Associate Professor Jed Duff

Associate Professor Jed Duff

Associate Professor

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Career Summary

Biography

Jed has been a registered nurse for 20 years. He describes himself as a ‘pracademic’ – someone who helps solve real world problems by combining the views of practitioners and academics. Prior to his appointment at the University of Newcastle, Jed was a Senior Research Fellow at a major metropolitan hospital where he developed, tested, and implemented strategies to improve the uptake of evidence into practice; designed and ran multidisciplinary research; and mentored staff in evidence-based practice, practice improvement, and research methods.

The focus of Jed’s research program is improving patient care through multidisciplinary health service research with a particular emphasis on implementation science. Implementation science is a relatively new field of research that focuses on the translation of evidence into routine practice. Jed is skilled at implementing evidence using pragmatic models and studying the implementation using mixed method approaches. From 2014-2016, Jed was an NHMRC Translating Research into Practice Fellow. During his fellowship he established a collaborative improvement program to implement evidence into practice across the St Vincent’s Health Australia network of acute care hospitals.   

Jed’s implementation research has been recognised with local and national awards. He has been awarded the Australian Private Hospitals Association (Baxter) Quality and Safety Award; and the Australian Council for Healthcare Standards Quality Improvement Award for his study that improved compliance with warfarin management guidelines. Jed was also the first nurse to receive the St Vincent’s Sydney Clinical Research Excellence Award for his work implementing VTE prophylaxis guidelines. And his research team received the Australian College of Perioperative Nurses Excellence in Perioperative Nursing Award for their work translating surgical care guidelines into practice.

Jed is actively engaged in the national and international nursing profession. He is a Fellow and immediate past President of the Australian Colleague of Perioperative Nurses; a former Board Member of the International Federation of Perioperative Nurses; and current Honorary Secretary of the Asian Perioperative Nurses Association. In recognition of his commitment to global nursing, Jed was chosen to join the International Council of Nursing’s Global Nursing Leadership Institute. 


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Australian Catholic University
  • Bachelor of Nursing, Charles Sturt University

Keywords

  • Acute Care
  • Healthcare Improvement
  • Implementation research
  • Improvement Science
  • Nursing
  • Perioperative Care

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified 50
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
31/12/2014 - 31/12/2016 Senior Research Fellow St Vincent's Private Hospital Sydney
Australia
16/05/2014 -  Fellow Australian College of Perioperative Nurses
Australia
1/01/2014 - 31/07/2016 NHMRC Translating Research into Practice Fellow National Health & Medical Research Council
Australia
31/12/2009 - 31/12/2014 Research Fellow St Vincent's Private Hospital Sydney
Australia
2/07/2007 - 1/12/2009 Practice Development and Research Fellow St Vincent's Private Hospital Sydney
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
15/11/2014 - 12/11/2016 President Australian College of Operating Room Nurses
Australia
13/11/2014 -  Honorary Secretary Asian Perioperative Nurses Association
Hong Kong
13/11/2014 - 19/11/2016 Board Member International Federation of Perioperative Nurses
United Kingdom
13/11/2014 - 13/01/2017 Deputy Chair Coalition of National Nursing and Midwifery Organisations
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2016 Best paper, Asian Perioperative Nurses Association Conference, Hong Kong.
Asian Perioperative Nurses Association
2016 Australian College of Perioperative Nurses Biannual Excellence in Perioperative Nursing Award (Team)
Australian College of Perioperative Nurses
2013 International Nurses Day Award (Professional Development)
St Vincent's Private Hospital Sydney
2011 American Journal of Vascular Nursing Annual Writing Award
Journal of Vascular Nursing (US)
2010 St Vincent’s Campus Excellence Award for Clinical Research
St Vincent's and Mater Health Services
2008 Australian Private Hospitals Association Baxter Quality and Safety Award
Australian Private Hospitals Association
2008 Australian Council for Healthcare Standards Quality Improvement Award:
Australian Council on Healthcare Standards (ACHS)

Grant Reviews

Year Grant Amount
2016 NHMRC Project Grants
Aust Competitive - Commonwealth - 1CS, Aust Competitive - Commonwealth - 1CS
$0
2016 ACORN Research Grant
Grant - Aust Non Government - 3AFG, Grant - Aust Non Government - 3AFG
$0
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (47 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Ralph N, Duff J, 'Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) protocols ¿ an opportunity for improved care and enhanced scope of practice?', ACORN: Journal of Perioperative Nursing in Australia, 30 3-4 (2017)
2017 Amanda E, Ralph N, Duff J, Conway A, Mills D, 'Oxygen supplementation for preventing adverse outcomes following surgery or invasive procedures', PROSPERO International prospective register of systematic reviews, (2017)
2017 Bayliss D, Duff J, Stricker P, Walker K, 'Decision-Making in Prostate Cancer--Choosing Active Surveillance Over Other Treatment Options: A Literature Review.', Urologic Nursing, 37 15-22 (2017)
DOI 10.7257/1053-816X.2017.37.1.15
2017 Woods L, Cummings E, Duff J, Walker K, 'Design Thinking for mHealth Application Co-Design to Support Heart Failure Self-Management', Studies in health technology and informatics, 241 97-102 (2017)
DOI 10.3233/978-1-61499-794-8-97
2017 Edwards KL, Walker K, Duff J, 'A multi-state, multi-site, multi-sector healthcare improvement model: implementing evidence for practice', International Journal For Quality In Health Care, (2017)
DOI 10.1093/intqhc/mzx099
2016 Duff J, Walker K, Edward KL, 'Collaborative Development of a Perioperative Thermal Care Bundle Using the Guideline Implementability Appraisal Tool', Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, (2016)

© 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Background: Perioperative hypothermia significantly increases a patient's risk of adverse complications, such as surgical s... [more]

© 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Background: Perioperative hypothermia significantly increases a patient's risk of adverse complications, such as surgical site infection; morbid cardiac events, and surgical bleeding. Although guideline recommendations are relatively simple and inexpensive, they are often not adhered to in clinical practice. Knowledge tools are tangible resources that assist clinicians to provide evidence-based care. Purpose: This article reports the collaborative development of a knowledge tool-a perioperative thermal care bundle. Methods: A multidisciplinary panel of experts used the online GuideLine Implementability Appraisal tool to prioritize and select recommendations for inclusion in the care bundle. Design: Collaborative, iterative design. Finding: Through a consensus process, the expert panel selected three main bundle elements: Assess patient's risk of hypothermia and contraindications to active warming; record temperature frequently preoperatively, intraoperatively, and postoperatively; and actively warm, intraoperatively, if they are at high risk, or anytime they are hypothermic. Conclusions: The GuideLine Implementability Appraisal tool was a simple yet comprehensive tool that enabled the development of a care bundle by expert clinicians.

DOI 10.1016/j.jopan.2016.05.007
2016 Duff J, 'President's report', ACORN, 29 4 (2016)
2016 Duff J, 'President's report', ACORN, 29 5 (2016)
2016 Woods LS, Walker KN, Duff JS, 'Heart failure patients' experiences of non-pharmacological self-care', British Journal of Cardiac Nursing, 11 498-506 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.12968/bjca.2016.11.10.498
2016 Duff J, Butler M, Davies M, Williams R, Carlile J, others, 'Factors that predict evidence use by Australian perioperative nurses', ACORN: The Journal of Perioperative Nursing in Australia, 29 24-29 (2016) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4
2016 Conway A, Duff J, 'Forced air warming to maintain normoTHERMIa during SEDation in the cardiac catheterization laboratory: protocol for the THERMISED pilot randomized controlled trial', Journal of advanced nursing, 72 2547-2557 (2016)
2016 Walker K, Campbell S, Duff J, Cummings E, 'Doctoral education for nurses today: The phd or professional doctorate?', Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, 34 60-69 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Australian Nursing Federation. All Rights Reserved. Objective This paper seeks to stimulate discussion and debate about the future of doctoral education for nurses in Aus... [more]

© 2016, Australian Nursing Federation. All Rights Reserved. Objective This paper seeks to stimulate discussion and debate about the future of doctoral education for nurses in Australia. Setting A large Magnet recognised acute care private hospital in New South Wales and a large regional university in Australia. Primary argument Healthcare today and into the future is increasingly more complex and requires ever more highly skilled healthcare professionals to meet the challenges of providing safe, quality care. Doctoral research and education based in the workplace and designed to improve healthcare while skilling up nurses and other professionals in research methods has never been more relevant and appropriate. Conclusion Nurses have generally not seen the PhD as the best fit for their higher professional development. The professional doctorate offers a compelling and dynamic alternative to the more academic focus of the PhD and prepares ¿inquiry-driven leaders¿ for tomorrow¿s challenges.

2016 Panti JP, Tan S, Kuo W, Fung S, Walker K, Duff J, 'Clinical and radiologic outcomes of the second-generation Trabecular Metal¿ glenoid for total shoulder replacements after 2¿6¿years follow-up', Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, 136 1637-1645 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Background: A porous tantalum glenoid component for total shoulder replacements was introduced in 2003 to promote biologic ingrowth. Ho... [more]

© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Background: A porous tantalum glenoid component for total shoulder replacements was introduced in 2003 to promote biologic ingrowth. However, reports of component failure prompted design modifications. The purpose of this study is to present the largest series to date, of TSR with the second-generation Trabecular Metal¿ glenoid component. Method: A radiologic and clinical evaluation of the second-generation TM glenoid was conducted in consecutive cases of 76 shoulders (66 patients) with a mean follow-up of 43.2¿months (range 24¿72¿months). Pre-operative VAS score, patient self-assessed ASES score, active shoulder range of motion, and radiologic assessment were recorded. Patients were recalled for latest follow-up clinical and radiologic evaluation. Results: On latest follow-up, the mean VAS scores (pre-op: 6.4¿latest: 0.9) and ASES scores (pre-op: 36.9¿latest: 88.5) improved. Active range of motion improved in all planes. There was no report of glenoid component migration, loosening, or humeral stem subsidence. The incidence of non-progressive radiolucency in the glenoid was 6.6¿% (Franklin 1: 3 cases, Franklin 2: 2 cases). Post-operative complications involved dislocation (n¿=¿2) which were reduced in ED, post-operative stiffness (n¿=¿1), transient axillary nerve neuropraxia (n¿=¿1), and supraspinatus tear which underwent arthroscopic repair at 16¿months post-op. There were no revision surgeries for implant loosening nor glenoid component fracture at the peg¿base plate junction. Conclusions: The modifications established in the second-generation TM glenoid resulted to improve early to mid-term survivorship and clinical outcomes in TSR, with promise of long-term implant stability through bony ingrowth. Level of evidence: Level IV, case series, treatment study.

DOI 10.1007/s00402-016-2562-1
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Bayliss D, Duff J, Stricker P, Walker K, 'Decision-Making in Prostate Cancer: Active Surveillance Over Other Treatment Options', Urologic nursing, 36 141-149 (2016) [C1]

A qualitative-descriptive study of four patients with prostate cancer used the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing framework to understand how and why men diagnosed wit... [more]

A qualitative-descriptive study of four patients with prostate cancer used the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing framework to understand how and why men diagnosed with prostate cancer choose active surveillance over other treatment options. In accordance with the literature, it was found that the surgeon or general practitioner's recommendation was the most influential factor when patients are making a treatment decision.

2016 Murphy K, Walker K, Duff J, Williams R, 'The collaborative development of a pre-operative checklist: An e-Delphi study', ACORN, 29 36-43 (2016) [C1]

The aim of this study was to identify which items should be included in a pre-operative checklist based on recommendations by nurse experts in order to promote patient safety and ... [more]

The aim of this study was to identify which items should be included in a pre-operative checklist based on recommendations by nurse experts in order to promote patient safety and effective communication in the perioperative environment. Method: Thirty-five nurses participated in this e-Delphi study, which was conducted online via SurveyMonkey®. Each survey presented participants with a list of potential items for inclusion in a pre-operative checklist. Participants were asked to identify items they felt should be included in the checklist with the option to include comments. Comments were de-identified and shared with other participants to allow confidential interaction. The surveys were analysed for consensus, determined as agreement between at least 70% of participants. Results: Three survey rounds were completed. Forty-six items achieved consensus for inclusion in a pre-operative checklist. Conclusion: The 46 items which achieved consensus were condensed to a list of 25 items categorised as: 1. Patient and procedure verification; 2. Preparation; and 3. Assessments. The findings of this study provide an evidence base for development of pre-operative checklists, to promote patient safety and effective communication in the perioperative environment.

2016 Kornhaber R, Walsh K, Duff J, Walker K, 'Enhancing adult therapeutic interpersonal relationships in the acute health care setting: An integrative review', Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, 9 537-546 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Kornhaber et al. Therapeutic interpersonal relationships are the primary component of all health care interactions that facilitate the development of positive clinician-pa... [more]

© 2016 Kornhaber et al. Therapeutic interpersonal relationships are the primary component of all health care interactions that facilitate the development of positive clinician-patient experiences. Therapeutic interpersonal relationships have the capacity to transform and enrich the patients¿ experiences. Consequently, with an increasing necessity to focus on patient-centered care, it is imperative for health care professionals to therapeutically engage with patients to improve health-related outcomes. Studies were identified through an electronic search, using the PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PsycINFO databases of peer-reviewed research, limited to the English language with search terms developed to reflect therapeutic interpersonal relationships between health care professionals and patients in the acute care setting. This study found that therapeutic listening, responding to patient emotions and unmet needs, and patient centeredness were key characteristics of strategies for improving therapeutic interpersonal relationships.

DOI 10.2147/JMDH.S116957
Citations Scopus - 2
2016 Duff J, 'President's report', ACORN, 29 4 (2016)
2015 Duff J, 'President's report', ACORN, 28 2 (2015)
2015 Betihavas V, Duff J, Chan A, Say RE, Ferry C, Walker KN, 'Identifying health literacy levels and modifiable risk factors in adults with cardiovascular disease', Heart, Lung and Circulation, 24 S445-S445 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.hlc.2015.06.772
2015 Edwards KJ, Walker K, Duff J, 'Instruments to measure the inpatient hospital experience: A literature review', Patient Experience Journal, 2 77-85 (2015) [C1]
2015 Ousey KJ, Edward K-L, Lui S, Stephenson J, Duff J, Walker KN, Leaper DJ, 'Perioperative warming therapy for preventing surgical site infection in adults undergoing surgery', The Cochrane Library, (2015)
2015 Walker K, Duff J, Fitzgerald K, ''Rounding' for better patient care: An evaluation of an improvement intervention implementation', International Journal of Nursing Practice, 21 207-213 (2015)

© 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd. 'Rounding' is reported to be an effective intervention to enhance patient-centred care; nurses make frequent calls on their patien... [more]

© 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd. 'Rounding' is reported to be an effective intervention to enhance patient-centred care; nurses make frequent calls on their patients to ensure their needs are met and reassure them they are the focus of their care. In our hospital, two clinical units implemented rounding as improvement projects and asked the research unit to evaluate the effectiveness of implementation. A qualitative descriptive study using focus groups and in-depth interviews revealed that although the idea of rounding was well intended, it was not as effectively implemented as it might have been. Consequently, lessons have been learnt about the difficulties of changing clinician behaviour and will inform a new attempt at implementation.

DOI 10.1111/ijn.12244
Citations Scopus - 2
2015 Duff J, 'President's report', ACORN, 28 2 (2015)
2015 Duff J, 'President's report', ACORN, 28 3 (2015)
2014 Walker K, Fitzgerald K, Duff J, 'Supporting a healthy culture results of the practice environment scale, Australia in a Magnet A Designated Hospital', Journal of Nursing Administration, 44 653-658 (2014) [C1]

Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health. The Magnet Recognition Program A requires evidence that nursing practice environments support staff to provide optimal care, access profes... [more]

Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health. The Magnet Recognition Program A requires evidence that nursing practice environments support staff to provide optimal care, access professional development opportunities, and participate in hospital affairs. The research presented in this article aimed to assess clinical nurses' work environment at a recently designated, private Magnet A hospital in Sydney, Australia. Authors compare results with baseline data collected for a gap analysis before application for recognition. The outcomes challenge previously reported data suggesting that hospitals on the journey to Magnet recognition outperform already designated hospitals in this respect.

DOI 10.1097/NNA.0000000000000143
2014 Edwards KJ, Duff J, Walker K, 'What really matters? A multi-view perspective of one patient's hospital experience', Contemporary Nurse, 49 122-136 (2014)

© eContent Management Pty Ltd. Contemporary Nurse.Background: 'Patient experience' is both recognised and solicited as a means of assessing healthcare delivery and a method for g... [more]

© eContent Management Pty Ltd. Contemporary Nurse.Background: 'Patient experience' is both recognised and solicited as a means of assessing healthcare delivery and a method for gauging patient centredness. Research comparing healthcare recipient and provider perceptions regarding the same episode of care is lacking. Aim: To identify what mattered to a patient and family member (healthcare recipients) during the patient's hospital experience and to examine the healthcare provider's awareness of what mattered. Methods: A qualitative descriptive investigation was undertaken using semi-structured interviews designed to compare multiple perceptions of one patient's hospital experience. Interviews were undertaken with the patient, family member, and healthcare providers. A definition of hospital experience was sought from each participant. Additional phrases as presented by the patient and family member were coded and grouped into categories and then salient themes. Phrases as presented by the healthcare providers were coded, and then allocated to the previously identified themes. Findings: One patient, his wife and seven healthcare providers (doctors (2), registered nurses (4) and a patient care orderly (1)) were interviewed. Definitions of 'hospital experience' differ between participants. Recipients include pre and post hospital admission periods, whereas providers limit hospital experience to admission. Three salient themes emerged from recipient data suggesting; medication management, physical comfort and emotional security are what mattered to the recipients. Awareness was dependent upon theme and differed between the providers. Conclusion: Hospital experience as a term is poorly defined, and definitions differ between recipients and providers of care. Healthcare providers are not always aware of what matters to the patient and family during their hospital admission.

Citations Scopus - 2
2014 Duff J, Walker K, Edward KL, Williams R, Sutherland-Fraser S, 'Incidence of perioperative inadvertent hypothermia and compliance with evidence-based recommendations at four Australian hospitals: A retrospective chart audit', ACORN, 27 16-22 (2014) [C1]

Perioperative inadvertent hypothermia (PIH) significantly increases a patient's risk of adverse complications such as surgical site infection; morbid cardiac events; and surg... [more]

Perioperative inadvertent hypothermia (PIH) significantly increases a patient's risk of adverse complications such as surgical site infection; morbid cardiac events; and surgical bleeding. A retrospective chart audit of 400 patients was conducted to identify the incidence of PIH and compliance with evidence-based recommendations at four Australian hospitals. Patients were excluded from the audit if they were pregnant, under 18 years of age, had impaired thermoregulation, therapeutic hypothermia, or local anaesthesia only. Trained auditors extracted data on the incidence of PIH, compliance with evidence-based recommendations, and patient characteristics. Of the 350 patients who met the inclusion criteria, the mean age was 56 (SD 19). The majority (74%, n=260) had elective surgery with orthopaedic procedures, the most common surgical type (28%, n=98). The incidence of PIH in the population was 32% (n=101) and the lowest recorded temperature was 34.0°C. Eighty per cent (n=280) of patients did not have a temperature documented intraoperatively and only 8.8% (n=29) had at least one documented temperature for each perioperative phase (pre-, intra-, and postoperative). Forty five per cent (n=133) of intraoperative patients and 77% (n=97) of postoperative patients did not receive active warming when indicated. Contrary to recommended practice, 47% (n=137) of patients were hypothermic at discharge from the post-anaesthetic recovery unit (PARU). This audit revealed poor compliance with evidence-based recommendations, which may have contributed to the significant number of patients who experienced PIH. Further research must be undertaken to identify the potential barriers to appropriate PIH prevention and identify strategy to translate the evidence into clinical practice.

Citations Scopus - 3
2014 Duff J, Butler M, Davies M, Williams R, Carlile J, 'Perioperative nurses

Despite the wide acceptance of evidence-based practice as the foundation for professional health care delivery, there still remains a considerable gap between research evidence an... [more]

Despite the wide acceptance of evidence-based practice as the foundation for professional health care delivery, there still remains a considerable gap between research evidence and current perioperative nursing practice. The aim of this study was to describe the self-reported knowledge, practice, attitudes and perceived barriers to evidence-based practice among perioperative nurses from nine metropolitan hospitals. Eight hundred nurses were sent a survey comprising two validated tools, the Barriers to Research Utilisation Scale (BARRIERS Scale) and the Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire (EBPQ). Four hundred and ninety-three participants completed the returned the survey (60%). On the seven-point EBPQ, participants rated their evidence-based practice knowledge as 4-65 (l=poor to 7=excellent); their use of evidence-based practice as 4.12 (1=never to 7=frequently); and their attitude to evidence-based practice as 5.23 (l=negative to 7=positive). On the BARRIERS Scale (l=no barrier to 4=great barrier) issues related to the organisation were identified as the most significant barrier (2.66); followed by research communication issues (2.76); individual adopter-related issues (2.65); and issues about the innovation (2.52). These results indicate that this sample of Australian perioperative nurses have a positive attitude to evidence-based practice and reasonable knowledge of the topic; but this has not resulted in extensive use of evidence in the clinical setting.

Citations Scopus - 4
2014 Duff J, 'The global nursing leadership institute', ACORN, 27 36 (2014)
2014 Duff J, 'Incoming president's report', ACORN, 27 2 (2014)
2014 Edwards KJ, Duff J, Walker K, 'What really matters? A multi-view perspective of one patient's hospital experience', Contemporary Nurse, 49 122-136 (2014) [C1]

© eContent Management Pty Ltd. Contemporary Nurse. Background: 'Patient experience' is both recognised and solicited as a means of assessing healthcare delivery and a m... [more]

© eContent Management Pty Ltd. Contemporary Nurse. Background: 'Patient experience' is both recognised and solicited as a means of assessing healthcare delivery and a method for gauging patient centredness. Research comparing healthcare recipient and provider perceptions regarding the same episode of care is lacking. Aim: To identify what mattered to a patient and family member (healthcare recipients) during the patient's hospital experience and to examine the healthcare provider's awareness of what mattered. Methods: A qualitative descriptive investigation was undertaken using semi-structured interviews designed to compare multiple perceptions of one patient's hospital experience. Interviews were undertaken with the patient, family member, and healthcare providers. A definition of hospital experience was sought from each participant. Additional phrases as presented by the patient and family member were coded and grouped into categories and then salient themes. Phrases as presented by the healthcare providers were coded, and then allocated to the previously identified themes. Findings: One patient, his wife and seven healthcare providers (doctors (2), registered nurses (4) and a patient care orderly (1)) were interviewed. Definitions of 'hospital experience' differ between participants. Recipients include pre and post hospital admission periods, whereas providers limit hospital experience to admission. Three salient themes emerged from recipient data suggesting; medication management, physical comfort and emotion al security are what mattered to the recipients. Awareness was dependent upon theme and differed between the providers. Conclusion: Hospital experience as a term is poorly defined, and definitions differ between recipients and providers of care. Healthcare providers are not always aware of what matters to the patient and family during their hospital admission.

Citations Scopus - 3
2013 Duff J, Walker K, Omari A, Stratton C, 'Prevention of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized patients: Analysis of reduced cost and improved clinical outcomes', Journal of Vascular Nursing, 31 9-14 (2013) [C1]

The impact of implementing a guideline on venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis was evaluated in a metropolitan private hospital with a before- and after-intervention study. Th... [more]

The impact of implementing a guideline on venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis was evaluated in a metropolitan private hospital with a before- and after-intervention study. This subsequent study aimed to identify if improved prophylaxis rates translated into cost savings and improved clinical outcomes. A conceptual decision-tree analytical model incorporating local treatment algorithms and clinical trial data was used to compare prophylaxis costs and clinical outcomes before and after the guideline implementation. The study analyzed data from 21,942 medical and surgical patients admitted to a 250-bed acute-care private hospital in Sydney, Australia. The modeled simulation estimated the incidence of symptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) as well as adverse events such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS), major bleeding, and mortality. The costs of prophylaxis therapy and treating adverse events were also calculated. The improvement in prophylaxis rates following the implementation of the guideline was estimated to result in 13 fewer deaths, 84 fewer symptomatic DVTs, 19 fewer symptomatic PEs, and 512 fewer hospital-bed days. Improved adherence to evidence-based prophylaxis regimens was associated with overall cost savings of $245,439 over 12 months. We conclude that improved adherence to evidence-based guidelines for VTE prophylaxis is achievable and is likely to result in fewer deaths, fewer VTE events, and a significant overall cost saving. © 2013 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc..

DOI 10.1016/j.jvn.2012.06.006
Citations Scopus - 7
2013 Duff J, Walker K, Omari A, Middleton S, McInnes E, 'Educational outreach visits to improve nurses' useof mechanical venous thromboembolism prevention in hospitalized medical patients', Journal of Vascular Nursing, 31 139-149 (2013)

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized medical patients. Evidence-based guidelines exist for preventing VTE; unfortunately,... [more]

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized medical patients. Evidence-based guidelines exist for preventing VTE; unfortunately, these guidelines are not always adhered to by clinicians. The aim of this study was to evaluate the acceptability, utility and clinical impact of an educational outreach visit (EOV) on nurses' provision of mechanical prophylaxis to hospitalized medical patients using a prospective, uncontrolled, before-and-after design. Nurses received a 1-to-1 educational session on mechanical VTE prevention by a trained nurse facilitator. The EOV intervention was designed by a multidisciplinary group of healthcare professionals using social marketing theory. Eighty-five of the 120 eligible nurses (71%) attended the EOV. The median length of each visit was 11.5minutes (interquartile range [IQR], 10-15) and the median time spent arranging and conducting each visit was 63minutes (IQR, 49-85). Eighty-four (99%) of the 85 participants gave a verbal commitment to trial the new evidence-based mechanical VTE prevention practices. However, there were no measurable improvements in the proportion of patients risk assessed (-1.7% improvement; 95% confidence interval [CI] , -7.0 to 10.3; P = .68) or provided appropriate mechanical prophylaxis (-0.3% improvement; 95% CI, -13.4 to 14; P = .96). Researchers conclude that EOV should not be used to improve nurses' use of mechanical VTE prevention because it has no measurable impact on clinical practice and is resource intensive, requiring 4.5 minutes of preparation for every minute spent face to face with participants. Further research into the specific mechanism of action is required to explain the variability in clinical effect seen with this intervention. © 2013 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.jvn.2013.04.002
Citations Scopus - 3
2013 Duff J, 'Vive le (evidence-based practice) revolution.', Journal of perioperative practice, 23 211 (2013)
2013 Duff J, Omari A, Middleton S, McInnes E, Walker K, 'Educational outreach visits to improve venous thromboembolism prevention in hospitalised medical patients: A prospective before-and-after intervention study', BMC Health Services Research, 13 (2013) [C1]

Background: Despite the availability of evidence-based guidelines on venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention clinical audit and research reveals that hospitalised medical patients... [more]

Background: Despite the availability of evidence-based guidelines on venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention clinical audit and research reveals that hospitalised medical patients frequently receive suboptimal prophylaxis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the acceptability, utility and clinical impact of an educational outreach visit (EOV) on the provision of VTE prophylaxis to hospitalised medical patients in a 270 bed acute care private hospital in metropolitan Australia. Methods. The study used an uncontrolled before-and-after design with accompanying process evaluation. The acceptability of the intervention to participants was measured with a post intervention survey; descriptive data on resource use was collected as a measure of utility; and clinical impact (prophylaxis rate) was assessed by pre and post intervention clinical audits. Doctors who admit > 40 medical patients each year were targeted to receive the intervention which consisted of a one-to-one educational visit on VTE prevention from a trained peer facilitator. The EOV protocol was designed by a multidisciplinary group of healthcare professionals using social marketing theory. Results: Nineteen (73%) of 26 eligible participants received an EOV. The majority (n = 16, 85%) felt the EOV was effective or extremely effective at increasing their knowledge about VTE prophylaxis and 15 (78%) gave a verbal commitment to provide evidence-based prophylaxis. The average length of each visit was 15 minutes (IQ range 15 to 20) and the average time spent arranging and conducting each visit was 92 minutes (IQ range 78 to 129). There was a significant improvement in the proportion of medical patients receiving appropriate pharmacological VTE prophylaxis following the intervention (54% to 70%, 16% improvement, 95% CI 5 to 26, p = 0.004). Conclusions: EOV is effective at improving doctors' prov ision of pharmacological VTE prophylaxis to hospitalised medical patients. It was also found to be an acceptable implementation strategy by the majority of participants; however, it was resource intensive requiring on average 92 minutes per visit. © 2013 Duff et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-13-398
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Murray E, Walker K, Duff J, 'Rapid response & rescue: Enhancing the detection and management of the deteriorating patient at St Vincent¿s Private Hospital, Sydney', HNE Handover: For Nurses and Midwives, 6 (2013)
2013 Walker K, Fitzgerald K, Duff J, Murray E, 'Setting the benchmark: The transformative power of magnet on clinical nurses¿', HNE Handover: For Nurses and Midwives, 6 (2013)
2012 Duff J, Di Staso R, Cobbe K-A, Draper N, Tan S, Halliday E, et al., 'Preventing hypothermia in elective arthroscopic shoulder surgery patients: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial', BMC surgery, 12 14-14 (2012)
DOI 10.1186/1471-2482-12-14
Citations Scopus - 4
2012 Cobbe K-A, Di Staso R, Duff J, Walker K, Draper N, 'Preventing inadvertent hypothermia: comparing two protocols for preoperative forced-air warming', Journal of PeriAnesthesia Nursing, 27 18-24 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jopan.2011.10.005
Citations Scopus - 6
2011 Walker K, Duff J, Di Staso R, Cobbe K-A, Bailey K, Pager P, Leathwick S, 'Perioperative nursing shines! Magnet designation reflected in staff engagement, empowerment and excellence', ACORN: The Journal of Perioperative Nursing in Australia, 24 34-42 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
2011 Duff J, Walker K, Omari A, 'Translating venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention evidence into practice: a multidisciplinary evidence implementation project', Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 8 30-39 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1741-6787.2010.00209.x
Citations Scopus - 15
2010 Hamlin L, Chiarella M, Cubitt J, Duff J, Jones K, Thoms D, Waldron J, 'The Perioperative Nursing Workforce Program in NSW: How a professional perioperative nursing association meets one of its mandates', ACORN Journal, 23 (2010)
Citations Scopus - 1
2010 Duff J, Walker K, 'Improving the safety and efficacy of warfarin therapy in a metropolitan private hospital: A multidisciplinary practice improvement project', Contemporary nurse, 35 234-244 (2010)
Citations Scopus - 3
2010 Walker K, Middleton S, Rolley J, Duff J, 'Nurses report a healthy culture: results of the Practice Environment Scale (Australia) in an Australian hospital seeking Magnet recognition', International journal of nursing practice, 16 616-623 (2010)
Citations Scopus - 10
2010 Li F, Walker K, McInnes E, Duff J, 'Testing the effect of a targeted intervention on nurses¿ compliance with ¿best practice¿ mechanical venous thromboembolism prevention', Journal of Vascular Nursing, 28 92-96 (2010)
Citations Scopus - 10
2010 Duff J, Walker K, Lee J, Stratton C, 'St Vincent¿s Private Hospital Sydney venous thromboembolism prevention project: Analysis of reduced cost and improved clinical outcomes', Value in Health, 13 A525-A525 (2010)
2009 Duff J, Walker K, Omari A, 'Using clinical indicators to improve antithrombotic therapy in a metropolitan private hospital', International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare, 7 208-208 (2009)
Show 44 more journal articles

Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Duff J, Preventing Venous Thromboembolism in Hospitalised Patients: Using Implementation Science to Close the Evidence-practice Gap, (2013)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 19
Total funding $1,334,200

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20172 grants / $31,700

Collaborative development of a smartphone application to promote self-management in out-patients with heart failure.$25,000

Funding body: St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)

Funding body St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)
Project Team

Woods L, Walker K, Duff J, Cummings L, Langley T, Bardsley K, Whitfield C, Mellor C, Patterson H, Johnston B.

Scheme Multi-disciplinary / patient focussed grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Warming of Irrigation Fluids for Prevention of Perioperative Hypothermia during Arthroscopy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis $6,700


Funding body: Sigma Theta Tau International Honors Society

Funding body Sigma Theta Tau International Honors Society
Project Team

Steelman V, Chae S, Duff J, Anderson M, Zaidi A.

Scheme Association of Perioperative Nurses Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

20163 grants / $550,000

St Vincent's Health Australia Collaboratives Program $500,000

Funding body: St Vincent's Health Australia

Funding body St Vincent's Health Australia
Project Team

Duff J, Walker K, Edwards KL

Scheme External
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Maintaining normoTHERMIa during SEDation: The THERMISED Pilot Study.$25,000

Funding body: St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)

Funding body St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)
Project Team

Conway A, Duff J

Scheme Multi-disciplinary / patient focussed grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT) in low-risk patients following elective foot or ankle surgery.$25,000

Funding body: St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)

Funding body St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)
Project Team

Sullivan M, Omari A, Panti JP, Walker K, Duff J

Scheme Multi-disciplinary / patient focussed grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

20155 grants / $347,500

Preventing perioperative inadvertent hypothermia in adult surgical patients: The development, implementation and evaluating of an evidence-based care bundle$170,000

Funding body: National Health and Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health and Medical Research Council
Project Team

Duff J

Scheme Translating Research into Practice Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Positive Wards: Making health care encounters count.$90,000

Funding body: University of Tasmania

Funding body University of Tasmania
Project Team

Walsh K, Iedema R, Walker K, Kinsman L, Duff J, Ford K, Hughes C

Scheme Industry collaboration seed funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Better perioperative management of iron deficiency anaemia: An implementation research study.$51,000

Funding body: St Vincent's and Mater Health Services

Funding body St Vincent's and Mater Health Services
Project Team

Walker K, Stevens J, Yoon L, Duff J

Scheme Curran foundation grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Preventing perioperative inadvertent hypothermia in adult surgical patients: The development, implementation and evaluating of an evidence-based care bundle$25,000

Funding body: St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)

Funding body St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)
Project Team

Duff J, Walker K, Edwards KL

Scheme Multi-disciplinary / patient focussed grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Exploring the impact of an educational tool on the health literacy and modifiable risk factors of adults with cardiovascular disease Health Literacy ACD study$11,500

Funding body: Heart Foundation

Funding body Heart Foundation
Project Team

Betihavas V, Chan A, Say R, Duff J, Walker K

Scheme Evaluation Consultancy
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20141 grants / $207,000

Health Literacy - Resource Development and Evaluation$207,000

Funding body: Department of Health and Human Services Tasmania

Funding body Department of Health and Human Services Tasmania
Project Team

Elmer SL, Walker K, Duff J, Van Der Ploeg J

Scheme Contract
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

20121 grants / $10,000

Perioperative nurses’ knowledge, attitudes, perceived barriers, and use of evidence-based practice: A cross-sectional survey.$10,000

Funding body: NSW Operating Theatre Association

Funding body NSW Operating Theatre Association
Project Team

Duff J, Butler M, Davies M, Carlile J, Williams R

Scheme Research grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

20103 grants / $104,000

Perioperative Nursing Workforce Program: Introducing Practice Development into the Perioperative Environment. $60,000

Funding body: NSW Operating Theatre Association

Funding body NSW Operating Theatre Association
Project Team

Chiarella M, Hamlin L, Cubitt J, Waldron J, Jones K, Duff J, Thoms D.

Scheme Research grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON N

Improving venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in medical patients using educational outreach visits$25,000

Funding body: St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)

Funding body St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)
Project Team

Duff J, Walker K, Middleton S, Omari A, McInnes E.

Scheme Multi-disciplinary / patient focussed grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Preventing hypothermia in elective arthroscopic shoulder surgery patients: A randomised controlled trial.$19,000

Funding body: St Vincent's and Mater Health Services

Funding body St Vincent's and Mater Health Services
Project Team

Walker K, Draper N, DiStaso R, Cobbe K, Duff J, Tan S, Haliday E, Middleton S & Lam L

Scheme Nursing research grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

20092 grants / $34,000

Patient Mediated Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism Prevention (PaMP VTE) Study.$25,000

Funding body: St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)

Funding body St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)
Project Team

Duff J, Walker K, Middleton S, Omari A, McInnes E.

Scheme Multi-disciplinary / patient focussed grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Venous Thromboembolism Prevention Project. $9,000

Funding body: Sanofi-Aventis

Funding body Sanofi-Aventis
Project Team

Duff J, Walker K, Middleton S, Omari A, McInnes E.

Scheme Research grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON N

20081 grants / $25,000

Preventing Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) in hospitalised patients.$25,000

Funding body: St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)

Funding body St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)
Project Team

Duff J, Walker K, Middleton S, Omari A, McInnes E.

Scheme Multi-disciplinary / patient focussed grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

20071 grants / $25,000

Warfarin anticoagulation safety and quality of care.$25,000

Funding body: St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)

Funding body St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)
Project Team

Walker K, Duff J, Omari A, McGrath M, Aguilera J.

Scheme Multi-disciplinary / patient focussed grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed6
Current4

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Collaborative development of a smartphone application to promote self-management in out-patients with heart failure. Nursing, University of Tasmania Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD An exploration into how the decision making processes of men undergoing treatment for prostate cancer is influenced. Nursing, University of Tasmania Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD The development and evaluation of a real time patient experience tool. Nursing, University of Tasmania Principal Supervisor
2014 Masters Investigating the embedding of a health librarian into the multidisciplinary team to facilitate the translation of evidence into practice. Health, University of Tasmania Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 Professional Doctorate How can Magnet designation be the driver of organisational sustainability while advancing the quality and safety agenda. Health, University of Tasmania Co-Supervisor
2016 Honours Issues affecting fluid restriction adherence in patients with heart failure. Nursing, University of Tasmania Principal Supervisor
2016 Honours Nurses’ experience of the visitor on acute adult inpatient hospital units: a qualitative descriptive study. Nursing, University of Tasmania Co-Supervisor
2015 Honours The collaborative development of a pre-operative checklist: An e-Delphi study. Nursing, University of Tasmania Co-Supervisor
2014 Honours An exploration into how men diagnosed with prostate cancer make decisions about treatment options: A qualitative-descriptive study. Nursing, University of Tasmania Co-Supervisor
2014 Honours Perceptions of patient experience: what really matters? Nursing, University of Tasmania Principal Supervisor
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Research Projects

Maintaining normoTHERMIa during SEDation: The THERMISED Pilot RCT 2016 -

We observed in our previous studies that one quarter of patients undergoing procedures with sedation were hypothermic after their procedure. Interventions to prevent hypothermia such as forced air warming are not currently used for sedated patients. This research aims to determine whether forced air warming reduces hypothermia in sedated patients.

Grants

Maintaining normoTHERMIa during SEDation: The THERMISED Pilot Study.

Funding body: St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)

Funding body St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)
Scheme Multi-disciplinary / patient focussed grants

Publications

Conway A, Duff J, 'Forced air warming to maintain normoTHERMIa during SEDation in the cardiac catheterization laboratory: protocol for the THERMISED pilot randomized controlled trial', Journal of advanced nursing, 72 2547-2557 (2016)


A prospective study assessing the incidence of Deep Venous Thrombosis in low-risk patients with 6 weeks non-weight bearing period following elective foot or ankle surgery. 2016 -

The main objective of the study is to determine the incidence of symptomatic and silent DVT diagnosed in low-risk patients who have a prolonged non-weight bearing period (6 weeks) after elective Foot or Ankle surgery without thromboembolic prophylaxis. 

Grants

Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT) in low-risk patients following elective foot or ankle surgery.

Funding body: St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)

Funding body St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)
Scheme Multi-disciplinary / patient focussed grants

Prevalence and risk of delayed opioid cessation after major orthopaedic surgery: A multi-centre, prospective, observational cohort study. 2016 -

Opioid analgesic use and its related harm is increasing in all developed countries. Internationally, the prevalence of delayed opioid cessation after major orthopaedic surgery ranges from 10% to 80%. There are currently limited research examining the prevalence of delayed opioid cessation in this population in Australia and no tools to assist clinicians identify those patients at-risk.

Objectives:

  1. Determine the prevalence of delayed opioid cessation (taking opioids ≥90 days post-surgery) after major orthopaedic surgery.
  2. Identify specific factors that independently predict patients at-risk of delayed opioid cessation.


A smart alarm to guide treatment of respiratory depression during procedural sedation: The CAPNOSED RCT 2017 -

This ‘hybrid effectiveness-implementation’ study aims to improve patient safety during nurse-administered sedation in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory by implementing a clinically validated ‘smart alarm’ strategy for respiratory monitoring.


A better way to care: improving the safety and quality of care for patients with cognitive impairment in Australian hospitals 2017 -

The aims of the research are to:
  1. Improve the safety and quality of care for patients with cognitive impairment (dementia and delirium) in hospitals by implementing the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care ‘Better Way to Care’ program using a Healthcare Collaborative method.
  2. Improve the reliability and consistency of knowledge translation by understanding when, for whom, and how Healthcare Collaboratives do or don’t work


Warming of irrigation fluids for prevention of perioperative hypothermia during arthroscopy: A systematic review and meta-analysis 2017 -

To determine if warming of irrigation fluids for patients undergoing arthroscopy minimizes the risk of hypothermia or shivering compared to using room temperature irrigation fluids. 

Grants

Warming of Irrigation Fluids for Prevention of Perioperative Hypothermia during Arthroscopy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

Funding body: Sigma Theta Tau International Honors Society

Funding body Sigma Theta Tau International Honors Society
Description


Scheme Association of Perioperative Nurses Research Grant

Perioperative warming therapy for the prevention of surgical site infection: A systematic review and meta analysis 2016 -

To systematically search, critically appraise, analyse and summarise RCTS that examine the effect of perioperative warming on the prevention of Surgical Site Infection 

Publications

Ousey KJ, Edward K-L, Lui S, Stephenson J, Duff J, Walker KN, Leaper DJ, 'Perioperative warming therapy for preventing surgical site infection in adults undergoing surgery', The Cochrane Library, (2015)


Oxygen supplementation for preventing adverse outcomes following surgery or invasive procedures: A systematic review and meta analysis 2017 -

In patients of any age undergoing surgery or invasive procedures, does oxygen supplementation reduce the incidence
of adverse outcomes?

Publications

Amanda E, Ralph N, Duff J, Conway A, Mills D, 'Oxygen supplementation for preventing adverse outcomes following surgery or invasive procedures', PROSPERO International prospective register of systematic reviews, (2017)


Oral nutritional supplements for preventing and treating surgical site infections: A systematic review and meta analysis 2017 -

We will review studies which use oral nutritional supplements preoperatively and/or postoperatively to prevent or treat surgical site infections in all adult surgical patients.


Hunter New England Health Nursing Research Capacity Building Program 2017 -

The HNE NMRC is offering an opportunity for senior nurses (CNC's, CMC's and NP's) along with their managers and any other interested clinical staff to participate in a research capacity building program. The program is aimed at encouraging and supporting nurses and midwives to engage in practice-based research by supporting teams to: Plan, develop, implement and evaluate a research conducive environment, with an established research agenda and research activity within their respective units, departments or clinical specialty, and Identify the supports required to action their research agenda.


Patient Education to Achieve Reduced Length of Stay (PEARLS): A pre-post test of a structured patient education intervention 2017 -

Patients undergo surgery with a range of expectations. This study aims to explore whether an educational intervention designed to align patient expectations with an ideal surgical recovery will improve a range of surgical outcomes including: length of stay, level of anxiety; health and well-being; and postoperative pain. We will conduct a case-control study where the control group will receive standard care and the intervention (case) group will receive standard care plus a structured educational intervention. We will administer the intervention before the operation and survey them before the intervention has been conducted. We will follow up patients and survey again before discharge and via telephone at 6 months postoperatively. We will analyse the findings to evaluate what benefits – if any – are to be had from preoperative education of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty.


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Associate Professor Jed Duff

Position

Associate Professor
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email jed.duff@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4985 4483
Link Twitter

Office

Room RW127 via RW124
Building Richardson Wing
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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