports the design and evaluation of an assertiveness communication training programme designed to enhance students¿ ability to communicate safety in clinical practice. Design: A culturally appropriate and evidence-based assertiveness communication workshop, informed by Gagne's instructional design principles, was implemented for third-year nursing students in two Japanese higher educational institutions in December 2017. A descriptive study design was used to evaluate the workshop. Methods: Students¿ perceptions of the workshop were evaluated using the Satisfaction with Assertiveness Communication Training Program Survey, which includes ten items that are rated using a 5-point Likert scale from strongly disagree [1] to strongly agree [5]. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. The Revised Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence (SQUIRE 2.0) guidelines were used in the reporting of this study. Results: A total of 111 students from a population of 150 participated in the study giving a response rate of 74%. The overall mean satisfaction score was 4.12 indicating a high level of agreement with each of the survey items. With the exception of two items, the mean scores were above 4.0. ¿Confidence in using assertiveness communication skills¿ and ¿Utilising role-plays to practice learnt skills¿ received mean scores of 3.71 and 3.90, respectively. Conclusion: Given the compelling research about the importance of assertive communication in health care, the results from this study support continuing investment in assertiveness communication training programmes for nursing students. Relevance to clinical practice: Assertive communication is an essential communication skill for safe nursing practice. Culturally appropriate assertiveness communication training programmes are of particular relevance in hierarchical healthcare contexts.

DOI 10.1111/jocn.14813
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Teresa Stone
2018 Omura M, Stone TE, Maguire J, Levett-Jones T, 'Exploring Japanese nurses perceptions of the relevance and use of assertive communication in healthcare: A qualitative study informed by the Theory of Planned Behaviour', Nurse Education Today, 67 100-107 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Background: The hierarchical nature of healthcare environments presents a key risk factor for effective interprofessional communication. Power differentials ev... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Background: The hierarchical nature of healthcare environments presents a key risk factor for effective interprofessional communication. Power differentials evident in traditional healthcare cultures can make it difficult for healthcare professionals to raise concerns and be assertive when they have concerns about patient safety. This issue is of particular concern in Japan where inherent cultural and social norms discourage assertive communication. Aim: The aim of this study was to (a) explore nurses¿ perceptions of the relevance and use of assertive communication in Japanese healthcare environments; and (b) identify the factors that facilitate or impede assertive communication by Japanese nurses. Design: A belief elicitation qualitative study informed by the Theory of Planned Behaviour was conducted and reported according to the COnsolidated criteria for REporting Qualitative research. Settings and Participants: Twenty-three practicing Japanese registered nurses were recruited by snowball sampling from October 2016 to January 2017. Methods: Individual face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted and transcribed in Japanese and then translated into English. Two researchers independently conducted a directed content analysis informed by the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Participants¿ responses were labelled in order of frequency for behavioural beliefs about the consequences of assertive communication, sources of social pressure, and factors that facilitate or impede assertive communication in Japanese healthcare environments. Findings: Although person-centred care and patient advocacy were core values for many of the participants, strict hierarchies, age-based seniority, and concerns about offending a colleague or causing team disharmony impeded their use of assertive communication. Novice nurses were particularly reluctant to speak up because of their perception of having limited knowledge and experience. Conclusion: This study identified Japanese nurses¿ behavioural, normative, and control beliefs in relation to assertive communication. The findings will be used to inform the development of a culturally appropriate assertiveness communication training program for Japanese nurses and nursing students.

DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2018.05.004
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Teresa Stone, Tracy Levett-Jones
2018 Omura M, Stone TE, Levett-Jones T, 'Cultural factors influencing Japanese nurses' assertive communication. Part 1: Collectivism.', Nursing & health sciences, 20 283-288 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/nhs.12411
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Teresa Stone, Tracy Levett-Jones
2018 Omura M, Stone TE, Levett-Jones T, 'Cultural factors influencing Japanese nurses assertive communication: Part 2 hierarchy and power', Nursing and Health Sciences, 20 289-295 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd Hierarchy and power characterize health-care relationships around the world, constituting a barrier to assertive communication and a ... [more]

© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd Hierarchy and power characterize health-care relationships around the world, constituting a barrier to assertive communication and a risk to patient safety. This issue is more problematic and complex in countries such as Japan, where deep-seated cultural values related to hierarchy and power persist. The current paper is the second of two that present the findings from a study exploring Japanese nurses¿ views and experiences of how cultural values impact assertive communication for health-care professionals. We conducted semistructured interviews with 23 registered nurses, following which data were analyzed using directed content analysis. Two overarching themes emerged from the analysis: hierarchy/power and collectivism. In the present study, we focus on cultural values related to hierarchy and power, including differences in professional status, gender imbalance, seniority/generation gap, bullying, and humility/modesty. The findings from our research provide meaningful insights into how Japanese cultural values influence and constrain nurses¿ communication and speaking up behaviors, and can be used to inform educational programs designed to teach assertiveness skills.

DOI 10.1111/nhs.12418
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Teresa Stone
2017 Omura M, Maguire J, Levett-Jones T, Stone TE, 'The effectiveness of assertiveness communication training programs for healthcare professionals and students: A systematic review', International Journal of Nursing Studies, 76 120-128 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Background Communication errors have a negative impact on patient safety. It is therefore essential that healthcare professionals have the skills and confidenc... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Background Communication errors have a negative impact on patient safety. It is therefore essential that healthcare professionals have the skills and confidence to speak up assertively when patient safety is at risk. Although the facilitators to and barriers of assertive communication have been the subject of previous reviews, evidence regarding the effectiveness of interventions designed to enhance assertive communication is lacking. Thus, this paper reports the findings from a systematic review of the effectiveness of assertiveness communication training programs for healthcare professionals and students. Objective The objective of this review is to identify, appraise and synthesise the best available quantitative evidence in relation to the effectiveness of assertiveness communication training programs for healthcare professionals and students on levels of assertiveness, communication competence and impact on clinicians¿ behaviours and patient safety. Data sources The databases included: CINAHL, Cochrane library, EMBASE, Informit health collection, MEDLINE, ProQuest nursing and allied health, PsycINFO, Scopus and Web of Science. The search for unpublished studies included: MedNar, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&I. Studies published in English from 2001 until 2016 inclusive were considered. Study eligibility criteria The review included original quantitative research that evaluated (a) any type of independent assertiveness communication training program; and (b) programs with assertiveness training included as a core component of team skills or communication training for healthcare professionals and students, regardless of healthcare setting and level of qualification of participants. Study appraisal and synthesis methods Studies selected based on eligibility criteria were assessed for methodological quality and the data were extracted by two independent researchers using the Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal and data extraction tools. Results Eleven papers were critically appraised using the Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal checklists. Eight papers from the USA, Australia, Ireland, and Taiwan were included in the review. Conclusions Interventions to improve assertive communication were reported to be effective to some degree with all targeted groups except experienced anaesthesiologists. Face-to-face and multimethod programs, support from leaders, teamwork skills training and communication techniques adapted from the aviation industry were identified as appropriate approaches for optimising the effectiveness of assertiveness communication training programs. Behavioural change as the result of assertiveness interventions was evaluated by observer-based rating scales during simulation, whilst self-perceived knowledge and attitudes were evaluated using validated scales. Future research should consider evaluation of sustained effect on behaviour change and patient safety.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2017.09.001
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Teresa Stone
2016 Omura M, Maguire J, Levett-Jones T, Stone TE, 'Effectiveness of assertive communication training programs for health professionals and students: a systematic review protocol', JBI database of systematic reviews and implementation reports, 14 64-71 (2016)

REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objective of this systematic review is to identify, appraise and synthesize the best available evidence related to the effectiveness of assertive co... [more]

REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objective of this systematic review is to identify, appraise and synthesize the best available evidence related to the effectiveness of assertive communication training programs in healthcare.More specifically, the objective of this systematic review is to determine the effectiveness of assertive communication interventions for health professionals and students on levels of assertiveness, communication competence and impact on clinician behaviors compared to alternative or no interventions.

DOI 10.11124/jbisrir-2016-003158
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Teresa Stone, Tracy Levett-Jones
2015 Omura M, Levett-Jones T, Stone TE, Maguire J, Lapkin S, 'Measuring the impact of an interprofessional multimedia learning resource on Japanese nurses and nursing students using the Theory of Planned Behavior Medication Safety Questionnaire', Nursing and Health Sciences, 17 500-506 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/nhs.12224
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Teresa Stone
Show 7 more journal articles

Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Omura M, Design and evaluation of an assertiveness communication training program for Japanese nursing students, The University of Newcastle (2018)
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Dr Mieko Omura

Position

Lecturer
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email mieko.omura@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4055 3333

Office

Room RW 2-35
Building Richardson Wing
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