Dr Rachel Sutherland

Dr Rachel Sutherland

MRFF Investigator Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health (Nutrition and Dietetics)

The clever new science creating widespread community health benefits

By researching chronic disease and implementation science in tandem, Dr Rachel Sutherland is working to ensure the latest health research can benefit entire communities, leading to programs that can be effectively scaled up to reach more people across Australia and the globe.

Image of Rachel Sutherland

Dr Rachel Sutherland is taking a fresh perspective to solving some of the world’s most enduring health challenges, including obesity and sedentary lifestyles. Her research aims to better understand chronic disease and create evidence-based solutions. But it doesn’t stop there. Rachel is also committed to researching the best ways of implementing those solutions into routine care and practice—allowing the latest research to have a direct impact in people’s lives and create community-wide change.

“My health research focuses on preventing chronic disease, with a particular focus on preventing excessive weight gain and obesity via implementing nutrition and physical activity interventions targeting schools (primary and secondary) and parents.

“I am very passionate about ensuring programs are delivered at scale, reach the communities that they would benefit most, and that research is translated and doesn’t just sit idle on the shelf.

“To do this, my research primarily evaluates methods of implementing evidence-based programs at scale—known as implementation science. Essentially, this type of research is conducted to ensure the community benefits from research that has been shown to be effective.”

When the rubber hits the road

Every year, talented researchers undertake extraordinarily valuable research with the potential to save and improve lives. The problem, Rachel says, is that much of this research is never delivered in practice, even when it’s proven to be effective.

“Unfortunately, research shows that it generally takes 17 years for research to benefit the community. Research that can’t be implemented successfully rarely helps the community. Implementation science aims to bridge this evidence-to-practice gap.”

To mobilise more research in Australia, Rachel and her peers are committed to investigating what stops research from translating into practice and, based on this knowledge, design evidence-based strategies for implementing research more effectively.

“As an implementation researcher, you need to be able to listen, communicate and understand a setting and the barriers to implementation. Unless you understand a setting and work in partnership, implementation at scale is not possible and not sustainable. It is essential to have commitment from partners and a clear vision from the outset of how the research can be translated.”

Rachel’s work in the pioneering field of implementation science neatly complements her health research, creating a powerful combination that enables the most exciting research findings to translate into innovative programs, policies and initiatives with widespread community health benefits.

“The field of implementation science and the science of scaling up is relatively new. This means new methods and measures are emerging and need to be developed. I’m excited to use implementation science to scale up nutrition and physical activity interventions to the community.

“My overarching aim is to prevent problematic weight gain and obesity before chronic disease is established and to maintain the health and wellbeing of children and families.”

Setting children on the right path

Rachel’s PhD research, completed in 2017, focused on the public health epidemic of obesity, a disease that can contribute to other chronic illnesses, like type 2 diabetes and some cancers. Her work created waves in the health research community; it was the first trial internationally to demonstrate an increase in physical activity and a reduction in unhealthy weight gain using cost-effective methods targeting disadvantaged adolescents.

Her PhD work was identified in the NSW Premier’s implementation plan for the prevention of obesity in children and informed Physical Activity 4 Everyone, a new school program that is now being implemented in schools across four local health districts in NSW, helping secondary schools teach healthy habits that can continue throughout a child’s life.

“As a result of the program, up to 25,000 adolescents are now attending NSW secondary schools that support physical activity and help adolescents maintain their physical activity levels in critical years when activity levels generally decline. This has a range of health, wellbeing and educational benefits.”

Rachel is currently involved in the scalable nutrition program SWAP IT, which helps parents pack healthy school lunchboxes for their children. Parents are encouraged and supported to swap out nutrient-poor foods for healthier alternatives.

“The food children consume at school impacts on their concentration, health and wellbeing—now and into the future. More than 85 per cent of school children take a packed lunch to school every day; however, packed inside are more than three servings of energy-dense, nutrition-poor snack foods.

“Making one to two simple swaps every day in the lunchbox can have an enormous impact at a population level, both in terms of health, education and wellbeing.”

Rachel’s program of work is being conducted in collaboration with industry partner, Skoolbag. It has received backing from the NSW Ministry of Health to evaluate the program’s health benefits, as well as funding from the NIB Foundation to scale up the program across the Hunter New England region.

Rachel’s work often takes place in partnership with multiple key stakeholders, who all play an integral role in seeing inventions implemented successfully.

“For implementation and scale-up to be successful, research and interventions need to be co-developed with partners across a range of settings where health may not be their core business. This takes time, communication and a great deal of understanding of how settings and organisations work.

“It’s exciting to work in partnership with stakeholders across a range of settings and see the community benefit from our research. Having the research delivered at scale to the community, and translated into tangible solutions, is the most important aspect of my work.”

Image of Rachel Sutherland

The clever new science creating widespread community health benefits

By researching chronic disease and implementation science in tandem, Dr Rachel Sutherland is working to ensure the latest health research can benefit entire communities, leading to programs that can be effectively scaled up to reach more people across Australia and…

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Career Summary

Biography

Dr Rachel Sutherland is an NHMRC Research Fellow with the University of Newcastle’s School of Medicine and Public Health (Nutrition and Dietetics). An influential translational researcher, her work is focused on the development and evaluation of implementation research interventions to scale up population health services. Dr Sutherland is also an experienced Public Health Nutritionist, Health Promotion Practitioner and Program Manager and has worked in the field of Population Health and Public Health Nutrition for more than 15 years.

In 2017, Dr Sutherland was awarded her PhD in the area of school-based interventions and student behaviour change. Her PhD and postdoctoral research led to the design, implementation and evaluation of the secondary school program Physical Activity 4 Everyone (PA4E1), which was the first successful trial worldwide to increase adolescent physical activity and improve the weight status of disadvantaged adolescents. The PA4E1 program is now listed in the NSW Premier’s Priority Implementation Plan. The success of Dr Sutherland’s postdoctoral work led to her assignment as lead investigator, working with Local Health Districts, to scale up the PA4E1 program across NSW in more than 50 secondary schools.

As an early career researcher, Dr Sutherland has held lead roles on a number of research projects and trials focused on childhood obesity prevention across the research translation spectrum, including feasibility studies, efficacy trials, hybrid implementation trials and the scale-up of a program known as SWAP IT, which supported parents of primary school children to swap nutrition-poor lunchbox foods for healthier food options.

Dr Sutherland previously held the role of Program Co-Director on the Good for Kids. Good for Life program, for which she developed, implemented and evaluated aspects of the children’s services stream and primary school stream of the program. Spanning six years, the program of work was Australia’s largest childhood obesity prevention program and received funding of more than $7.5 million.

Dr Sutherland has delivered presentations at more than 40 national and international conferences, and published more 60 peer-reviewed journal articles, two government reports and an invited book chapter. In the past five years, she has been awarded over $3 million from competitive grants including the NSW Ministry of Health Translational Research Grant Scheme, Australian Research Council and Medical Research Futures Fund.

Collaborations: As a research practitioner, Dr Sutherland collaborates with key stakeholders in both practice and research fields to produce programs, research and dissemination activities with international impact. This includes collaborating with stakeholders from the Department of Education, Catholic Schools Office, Association of Independent Schools and research organisations within Australia and internationally including the UK and Canada. Internationally, Dr Sutherland also facilitates the global research networking and mentoring of physical activity and nutrition researchers via her role in co-ordinating the webinar series for the ECR network of the International Society of Physical Activity and Health.

Community engagement: Within her integrated research and practice role, Dr Sutherland regularly engages with the community to co-produce, design and disseminate research findings. She is responsible for delivering health promotion services to primary (n=450) and secondary schools (n-105). She also delivers workshops to school principals, parents and teachers. Dr Sutherland regularly provides lectures at the University of Newcastle and supervisors undergraduate and postgraduate students.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Health Science (Nutrition & Dietetics), University of Newcastle
  • Master of Public Health, Curtin University

Keywords

  • Implementation Science
  • Nutrition
  • Obesity Prevention
  • Physical Activity
  • Public Health
  • Translation

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
321005 Public health nutrition 60
420603 Health promotion 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Postdoctoral Researcher University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
MRFF Investigator Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
21/1/2002 - 17/11/2019 Nutriiton Program Manager Hunter New England Population Health
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (108 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Manson AC, Johnson BJ, Zarnowiecki D, Sutherland R, Golley RK, 'The food and nutrient intake of 5 to 12 year old Australian children during school hours: A secondary analysis of the 2011-12 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey', Public Health Nutrition, (2021)

Objective School food intake of Australian children is not comprehensively described in literature, with limited temporal, nationally representative data. Greater understanding of... [more]

Objective School food intake of Australian children is not comprehensively described in literature, with limited temporal, nationally representative data. Greater understanding of intake at school can inform school-based nutrition promotion. This study aimed to describe the dietary intake of primary-aged children during school hours and its contribution to daily intake. Design This secondary analysis used nationally representative, cross-sectional data from the 2011-12 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey. Dietary intake was assessed using validated 24-hour dietary recalls on school days. Descriptive statistics were undertaken to determine energy, nutrients, food groups, and food products consumed during school hours, as well as their contributions to total daily intake. Associations between school food intake and socio-demographic characteristics were explored. Setting Australia. Participants Seven hundred and ninety-five children aged 5-12 years. Results Children consumed 37% of their daily energy and 31-43% of select nutrient intake during school hours, with discretionary choices contributing 44% of school energy intake. Most children consumed less than one serve of vegetables, meat and alternatives or milk and alternatives during school hours. Commonly consumed products were discretionary choices (34%, including biscuits, processed meat), bread (17%) and fruit (12%). There were limited associations with SES variables, apart from child age. Conclusions Children's diets were not aligned with national recommendations, with school food characterised by high intake of discretionary choices. These findings are consistent with previous Australian evidence and support transformation of the Australian school food system to better align school food consumption with recommendations.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980021003888
2021 Sutherland R, Brown A, Nathan N, Yoong S, Janssen L, Chooi A, et al., 'A multicomponent mHealth-based intervention (SWAP IT) to decrease the consumption of discretionary foods packed in school lunchboxes: Type I effectiveness-implementation hybrid cluster randomized controlled trial', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 23 (2021)

Background: There is significant opportunity to improve the nutritional quality of foods packed in children's school lunchboxes. Interventions that are effective and scalable... [more]

Background: There is significant opportunity to improve the nutritional quality of foods packed in children's school lunchboxes. Interventions that are effective and scalable targeting the school and home environment are therefore warranted. Objective: This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of a multicomponent, mobile health-based intervention, SWAP IT, in reducing the energy contribution of discretionary (ie, less healthy) foods and drinks packed for children to consume at school. Methods: A type I effectiveness-implementation hybrid cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted in 32 primary schools located across 3 local health districts in New South Wales, Australia, to compare the effects of a 6-month intervention targeting foods packed in children's lunchboxes with those of a usual care control. Primary schools were eligible if they were not participating in other nutrition studies and used the required school communication app. The Behaviour Change Wheel was used to co-design the multicomponent SWAP IT intervention, which consisted of the following: school lunchbox nutrition guidelines, curriculum lessons, information pushed to parents digitally via an existing school communication app, and additional parent resources to address common barriers to packing healthy lunchboxes. The primary outcome, mean energy (kilojoules) content of discretionary lunchbox foods and drinks packed in lunchboxes, was measured via observation using a validated school food checklist at baseline (May 2019) and at 6-month follow-up (October 2019). Additional secondary outcomes included mean lunchbox energy from discretionary foods consumed, mean total lunchbox energy packed and consumed, mean energy content of core lunchbox foods packed and consumed, and percentage of lunchbox energy from discretionary and core foods, all of which were also measured via observation using a validated school food checklist. Measures of school engagement, consumption of discretionary foods outside of school hours, and lunchbox cost were also collected at baseline and at 6-month follow-up. Data were analyzed via hierarchical linear regression models, with controlling for clustering, socioeconomic status, and remoteness. Results: A total of 3022 (3022/7212, 41.90%) students consented to participate in the evaluation (mean age 7.8 years; 1487/3022, 49.22% girls). There were significant reductions between the intervention and control groups in the primary trial outcome, mean energy (kilojoules) content of discretionary foods packed in lunchboxes (-117.26 kJ; 95% CI -195.59 to -39.83; P=.003). Relative to the control, the intervention also significantly reduced secondary outcomes regarding the mean total lunchbox energy (kilojoules) packed (-88.38 kJ; 95% CI -172.84 to -3.92; P=.04) and consumed (-117.17 kJ; 95% CI -233.72 to -0.62; P=.05). There was no significant difference between groups in measures of student engagement, consumption of discretionary foods outside of school hours, or cost of foods packed in children's lunchboxes. Conclusions: The SWAP IT intervention was effective in reducing the energy content of foods packed for and consumed by primary school-aged children at school. Dissemination of the SWAP IT program at a population level has the potential to influence a significant proportion of primary school-aged children, impacting weight status and associated health care costs.

DOI 10.2196/25256
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Christopher Oldmeadow, Kathryn L Reilly, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Andrew Searles
2021 Brown A, Sutherland R, Janssen L, Hudson N, Chooi A, Reynolds R, et al., 'Enhancing the potential effects of text messages delivered via an m-health intervention to improve packing of healthy school lunchboxes', Public Health Nutrition, 24 2867-2876 (2021)

Abstract Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the impact of different lunchbox messages on parents' intention to pack a healthy lunchbox. Design: This study employed... [more]

Abstract Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the impact of different lunchbox messages on parents' intention to pack a healthy lunchbox. Design: This study employed an experimental design. Setting: A series of messages were developed to align with the six constructs of the Health Belief Model. Messages were also developed that were (and were not) personalised and varied based on the source of the information provided (university, school, dietitian and health promotion service). During a telephone survey, participants were read the content of each message and asked about their intention to pack a healthy lunchbox. Participants: Parents of primary school-aged children were randomised to receive different messages to encourage the packing of healthy lunchboxes. Results: The study was completed by 511 parents. Linear mixed regression analyses identified significant differences (P < 0·05) in intention scores between variant messages targeting the same behavioural constructs for 'susceptibility', 'severity', 'benefits' and 'barriers' but not 'cues to action' or 'self-efficacy'. The highest mean behavioural intention score was for 'benefits', whilst the lowest mean score was for 'barriers'. There were no significant differences in intention scores of parents receiving messages from a dietitian, university, health promotion team or school (P = 0·37). Intention scores did not differ in which messages were personalised based on child's name (P = 0·84) or grade level (P = 0·54). Conclusions: The findings suggest that messages that focus on the benefits of packing healthy lunchboxes may be particularly useful in improving intentions of parents to pack healthy foods for their children to consume at school.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980020003997
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Kathryn L Reilly, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden
2021 Sutherland R, Ying Ooi J, Finch M, Yoong SL, Nathan N, Wrigley J, et al., 'A cluster randomised controlled trial of a secondary school intervention to reduce intake of sugar-sweetened beverages: Mid-intervention impact of switchURsip environmental strategies.', Health Promot J Austr, (2021)
DOI 10.1002/hpja.469
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Kathryn L Reilly
2021 Nathan N, Hall A, McCarthy N, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, Bauman AE, et al., 'Multi-strategy intervention increases school implementation and maintenance of a mandatory physical activity policy: outcomes of a cluster randomised controlled trial.', Br J Sports Med, (2021)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2020-103764
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Christopher Oldmeadow, Alix Hall, John Wiggers
2021 Nathan N, McCarthy N, Hope K, Sutherland R, Lecathelinais C, Hall A, et al., 'The impact of school uniforms on primary school student's physical activity at school: outcomes of a cluster randomized controlled trial.', Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act, 18 17 (2021)
DOI 10.1186/s12966-021-01084-0
Co-authors Alix Hall, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2021 Yoong SL, Jackson J, Barnes C, Pearson N, Swindle T, O'Reilly S, et al., 'Changing landscape of nutrition and dietetics research? A bibliographic analysis of top-tier published research in 1998 and 2018', Public Health Nutrition, 24 1318-1327 (2021) [C1]

Objective: The current study sought to describe and compare study type, research design and translation phase of published research in nutrition and dietetic journals in 1998 and ... [more]

Objective: The current study sought to describe and compare study type, research design and translation phase of published research in nutrition and dietetic journals in 1998 and 2018. Design: This was a repeat cross-sectional bibliographic analysis of Nutrition and Dietetics research. All eligible studies in the top eight Nutrition and Dietetics indexed journals in 1998 and 2018 were included. Two independent reviewers coded each study for research design (study type and study design) and translation phase (T0-T4) of the research using seminal texts in the field. Setting: Not relevant. Participants: Not relevant. Results: The number of publications (1998, n 1030; 2018, n 1016) has not changed over time, but the research type, design and translation phases have. The proportion of intervention studies in 1998 (43.8 %) was significantly higher than 2018 (19.4 %). In 2018, more reviews (46.9 % v. 15.6 % in 1998) and less randomised trials (14.3 % v. 37.8 % in 1998) were published. In regard to translation phase, there was a higher proportion of T2-T4 research in 2018 (18.3 % v. 3.8 % in 1998); however, the proportion of T3/T4 (dissemination, implementation and population-level research) research was still low (<3 %). Our sensitivity analysis with the four journals that remained in the top eight journal across the two time periods found no differences in the research type, design and translation phases across time. Conclusions: There was a reduction in intervention and T0 publications, alongside higher publication of clinical study designs over time; however, published T3/T4 research in Nutrition and Dietetics is low. A greater focus on publishing interventions and dissemination and implementation may be needed.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980021000136
Co-authors Courtney Barnes, Serene Yoong
2021 Lane C, McCrabb S, Nathan N, Naylor PJ, Bauman A, Milat A, et al., 'How effective are physical activity interventions when they are scaled-up: a systematic review', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 18 (2021)

Background: The ¿scale-up¿ of effective physical activity interventions is required if they are to yield improvements in population health. The purpose of this study was to system... [more]

Background: The ¿scale-up¿ of effective physical activity interventions is required if they are to yield improvements in population health. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the effectiveness of community-based physical activity interventions that have been scaled-up. We also sought to explore differences in the effect size of these interventions compared with prior evaluations of their efficacy in more controlled contexts, and describe adaptations that were made to interventions as part of the scale-up process. Methods: We performed a search of empirical research using six electronic databases, hand searched reference lists and contacted field experts. An intervention was considered ¿scaled-up¿ if it had been intentionally delivered on a larger scale (to a greater number of participants, new populations, and/or by means of different delivery systems) than a preceding randomised control trial (¿pre-scale¿) in which a significant intervention effect (p < 0.05) was reported on any measure of physical activity. Effect size differences between pre-scale and scaled up interventions were quantified ([the effect size reported in the scaled-up study / the effect size reported in the pre-scale-up efficacy trial] × 100) to explore any scale-up ¿penalties¿ in intervention effects. Results: We identified 10 eligible studies. Six scaled-up interventions appeared to achieve significant improvement on at least one measure of physical activity. Six studies included measures of physical activity that were common between pre-scale and scaled-up trials enabling the calculation of an effect size difference (and potential scale-up penalty). Differences in effect size ranged from 132 to 25% (median = 58.8%), suggesting that most scaled-up interventions typically achieve less than 60% of their pre-scale effect size. A variety of adaptations were made for scale-up ¿ the most common being mode of delivery. Conclusion: The majority of interventions remained effective when delivered at-scale however their effects were markedly lower than reported in pre-scale trials. Adaptations of interventions were common and may have impacted on the effectiveness of interventions delivered at scale. These outcomes provide valuable insight for researchers and public health practitioners interested in the design and scale-up of physical activity interventions, and contribute to the growing evidence base for delivering health promotion interventions at-scale. Trial registration: PROSPERO CRD42020144842.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-021-01080-4
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Sam Mccrabb
2021 Wyse R, Delaney T, Stacey F, Zoetemeyer R, Lecathelinais C, Lamont H, et al., 'Effectiveness of a Multistrategy Behavioral Intervention to Increase the Nutritional Quality of Primary School Students' Web-Based Canteen Lunch Orders (Click & Crunch): Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.', J Med Internet Res, 23 e26054 (2021)
DOI 10.2196/26054
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Kathryn L Reilly, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, John Attia, Christopher Oldmeadow, Serene Yoong
2021 McLaughlin M, Delaney T, Hall A, Byaruhanga J, Mackie P, Grady A, et al., 'Erratum: Associations between digital health intervention engagement, physical activity, and sedentary behavior: Systematic review and meta-analysis (Journal of Medical Internet Research (2021) 23:2 (e23180) DOI: 10.2196/23180)', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 23 (2021)

In ¿Associations Between Digital Health Intervention Engagement, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behavior: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis¿ (J Med Internet Res 2021;23(2):e23... [more]

In ¿Associations Between Digital Health Intervention Engagement, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behavior: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis¿ (J Med Internet Res 2021;23(2):e23180) a character display error was noted in 3 tables. The ¿gamma¿ symbol (¿) was not properly rendered in 5 places in the paper due to an XML conversion error. In Table 4, row ¿Rebar et al,¿ column ¿Association¿: =0.51 (95% CI -1.77 to 2.72); P>.05 has been corrected to: ¿=0.51 (95% CI -1.77 to 2.72); P>.05 In Table 5, row ¿Rebar et al, Time,¿ column ¿Association¿: =2.33 (95% CI 0.09 to 4.64); P<.05 has been corrected to: ¿=2.33 (95% CI 0.09 to 4.64); P<.05 and: =0.51 (95% CI -1.77 to 2.72); P>.05 has been corrected to: ¿=0.51 (95% CI -1.77 to 2.72); P>.05 In Table 5, row ¿Rebar et al, Logins,¿ column ¿Association¿: =3.18 (95% CI 1.15 to 5.07); P<.05 has been corrected to: ¿=3.18 (95% CI 1.15 to 5.07); P<.05 and: =2.04 (95% CI 0.29 to 3.84); P<.05 has been corrected to: ¿=2.04 (95% CI 0.29 to 3.84); P<.05 The correction will appear in the online version of the paper on the JMIR Publications website on March 29, 2021, together with the publication of this correction notice. Because this was made after submission to PubMed, PubMed Central, and other full-text repositories, the corrected article has also been resubmitted to those repositories.

DOI 10.2196/29094
Co-authors Alix Hall, Kathryn L Reilly, John Wiggers, Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden
2021 Reilly K, Bauman A, Reece L, Lecathelinais C, Sutherland R, Wolfenden L, 'Evaluation of a voucher scheme to increase child physical activity in participants of a school physical activity trial in the Hunter region of Australia', BMC Public Health, 21 (2021) [C1]

Background: Global population data suggest that physical activity levels in children remain unacceptably low. Improved participation in organised sport has been recommended by the... [more]

Background: Global population data suggest that physical activity levels in children remain unacceptably low. Improved participation in organised sport has been recommended by the WHO as one strategy to improve population levels of physical activity. In 2018, in the state of New South Wales, Australia, the government introduced the Active Kids scheme, to help families meet the cost of getting children into organized sport. The aim of this study is to describe the uptake of Active Kids and assess the impact of the scheme on organized sport participation and child physical activity in a region of New South Wales. Methods: A pragmatic longitudinal study was undertaken of parents/carers from primary school aged children (5¿12 years) in the Hunter region of NSW, Australia. Baseline data were collected between Oct-Dec 2017, with follow-up 12 months later. A telephone survey occurred at both time points, asking questions regarding registration and redemption of an Active Kids voucher for their child, child participation in organised sports and child physical activity levels. Results: Of the 974 parents/carers who consented to participate, 511 (52.5%) completed the telephone surveys at both time points. A very large proportion of children (n = 454, 89.0%) were reported by their parents/carers at baseline as meeting the minimum physical activity guideline of 60 min per day. Of participating parents/carers in this study, 407 (96.0%) reported redeeming an Active Kids voucher. Children who redeemed a voucher had three times the odds to participate in organized team sports from baseline to follow-up (p = 0.009). Sub group analyses identified that females who redeemed a voucher had four times the odds to participate in organized team sports (p = 0.012). Conclusions: Given the already active nature of this sample, no significant improvements in physical activity levels were noted, but the positive contribution community sport can have on health and wellbeing amongst children is reinforced. Whilst voucher schemes can address financial burdens across all socio-economic groups, more population targeting is needed to deliver voucher schemes to the most disadvantaged and inactive segments of the population in order to increase physical activity.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-021-10588-0
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Kathryn L Reilly
2021 Barnes C, McCrabb S, Stacey F, Nathan N, Yoong SL, Grady A, et al., 'Improving implementation of school-based healthy eating and physical activity policies, practices, and programs: a systematic review.', Transl Behav Med, 11 1365-1410 (2021)
DOI 10.1093/tbm/ibab037
Co-authors Courtney Barnes, Sam Mccrabb, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Hodder, Serene Yoong, Alice Grady, Nicole Nathan
2021 Ooi JY, Wolfenden L, Sutherland R, Nathan N, Oldmeadow C, Mclaughlin M, et al., 'A Systematic Review of the Recent Consumption Levels of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages in Children and Adolescents From the World Health Organization Regions With High Dietary-Related Burden of Disease.', Asia Pac J Public Health, 10105395211014642 (2021)
DOI 10.1177/10105395211014642
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Christopher Oldmeadow, Alix Hall, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc, Courtney Barnes, Serene Yoong
2021 Wolfenden L, Foy R, Presseau J, Grimshaw JM, Ivers NM, Powell BJ, et al., 'Designing and undertaking randomised implementation trials: Guide for researchers', The BMJ, 372 (2021)

Implementation science is the study of methods to promote the systematic uptake of evidence based interventions into practice and policy to improve health. Despite the need for hi... [more]

Implementation science is the study of methods to promote the systematic uptake of evidence based interventions into practice and policy to improve health. Despite the need for high quality evidence from implementation research, randomised trials of implementation strategies often have serious limitations. These limitations include high risks of bias, limited use of theory, a lack of standard terminology to describe implementation strategies, narrowly focused implementation outcomes, and poor reporting. This paper aims to improve the evidence base in implementation science by providing guidance on the development, conduct, and reporting of randomised trials of implementation strategies. Established randomised trial methods from seminal texts and recent developments in implementation science were consolidated by an international group of researchers, health policy makers, and practitioners. This article provides guidance on the key components of randomised trials of implementation strategies, including articulation of trial aims, trial recruitment and retention strategies, randomised design selection, use of implementation science theory and frameworks, measures, sample size calculations, ethical review, and trial reporting. It also focuses on topics requiring special consideration or adaptation for implementation trials. We propose this guide as a resource for researchers, healthcare and public health policy makers or practitioners, research funders, and journal editors with the goal of advancing rigorous conduct and reporting of randomised trials of implementation strategies.

DOI 10.1136/bmj.m3721
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder, Christopher M Williams, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan
2021 Leonard A, Delaney T, Seward K, Zoetemeyer R, Lamont H, Sutherland R, et al., 'Investigating differences between traditional (paper bag) ordering and online ordering from primary school canteens: A cross-sectional study comparing menu, usage and lunch order characteristics', Public Health Nutrition, 24 2502-2511 (2021)

Objective: To assess differences between traditional paper bag ordering and online ordering from primary school canteens in terms of menu, usage and lunch order characteristics. D... [more]

Objective: To assess differences between traditional paper bag ordering and online ordering from primary school canteens in terms of menu, usage and lunch order characteristics. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: New South Wales (NSW) primary schools that offered both paper bag and online canteen ordering. Participants: Students (aged 5-12 years) with a lunch order on the day of the observation. Results: Across the six school canteens, 59-90 % of all available items were listed on both the online and paper menus, with no significant differences in the nutritional quality ('Everyday'/'Occasional') or nutritional content (kJ/saturated fat/sugar/sodium) of menu items. In total, 387 student lunch orders were placed, containing 776 menu items. Most orders (68 %) were placed online. There were no significant differences between order modality in the quantity of items ordered or the cost of orders, or the nutritional quality of orders based on the classification system of the NSW Healthy School Canteen Strategy ('Everyday'/'Occasional'). However, nutritional analysis revealed that paper bag orders contained 222 fewer kJ than online orders (P = 0·001), 0·65 g less saturated fat (P = 0·04) and 4·7 g less sugar (P < 0·001). Conclusions: Online canteens are commonly used to order canteen lunches for primary school children. This is the first study to investigate differences between traditional paper bag ordering and online ordering in this setting. Given the rapid increase in the use of online ordering systems in schools and other food settings and their potential to deliver public health nutrition interventions, additional research is warranted to further investigate differences in ordering modalities.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980020003559
Co-authors Kathryn L Reilly, Rebecca Wyse
2021 Shoesmith A, Hall A, Wolfenden L, Shelton RC, Powell BJ, Brown H, et al., 'Barriers and facilitators influencing the sustainment of health behaviour interventions in schools and childcare services: a systematic review', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 16 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-021-01134-y
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong, Alix Hall, Luke Wolfenden, Sam Mccrabb, Hannah Brown
2021 Mclaughlin M, Delaney T, Hall A, Byaruhanga J, Mackie P, Grady A, et al., 'Associations Between Digital Health Intervention Engagement, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behavior: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.', J Med Internet Res, 23 e23180 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/23180
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Alix Hall, Kathryn L Reilly
2021 Murawski B, Reilly KL, Hope K, Hall AE, Sutherland RL, Trost SG, et al., 'Exploring the effect of a school-based cluster-randomised controlled trial to increase the scheduling of physical activity for primary school students on teachers' physical activity.', Health Promot J Austr, (2021)
DOI 10.1002/hpja.499
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Alix Hall, Serene Yoong, Kathryn L Reilly
2021 Yoong SL, Hall A, Stacey F, Nathan N, Reilly K, Delaney T, et al., 'An exploratory analysis to identify behavior change techniques of implementation interventions associated with the implementation of healthy canteen policies.', Transl Behav Med, 11 1606-1616 (2021)
DOI 10.1093/tbm/ibab036
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Hodder, Kathryn L Reilly, Alix Hall, Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong
2021 McCarthy N, Hall A, Shoesmith A, Sutherland R, Hodder R, Campbell E, Nathan N, 'Australian children are not meeting recommended physical activity levels at school: Analysis of objectively measured physical activity data from a cross sectional study.', Preventive medicine reports, 23 101418 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2021.101418
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Rebecca Hodder, Alix Hall
2021 Mclaughlin M, Duff J, McKenzie T, Campbell E, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Evaluating Digital Program Support for the Physical Activity 4 Everyone (PA4E1) School Program: Mixed Methods Study.', JMIR Pediatr Parent, 4 e26690 (2021)
DOI 10.2196/26690
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Jed Duff, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc, John Wiggers
2021 Barnes C, Hall A, Nathan N, Sutherland R, McCarthy N, Pettet M, et al., 'Efficacy of a school-based physical activity and nutrition intervention on child weight status: Findings from a cluster randomized controlled trial', Preventive Medicine, 153 (2021)

Despite the benefits of factorial designs in quantifying the relative benefits of different school-based approaches to prevent unhealthy weight gain among students, few have been ... [more]

Despite the benefits of factorial designs in quantifying the relative benefits of different school-based approaches to prevent unhealthy weight gain among students, few have been undertaken. The aims of this 2 × 2 cluster randomized factorial trial was to evaluate the impact of a physical activity and nutrition intervention on child weight status and quality of life. Twelve primary schools in New South Wales, Australia randomly allocated to one of four groups: (i.) physical activity (150 min of planned in-school physical activity); (ii.) nutrition (a healthy school lunch-box); (iii.) combined physical activity and nutrition; or (iv.) control. Outcome data assessing child weight and quality of life were collected at baseline and 9-months post-baseline. Within Grades 4¿6 in participating schools, 742 students participated in anthropometric measurements, including child body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference, at baseline and follow-up. Findings indicated that students that received the nutrition intervention had higher odds of being classified in the BMI category of underweight/healthy weight (OR 1.64 95%CI 1.07, 2.50; p = 0.0220), while those who received the physical activity intervention reported a lower waist circumference (mean difference - 1.86 95%CI -3.55, -0.18; p = 0.030). There were no significant effects of the nutrition or physical activity intervention on child BMI scores or child quality of life, and no significant synergistic effects of the two interventions combined. Future research assessing the longer-term impact of both intervention strategies, alone and combined, is warranted to better understand their potential impact on child health. Trial registration: Australian Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN: ACTRN12616001228471.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2021.106822
Co-authors Alix Hall, Nicole Nathan, Courtney Barnes, Luke Wolfenden
2021 Delaney T, McLaughlin M, Hall A, Yoong SL, Brown A, O brien K, et al., 'Associations between digital health intervention engagement and dietary intake: A systematic review', Nutrients, 13 (2021)

There has been a proliferation of digital health interventions (DHIs) targeting dietary in-take. Despite their potential, the effectiveness of DHIs are thought to be dependent, in... [more]

There has been a proliferation of digital health interventions (DHIs) targeting dietary in-take. Despite their potential, the effectiveness of DHIs are thought to be dependent, in part, on user engagement. However, the relationship between engagement and the effectiveness of dietary DHIs is not well understood. The aim of this review is to describe the association between DHI engagement and dietary intake. A systematic search of four electronic databases and grey literature for records published before December 2019 was conducted. Studies were eligible if they examined a quantitative association between objective measures of engagement with a DHI (subjective experience or usage) and measures of dietary intake in adults (aged = 18 years). From 10,653 citations, seven studies were included. Five studies included usage measures of engagement and two examined subjective experiences. Narrative synthesis, using vote counting, found mixed evidence of an association with usage measures (5 of 12 associations indicated a positive relationship, 7 were in-conclusive) and no evidence regarding an association with subjective experience (both studies were inconclusive). The findings provide early evidence supporting an association between measures of usage and dietary intake; however, this was inconsistent. Further research examining the association between DHI engagement and dietary intake is warranted.

DOI 10.3390/nu13093281
Co-authors Jenna Hollis, Luke Wolfenden, Julia Dray, Rebecca Wyse, Courtney Barnes, John Wiggers, Alix Hall, Serene Yoong, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc
2020 McCarthy N, Hope K, Sutherland R, Campbell E, Hodder R, Wolfenden L, Nathan N, 'Australian primary school principals', teachers', and parents' attitudes and barriers to changing school uniform policies from traditional uniforms to sports uniforms', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 17 1019-1024 (2020) [C1]

Background: To determine Australian primary school principals&apos;, teachers&apos;, and parents&apos; attitudes to changing school uniform policies to allow students to wear spor... [more]

Background: To determine Australian primary school principals', teachers', and parents' attitudes to changing school uniform policies to allow students to wear sports uniforms every day and to assess associations between participant characteristics and their attitudes. A secondary aim was to identify principals' and teachers' perceived barriers to uniform changes. Methods: Cross-sectional surveys of principals, teachers, and parents of children in grades 2 to 3 (age 7-10 y) from 62 Australian primary schools (Oct 2017-Mar 2018) were undertaken. Mixed logistic regression analyses assessed the associations between participant characteristics and attitudes toward uniform changes. Results: In total, 73% of the principals (38/52) who responded reported that their school only allowed children to wear a sports uniform on sports days. Overall, 38% of the principals (18/47), 63% of the teachers (334/579), and 78% of the parents (965/1231) reported they would support a policy that allowed children to wear daily sports uniforms. The most commonly reported barrier was the perception that sports uniforms were not appropriate for formal occasions. Conclusions: Although the majority of the principals were not supportive of a change to a daily sports uniform, the majority of the teachers and parents were. Strategies to improve principal support may be required if broader adoption of physical activity-supporting uniforms is to be achieved.

DOI 10.1123/jpah.2020-0116
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rebecca Hodder
2020 Nathan NK, Sutherland RL, Hope K, McCarthy NJ, Pettett M, Elton B, et al., 'Implementation of a school physical activity policy improves student physical activity levels: Outcomes of a cluster-randomized controlled trial', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 17 1009-1018 (2020) [C1]

Aim: To assess the impact of a multistrategy intervention designed to improve teachers&apos; implementation of a school physical activity (PA) policy on student PA levels. Methods... [more]

Aim: To assess the impact of a multistrategy intervention designed to improve teachers' implementation of a school physical activity (PA) policy on student PA levels. Methods: A cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted in 12 elementary schools. Policy implementation required schools to deliver 150 minutes of organized PA for students each week via physical education, sport, or class-based activities such as energizers. Schools received implementation support designed using the theoretical domains framework to help them implement the current policy. Results: A total of 1,502 children in kindergarten to grade 6 participated. At follow-up compared with control, students attending intervention schools had, measured via accelerometer, significantly greater increases in school day counts per minute (97.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 64.5 to 130.4; P <.001) and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) (3.0; 95% CI, 2.2-3.8, P <.001) and a greater decrease in sedentary time (-2.1; 95% CI, -3.9 to -0.4, P =.02) per school day. Teachers in intervention schools delivered significantly more minutes (36.6 min) of PA to their students at follow-up (95% CI, 2.7-70.5, P =.04). Conclusions: Supporting teachers to implement a PA policy improves student PA. Additional strategies may be needed to support teachers to implement activities that result in larger gains in student MVPA.

DOI 10.1123/jpah.2019-0595
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Kathryn L Reilly, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Alix Hall
2020 Mclaughlin M, Duff J, Sutherland R, Campbell E, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, 'Protocol for a mixed methods process evaluation of a hybrid implementation-effectiveness trial of a scaled-up whole-school physical activity program for adolescents: Physical Activity 4 Everyone (PA4E1)', TRIALS, 21 (2020)
DOI 10.1186/s13063-020-4187-5
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jed Duff, Luke Wolfenden, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc
2020 Nathan N, Murawski B, Hope K, Young S, Sutherland R, Hodder R, et al., 'The efficacy of workplace interventions on improving the dietary, physical activity and sleep behaviours of school and childcare staff: A systematic review', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 1-24 (2020) [C1]

There is a need for effective interventions that improve the health and wellbeing of school and childcare staff. This review examined the efficacy of workplace interventions to im... [more]

There is a need for effective interventions that improve the health and wellbeing of school and childcare staff. This review examined the efficacy of workplace interventions to improve the dietary, physical activity and/or sleep behaviours of school and childcare staff. A secondary aim of the review was to assess changes in staff physical/mental health, productivity, and students¿ health behaviours. Nine databases were searched for controlled trials including randomised and non-randomised controlled trials and quasi-experimental trials published in English up to October 2019. PRISMA guidelines informed screening and study selection procedures. Data were not suitable for quantitative pooling. Of 12,396 records screened, seven articles (based on six studies) were included. Most studies used multi-component interventions including educational resources, work-based wellness committees and planned group practice (e.g., walking groups). Multiple outcomes were assessed, findings were mixed and on average, there was moderate risk of bias. Between-group differences in dietary and physical activity behaviours (i.e., fruit/vegetable intake, leisure-time physical activity) favoured intervention groups, but were statistically non-significant for most outcomes. Some of the studies also showed differences favouring controls (i.e., nutrient intake, fatty food consumption). Additional robust studies testing the efficacy of workplace interventions to improve the health of educational staff are needed.

DOI 10.3390/ijerph17144998
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Hodder, Kathryn L Reilly
2020 Brown A, Barnes C, Byaruhanga J, McLaughlin M, Hodder RK, Booth D, et al., 'Effectiveness of technology-enabled knowledge translation strategies in improving the use of research in public health: Systematic review', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 22 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/17274
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Rebecca Hodder, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc, Courtney Barnes, Luke Wolfenden
2020 Mclaughlin M, Atkin AJ, Starr L, Hall A, Wolfenden L, Sutherland R, et al., 'Worldwide surveillance of self-reported sitting time: a scoping review.', The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, 17 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-020-01008-4
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors John Wiggers, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc, Luke Wolfenden, Alix Hall
2020 Yoong SL, Bolsewicz K, Grady A, Wyse R, Sutherland R, Hodder RK, et al., 'Adaptation of public health initiatives: expert views on current guidance and opportunities to advance their application and benefit', Health education research, 35 243-257 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyaa014
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Sam Mccrabb, John Wiggers, John Attia, Alix Hall, Rebecca Hodder, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong
2020 Sutherland R, Campbell E, McLaughlin M, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Lubans DR, et al., 'Scale-up of the Physical Activity 4 Everyone (PA4E1) intervention in secondary schools: 12-month implementation outcomes from a cluster randomized controlled trial.', Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act, 17 100 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-020-01000-y
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Matthew Mclaughlin Mc, Jenna Hollis, Nicole Nathan, Philip Morgan, Andrew Searles, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, David Lubans, Christopher Oldmeadow
2020 Yoong SL, Grady A, Wiggers JH, Stacey FG, Rissel C, Flood V, et al., 'Child-level evaluation of a web-based intervention to improve dietary guideline implementation in childcare centers: A cluster-randomized controlled trial', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 111 854-863 (2020) [C1]

Although it is recommended that childcare centers provide foods consistent with dietary guidelines, the impact of implementing sector-specific guidelines on child outcomes is larg... [more]

Although it is recommended that childcare centers provide foods consistent with dietary guidelines, the impact of implementing sector-specific guidelines on child outcomes is largely unknown. Objectives: This study aims to examine the impact of a web-based program and support to implement dietary guidelines in childcare centers on children's 1) diet; 2) BMI z scores; and 3) child health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Methods: This study was a cluster-randomized controlled trial utilizing a Type-3 Hybrid implementation-effectiveness design conducted between October 2016 and March 2018. This study reports on child outcomes. Fifty-four childcare centers in New South Wales, Australia were randomly assigned to the intervention (a web-based menu-planning tool and support) or control group (usual care). The intervention was designed to address barriers and enablers to dietary guideline implementation according to the Theoretical Domains Framework. A quota of 35 consenting childcare centers undertook child-level evaluation of dietary intake where 522 parents consented to completing =1 component of data collection for their child. Child consumption of core and discretionary (unhealthy) foods while in care was assessed via dietary observations by blinded research assistants, childcare diet quality was assessed via educator-completed questionnaires, BMI z scores were assessed via measured weight and height, and child HRQoL was assessed via parent report at baseline and 12-mo follow-up. Results: There was a significant increase in mean child consumption of fruit (0.39 servings; 95% CI: 0.12, 0.65 servings) and dairy foods (0.38 servings; 95% CI: 0.19, 0.57 servings) and a significant reduction in consumption of discretionary foods (-0.40 servings; 95% CI: -0.64, -0.16 servings) in care in the intervention group, relative to control at 12-mo follow-up. No significant differences were observed in diet quality, BMI z scores, or HRQoL. Conclusions: A web-based intervention to support planning of childcare menus consistent with dietary guidelines can improve child consumption of healthier foods in daycare. This trial was registered at www.anzctr.org.au as ACTRN12616000974404.

DOI 10.1093/ajcn/nqaa025
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Alice Grady, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Courtney Barnes, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2020 Shoesmith A, Hall A, Hope K, Sutherland R, Hodder RK, Trost SG, et al., 'Associations between in-school-hours physical activity and child health-related quality of life: A cross-sectional study in a sample of Australian primary school children', Preventive Medicine Reports, 20 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2020.101179
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, Alix Hall, Nicole Nathan
2020 Sutherland R, Nathan N, Brown A, Yoong S, Reynolds R, Walton A, et al., 'A cross-sectional study to determine the energy density and nutritional quality of primary-school children's lunchboxes', Public Health Nutrition, 23 1108-1116 (2020) [C1]

Objective: The present study describes the energy content of primary-school children&apos;s lunchboxes and the proportion of lunchbox foods considered discretionary. Subgroup anal... [more]

Objective: The present study describes the energy content of primary-school children's lunchboxes and the proportion of lunchbox foods considered discretionary. Subgroup analyses by sex, socio-economic status, age and weight status were undertaken.Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted. Mean kilojoule content, number of items and categorisation of foods and drinks in lunchboxes as 'everyday' (healthy) or discretionary (sometimes) foods were assessed via a valid and reliable lunchbox observational audit.Setting: Twelve Catholic primary schools (Kindergarten-Grade 6) located in the Hunter region of New South Wales, Australia.Participants: Kindergarten to Grade 6 primary-school students.Results: In total, 2143 children (57 %) had parental consent to have their lunchboxes observed. School lunchboxes contained a mean of 2748 kJ, of which 61·2 % of energy was from foods consistent with the Australian Dietary Guidelines and 38·8 % of energy was discretionary foods. The proportion of lunchboxes containing only healthy foods was 12 %. Children in Kindergarten-Grade 2 packed more servings of 'everyday' foods (3·32 v. 2·98, P < 0·01) compared with children in Grades 3-6. Children in Grades 3-6 had a higher percentage of energy from discretionary foods (39·1 v. 33·8 %, P < 0·01) compared with children in Kindergarten-Grade 2 and children from the most socio-economically disadvantaged areas had significantly higher total kilojoules in the school lunchbox compared with the least disadvantaged students (2842 v. 2544 kJ, P = 0·03).Conclusions: Foods packed within school lunchboxes may contribute to energy imbalance. The development of school policies and population-based strategies to support parents overcome barriers to packing healthy lunchboxes are warranted.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980019003379
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan
2020 Wolfenden L, Williams CM, Kingsland M, Yoong SL, Nathan N, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, 'Improving the impact of public health service delivery and research: a decision tree to aid evidence-based public health practice and research', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 44 331-332 (2020)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.13023
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden
2020 Pearson N, Wolfenden L, Finch M, Yoong SL, Kingsland M, Nathan N, et al., 'A cross-sectional study of packed lunchbox foods and their consumption by children in early childhood education and care services', NUTRITION & DIETETICS, 78 397-405 (2020)
DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12632
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2020 Yoong SL, Hall A, Stacey F, Grady A, Sutherland R, Wyse R, et al., 'Nudge strategies to improve healthcare providers' implementation of evidence-based guidelines, policies and practices: a systematic review of trials included within Cochrane systematic reviews', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 15 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-020-01011-0
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Amy Anderson, Alice Grady, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Alix Hall
2020 Ahmadi MN, Nathan N, Sutherland R, Wolfenden L, Trost SG, 'Non-wear or sleep? Evaluation of five non-wear detection algorithms for raw accelerometer data', Journal of Sports Sciences, 38 399-404 (2020) [C1]

Detection of non-wear periods is an important step in accelerometer data processing. This study evaluated five non-wear detection algorithms for wrist accelerometer data and two r... [more]

Detection of non-wear periods is an important step in accelerometer data processing. This study evaluated five non-wear detection algorithms for wrist accelerometer data and two rules for non-wear detection when non-wear and sleep algorithms are implemented in parallel. Non-wear algorithms were based on the standard deviation (SD), the high-pass filtered acceleration, or tilt angle. Rules for differentiating sleep from non-wear consisted of an override rule in which any overlap between non-wear and sleep was deemed non-wear; and a 75% rule in which non-wear periods were deemed sleep if the duration was < 75% of the sleep period. Non-wear algorithms were evaluated in 47 children who wore an ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer during school hours for 5¿days. Rules for differentiating sleep from non-wear were evaluated in 15 adults who wore a GeneActiv Original accelerometer continuously for 24¿hours. Classification accuracy for the non-wear algorithms ranged between 0.86¿0.95, with the SD of the vector magnitude providing the best performance. The override rule misclassified 37.1¿minutes of sleep as non-wear, while the 75% rule resulted in no misclassification. Non-wear algorithms based on the SD of the acceleration signal can effectively detect non-wear periods, while application of the 75% rule can effectively differentiate sleep from non-wear when examined concurrently.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2019.1703301
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden
2019 Direito A, Murphy JJ, McLaughlin M, Mair J, Mackenzie K, Kamada M, et al., 'Early career professionals (researchers, practitioners, and policymakers) role in advocating, disseminating, and implementing the global action plan on physical activity: ISPAH early career network view', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 16 940-944 (2019) [C1]

Increasing population levels of physical activity (PA) can assist in achieving the United Nations sustainable development goals, benefiting multiple sectors and contributing to gl... [more]

Increasing population levels of physical activity (PA) can assist in achieving the United Nations sustainable development goals, benefiting multiple sectors and contributing to global prosperity. Practices and policies to increase PA levels exist at the subnational, national, and international levels. In 2018, the World Health Organization launched the first Global Action Plan on Physical Activity (GAPPA). The GAPPA provides guidance through a framework of effective and feasible policy actions for increasing PA, and requires engagement and advocacy from a wide spectrum of stakeholders for successful implementation of the proposed actions. Early career professionals, including researchers, practitioners, and policymakers, can play a major role with helping ¿all people being regularly active¿ by contributing to 4 overarching areas: (1) generation¿of evidence, (2) dissemination¿of key messages and evidence, (3) implementation¿of the evidence-based actions proposed in the GAPPA, and (4) contributing to advocacy for robust national action plans on PA. The contribution of early career professionals can be achieved through 5 pathways: (1) research, (2) workplace/practice, (3) business, (4) policy, and (5) professional and public opinion. Recommendations of how early career professionals can contribute to the generation, dissemination, and implementation of the evidence and actions proposed by the GAPPA are provided.

DOI 10.1123/jpah.2019-0450
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Matthew Mclaughlin Mc
2019 Hodder RK, O'Brien KM, Stacey FG, Tzelepis F, Wyse RJ, Bartlem KM, et al., 'Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2019 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub6
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Rebecca Hodder, Erica James, Rebecca Wyse, Courtney Barnes, Luke Wolfenden, Kate Bartlem
2019 Pond N, Finch M, Sutherland R, Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Kingsland M, et al., 'Cluster randomised controlled trial of an m-health intervention in centre-based childcare services to reduce the packing of discretionary foods in children's lunchboxes: study protocol for the ' SWAP IT Childcare' trial', BMJ OPEN, 9 (2019)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-026829
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Alice Grady, Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2019 Sutherland R, Campbell E, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, et al., 'A cluster randomised trial of an intervention to increase the implementation of physical activity practices in secondary schools: study protocol for scaling up the Physical Activity 4 Everyone (PA4E1) program', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 19 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-019-6965-0
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
Co-authors David Lubans, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Christopher Oldmeadow, Philip Morgan, John Wiggers, Andrew Searles
2019 Nathan N, Janssen L, Sutherland R, Hodder RK, Evans CEL, Booth D, et al., 'The effectiveness of lunchbox interventions on improving the foods and beverages packed and consumed by children at centre-based care or school: a systematic review and meta-analysis', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 16 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-019-0798-1
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Hodder, Serene Yoong, Kathryn L Reilly, Nicole Nathan
2019 McCrabb S, Lane C, Hall A, Milat A, Bauman A, Sutherland R, et al., 'Scaling-up evidence-based obesity interventions: A systematic review assessing intervention adaptations and effectiveness and quantifying the scale-up penalty', OBESITY REVIEWS, 20 964-982 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/obr.12845
Citations Scopus - 61Web of Science - 49
Co-authors Alix Hall, Sam Mccrabb, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2019 McCarthy N, Nathan N, Hodder R, Lecathelinais C, Sutherland R, Campbell E, Wolfenden L, 'Australian primary school student's attitudes to changing from traditional school uniforms to sports uniforms and association with student characteristics', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 43 94-95 (2019)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12851
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rebecca Hodder
2019 Sutherland R, Brown A, Nathan N, Janssen L, Reynolds R, Walton A, et al., 'Protocol for an effectiveness- implementation hybrid trial to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an m-health intervention to decrease the consumption of discretionary foods packed in school lunchboxes: the 'SWAP IT' trial', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 19 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-019-7725-x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Andrew Searles, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Kathryn L Reilly, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2019 Reynolds R, Sutherland R, Nathan N, Janssen L, Lecathelinais C, Reilly K, et al., 'Feasibility and principal acceptability of school-based mobile communication applications to disseminate healthy lunchbox messages to parents', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 30 108-113 (2019) [C1]

Issue addressed: This study aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of using an existing school-based mobile communication application to deliver messages to parents on ... [more]

Issue addressed: This study aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of using an existing school-based mobile communication application to deliver messages to parents on how to pack a healthy lunchbox. Methods: A telephone survey was conducted with 196 primary school principals within the Hunter New England region of New South Wales, Australia, in 2016. Results: Almost two thirds of primary schools (59%) currently use a school-based mobile communication application to communicate with parents. Most principals (91%) agreed school lunchboxes need improving, of which 80% agree it is a school's role to provide information and guidelines to parents. However, only 50% of principals reported currently providing such information. The provision of lunchbox messages to parents by a third party appeared an acceptable model of delivery by principals. Larger schools and schools in urban and lower socio-economic localities were more likely to have used a school-based mobile communication application. Conclusion: The majority of principals recognise student lunchboxes need improving. The use of school-based mobile communication applications appears to be feasible and acceptable by principals as a method of communicating lunchbox messages to parents. So what?: Use of school-based mobile communication applications may be an effective method for delivering health information at a population level. Future research should assess the potential efficacy of disseminating health interventions via this modality.

DOI 10.1002/hpja.57
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Kathryn L Reilly
2019 Delaney T, Sutherland R, Wyse R, Wolfenden L, Lecathelinais C, Janssen L, et al., 'A cross-sectional study of the nutritional quality of student canteen purchases from New South Wales primary-school canteens', Public Health Nutrition, 22 3092-3100 (2019) [C1]

Objective: To assess the nutritional quality of student canteen purchases at recess and lunch, including: (i) the mean energy (kilojoules), saturated fat (grams), total sugar (gra... [more]

Objective: To assess the nutritional quality of student canteen purchases at recess and lunch, including: (i) the mean energy (kilojoules), saturated fat (grams), total sugar (grams) and Na (milligrams) and percentage of energy from saturated fat and total sugar; and (ii) the proportion and types of foods purchased that are healthier (green) and less healthy (amber/red) according to a state school canteen policy.Design: A cross-sectional study of student canteen food and beverage recess and lunch purchases.Setting: Twenty-six randomly selected government primary schools that were non-compliant with a state school canteen policy from a region of New South Wales, Australia, were approached to participate.Participants: Students (aged 5-12 years) of participating schools.Results: Eighteen schools (69 %) consented to participate. On average students' recess purchases contained 571·2 kJ energy, 1·6 g saturated fat, 11·6 g total sugar and 132·4 mg Na with 10·0 % of energy from saturated fat and 37·8 % of energy from total sugar. Students' lunch purchases contained 685·4 kJ energy, 1·8 g saturated fat, 12·7 g total sugar and 151·4 mg Na with 9·5 % of energy from saturated fat and 31·8 % of energy from total sugar. Less healthy items represented 72 and 76 % of all items purchased at recess and lunch, respectively, with 'savoury snacks' and 'sugar-sweetened ice blocks and slushies' being the most common recess and lunch purchases, respectively.Conclusions: There is considerable scope to improve the nutritional quality of student purchases from primary-school canteens, with a high percentage of energy from total sugar. Future research is required to identify effective strategies to enhance compliance with canteen policies and support the purchase of healthier foods from school canteens.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980019001903
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Kathryn L Reilly, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse
2019 Nathan N, Wiggers J, Bauman AE, Rissel C, Searles A, Reeves P, et al., 'A cluster randomised controlled trial of an intervention to increase the implementation of school physical activity policies and guidelines: study protocol for the physically active children in education (PACE) study', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 19 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-019-6492-z
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, John Wiggers, Andrew Searles, Luke Wolfenden, Kathryn L Reilly, Nicole Nathan
2019 Sutherland R, Nathan N, Brown A, Yoong S, Finch M, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'A randomized controlled trial to assess the potential efficacy, feasibility and acceptability of an m-health intervention targeting parents of school aged children to improve the nutritional quality of foods packed in the lunchbox 'SWAP IT'', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 16 1-13 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-019-0812-7
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Alix Hall
2019 Reilly K, Yoong SL, Sutherland R, Wiggers JH, Delaney T, Reynolds RC, et al., 'Secondary school implementation of a healthy eating policy', HEALTH PROMOTION JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 32 21-25 (2019)
DOI 10.1002/hpja.310
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Kathryn L Reilly, Serene Yoong
2019 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Reilly K, Delaney T, Janssen LM, Reynolds R, et al., 'Two-year follow-up of a randomised controlled trial to assess the sustainability of a school intervention to improve the implementation of a school-based nutrition policy', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 30 26-33 (2019) [C1]

Issue addressed: School-based nutrition policies can have a positive effect on the school food environment. The primary aim of this study was to assess the primary school adherenc... [more]

Issue addressed: School-based nutrition policies can have a positive effect on the school food environment. The primary aim of this study was to assess the primary school adherence to a mandatory state-wide healthy canteen policy 12¿months after an effective multi-strategic implementation intervention concluded. Methods: Primary schools were randomised to (a) a 12-14¿months multi-strategic intervention or (b) no-intervention (control). The intervention aimed to improve implementation of a state-wide canteen policy by encouraging schools to remove unhealthy food and beverages (classified as ¿¿red¿¿ or ¿¿banned¿¿) from canteen menus and replace with healthy items (classified as ¿¿green¿¿). No implementation support was provided to either group by the research team between the 12 and 24¿months data collection period. Results: Seventy schools participated, of which 56 schools were assessed at 24-month follow-up. Intervention schools were less likely to have a menu which contained ¿¿red/banned¿¿ items at 24-month follow-up (RR¿=¿2.28; 95% CI: 1.18-4.40; P¿=¿0.01). Intervention schools, however, were not more likely than controls to have a menu which contained >50% ¿¿green¿¿ items at 24-month follow-up (RR¿=¿1.29; 95% CI: 0.98-1.70; P¿=¿0.10). Intervention schools were more likely to adhere to both policy components (no red/banned items and >50% green items on the menu) than control schools (RR¿=¿2.61; 95% CI: 1.29-5.29; P¿=¿0.006). Among intervention schools that were fully adherent to the policy following implementation support (12-month post baseline), all were also adherent at the 24-month follow-up. Conclusion: The intervention was effective in achieving long-term school adherence to a state-wide canteen policy at 24-month follow-up. So what?: The findings suggest that sustained improvements in implementation of school nutrition policies is possible following a period (12¿months) of comprehensive implementation support.

DOI 10.1002/hpja.238
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Jenna Hollis, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Kathryn L Reilly, Rebecca Wyse, Christopher M Williams
2019 Wolfenden L, Jones J, Parmenter B, Razak LA, Wiggers J, Morgan PJ, et al., 'Efficacy of a free-play intervention to increase physical activity during childcare: A randomized controlled trial', Health Education Research, 34 98-112 (2019) [C1]

The primary aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a childcare-based intervention in increasing child physical activity by allowing children unrestricted access to outdoo... [more]

The primary aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a childcare-based intervention in increasing child physical activity by allowing children unrestricted access to outdoor areas for free-play when structured activity is not taking place. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in six childcare services. Intervention services provided children unrestricted access outdoors for active free-play, while control services provided their usual scheduled periods of outdoor play. Consent was obtained from 231 children. Child moderate to vigorous activity (MVPA), the primary trial outcome, was assessed via accelerometer at baseline and 3 months post baseline. Intervention effects were examined using Generalised Linear Mixed Models. Controlling for child age, gender and baseline outcome measure, at follow-up there were no significant differences between groups in minutes of MVPA in-care (mean difference: 4.85; 95% CI: -3.96, 13.66; P = 0.28), proportion of wear time in-care spent in MVPA (mean difference: 1.52%; 95% CI: -0.50, 3.53; P = 0.14) or total physical activity in-care (mean difference in counts per minute: 23.18; 95% CI: -4.26, 50.61; P = 0.10), nor on measures of child cognition (P = 0.45-0.91). It was concluded that interventions addressing multiple aspects of the childcare and home environment might provide the greatest potential to improve child physical activity.

DOI 10.1093/her/cyy041
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2019 Wyse R, Delaney T, Gibbins P, Ball K, Campbell K, Yoong SL, et al., 'Cluster randomised controlled trial of an online intervention to improve healthy food purchases from primary school canteens: a study protocol of the 'click & crunch' trial', BMJ OPEN, 9 (2019)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-030538
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Christopher Oldmeadow, Kathryn L Reilly, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, John Attia, Serene Yoong
2019 Wolfenden L, Reilly K, Kingsland M, Grady A, Williams CM, Nathan N, et al., 'Identifying opportunities to develop the science of implementation for community-based non-communicable disease prevention: A review of implementation trials', Preventive Medicine, 118 279-285 (2019) [C1]

Implementation of interventions in community organisations such as schools, childcare centres, and sporting clubs are recommended to target a range of modifiable risks of non-comm... [more]

Implementation of interventions in community organisations such as schools, childcare centres, and sporting clubs are recommended to target a range of modifiable risks of non-communicable diseases. Poor implementation, however, is common and has contributed to the failure of non-communicable disease interventions globally. This study aimed to characterise experimental research regarding strategies to improve implementation of chronic disease prevention programs in community settings. The review used data collected in three comprehensive systematic reviews undertaken between August 2015 and July 2017. Randomised controlled trials, including cluster design, and non-randomised trials with a parallel control group were included. The data were extracted to describe trial characteristics, implementation strategies employed, implementation outcomes and study quality. Of the 40 implementation trials included in the study, unhealthy diet was the most common risk factor targeted (n = 20). The most commonly reported implementation strategies were educational meetings (n = 38, 95%), educational materials (n = 36, 90%) and educational outreach visits (n = 29, 73%). Few trials were conducted ¿at-scale¿ (n = 8, 20%) or reported adverse effects (n = 5, 13%). The reporting of implementation related outcomes; intervention adoption (n = 13, 33%); appropriateness (n = 11, 28%); acceptability (n = 8, 20%); feasibility (n = 8, 20%); cost (n = 3, 8%); and sustainability (n = 2, 5%); was limited. For the majority of trials, risk of bias was high for blinding of study personnel/participants and outcome assessors. Testing of strategies to improve implementation of non-communicable disease prevention strategies in community settings, delivered ¿at-scale¿, utilising implementation frameworks, including a comprehensive range of implementation outcomes should be priority areas for future research in implementation science.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.11.014
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Kathryn L Reilly, Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Nicole Nathan, Christopher M Williams
2019 Yoong SL, Nathan N, Reilly K, Sutherland R, Straus S, Barnes C, et al., 'Adapting implementation strategies: a case study of how to support implementation of healthy canteen policies', Public Health, 177 19-25 (2019) [C1]

Objectives: Although evidence-based interventions (EBIs) and effective strategies to implement them exist, they cannot be used by policy makers and practitioners if they do not al... [more]

Objectives: Although evidence-based interventions (EBIs) and effective strategies to implement them exist, they cannot be used by policy makers and practitioners if they do not align with end users¿ needs. As such, adaptations to EBIs and implementation approaches are likely to occur to increase ¿fit¿ with end users¿ capacity. This article describes an approach undertaken by a population health service delivery unit in one Australian state to develop an adapted implementation strategy to support the implementation of the mandatory healthy canteen policy (EBI) to all schools located in the service delivery region. Study design: This is a case study of adapting an intervention to improve implementation of the healthy canteen policy. Methods and results: This is a six-step pragmatic, empirically driven approach. The steps include (i) adapt, where appropriate, the EBI to facilitate implementation; (ii) identify end users¿ capacity for implementation; (iii) identify opportunities to adapt the implementation interventions while preserving meaningful intervention impact; (iv) undertake program adaptation; (v) develop training and resources to support delivery of implementation strategies and; (vi) evaluate the adapted intervention. This article describes the application of these steps by the authors to develop an adapted support strategy consistent with end users¿ needs. Conclusions: This study provides some guidance on how to adapt implementation support approaches particularly when EBIs cannot be adapted. Future empirical research providing guidance on making practical adaptation decisions are needed.

DOI 10.1016/j.puhe.2019.07.003
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Courtney Barnes, Serene Yoong, Kathryn L Reilly, Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan
2019 Wolfenden L, Bolsewicz K, Grady A, McCrabb S, Kingsland M, Wiggers J, et al., 'Optimisation: Defining and exploring a concept to enhance the impact of public health initiatives', Health Research Policy and Systems, 17 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12961-019-0502-6
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Alix Hall, John Attia, Rebecca Hodder, Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Sam Mccrabb, John Wiggers, Nicole Nathan
2018 Hodder RK, Stacey FG, O'Brien KM, Wyse RJ, Clinton-McHarg T, Tzelepis F, et al., 'Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2018)
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub4
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Kate Bartlem, Rebecca Wyse, Rebecca Hodder, Nicole Nathan, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2018 Abdul Razak L, Yoong SL, Wiggers J, Morgan P, Jones J, Finch M, et al., 'Impact of scheduling multiple free-play periods in childcare on child moderate-to-vigorous physical activity: a cluster randomised trial', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 15 1-13 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-018-0665-5
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Luke Wolfenden, Philip Morgan
2018 Nathan N, Elton B, Babic M, McCarthy N, Sutherland R, Presseau J, et al., 'Barriers and facilitators to the implementation of physical activity policies in schools: A systematic review', Preventive Medicine, 107 45-53 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.11.012
Citations Scopus - 54Web of Science - 55
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan
2018 Ooi JY, Sutherland R, Nathan N, Yoong SL, Janssen L, Wrigley J, Wolfenden L, 'A cluster randomised controlled trial of a sugar-sweetened beverage intervention in secondary schools: Pilot study protocol', Nutrition and Health, 24 217-229 (2018)

Background: Due to the rising prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents, reducing childhood overweight and obesity rates is a public-health priority. A sign... [more]

Background: Due to the rising prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents, reducing childhood overweight and obesity rates is a public-health priority. A significant source of excess sugar and energy in children¿s diets comes from sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), with adolescents having the highest intake of all age groups. However, existing interventions targeting SSB intake in adolescents have multiple limitations. Schools have proven to be an appropriate setting for improving student health. Aim: To assess the effectiveness of a school-based SSB intervention in reducing daily SSB consumption and daily percentage energy from SSBs of secondary-school students. Methods: A pilot study (switchURsip) was designed based on the Health Promoting Schools framework components. A convenience sample of schools in New South Wales, Australia will be used to recruit six schools (three intervention; three control). The study incorporates strategies that focus on factors associated with SSB intake in adolescents. These strategies include: lesson plans on SSB; communication with students and parents; school challenge to build peer support; and school nutrition environment modifications. Support strategies to facilitate implementation are executive leadership and school committees, auditing and feedback, providing resources, staff professional learning and communication and marketing. Conclusion: The high intake of SSB in adolescents has been consistently linked to having overweight and obesity, hence, interventions in this area should be prioritised. This pilot study intends to address identified evidence gaps by piloting the first intervention in Australia of its kind to reduce SSB intake in adolescents.

DOI 10.1177/0260106018791856
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan
2018 Hodder RK, O'Brien KM, Stacey FG, Wyse RJ, Clinton-Mcharg T, Tzelepis F, et al., 'Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2018 (2018)
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub5
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, Kate Bartlem, Erica James, Rebecca Hodder, Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong, Flora Tzelepis
2018 Grady A, Yoong S, Sutherland R, Lee H, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, 'Improving the public health impact of eHealth and mHealth interventions', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 42 118-119 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12771
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Nicole Nathan
2018 Reilly K, Nathan N, Wu JHY, Delaney T, Wyse R, Cobcroft M, et al., 'Assessing the potential impact of a front-of-pack nutritional rating system on food availability in school canteens: A randomised controlled trial', Appetite, 121 309-315 (2018) [C1]

Background Front-of-pack graphical nutritional rating of products is becoming an important strategy in many countries to improve healthy food purchases by consumers. Evidence of t... [more]

Background Front-of-pack graphical nutritional rating of products is becoming an important strategy in many countries to improve healthy food purchases by consumers. Evidence of the effectiveness of such on facilitating healthy food choices by school food service providers has not been reported. The primary aim of the study was to assess the impact of providing front-of-pack nutritional rating information on school canteen managers¿ likely food selections. Secondary outcomes were canteen manager awareness, attitudes and reported barriers to using the front-of-pack information. Methods A randomised controlled trial involving primary school canteen managers was conducted in a single region in New South Wales, Australia. Eligible participants were randomised to an intervention or control group and asked in a telephone interview which of 12 common food products sold in school canteens they would sell. Both groups received product name and brand information. The intervention group also received information regarding the nutritional rating of products. Results Canteen managers in the intervention group were significantly more likely than those in the control group to indicate they would sell three of the six ¿healthier¿ products (p = 0.036, 0.005, 0.009). There was no difference between groups in the likelihood of making available for sale any of the six ¿less healthy¿ products. The majority of canteen managers who had heard of a product nutritional rating system agreed that it was helpful in identifying ¿healthier¿ foods (88%, n = 31). Conclusions The inclusion of product nutritional rating information has the potential to improve the availability of some ¿healthier¿ items on canteen menus and contribute to improving child dietary intake. Further research is required to determine whether the use of product nutritional rating information actually makes a difference to canteen manager choices.

DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2017.11.103
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Kathryn L Reilly, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Wolfenden L, Nathan NK, Sutherland R, Yoong SL, Hodder RK, Wyse RJ, et al., 'Strategies for enhancing the implementation of school-based policies or practices targeting risk factors for chronic disease', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD011677.pub2
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 53
Co-authors Alison A Fielding, Flora Tzelepis, Rebecca Wyse, Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers, Nicole Nathan, Alice Grady, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2017 Delaney T, Wyse R, Yoong SL, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, Ball K, et al., 'Cluster randomized controlled trial of a consumer behavior intervention to improve healthy food purchases from online canteens.', The American journal of clinical nutrition, 106 1311-1320 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3945/ajcn.117.158329
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2017 Delaney T, Wyse R, Yoong SL, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, Ball K, et al., 'Cluster randomised controlled trial of a consumer behaviour intervention to improve healthy food purchases from online canteens: study protocol', BMJ OPEN, 7 (2017)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-014569
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Hodder RK, Stacey FG, Wyse RJ, O'Brien KM, Clinton-McHarg T, Tzelepis F, et al., 'Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub3
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Kate Bartlem, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Hodder, Erica James, Rebecca Wyse, Flora Tzelepis, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2017 Stacey FG, Finch M, Wolfenden L, Grady A, Jessop K, Wedesweiler T, et al., 'Evidence of the Potential Effectiveness of Centre-Based Childcare Policies and Practices on Child Diet and Physical Activity: Consolidating Evidence from Systematic Reviews of Intervention Trials and Observational Studies', Current Nutrition Reports, 6 228-246 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s13668-017-0212-z
Citations Scopus - 20
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Kate Bartlem
2017 Sutherland RL, Nathan NK, Lubans DR, Cohen K, Davies LJ, Desmet C, et al., 'An RCT to Facilitate Implementation of School Practices Known to Increase Physical Activity.', American journal of preventive medicine, 53 818-828 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2017.08.009
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, John Wiggers, David Lubans, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Hollis JL, Sutherland R, Williams AJ, Campbell E, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, et al., 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity levels in secondary school physical education lessons', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 14 (2017) [C1]

Background: Schools play an important role in physical activity promotion for adolescents. The systematic review aimed to determine the proportion of secondary (middle and high) s... [more]

Background: Schools play an important role in physical activity promotion for adolescents. The systematic review aimed to determine the proportion of secondary (middle and high) school physical education (PE) lesson time that students spend in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and to assess if MVPA was moderated by school level (middle and high school), type of physical activity measurement and type of PE activities. Methods: A systematic search of nine electronic databases was conducted (PROSPERO2014:CRD42014009649). Studies were eligible if they were published between 2005 and 2014; written in English; assessed MVPA in PE lessons of secondary (middle and high) school students; and used a quantitative MVPA measure (i.e., accelerometry, heart rate monitoring, pedometers or observational measures). Two reviewers examined the retrieved articles, assessed risk of bias, and performed data extraction. Random effects meta-analysis was used to calculate a pooled estimate of the percent of PE lesson time spent in MVPA and to assess moderator effects where data allowed. Results: The search yielded 5,132 potentially relevant articles; 28 articles representing 25 studies (7 middle and 18 high school) from seven countries were included. Twelve studies measured MVPA through observational measures, seven used accelerometers, five used heart rate monitors and four used pedometers (including three studies using a mix of measures). Meta-analysis of 15 studies found that overall, students spent a mean (95% CI) of 40.5% (34.8-46.2%) of PE in MVPA. Middle school students spent 48.6% (41.3-55.9%) of the lesson in MVPA (n=5 studies) and high school students 35.9% (28.3-43.6%) (n=10 studies). Studies measuring MVPA using accelerometers (n=5) showed that students spent 34.7% (25.1-44.4%) of the lesson in MVPA, while 44.4% (38.3-50.5%) was found for lessons assessed via observation (n=9), 43.1% (24.3-61.9%) of the lesson for a heart rate based study, and 35.9% (31.0-40.8%) for a pedometer-measured study. Conclusions: The proportion of PE spent in MVPA (40.5%) is below the US Centre for Disease Control and Prevention and the UK Associations for Physical Education recommendation of 50%. Findings differed according to the method of MVPA assessment. Additional strategies and intervention research are needed to build more active lesson time in PE.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0504-0
Citations Scopus - 103Web of Science - 95
Co-authors Jenna Hollis, Nicole Nathan, David Lubans, John Wiggers, Philip Morgan, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Nathan N, Sutherland R, Beauchamp MR, Cohen K, Hulteen RM, Babic M, et al., 'Feasibility and efficacy of the Great Leaders Active StudentS (GLASS) program on children's physical activity and object control skill competency: A non-randomised trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 20 1081-1086 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2017.04.016
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, David Lubans, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Nathan N, Wiggers J, Wyse R, Williams CM, Sutherland R, Yoong SL, et al., 'Factors associated with the implementation of a vegetable and fruit program in a population of Australian elementary schools', Health Education Research, 32 197-205 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyx038
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Christopher M Williams, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Wyse R, Yoong SL, Dodds P, Campbell L, Delaney T, Nathan N, et al., 'Online canteens: Awareness, use, barriers to use, and the acceptability of potential online strategies to improve public health nutrition in primary schools', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 28 67-71 (2017) [C1]

Issue addressed: This study of primary school principals assessed the awareness, use, barriers to use and acceptability of online canteens. Methods: A telephone survey of 123 prim... [more]

Issue addressed: This study of primary school principals assessed the awareness, use, barriers to use and acceptability of online canteens. Methods: A telephone survey of 123 primary school principals within the Hunter New England Region of New South Wales, Australia was conducted from September 2014 to November 2014. Results: Fifty-six percent of principals were aware of the existence of online canteens, with 8% having implemented such a system, and 38% likely to do so in the future. Medium/large schools were more likely to be aware of or to use online canteens, however there were no differences in awareness or use in relation to school rurality or socioeconomic advantage. Principals cited parent internet access as the most commonly identified perceived barrier to online canteen use, and the majority of principals (71-93%) agreed that it would be acceptable to implement a range of consumer behaviour strategies via an online canteen. Conclusions: Study findings suggest that despite relatively low levels of current use, online canteens have the potential to reach a large proportion of school communities in the future, across geographical and socioeconomic divides, and that the nutrition interventions which they have the capacity to deliver are considered acceptable to school principals. So what? Online canteens may represent an opportunity to deliver nutrition interventions to school communities. Future research should examine the feasibility and potential effectiveness of interventions delivered via this modality.

DOI 10.1071/HE15095
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Kathryn L Reilly, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2017 Borde R, Smith JJ, Sutherland R, Nathan N, Lubans DR, 'Methodological considerations and impact of school-based interventions on objectively measured physical activity in adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 18 476-490 (2017) [C1]

Objective: The aims of this systematic review and meta-analysis are (i) to determine the impact of school-based interventions on objectively measured physical activity among adole... [more]

Objective: The aims of this systematic review and meta-analysis are (i) to determine the impact of school-based interventions on objectively measured physical activity among adolescents and (ii) to examine accelerometer methods and decision rule reporting in previous interventions. Methods: A systematic search was performed to identify randomized controlled trials targeting adolescents (age: =10¿years), conducted in the school setting, and reporting objectively measured physical activity. Random effects meta-analyses were conducted to determine the pooled effects of previous interventions on total and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Potential moderators of intervention effects were also explored. Results: Thirteen articles met the inclusion criteria, and twelve were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled effects were small and non-significant for both total physical activity (standardized mean difference¿=¿0.02 [95% confidence interval¿=¿-0.13 to 0.18]) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (standardized mean difference¿=¿0.24 [95% confidence interval¿=¿-0.08 to 0.56]). Sample age and accelerometer compliance were significant moderators for total physical activity, with a younger sample and higher compliance associated with larger effects. Conclusion: Previous school-based physical activity interventions targeting adolescents have been largely unsuccessful, particularly for older adolescents. There is a need for more high-quality research using objective monitoring in this population. Future interventions should comply with best-practice recommendations regarding physical activity monitoring protocols.

DOI 10.1111/obr.12517
Citations Scopus - 58Web of Science - 63
Co-authors Jordan Smith, David Lubans, Nicole Nathan
2017 Hollis JL, Sutherland R, Williams AJ, Campbell E, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, et al., 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity levels in secondary school physical education lessons', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 14 (2017) [C1]

Background: Schools play an important role in physical activity promotion for adolescents. The systematic review aimed to determine the proportion of secondary (middle and high) s... [more]

Background: Schools play an important role in physical activity promotion for adolescents. The systematic review aimed to determine the proportion of secondary (middle and high) school physical education (PE) lesson time that students spend in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and to assess if MVPA was moderated by school level (middle and high school), type of physical activity measurement and type of PE activities. Methods: A systematic search of nine electronic databases was conducted (PROSPERO2014:CRD42014009649). Studies were eligible if they were published between 2005 and 2014; written in English; assessed MVPA in PE lessons of secondary (middle and high) school students; and used a quantitative MVPA measure (i.e., accelerometry, heart rate monitoring, pedometers or observational measures). Two reviewers examined the retrieved articles, assessed risk of bias, and performed data extraction. Random effects meta-analysis was used to calculate a pooled estimate of the percent of PE lesson time spent in MVPA and to assess moderator effects where data allowed. Results: The search yielded 5,132 potentially relevant articles; 28 articles representing 25 studies (7 middle and 18 high school) from seven countries were included. Twelve studies measured MVPA through observational measures, seven used accelerometers, five used heart rate monitors and four used pedometers (including three studies using a mix of measures). Meta-analysis of 15 studies found that overall, students spent a mean (95% CI) of 40.5% (34.8-46.2%) of PE in MVPA. Middle school students spent 48.6% (41.3-55.9%) of the lesson in MVPA (n=5 studies) and high school students 35.9% (28.3-43.6%) (n=10 studies). Studies measuring MVPA using accelerometers (n=5) showed that students spent 34.7% (25.1-44.4%) of the lesson in MVPA, while 44.4% (38.3-50.5%) was found for lessons assessed via observation (n=9), 43.1% (24.3-61.9%) of the lesson for a heart rate based study, and 35.9% (31.0-40.8%) for a pedometer-measured study. Conclusions: The proportion of PE spent in MVPA (40.5%) is below the US Centre for Disease Control and Prevention and the UK Associations for Physical Education recommendation of 50%. Findings differed according to the method of MVPA assessment. Additional strategies and intervention research are needed to build more active lesson time in PE.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0504-0
Citations Scopus - 73Web of Science - 71
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, David Lubans, Jenna Hollis, Nicole Nathan, John Wiggers, Philip Morgan
2017 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Janssen LM, Wiggers J, Reilly K, Delaney T, et al., 'Multi-strategic intervention to enhance implementation of healthy canteen policy: a randomised controlled trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 12 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0537-9
Citations Scopus - 45Web of Science - 45
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Kathryn L Reilly, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, Megan Freund, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Christopher Oldmeadow
2016 Nathan N, Yoong SL, Sutherland R, Reilly K, Delaney T, Janssen L, et al., 'Effectiveness of a multicomponent intervention to enhance implementation of a healthy canteen policy in Australian primary schools: a randomised controlled trial', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 13 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0431-5
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 33
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Kathryn L Reilly
2016 Sutherland RL, Campbell EM, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Nathan NK, Wolfenden L, et al., 'The Physical Activity 4 Everyone Cluster Randomized Trial: 2-Year Outcomes of a School Physical Activity Intervention Among Adolescents.', Am J Prev Med, 51 195-205 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2016.02.020
Citations Scopus - 50Web of Science - 46
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Jenna Hollis, Nicole Nathan, Philip Morgan, David Lubans, Christopher Oldmeadow, John Wiggers
2016 Yoong SL, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Reilly K, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'CAFE: a multicomponent audit and feedback intervention to improve implementation of healthy food policy in primary school canteens: a randomised controlled trial', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 13 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0453-z
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Kathryn L Reilly, John Wiggers, Christopher Oldmeadow, Serene Yoong, Christopher M Williams
2016 Sutherland R, Reeves P, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Nathan N, et al., 'Cost effectiveness of a multi-component school-based physical activity intervention targeting adolescents: The 'Physical Activity 4 Everyone' cluster randomized trial', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 13 (2016) [C1]

Background: Few school-based interventions have been successful in reducing physical activity decline and preventing overweight and obesity in adolescent populations. As a result,... [more]

Background: Few school-based interventions have been successful in reducing physical activity decline and preventing overweight and obesity in adolescent populations. As a result, few cost effectiveness analyses have been reported. The aim of this paper is to report the cost and cost effectiveness of the Physical Activity 4 Everyone (PA4E1) intervention which was a multi-component intervention implemented in secondary schools located in low-income communities. Cost effectiveness was assessed using both the physical activity and weight status trial outcomes. Methods: Intervention and Study Design: The PA4E1 cluster randomised controlled trial was implemented in 10 Australian secondary schools (5 intervention: 5 control) and consisted of intervention schools receiving seven physical activity promotion strategies and six additional strategies that supported school implementation of the intervention components. Costs associated with physical activity strategies, and intervention implementation strategies within the five intervention schools were estimated and compared to the costs of usual physical activity practices of schools in the control group. The total cost of implementing the intervention was estimated from a societal perspective, based on the number of enrolled students in the target grade at the start of the intervention (Grade 7, n = 837). Economic Outcomes: The economic analysis outcomes were cost and incremental cost effectiveness ratios for the following: minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day gained, MET hours gained per person/day; Body Mass Index (BMI) unit avoided; and 10 % reduction in BMI z-score. Results: The intervention cost AUD $329,952 over 24 months, or AUD$394 per student in the intervention group. This resulted in a cost effectiveness ratio of AUD$56 ($35-$147) per additional minute of MVPA, AUD$1 ($0.6-$2.7) per MET hour gained per person per day, AUD$1408 ($788-$6,570) per BMI unit avoided, and AUD$563 ($282-$3,942) per 10 % reduction in BMI z-score. Conclusion: PA4E1 is a cost effective intervention for increasing the physical activity levels and reducing unhealthy weight gain in adolescence, a period in which physical activity typically declines. Additional modelling could explore the potential economic impact of the intervention on morbidity and mortality. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000382875.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0418-2
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 23
Co-authors John Wiggers, Philip Morgan, David Lubans, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Morgan P, Abdul Razak L, Jones J, Finch M, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of multiple periods of outdoor free-play to increase moderate-to-vigorous physical activity among 3 to 6 year old children attending childcare: study protocol', BMC Public Health, (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3604-x
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2016 Hollis JL, Sutherland R, Campbell L, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Nathan N, et al., 'Effects of a 'school-based' physical activity intervention on adiposity in adolescents from economically disadvantaged communities: secondary outcomes of the 'Physical Activity 4 Everyone' RCT', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBESITY, 40 1486-1493 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2016.107
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Philip Morgan, John Wiggers, David Lubans, Luke Wolfenden, Jenna Hollis, Nicole Nathan, Christopher Oldmeadow
2016 Hollis JL, Williams AJ, Sutherland R, Campbell E, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, et al., 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity levels in elementary school physical education lessons', Preventive Medicine, 86 34-54 (2016)

Objective: To examine elementary school students&apos; moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) levels during physical education (PE) lessons. Methods: A systematic search of... [more]

Objective: To examine elementary school students' moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) levels during physical education (PE) lessons. Methods: A systematic search of nine electronic databases was conducted (PROSPERO2014:CRD42014009649). Studies were eligible if they were in English; published between 2005-April 2014; assessed MVPA levels in PE lessons of elementary school children (aged four-12 years); and used an objective MVPA measure. Two reviewers retrieved articles, assessed risk of bias, and performed data extraction. The findings were synthesised using a meta-analysis. Results: The search yielded 5132 articles. Thirteen studies from nine countries met the inclusion criteria. Eight studies measured MVPA through observational measures, five used accelerometry and one used heart rate monitoring. The percentage of PE lesson time spent in MVPA ranged between 11.4-88.5%. Meta-analysis of seven studies (direct observations; 4 accelerometers) found that children spent a mean (95% CI) 44.8 (28.2-61.4)% of PE lesson time in MVPA. When measured using direct observation and accelerometers, children spent 57.6 (47.3-68.2) and 32.6 (5.9-59.3)% of PE lesson time in MVPA, respectively. The review has limitations; the search strategy was restricted to studies in English; theses, dissertations and conference abstracts were excluded; and six studies that provided insufficient data were excluded from the meta-analysis. Conclusion: MVPA levels during elementary school PE lessons do not meet the United States Centre for Disease Control and Prevention and the United Kingdom's Association of Physical Education recommendation (50% of lesson time), but is higher than estimated in the previous review (34.2%). Interventions to increase MVPA in PE lessons are needed.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.11.018
Citations Scopus - 107Web of Science - 99
Co-authors Philip Morgan, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, David Lubans, Jenna Hollis, Nicole Nathan
2016 Reilly K, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Sutherland R, Wyse R, Yoong SL, 'Validity of four measures in assessing school canteen menu compliance with state-based healthy canteen policy', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 27 215-221 (2016) [C1]

Issue addressed In order to assess the impact of healthy school canteen policies on food availability for students, valid methods of measuring compliance are needed that can be ap... [more]

Issue addressed In order to assess the impact of healthy school canteen policies on food availability for students, valid methods of measuring compliance are needed that can be applied at scale. The aim of this study is to assess the validity and direct cost of four methods to assess policy compliance: 1) principal and 2) canteen manager self-report via a computer-assisted telephone interview; and 3) comprehensive and 4) quick menu audits by dietitians, compared with observations. Methods A cross-sectional study took place in the Hunter region of NSW, Australia, in a sample of 38 primary schools that had previously participated in a randomised controlled trial to improve healthy canteen policy compliance. Policy compliance was assessed using the four methods specified above. Percentage agreement, kappa, sensitivity and specificity compared with observations was calculated together with the direct time taken and costs of each method. Indirect costs (including set-up costs) for all measures have not been included. Results Agreement with observations was substantial for the quick menu audit (kappa=0.68), and moderate for the comprehensive menu audit (kappa=0.42). Principal and canteen manager self-report resulted in poor agreement and low specificity with the gold standard. The self-reported measures had the lowest cost, followed by the quick menu audit and lastly the comprehensive menu audit. Conclusion The quick menu audit represents a valid and potentially low-cost method of supporting policy implementation at scale. So what? This study demonstrates that a quick menu audit represents a valid measure of undertaking assessment of school canteen policy compliance at a population level.

DOI 10.1071/HE16053
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Nicole Nathan, Kathryn L Reilly, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Sutherland R, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Nathan N, et al., 'Physical education in secondary schools located in low-income communities: Physical activity levels, lesson context and teacher interaction', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 19 135-141 (2016) [C1]

Objectives: Physical education (PE) plays an important role in contributing to students&apos; physical activity (PA); however, moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) within PE is lower th... [more]

Objectives: Physical education (PE) plays an important role in contributing to students' physical activity (PA); however, moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) within PE is lower than recommended. Little is known about the PA levels of students from disadvantaged schools within PE. This study aimed to describe: (i) the PA levels of students from disadvantaged secondary schools during PE lessons, (ii) the lesson context and teacher interactions occurring during PE, and (iii) the associations between teacher, school or PE lesson characteristics with student physical activity levels in PE. Design: Cross-sectional study of 100 Grade 7 PE lessons across 10 secondary schools. Methods: System for observing fitness instruction time (SOFIT) was used to assess student PA, lesson context, and teacher interaction. Teacher and school characteristics were collected via survey. Mean proportion of lesson time was used to describe PA, lesson context and teacher interaction. Associations between each outcome variable and each characteristic were examined using 2-sample t-tests, ANOVAs and linear regression. Results: Thirty-nine percent of PE lesson was spent in MVPA, and less than 10% spent in VA. Lessons in schools in urban areas included significantly more MVPA than rural areas (P = 0.04). Male teachers and more experienced teachers conducted lessons with significantly more VA than female and less experienced teachers (P = 0.04 and 0.02). MVPA was also higher in lessons conducted by more experienced teachers. Conclusions: PA during PE lessons within disadvantaged secondary schools is below international recommendations. Male teachers, more experienced teachers and schools in urban regions teach more active lessons.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2014.12.003
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Philip Morgan, John Wiggers, David Lubans, Nicole Nathan
2016 Sutherland R, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Nathan N, et al., ''Physical activity 4 everyone' school-based intervention to prevent decline in adolescent physical activity levels: 12 month (mid-intervention) report on a cluster randomised trial', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 50 488-495 (2016) [C1]

Background: Adolescence is a recognised period of physical activity decline, particularly among low-income communities. We report the 12-month (midpoint) effects of a 2-year multi... [more]

Background: Adolescence is a recognised period of physical activity decline, particularly among low-income communities. We report the 12-month (midpoint) effects of a 2-year multicomponent physical activity intervention implemented in disadvantaged secondary schools. Methods: A cluster randomised trial was undertaken in 10 secondary schools located in disadvantaged areas in New South Wales, Australia. Students in Grade 7 were recruited, with follow-up in Grade 8. The intervention was guided by socioecological theory and included seven physical activity strategies, and six implementation adoption strategies. The primary outcome was mean minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day assessed using Actigraph GT3X accelerometers. Outcome data were analysed using repeated measures linear mixed models. Results: At baseline, 1150 (93%) students participated in the data collection (mean age 12 years, 48% boys) and 1050 (79%) students participated at 12-month follow-up. By the 12-month follow-up, the six implementation adoption strategies had been used to support schools to deliver four of the seven physical activity elements. There was a significant group-by-time interaction for mean minutes of MVPA per day in favour of the intervention group (adjusted difference between groups at follow-up=3.85 min, 95% CI (0.79 to 6.91), p=0.01), including significantly more vigorous physical activity (2.45 min, p=0.01), equating to 27 min more MVPA per week. Summary: At 12-month follow-up, the intervention had reduced the decline in physical activity among adolescents from disadvantaged schools. The intervention may assist students to meet physical activity guidelines.

DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2014-094523
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 39
Co-authors Jenna Hollis, Luke Wolfenden, David Lubans, John Wiggers, Philip Morgan, Nicole Nathan
2015 Williams CM, Nathan NK, Wyse RJ, Yoong SL, Delaney T, Wiggers J, et al., 'Strategies for enhancing the implementation of school-based policies or practices targeting risk factors for chronic disease', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2015 (2015)

This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The primary aims of the review are to examine the effectiveness of strategies aiming to ... [more]

This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The primary aims of the review are to examine the effectiveness of strategies aiming to improve the implementation of school-based policies, programs or practices that aim to promote healthy or reduce unhealthy behaviours relating to child diet, physical activity, obesity, or tobacco or alcohol use. Secondary objectives of the review are to: examine the effectiveness of implementation strategies on health behavioural (e.g. fruit and vegetable consumption) and anthropometric outcomes (e.g. BMI, weight); describe the impact of such strategies on the knowledge, skills or attitudes of stakeholders involved in implementing health promoting policies, programs or practices; describe the cost or cost effectiveness of such strategies; describe any unintended adverse effects of strategies on schools, school staff or children.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD011677
Citations Scopus - 65
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Rebecca Hodder, Christopher M Williams, Megan Freund, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Wolfenden L, Finch M, Nathan N, Weaver N, Wiggers J, Yoong SL, et al., 'Factors associated with early childhood education and care service implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in Australia: a cross-sectional study', Translational Behavioral Medicine, 5 327-334 (2015) [C1]

Many early childhood education and care (ECEC) services fail to implement recommended policies and practices supportive of healthy eating and physical activity. The purpose of thi... [more]

Many early childhood education and care (ECEC) services fail to implement recommended policies and practices supportive of healthy eating and physical activity. The purpose of this study was to assess whether certain theoretically-based factors are associated with implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in a sample of ECEC services. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with Service Managers of ECEC services. The survey assessed the operational characteristics, policy, and practice implementation, and 13 factors were suggested by Damschroder¿s Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research to impede or promote implementation. Logistic regression analyses found a significant association between implementation factor score and full implementation (OR 1.38; 95% CI 1.18¿1.61; p = <0.01), indicating that for every one point increase in implementation score, ECEC services were 38¿% more likely to be fully implementing the policies and practices. The findings highlight the opportunities for improving implementation of obesity prevention interventions in this setting by developing interventions that address such factors.

DOI 10.1007/s13142-015-0319-y
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Natasha Weaver
2015 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Williams CM, Yoong SL, Lecathelinais C, Bell AC, et al., 'Adoption of obesity prevention policies and practices by Australian primary schools: 2006 to 2013', HEALTH EDUCATION RESEARCH, 30 262-271 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyu068
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan
2015 Yoong SL, Nathan NK, Wyse RJ, Preece SJ, Williams CM, Sutherland RL, et al., 'Assessment of the School Nutrition Environment: A Study in Australian Primary School Canteens', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 49 215-222 (2015) [C1]

Introduction Schools represent a valuable setting for interventions to improve children&apos;s diets, as they offer structured opportunities for ongoing intervention. Modification... [more]

Introduction Schools represent a valuable setting for interventions to improve children's diets, as they offer structured opportunities for ongoing intervention. Modifications to the school food environment can increase purchasing of healthier foods and improve children's diets. This study examines the availability of healthy food and drinks, implementation of pricing and promotion strategies in Australian primary school canteens, and whether these varied by school characteristics. Methods In 2012 and 2013, canteen managers of primary schools in the Hunter New England region of New South Wales reported via telephone interview the pricing and promotion strategies implemented in their canteens to encourage healthier food and drink purchases. A standardized audit of canteen menus was performed to assess the availability of healthy options. Data were analyzed in 2014. Results Overall, 203 (79%) canteen managers completed the telephone interview and 170 provided menus. Twenty-nine percent of schools had menus that primarily consisted of healthier food and drinks, and 11% did not sell unhealthy foods. Less than half reported including only healthy foods in meal deals (25%), labeling menus (43%), and having a comprehensive canteen policy (22%). A significantly larger proportion of schools in high socioeconomic areas (OR=3.0) and large schools (OR=4.4) had primarily healthy options on their menus. School size and being a Government school were significantly associated with implementation of some pricing and promotion strategies. Conclusions There is a need to monitor canteen environments to inform policy development and research. Future implementation research to improve the food environments of disadvantaged schools in particular is warranted.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2015.02.002
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2015 Colin Bell A, Davies L, Finch M, Wolfenden L, Francis JL, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, 'An implementation intervention to encourage healthy eating in centre-based child-care services: Impact of the Good for Kids Good for Life programme', Public Health Nutrition, 18 1610-1619 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1368980013003364
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 33
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2015 Williams CM, Nathan N, Delaney T, Yoong SL, Wiggers J, Preece S, et al., 'CAFÉ: A multicomponent audit and feedback intervention to improve implementation of healthy food policy in primary school canteens: Protocol of a randomised controlled trial', BMJ Open, 5 (2015) [C1]

Introduction: A number of jurisdictions internationally have policies requiring schools to implement healthy canteens. However, many schools have not implemented such policies. On... [more]

Introduction: A number of jurisdictions internationally have policies requiring schools to implement healthy canteens. However, many schools have not implemented such policies. One reason for this isthat current support interventions cannot feasibly be delivered to large numbers of schools. A promising solution to support population-wide implementation of healthy canteen practices is audit and feedback. The effectiveness of this strategy has, however, not previously been assessed in school canteens. This study aims to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an audit and feedback intervention, delivered by telephone and email, in increasing the number of school canteens that have menus complying with a government healthy-canteen policy. Methods and analysis: Seventy-two schools, across the Hunter New England Local Health District in New South Wales Australia, will be randomised to receive the multicomponent audit and feedback implementation intervention or usual support. The intervention will consist of between two and four canteen menu audits over 12 months. Each menu audit will be followed by two modes of feedback: a written feedback report and a verbal feedback/support via telephone. Primary outcomes, assessed by dieticians blind to group status and as recommended by the Fresh Tastes @ School policy, are: (1) the proportion of schools with a canteen menu containing foods or beverages restricted for sale, and; (2) the proportion of schools that have a menu which contains more than 50% of foods classified as healthy canteen items. Secondary outcomes are: the proportion of menu items in each category ('red', 'amber' and 'green'), canteen profitability and cost-effectiveness. Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval has been obtained by from the Hunter New England Human Research Ethics Committee and the University of Newcastle Human Research Ethics Committee. The findings will be disseminated in usual forums, including peer-reviewed publication and conference presentations.

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006969
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Kathryn L Reilly
2014 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Williams CM, Delaney T, Reilly KL, Freund M, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to increase the implementation of a healthy canteen policy in Australian primary schools: study protocol.', Implement Sci, 9 147 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-014-0147-3
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 21
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Nicole Nathan, Kathryn L Reilly, Christopher M Williams, Megan Freund, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2013 Sutherland R, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Nathan N, et al., 'A cluster randomised trial of a school-based intervention to prevent decline in adolescent physical activity levels: study protocol for the 'Physical Activity 4 Everyone' trial', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 13 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-57
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, David Lubans, John Wiggers
2013 Bell AC, Wolfenden L, Sutherland R, Coggan L, Young K, Fitzgerald M, et al., 'Harnessing the power of advertising to prevent childhood obesity', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 10 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-10-114
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers
2012 Nathan NK, Wolfenden L, Bell AC, Wyse R, Morgan PJ, Butler MT, et al., 'Effectiveness of a multi-strategy intervention in increasing the implementation of vegetable and fruit breaks by Australian primary schools: A non-randomized controlled trial', BMC Public Health, 12 651 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-12-651
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Philip Morgan, John Wiggers, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden
2011 Wolfenden L, Neve M, Farrell L, Lecathelinais C, Bell C, Milat A, et al., 'Physical activity policies and practices of childcare centres in Australia', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 47 73-76 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1754.2010.01738.x
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 41
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2008 Sutherland RL, Finch M, Harrison M, Collins CE, 'Higher prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity in association with gender and socioeconomic status in the Hunter region of New South Wales', Nutrition & Dietetics, 65 192-197 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1747-0080.2008.00287.x
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Clare Collins
2007 Finch M, Begley A, Sutherland RL, Butler MT, Collins CE, 'Development and reproducibility of a tool to assess school food-purchasing practices and lifestyle habits of Australian primary school-aged children', Nutrition and Dietetics, 64 86-92 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1747-0080.2007.00148.x
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Clare Collins
2007 Horvath LG, Lelliott JE, Kench JG, Lee CS, Williams ED, Saunders DN, et al., 'Secreted frizzled-related protein 4 inhibits proliferation and metastatic potential in prostate cancer', Prostate, 67 1081-1090 (2007)

BACKGROUND. Secreted frizzled-related proteins (sFRP4) inhibits Wnt signaling and thus cellular proliferation in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells in vitro. However, incr... [more]

BACKGROUND. Secreted frizzled-related proteins (sFRP4) inhibits Wnt signaling and thus cellular proliferation in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells in vitro. However, increased expression of membranous sFRP4 is associated with a good prognosis in human localized androgen-dependent prostate cancer, suggesting a role for sFRP4 in early stage disease. Here, we investigated the phenotype of sFRP4 overexpression in an androgen-dependent prostate cancer model. METHODS. An sFRP4-overexpressing androgen-dependent (LNCaP) prostate cancer model was established to assess changes in cellular proliferation, the expression, and subcellular localization of adhesion molecules and cellular invasiveness, and compared with the findings in sFRP4-overexpressing androgen-independent cells (PC3). RESULTS. sFRP4 overexpression in both cell line models resulted in a morphologic change to a more epithelioid cell type with increased localization of ß-catenin and cadherins (E-cadherin in LNCaP, N-cadherin in PC3) to the cell membrane. Functionally, sFRP4 overexpression was associated with a decreased rate of proliferation (P = 0.0005), decreased anchorage-independent growth (P < 0.001), and decreased invasiveness in PC3 cells (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, increased membranous sFRP4 expression was associated with increased membranous ß-catenin expression (P = 0.02) in a cohort of 224 localized human androgen-dependent prostate cancers. CONCLUSIONS. These data suggest that sFRP4 is an inhibitor of prostate cancer growth and invasion in vitro independent of androgen receptor (AR) signaling with correlative evidence in human androgen-dependent disease suggesting similar changes in the clinical setting. Consequently, potential therapeutic strategies to modulate Wnt signaling by sFRP4 will be relevant to both localized androgen-dependent prostate cancer and advanced metastatic disease. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

DOI 10.1002/pros.20607
Citations Scopus - 42
2007 Kohonen-Corish MRJ, Sigglekow ND, Susanto J, Chapuis PH, Bokey EL, Dent OF, et al., 'Promoter methylation of the mutated in colorectal cancer gene is a frequent early event in colorectal cancer', Oncogene, 26 4435-4441 (2007)

The mutated in colorectal cancer (MCC) gene is in close linkage with the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene on chromosome 5, in a region of frequent loss of heterozygosity in c... [more]

The mutated in colorectal cancer (MCC) gene is in close linkage with the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene on chromosome 5, in a region of frequent loss of heterozygosity in colorectal cancer. The role of MCC in carcinogenesis, however, has not been extensively analysed, and functional studies are emerging, which implicate it as a candidate tumor suppressor gene. The aim of this study was to examine loss of MCC expression due to promoter hypermethylation and its clinicopathologic significance in colorectal cancer. Correspondence of MCC methylation with gene silencing was demonstrated using bisulfite sequencing, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. MCC methylation was detected in 45-52% of 187 primary colorectal cancers. There was a striking association with CDKN2A methylation (P<0.0001), the CpG island methylator phenotype (P<0.0001) and the BRAF V600E mutation (P<0.0001). MCC methylation was also more common (P=0.0084) in serrated polyps than in adenomas. In contrast, there was no association with APC methylation or KRAS mutations. This study demonstrates for the first time that MCC methylation is a frequent change during colorectal carcinogenesis. Furthermore, MCC methylation is significantly associated with a distinct spectrum of precursor lesions, which are suggested to give rise to cancers via the serrated neoplasia pathway. © 2007 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1038/sj.onc.1210210
Citations Scopus - 55
2006 Finch M, Sutherland RL, Harrison M, Collins CE, 'Canteen purchasing practices of year 1-6 primary school children and association with SES and weight status', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 30 247-251 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2006.tb00865.x
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 40
Co-authors Clare Collins
Delaney T, Mclaughlin M, Hall A, Yoong SL, Brown A, O'Brien K, et al., 'Associations between digital health intervention engagement and dietary intake: A Systematic Review (Preprint)
DOI 10.2196/preprints.26698
Co-authors Julia Dray, Luke Wolfenden, Jenna Hollis, Serene Yoong, Courtney Barnes, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Alix Hall
Mclaughlin M, Delaney T, Hall A, Byaruhanga J, Mackie P, Grady A, et al., 'Associations Between Digital Health Intervention Engagement, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behavior: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis (Preprint)
DOI 10.2196/preprints.23180
Co-authors Alice Grady, Kathryn L Reilly, Alix Hall, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
Brown A, Barnes C, Byaruhanga J, McLaughlin M, Hodder RK, Booth D, et al., 'Effectiveness of Technology-Enabled Knowledge Translation Strategies in Improving the Use of Research in Public Health: Systematic Review (Preprint)
DOI 10.2196/preprints.17274
Co-authors Courtney Barnes, Nicole Nathan, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc, Rebecca Hodder, Luke Wolfenden
Sutherland R, Brown A, Nathan N, Yoong S, Janssen L, Chooi A, et al., 'A Multicomponent mHealth-Based Intervention (SWAP IT) to Decrease the Consumption of Discretionary Foods Packed in School Lunchboxes: Type I Effectiveness Implementation Hybrid Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial (Preprint)
DOI 10.2196/preprints.25256
Co-authors Andrew Searles, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, John Wiggers, Kathryn L Reilly, Christopher Oldmeadow, Serene Yoong
Wyse R, Delaney T, Stacey F, Lecathelinais C, Ball K, Zoetemeyer R, et al., 'The long-term effectiveness of a multi-strategy behavioural intervention to increase the nutritional quality of primary school students online lunch orders: 18-month follow-up of the Click & Crunch cluster randomized controlled trial (Preprint)', Journal of Medical Internet Research,
DOI 10.2196/31734
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse
Show 105 more journal articles

Conference (30 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Delaney T, Wolfenden L, Yoong SL, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, Wyse R, 'A cluster randomised controlled trial of a consumer behaviour intervention to improve the nutritional content of food purchases from online canteens: Subgroup Analyses by frequency of use and student grade', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2021)
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2020 Ooi JY, Yoong SL, Sutherland R, Wrigley J, Lecathelinais C, Reilly K, et al., 'Prevalence of current school-level nutrition policies and practices of secondary schools in NSW, Australia', HEALTH PROMOTION JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA (2020)
DOI 10.1002/hpja.357
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Kathryn L Reilly
2019 Sutherland R, Reynolds R, Janssen L, Muddle R, Chooi A, Brown A, et al., 'Assessing the Potential Effectiveness of Dissemination Strategies on Uptake of an Evidence-Based Program to Improve Packing of Healthy Student Lunchboxes', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2019)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden
2019 McLaughlin M, Brown A, Elton B, Young S, Wrigley J, Barnes C, et al., 'Bridging the Gap Between Research and Practice: A System for Knowledge Translation', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2019)
2018 Sutherland R, Nathan N, Lubans D, Butler P, McCarthy N, Desmet C, et al., 'Effectiveness of a randomized controlled trial to scale up an efficacious school-based intervention to improving children's MVPA', Effectiveness of a randomized controlled trial to scale up an efficacious school-based intervention to improving children's MVPA., London (2018)
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2018-0535
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, David Lubans
2018 Mclaughlin M, McKenzie T, Sutherland R, Campbell E, Nathan N, Gillham K, et al., 'Results of a systematic and theoretical approach to scaling-up an efficacious school-based physical activity intervention for adolescents: Physical Activity for Everyone ', Results of a systematic and theoretical approach to scaling-up an efficacious school-based physical activity intervention for adolescents: Physical Activity for Everyone , London (2018)
DOI 10.13140/RG.2.2.30218.72643
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Nicole Nathan
2018 Nathan N, Yoong SL, Reilly K, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Increasing Australian schools' implementation of a mandatory state-wide school healthy food policy: results of three randomised-controlled trials', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE (2018)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Kathryn L Reilly
2018 Nathan N, Sutherland R, Beauchamp M, Hulteen R, Wolfenden L, Lubans D, Cohen K, 'Implementation of an elementary school peer-teching physical activity program: learnings from a non-randomised trial', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY & HEALTH (2018)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, David Lubans, Nicole Nathan
2018 Nathan N, Elton B, Babic M, McCarthy N, Sutherland R, Presseau J, et al., 'A systematic review of barriers and facilitators to the implementation of physical activity policies in schools', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY & HEALTH (2018)
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2018 Delaney T, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, Rissel C, Wyse R, 'A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial of a Consumer Behavior Intervention to Improve Healthy Food Purchases From Online Canteens', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Citations Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2018 Brown A, Sutherland R, Nathan N, Lecathelinais C, Reynolds R, Janssen L, et al., 'Assessing the Effectiveness, Feasibility and Acceptability of an m-Health Intervention to Improve the NutritionalQuality of Primary School Aged Children's Lunchboxes', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, John Wiggers
2018 Pond N, Finch M, Yoong S, Jones J, Sutherland R, Wolfenden L, Kingsland M, 'Using the Behavior Change Wheel to Inform an App-Based Intervention to Increase Parents' Packing of Healthy Lunchbox Foods for Children Attending Center-Based Childcare', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Nathan N, Yoong SL, Reilly K, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Increasing Australian schools' implementation of a mandatory state-wide school healthy food policy: results of three randomised-controlled trials', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE (2017)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Kathryn L Reilly
2016 Sutherland R, Hollis J, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Nathan N, et al., 'EFFECTS OF A SCHOOL-BASED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTION ON ADIPOSITY IN ADOLESCENTS FROM ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED COMMUNITIES: 'PHYSICAL ACTIVITY 4 EVERYONE' RCT.', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Nicole Nathan, David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2016 Finch M, Nathan N, Yoong S, Sutherland R, Seward K, Reilly K, et al., 'SUPPORTING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF STATE NUTRITION GUIDELINES AND POLICIES IN SCHOOLS AND CHILDCARE: APPLICATION OF THE THEORETICAL DOMAINS FRAMEWORK', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Kathryn L Reilly
2016 Yoong S, Nathan N, Finch M, Sutherland R, Seward K, Reilly K, et al., 'IMPLEMENTING STATE NUTRITION GUIDELINES AND POLICIES IN SCHOOLS AND CENTRE BASED CHILDCARE: BARRIERS AND ENABLERS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Kathryn L Reilly, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Nathan N, Yoong S, Reilly K, Delaney T, Janssen L, Sutherland R, et al., 'THEORY-INFORMED INTERVENTIONS TO INCREASE IMPLEMENTATION OF A MANDATORY HEALTHY FOOD POLICY IN SCHOOLS. APPLICATION OF THE THEORETICAL DOMAINS FRAMEWORK.', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Kathryn L Reilly
2016 Wyse R, Yoong SL, Dodds P, Campbell L, Delaney T, Nathan N, et al., 'THE POTENTIAL OF ONLINE CANTEENS TO DELIVER PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION INTERVENTIONS TO SCHOOL COMMUNITIES', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Kathryn L Reilly, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rebecca Wyse
2016 Nathan N, Sutherland R, Gillham K, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'CREATING HEALTHY ACTIVE LEADERS FOR KIDS (CHALK): PRINCIPALS AND TEACHERS ACCEPTABILITY OF A TEACHER'S HEALTH INITIATIVE', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Nicole Nathan
2016 Nathan N, Yoong S, Williams C, Reilly K, Delaney T, Sutherland R, et al., 'INCREASING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A STATE-WIDE HEALTHY CANTEEN POLICY: RESULTS OF THREE RANDOMISED-CONTROLLED TRIALS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Kathryn L Reilly, Serene Yoong, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2016 Sutherland RR, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, et al., 'PHYSICAL ACTIVITY 4 EVERYONE' CLUSTER RCT: 24-MONTH PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OUTCOMES OF A SCHOOL-BASED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTION TARGETING ADOLESCENTS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Luke Wolfenden, David Lubans, John Wiggers, Christopher Oldmeadow, Nicole Nathan
2016 Sutherland R, Reeves P, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Nathan N, et al., 'IS A SCHOOL-BASED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTION TARGETING SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS COST EFFECTIVE?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Philip Morgan, Luke Wolfenden, David Lubans, John Wiggers
2015 Sutherland RL, Campbell L, Lubans D, Morgan P, Oakley A, Nathan N, et al., 'Mid-intervention findings from the Physical Activity 4 Every1 trial: a cluster RCT in secondary schools located in low-income communities', Edinburgh, UK (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Nicole Nathan, John Wiggers, David Lubans, Luke Wolfenden
2014 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Williams CM, Yoong SL, Lecathelinais C, Bell AC, et al., 'Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Australian Primary Schools 2006-2013: How Far Have We Really Come?', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY & HEALTH, Toronto, CANADA (2014)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Nicole Nathan, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2014 Wolfenden L, Finch M, Yoong SL, Nathan N, Waever N, Jones J, et al., 'FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE IMPLEMENTATION OF OBESITY PREVENTION PRACTICES IN AUSTRALIAN CHILDCARE SERVICES', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, Brainerd, MN (2014)
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse
2014 Wiggers JH, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Williams CM, Yoong SZ, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'OBESITY PREVENTION POLICIES AND PRACTICES IN AUST RALIAN PRIMARY SCHOOLS 2006-2013: HOW FAR HAVE WE COME?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2014)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rebecca Wyse
2014 Sutherland R, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Nathan N, et al., 'Objectively Measured Sedentary Behavior in Secondary School Physical Education Lessons', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY & HEALTH, Toronto, CANADA (2014)
Co-authors John Wiggers, David Lubans, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Philip Morgan
2009 Wolfenden L, Hutchesson MJ, Farrell L, Lecathelinais LC, Sutherland RL, Bell C, et al., 'Physical activity policies and practices in childcare centres: A population based study', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2007 Finch M, Sutherland RL, Collins CE, 'School food purchasing patterns of Hunter primary school children', Program and Abstracts of the 23rd National Dietitians Association of Australia Conference, Perth (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins
2005 Sutherland RL, Finch M, Harrison M, Collins CE, 'Obesity prevalence is greater amongst children from a low SES background and greater in females', Proceedings of the 36th PHAA Conference, Perth (2005) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins
Show 27 more conferences

Other (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
Mclaughlin M, Delaney T, Hall A, Byaruhanga J, Mackie P, Grady A, et al., 'Correction: Associations Between Digital Health Intervention Engagement, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behavior: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis (Preprint)', JMIR Publications Inc. [O1]
DOI 10.2196/preprints.29094
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Kathryn L Reilly, Alix Hall, Alice Grady
Wyse R, Delaney T, Stacey F, Zoetemeyer R, Lecathelinais C, Lamont H, et al., 'Effectiveness of a Multistrategy Behavioral Intervention to Increase the Nutritional Quality of Primary School Students Web-Based Canteen Lunch Orders (Click & Crunch): Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial (Preprint)', JMIR Publications Inc. [O1]
DOI 10.2196/preprints.26054
Co-authors Kathryn L Reilly, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Christopher Oldmeadow, John Attia
Mclaughlin M, Duff J, McKenzie T, Campbell E, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Evaluating Digital Program Support for the Physical Activity 4 Everyone (PA4E1) School Program: Mixed Methods Study (Preprint)', JMIR Publications Inc. [O1]
DOI 10.2196/preprints.26690
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Jed Duff, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc
Wyse R, Delaney T, Stacey F, Lecathelinais C, Ball K, Zoetemeyer R, et al., 'The long-term effectiveness of a multi-strategy behavioural intervention to increase the nutritional quality of primary school students online lunch orders: 18-month follow-up of the Click & Crunch cluster randomized controlled trial (Preprint)', JMIR Publications Inc. [O1]
DOI 10.2196/preprints.31734
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden
Show 1 more other

Report (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Allman-Farinelli M, Collins CE, Williams P, Gifford J, Byron A, Truby H, et al., 'A review of the evidence to address targeted questions to inform the revision of the Australian Dietary Guidelines (Evidence Report).', National Health and Medical Research Council, 1078 (2011) [R1]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Alison A Fielding, Amanda Patterson, Surinder Baines, Tracy Burrows, Lesley Wicks, Alexis Hure
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 15
Total funding $4,468,806

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20212 grants / $1,652,692

A big problem needs a big solution: Advancing the science of scaling up chronic disease prevention interventions$1,562,692

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Doctor Rachel Sutherland
Scheme MRFF Investigator
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2025
GNo G2000052
Type Of Funding C1300 - Aust Competitive - Medical Research Future Fund
Category 1300
UON Y

Dr Aubrey Crawley WIMR Fellowship$90,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Doctor Rachel Sutherland
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2023
GNo G2100200
Type Of Funding C3300 – Aust Philanthropy
Category 3300
UON Y

20203 grants / $1,260,217

A randomised trial of an intervention to sustain schools’ implementation of a state-wide physical activity policy$1,068,909

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Nicole Nathan, Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Adrian Bauman, Chris Rissel, Patti-Jean Naylor, Professor Patti-Jean Naylor
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2026
GNo G1900842
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON Y

Harnessing digital innovation in High School Canteens to reduce cardiovascular dietary risk factors$150,000

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Doctor Rebecca Wyse, Doctor Serene Yoong, Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Rachel Sutherland
Scheme Vanguard Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1900819
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON Y

SWAP-IT Healthy lunchbox program$41,308

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Nicole Nathan
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G2001068
Type Of Funding C3300 – Aust Philanthropy
Category 3300
UON Y

20191 grants / $22,000

Disseminating an efficacious healthy eating intervention to primary schools across the Hunter New England region$22,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Rebecca Wyse, Doctor Rebecca Hodder, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Doctor Nicole Nathan
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1901537
Type Of Funding C3300 – Aust Philanthropy
Category 3300
UON Y

20185 grants / $886,606

A technology based solution to support parents to improve their child’s diet ‘Swap What’s Packed in the lunchbox: ‘SWAP-It’$499,500

Funding body: nib Foundation

Funding body nib Foundation
Project Team Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Doctor Nicole Nathan, Doctor Serene Yoong, Professor John Wiggers
Scheme Multi-Year Partnerships
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1700907
Type Of Funding C3200 – Aust Not-for Profit
Category 3200
UON Y

A randomised trial of an intervention to facilitate the implementation of evidence based secondary school physical activity practices$182,810

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Rachel Sutherland
Scheme Translating Research into Practice (TRIP) Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1700892
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON Y

Addressing the health risk behaviours of the education workforce: A program to enhance the wellbeing of primary school teachers$124,700

Funding body: Teachers Health Foundation

Funding body Teachers Health Foundation
Project Team Doctor Nicole Nathan, Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Serene Yoong, Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Doctor Rebecca Hodder, Doctor Kathryn Reilly, Doctor Elaine Toomey
Scheme Research Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1800853
Type Of Funding C3200 – Aust Not-for Profit
Category 3200
UON Y

Enhancing Teacher's Health$70,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Doctor Nicole Nathan, Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Serene Yoong, Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Doctor Rebecca Hodder, Doctor Kathryn Reilly, Doctor Elaine Toomey
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800924
Type Of Funding C2400 – Aust StateTerritoryLocal – Other
Category 2400
UON Y

SDVCRI Research Support for NHMRC TRIP Fellowship$9,596

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Rachel Sutherland
Scheme Special Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1800745
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20171 grants / $25,000

A randomised controlled trial to assess the impact of a uniform intervention on girl’s physical activity at school$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Nicole Nathan, Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Doctor Serene Yoong, Professor John Wiggers
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701511
Type Of Funding C3300 – Aust Philanthropy
Category 3300
UON Y

20161 grants / $78,030

Research to gather baseline data regarding operations and provision of healthy food and drinks of licensed school canteens$78,030

Funding body: Health Administration Corporation

Funding body Health Administration Corporation
Project Team Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Rebecca Wyse, Ms Tessa Delaney, Doctor Serene Yoong, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Ms Nicole Nathan
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600903
Type Of Funding C2300 – Aust StateTerritoryLocal – Own Purpose
Category 2300
UON Y

20132 grants / $544,261

Moving from policy to practice: A randomised trial of an implementation intervention to facilitate the adoption of a statewide healthy canteen policy$416,263

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bell, Doctor Megan Freund, Ms Karen Gillham, Doctor Libby Campbell, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Dr Nicole Nathan, Campbell, Elizabeth, Gillham, Karen, Sutherland, Rachel
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1201168
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Moving from policy to practice: A randomised trial of an implementation intervention to facilitate the adoption of a statewide healthy canteen policy$127,998

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bell, Doctor Megan Freund, Ms Karen Gillham, Doctor Libby Campbell, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Dr Nicole Nathan, Campbell, Elizabeth, Campbell, Elizabeth, Gillham, Karen, Gillham, Karen, Sutherland, Rachel, Sutherland, Rachel
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1300710
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current8

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2021 PhD Understanding the Research Impact of Implementation Research using the Framework to Assess the Impact from Translational Health Research (FAIT) and Assessing the Feasibility of Applying FAIT to Community-Based Implementation Research PhD (Public Health & BehavSci), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2019 PhD The Impact of School Uniforms on Students Physical Activity at School PhD (Public Health & BehavSci), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD An m-health nutrition intervention targeting parent packing of lunchboxes to improve the dietary intake of children attending childcare services PhD (Public Health & BehavSci), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Improving the Nutritional Quality of Australian Primary School Lunchboxes PhD (Behavioural Science), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial of an Intervention to Increase the Implementation of School Physical Activity Policies and Guidelines PhD (Public Health & BehavSci), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Addressing Sedentary Behaviour and Physical Inactivity to Reduce Chronic Disease Risk PhD (Public Health & BehavSci), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Investigating Nutrition in Adolescents and Piloting an Intervention to Reduce Adolescent Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption PhD (Behavioural Science), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD The efficacy of an online public health nutrition intervention on improving healthy food purchases from primary school canteens PhD (Behavioural Science), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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News

More than $10 million to support innovations in health service delivery

May 21, 2020

Six projects led by Hunter researchers have been successful in attracting a combined total of $10.6 million in the latest round of competitive National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) funding.

Funding success to improve health outcomes

April 12, 2018

Researchers from the University of Newcastle (UON), Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) and Hunter New England Health have been awarded more than $600,000 in National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) funding.

Dr Rachel Sutherland

Positions

MRFF Investigator Fellow
School of Medicine and Public Health
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Postdoctoral Researcher
School of Medicine and Public Health
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Focus area

Nutrition and Dietetics

Contact Details

Email rachel.sutherland@newcastle.edu.au
Phone ####

Office

Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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