Dr Jordan Smith

Dr Jordan Smith

Lecturer

School of Education

Fit for Learning

Inspired by a love of physical activity, and following in the footsteps of his father, Jordan originally came to UON to train as a PE teacher.

“I always wanted whatever work I did to be meaningful, and I felt that teaching was a way I could have a positive impact on young people.”

After spending some time working in local high schools, an unexpected opportunity came his way.

When UON’s Professor David Lubans was successful in obtaining ARC support for a school-based exercise program, a colleague at the Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition put Jordan’s name forward as a potential PhD candidate to work on the project.

“I'm really happy with where I am – my PhD was a really great experience and this field of research is a world I hadn't realised was an option for me earlier on.”

Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time

Jordan’s PhD project saw him working with high school teachers and students to implement the ‘Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time' (ATLAS) physical activity program.

The program targeted adolescent boys from low-income areas that were not meeting national physical activity or screen-time guidelines. One of the novel aspects of the program was the use of resistance training as a ‘hook’ to get boys re-engaged with physical activity.

“Most young people fail to appreciate the long-term health benefits of exercise, but teenage boys do care about being fit and strong, and having big muscles.”

“Our goal was to tap into what teenage boys value, but also to shift the focus away from aesthetics, and towards developing fitness while focusing on personal improvement.”

The program also involved an educational element to inform boys of the health hazards of inactivity, excessive screen-time, and over-consumption of sugary drinks, all of which are problematic behaviours in this population.

“I’d seen the negative health behaviours that many of these kids were demonstrating - drinking soft drinks and energy drinks at the start of the school day, and coming to lessons tired from staying up all night on screens.”

“This cluster of negative health behaviours was something I saw first-hand in schools, and I thought, this is an area where I could have a positive impact.”

One of the major aims of the 20-week ATLAS program was to reduce recreational screen-time – the recommended daily limit of which is two hours. But the researchers also measured body composition, physical activity and muscular fitness, consumption of sugary drinks and indicators of mental health.

“We saw a difference of 30 minutes of screen-time per day between boys who undertook the program and those allocated to the control group, which was maintained 10 months after the program ended”.

“Our findings highlight the drastic changes in sedentary screen viewing that occur during early adolescence, and stress the need for effective programs that can help to stem this rise”.

“We also found that boys who reduced their screen-time experienced improvements in psychological wellbeing, which in the current era of screen-media technology is a really important finding.”

Another great outcome of the research was the boys’ development and retention of resistance training movement skills.

“A core part of the program was teaching boys how to perform resistance training exercises safely and correctly, and we know from previous research that feeling confident in your physical abilities has a large impact on your motivation and intentions to continue that activity.”

“We were really happy about this finding, because it ties in nicely with the concept of physical literacy, which suggests that young people need more than just opportunities to be active. They also need to develop skills, confidence and motivation if they are going to be active for life.”

That initial research project was part of an effectiveness study designed to test the ‘real world’ feasibility of the approach. Following its success however, Jordan and the research team are now working in partnership with the Department of Education to roll out the program in high schools across the state, alongside a similar program for teen girls.

“A really important part of our approach is that we train teachers to deliver the programs – there’s no way to have an impact at scale if researchers go out and deliver things all the time”.

“If we want sustainability and to have a broader impact on the health and wellbeing of young people, we need to think of ways these programs can live on when we step away from them.”

Burn 2 Learn

Supported by the NHMRC, Jordan will soon begin work on a new project led by UON’s Professor David Lubans. The ‘Burn 2 Learn’ project involves working with senior school students to help improve not just their physical health, but also their cognitive and mental health.

“Most people know exercise is good for your mental health, but we really don't know for sure how exercise confers these benefits.”

Unlike grade 7-10 students who have mandatory Physical Education, senior students usually don’t have any planned physical activity during the school week. Ironically, these students are among those who could stand to benefit most from regular physical activity opportunities at school.

“They have exam stress, major life changes that are happening, friendships and romantic relationships to manage, all while juggling a busy work and study schedule.”

“With all this going on, it’s probably no surprise we see dramatic increases in the prevalence of mental health problems in this age group. And it certainly doesn’t help that we remove planned physical activity from their week, as exercise is a proven strategy for dealing with stress.”

To satisfy the needs of this time-poor cohort, the ‘Burn 2 Learn’ team will be focusing on the delivery of high intensity interval training, or ‘HIIT’- highly vigorous but short bouts of exercise interspersed by rest periods. There has been strong interest in HIIT in recent years, due to a number of studies showing the substantial health benefits that can be achieved with a very low volume of exercise.

“It certainly raises questions about age-old advice saying you need to pound the pavement for an hour at a time.”

“Emerging research also suggests HIIT may have positive impacts on markers of cognitive and mental health, but there is still a lot that we don’t know”.

The research team has developed a conceptual model illustrating a number of possible explanations for how physical activity improves cognitive and mental health. They’ll be using a range of experimental methods to test their ideas, and have a number of world-class collaborators, local and international, to help guide them through the process.

“It was always important to me that I could say the work I'm doing is having some kind of benefit to others. Working at the intersect of health and education, and trying to develop new and exciting ways of improving the health and wellbeing of young people, has certainly been a rewarding way to do that.”

Jordan Smith

Fit for Learning

Dr Jordan Smith id engaged in research that aims to improve physical and mental health in youth.

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Career Summary

Biography

Jordan is a lecturer in the School of Education and Deputy Lead of the school-based research theme within the Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition (PRC-PAN) at the University of Newcastle. He attained a Bachelor of Teaching (secondary)/ Bachelor of Health and Physical Education (Hons) from the University of Newcastle in 2010 and completed his PhD 2015. Jordan also holds a Strength and Conditioning Coaching qualification from the Australian Strength and Conditioning Association (ASCA).

Jordan's doctoral research focused on the development and evaluation of a school-based obesity prevention intervention for disadvantaged and low-active adolescent boys - the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time (ATLAS) cluster randomised controlled trial A novel aspect of the program was an emphasis on the promotion of resistance training as a 'hook' to get boys re-engaged with physical activity. In partnership with the Department of Education, the school-based fitness program that Jordan helped to develop is currently being implemented in public high schools throughout New South Wales, alongside another previously successful program for adolescent girls.

Jordan's PhD research helped to consolidate his research focus. He is currently interested in building evidence around the physical and mental health benefits of resistance exercise. In addition he is investigating novel ways to promote muscle-strengthening physical activities to different population groups using scalable intervention approaches.

In addition to the fitness programs currently being delivered in NSW schools, Jordan has recently been involved in the delivery of the eCoFit program, an exercise intervention integrating smartphone technology, the outdoor environment and resistance exercise as a means of improving the health and well-being of adults at risk of Type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, Jordan is a Chief Investigator on an upcoming NHMRC project examining the effects of High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) on the cognitive and mental health of senior school students.



Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Teaching/B Health & Phys Educ (Hons), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Fitness
  • Intervention
  • Obesity prevention
  • Physical education
  • Resistance training
  • Schools
  • adolescent health
  • physical activity
  • public health

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 40
110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified 35
139999 Education not elsewhere classified 25

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2016 Best New Investigator (Physical Activity and Health Promotion)
Sports Medicine Australia
2015 Best paper in Exercise Science
Sports Medicine Australia

Prize

Year Award
2015 RHD publication prize (first runner up), Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
The University of Newcastle

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
EDUC2058 PE studies 4: Invasion games
Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Course tutor 3/03/2014 - 13/06/2014
EDUC1016 PE studies 2: Court and striking games
Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Course tutor 27/07/2015 - 6/11/2015
EDUC3058 PE studies 5: Lifetime physical activities
Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Course tutor 23/02/2015 - 5/06/2015
PUBH1030 Foundation Studies in K-6 PDHPE
Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Course lecturer 23/02/2015 - 5/06/2015
EDUC4013 PE studies 6: Physical activity behaviour
Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Course coorindator 22/02/2016 - 3/06/2016
EDUC4014 PE studies 7: Sports coaching
Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Course coordinator 25/07/2016 - 4/11/2016
EDUC3058 PE studies 5: Lifetime physical activities
Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Course tutor 22/02/2016 - 3/06/2016
EDUC4013 PE studies 6: Physical activity behaviour
Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Course tutor 28/07/2014 - 7/11/2014
EDUC4013 PE studies 6: Physical activity behaviour
The University of Newcastle
Course coordinator 23/02/2015 - 5/06/2015
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Smith JJP, Lubans D, Lyn R, 'Physical activity in schools', Routledge Handbook of Physical Activity Policy and Practice, Routledge International Handbooks, Oxon 322-341 (2018)
Co-authors David Lubans

Journal article (30 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Kennedy SG, Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Peralta LR, Hilland TA, Eather N, et al., 'Implementing Resistance Training in Secondary Schools: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 50 62-72 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 by the American College of Sports Medicine. Purpose: Guidelines recommend that young people engage in muscle-strengthening activities on at least 3 dIwkj1. The purpose of t... [more]

© 2017 by the American College of Sports Medicine. Purpose: Guidelines recommend that young people engage in muscle-strengthening activities on at least 3 dIwkj1. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a school-based intervention focused on resistance training (RT) for adolescents. Methods: The ''Resistance Training for Teens'' intervention was evaluated using a cluster-randomized, controlled trial with 607 adolescents (50.1% girls; 14.1 T 0.5 yr) from 16 secondary schools. Teachers were trained to deliver the intervention, which included the following: (i) an interactive student seminar; (ii) a structured physical activity program, focused on RT; (iii) lunchtime fitness sessions; and (iv) Web-based smartphone apps. The primary outcome was muscular fitness (MF) and secondary outcomes included body mass index, RT skill competency, flexibility, physical activity, self-efficacy, and motivation. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 6 months (postprogram; primary end point), and 12 months (follow-up). Outcomes were assessed using linear mixed models, with three potential moderators tested using interaction terms (and subgroup analyses where appropriate). Results: For the primary outcome (MF), a group-time effect was observed at 6 months for the upper body (2.0 repetitions; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.8-3.2), but not the lower body (j1.4 cm; 95% CI, j4.7-1.9). At 6 months, there were intervention effects for RT skill competency and self-efficacy, but no other secondary outcomes. Effects for upper body MF and RT skill competency were sustained at 12 months. Despite overall no effect for body mass index, there was a group-time effect at 12 months among students whowere overweight/obese at baseline (j0.55 kgImj2; 95% CI, j1.01 toj0.08). Conclusions: The school-based RT intervention resulted in immediate and sustained improvements in upper body MF and RT skill competency, demonstrating an effective and scalable approach to delivering RT within secondary schools.

DOI 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001410
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Emma R Pollock Uon, David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff, Sarah Kennedy, Narelle Eather, Philip Morgan
2018 Leahy AA, Eather N, Smith JJ, Hillman CH, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, et al., 'Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of a Teacher-Facilitated High-Intensity Interval Training Intervention for Older Adolescents.', Pediatr Exerc Sci, 1-11 (2018)
DOI 10.1123/pes.2018-0039
Co-authors Sarah Costigan, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Narelle Eather, Michael Nilsson, Philip Morgan
2018 Smith JJ, Beauchamp MR, Faulkner G, Morgan PJ, Kennedy SG, Lubans DR, 'Intervention effects and mediators of well-being in a school-based physical activity program for adolescents: The ¿Resistance Training for Teens¿ cluster RCT', Mental Health and Physical Activity, 15 88-94 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Objective: To examine the impact of a school-based physical activity intervention on adolescents' self-esteem and subjective well-being, and to explore mo... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Objective: To examine the impact of a school-based physical activity intervention on adolescents' self-esteem and subjective well-being, and to explore moderators and mediators of intervention effects. Methods: Resistance Training for Teens was evaluated using a cluster RCT in 16 schools located in New South Wales, Australia. Adolescents (N = 508; 14.1 ± 0.5 years; 49.6% female) completed measures of global self-esteem, subjective well-being, and hypothesized mediators (i.e., perceived fitness, resistance training self-efficacy, and autonomous motivation) at baseline (April¿June, 2015) and post-intervention (October¿December). The school-based physical activity program was delivered by teachers over 10-weeks via Physical Education, co-curricular school sport, or an elective subject known as Physical Activity and Sport Studies, and involved once-weekly fitness sessions and additional lunch-time sessions. Intervention effects and moderator analyses were tested using multi-level linear regression analyses with interaction terms. Multi-level mediation analyses were used to explore potential mediators of changes in well-being outcomes. Results: Intervention effects for self-esteem (ß = 0.05, p =.194) and wellbeing (ß = 0.03, p =.509) were not statistically significant. Moderator analyses showed effects for self-esteem were greater for the overweight/obese subgroup (p =.069 for interaction), and resistance training self-efficacy was a significant mediator of changes in self-esteem (product-of-coefficients [AB] = 0.021, SE = 0.010, 95% CIs = 0.002 to 0.040). No other significant indirect effects were observed. Conclusion: Overall, Resistance Training for Teens did not improve adolescents' self-esteem or subjective well-being. However, our mediation findings lend support to resistance training self-efficacy as a mechanism explaining the positive effect of resistance training on self-esteem.

DOI 10.1016/j.mhpa.2018.08.002
Co-authors David Lubans, Sarah Kennedy, Philip Morgan
2018 Smith JJ, DeMarco M, Kennedy SG, Kelson M, Barnett LM, Faigenbaum AD, Lubans DR, 'Prevalence and correlates of resistance training skill competence in adolescents', Journal of Sports Sciences, 36 1241-1249 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. The aim of this study is to examine the prevalence and correlates of adolescents¿ resistance training (RT) skil... [more]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. The aim of this study is to examine the prevalence and correlates of adolescents¿ resistance training (RT) skill competence. Participants were 548 adolescents (14.1¿±¿0.5¿years) from 16 schools in New South Wales, Australia. RT skills were assessed using the Resistance Training Skills Battery. Demographics, BMI, muscular fitness, perceived strength, RT self-efficacy, and motivation for RT were also assessed. The proportion demonstrating ¿competence¿ and ¿near competence¿ in each of the six RT skills were calculated and sex differences explored. Associations between the combined RT skill score and potential correlates were examined using multi-level linear mixed models. Overall, the prevalence of competence was low (range¿=¿3.3% to 27.9%). Females outperformed males on the squat, lunge and overhead press, whereas males performed better on the push-up (p¿<.05). Significant associations were seen for a number of correlates, which largely differed by sex. Muscular fitness was moderately and positively associated with RT skills among both males (ß¿=¿0.34, 95%CIs¿=¿0.23 to 0.46) and females (ß¿=¿0.36, 95%CIs¿=¿0.23 to 0.48). Our findings support a link between RT skills and muscular fitness. Other associations were statistically significant but small in magnitude, and should therefore be interpreted cautiously.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2017.1370822
Co-authors Sarah Kennedy, David Lubans
2018 Wade L, Smith JJ, Duncan MJ, Lubans DR, 'Mediators of aggression in a school-based physical activity intervention for low-income adolescent boys', Mental Health and Physical Activity, 14 39-46 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Objective The present study examined the effect of a school-based multicomponent physical activity intervention on aggression in adolescent males from low-inco... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Objective The present study examined the effect of a school-based multicomponent physical activity intervention on aggression in adolescent males from low-income areas, and explored potential mediators of change in aggression. Methods Participants were adolescent males (N = 361; 12.7 ± 0.5 years) enrolled in the ¿Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time¿ cluster RCT. Self-report measures for aggression, perceived strength and recreational screen-time were collected at baseline and 8-months. The effect of the intervention on aggression was tested using multi-level linear regression and potential mediators (i.e., screen-time and perceived strength) were explored using a product-of-coefficients test. Results There was no significant intervention effects for aggression (C [SE] = -0.038 [0.044], p =.384) or perceived strength (A [SE] = -0.0 [0.0], p =.884). However, a statistically significant effect was found for screen-time (A [SE] = -0.160 [0.04], p= <0.01). Changes in screen-time significantly mediated changes in aggression at post-test (AB [SE] = -0.021 [0.009], 95% CI = -0.042 to -0.005). Conclusion Limiting recreational screen-time may help to reduce aggression in adolescent boys. Interventions targeting adolescents' recreational screen-time should examine their ¿flow-on¿ effects on externalising behaviours in adolescent populations.

DOI 10.1016/j.mhpa.2017.12.006
Co-authors Mitch Duncan, David Lubans
2017 Hulteen RM, Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Barnett LM, Hallal PC, Colyvas K, Lubans DR, 'Global participation in sport and leisure-time physical activities: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Preventive Medicine, 95 14-25 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. This review aimed to determine the most popular physical activities performed by children, adolescents, and adults globally. Statistic bureau websites and art... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. This review aimed to determine the most popular physical activities performed by children, adolescents, and adults globally. Statistic bureau websites and article databases Scopus, ProQuest, SPORTDiscus, and Science Direct were searched between November 17th, 2014 and April 31st, 2015. Eligible studies were published in the last 10¿years with participation rates for specific physical activities among individuals five years or older. Data extraction for included articles (n¿=¿64) was assessed independently and agreed upon by two authors. A random-effects model was used to calculate participation rates in specific activities for each age group and region. In total 73,304 articles were retrieved and 64 articles representing 47 countries were included in the final meta-analysis. Among adults, walking was the most popular activity in the Americas (18.9%; 95% CI 10.2 to 32.5), Eastern Mediterranean (15.0%; 95% CI 5.8 to 33.6), Southeast Asia (39.3%; 95% CI 0.9 to 98.0) and Western Pacific (41.8%; 95% CI 25.2 to 60.6). In Europe and Africa, soccer (10.0%; 95% CI 6.5 to 15.1) and running (9.3%; 95% CI 0.9 to 53.9), respectively, were top activities. Child and adolescent participation results were highly dependent upon region. American youth team sport participation was high, while youth from the Eastern Mediterranean and Western Pacific were more likely to report participation in lifelong physical activities. Global data for adults reflects a consistent pattern of participation in running and walking. Among all age groups and regions soccer was popular. In children and adolescents, preferences were variable between regions.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.11.027
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Kim Colyvas, Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2017 Babic MJ, Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Eather N, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, 'Longitudinal associations between changes in screen-time and mental health outcomes in adolescents', Mental Health and Physical Activity, 12 124-131 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Introduction The primary aim was to examine longitudinal associations between changes in screen-time and mental health outcomes among adolescents. Methods Adol... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Introduction The primary aim was to examine longitudinal associations between changes in screen-time and mental health outcomes among adolescents. Methods Adolescents (N¿=¿322, 65.5% females, mean age¿=¿14.4¿±¿0.6 years) reported screen-time and mental health at two time points over a school year. Multi-level linear regression analyses were conducted after adjusting for covariates. Results Changes in total recreational screen-time (ß¿=¿-0.09 p¿=¿0.048) and tablet/mobile phone use (ß¿=¿-0.18, p¿<¿0.001) were negatively associated with physical self-concept. Changes in total recreational screen-time (ß¿=¿-0.20, p¿=¿0.001) and computer use (ß¿=¿-0.23, p¿=¿0.003) were negatively associated with psychological well-being. A positive association was found with television/DVD use and psychological difficulties (ß¿=¿0.16, p¿=¿0.015). No associations were found for non-recreational screen-time. Conclusion Changes in recreational screen-time were associated with changes in a range of mental health outcomes.

DOI 10.1016/j.mhpa.2017.04.001
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Narelle Eather, David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2017 Plotnikoff RC, Wilczynska M, Cohen KE, Smith JJ, Lubans DR, 'Integrating smartphone technology, social support and the outdoor physical environment to improve fitness among adults at risk of, or diagnosed with, Type 2 Diabetes: Findings from the ¿eCoFit¿ randomized controlled trial', Preventive Medicine, 105 404-411 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. The risk and prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) has dramatically increased over the past decade. The aim of this study was to develop, implement and evaluate... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. The risk and prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) has dramatically increased over the past decade. The aim of this study was to develop, implement and evaluate a physical activity intervention to improve aerobic and muscular fitness among adults at risk of, or diagnosed with T2D. A 20-week, assessor blinded, parallel-group randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted at the University of Newcastle (June¿December 2015). Adults were randomized to the intervention (n = 42) or wait-list control group (n = 42). The theory-based intervention included: Phase 1 (weeks 1¿10) integrated group sessions (outdoor physical activity and cognitive mentoring), and the eCoFit smartphone application (app). Phase 2 (weeks 11¿20) only included the eCoFit app. Participants were assessed at baseline, 10 weeks and 20 weeks. Linear mixed models (intention-to-treat) were used to determine group-by-time interactions at 10 weeks (primary time-point) and 20 weeks for the primary outcomes. Several secondary outcomes were also assessed. After 10 weeks, significant group-by-time effects were observed for aerobic fitness (4.5 mL/kg/min; 95% CI [1.3, 7.7], d = 0.68) and muscular fitness (lower body) (3.4 reps, 95% CI [2.7, 4.2], d = 1.45). Intervention effects for secondary outcomes included significant increased physical activity (1330 steps/week), improved upper body muscular fitness (5 reps; arm-curl test), improved functionality (- 1.8 s; timed-up and go test) reduced waist circumference (2.8 cm) and systolic blood pressure (- 10.4 mm Hg). After 20 weeks, significant effects were observed for lower body muscular fitness and health outcomes. eCoFit is an innovative lifestyle intervention which integrates smartphone technology, social support, and the outdoor environment to improve aerobic and muscular fitness.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.08.027
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
2017 Lubans DR, Lonsdale C, Cohen K, Eather N, Beauchamp MR, Morgan PJ, et al., 'Framework for the design and delivery of organized physical activity sessions for children and adolescents: rationale and description of the 'SAAFE' teaching principles', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 14 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0479
Citations Scopus - 14
Co-authors Narelle Eather, Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2017 Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Lonsdale C, Dally K, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, 'Mediators of change in screen-time in a school-based intervention for adolescent boys: findings from the ATLAS cluster randomized controlled trial', Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 40 423-433 (2017) [C1]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. The mechanisms of behavior change in youth screen-time interventions are poorly understood. Participants were 361 adolescent boys... [more]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. The mechanisms of behavior change in youth screen-time interventions are poorly understood. Participants were 361 adolescent boys (12¿14¿years) participating in the ATLAS obesity prevention trial, evaluated in 14 schools in low-income areas of New South Wales, Australia. Recreational screen-time was assessed at baseline, 8- and 18-months, whereas potential mediators (i.e., motivation to limit screen-time and parental rules) were assessed at baseline, 4- and 18-months. Multi-level mediation analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle and were conducted using a product-of-coefficients test. The intervention had a significant impact on screen-time at both time-points, and on autonomous motivation at 18-months. Changes in autonomous motivation partially mediated the effect on screen-time at 18-months in single and multi-mediator models [AB (95% CI)¿=¿-5.49 (-12.13, -.70)]. Enhancing autonomous motivation may be effective for limiting screen-time among adolescent males. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry No: ACTRN12612000978864.

DOI 10.1007/s10865-016-9810-2
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Kerry Dally
2017 Borde R, Smith JJ, Sutherland R, Nathan N, Lubans DR, 'Methodological considerations and impact of school-based interventions on objectively measured physical activity in adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 18 476-490 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 World Obesity Federation Objective: The aims of this systematic review and meta-analysis are (i) to determine the impact of school-based interventions on objectively measur... [more]

© 2017 World Obesity Federation Objective: The aims of this systematic review and meta-analysis are (i) to determine the impact of school-based interventions on objectively measured physical activity among adolescents and (ii) to examine accelerometer methods and decision rule reporting in previous interventions. Methods: A systematic search was performed to identify randomized controlled trials targeting adolescents (age: =10¿years), conducted in the school setting, and reporting objectively measured physical activity. Random effects meta-analyses were conducted to determine the pooled effects of previous interventions on total and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Potential moderators of intervention effects were also explored. Results: Thirteen articles met the inclusion criteria, and twelve were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled effects were small and non-significant for both total physical activity (standardized mean difference¿=¿0.02 [95% confidence interval¿=¿-0.13 to 0.18]) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (standardized mean difference¿=¿0.24 [95% confidence interval¿=¿-0.08 to 0.56]). Sample age and accelerometer compliance were significant moderators for total physical activity, with a younger sample and higher compliance associated with larger effects. Conclusion: Previous school-based physical activity interventions targeting adolescents have been largely unsuccessful, particularly for older adolescents. There is a need for more high-quality research using objective monitoring in this population. Future interventions should comply with best-practice recommendations regarding physical activity monitoring protocols.

DOI 10.1111/obr.12517
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 15
Co-authors David Lubans, Nicole Nathan
2016 Wilczynska M, Lubans DR, Cohen KE, Smith JJ, Robards SL, Plotnikoff RC, 'Rationale and study protocol for the 'eCoFit' randomized controlled trial: Integrating smartphone technology, social support and the outdoor physical environment to improve health-related fitness among adults at risk of, or diagnosed with, Type 2 Diabetes', CONTEMPORARY CLINICAL TRIALS, 49 116-125 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2016.06.013
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
2016 Barnett LM, Stodden D, Cohen KE, Smith JJ, Lubans DR, Lenoir M, et al., 'Fundamental Movement Skills: An Important Focus', Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, 35 219-225 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1123/jtpe.2014-0209
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Andrew Miller, Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2016 Lubans DR, Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Beauchamp MR, Miller A, Lonsdale C, et al., 'Mediators of psychological well-being in adolescent boys', Journal of Adolescent Health, 58 230-236 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved. Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the effect of the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time (A... [more]

© 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved. Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the effect of the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time (ATLAS) intervention on psychological well-being in adolescent boys and to examine the potential mediating mechanisms that might explain this effect. Methods: ATLAS was evaluated using a cluster randomized controlled trial in 14 secondary schools located in low-income communities (N = 361 adolescent boys, mean age = 12.7 ±.5 years). The 20-week intervention was guided by self-determination theory and involved: professional development for teachers, provision of fitness equipment to schools, enhanced school sport sessions, researcher-led seminars, a smartphone application, and parental strategies for reducing screen time. Assessments were conducted at baseline and immediately post intervention (8 months). Psychological well-being was measured using the Flourishing Scale. Motivational regulations (intrinsic, identified, introjected, controlled, and amotivation) and basic psychological needs (autonomy, competence, and relatedness) in school sport, muscular fitness, resistance training skill competency, and recreational screen time were examined as potential mediating mechanisms of the intervention effect. Results: The intervention effect on well-being was small but statistically significant. Within a multiple mediator model, changes in autonomy needs satisfaction, recreational screen time, and muscular fitness significantly mediated the effect of the intervention on psychological well-being. Conclusions: In addition to the physical health benefits, targeted physical activity programs for adolescent boys may have utility for mental health promotion through the mechanisms of increasing autonomy support and muscular fitness and reducing screen time.

DOI 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2015.10.010
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Kerry Dally, Philip Morgan, David Lubans, Andrew Miller
2016 Babic MJ, Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Lonsdale C, Plotnikoff RC, Eather N, et al., 'Intervention to reduce recreational screen-time in adolescents: Outcomes and mediators from the ¿Switch-Off 4 Healthy Minds¿ (S4HM) cluster randomized controlled trial', Preventive Medicine, 91 50-57 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. Introduction The primary objective was to evaluate the impact of the ¿Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds¿ (S4HM) intervention on recreational screen-time in adolescen... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. Introduction The primary objective was to evaluate the impact of the ¿Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds¿ (S4HM) intervention on recreational screen-time in adolescents. Methods Cluster randomized controlled trial with study measures at baseline and 6-months (post-intervention). Eligible participants reported exceeding recreational screen-time recommendations (i.e., >¿2¿h/day). In total, 322 adolescents (mean age¿=¿14.4¿±¿0.6¿years) from eight secondary schools in New South Wales, Australia were recruited. The S4HM intervention was guided by Self-Determination Theory and included: an interactive seminar, eHealth messaging, a behavioral contract and parental newsletters. The primary outcome was recreational screen-time. Secondary outcomes included mental health (i.e., well-being, psychological distress, self-perceptions), objectively measured physical activity, and body mass index (BMI). Outcome analyses were conducted using linear mixed models and mediation was examined using a product-of-coefficients test. Results At post-intervention, significant reductions in screen-time were observed in both groups, with a greater reduction observed in the intervention group (-¿50¿min/day versus -¿29¿min, p¿<¿0.05 for both). However, the adjusted difference in change between groups was not statistically significant (mean¿=¿-¿21.3¿min/day, p¿=¿0.255). There were no significant intervention effects for mental health outcomes, physical activity or BMI. Significant mediation effects for autonomous motivation were found. Conclusions Participants in both the S4HM intervention and control groups significantly reduced their screen-time, with no group-by-time effects. Enhancing autonomous motivation might be a useful intervention target for trials aimed at reducing adolescents' recreational screen-time. Trial registration ACTRN12614000163606.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.07.014
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Emma R Pollock Uon, Amanda Baker, Geoff Skinner, David Lubans, Narelle Eather
2016 Lubans DR, Smith JJ, Plotnikoff RC, Dally KA, Okely AD, Salmon J, Morgan PJ, 'Assessing the sustained impact of a school-based obesity prevention program for adolescent boys: The ATLAS cluster randomized controlled trial', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 13 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Obesity prevention interventions targeting &apos;at-risk&apos; adolescents are urgently needed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the sustaine... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Obesity prevention interventions targeting 'at-risk' adolescents are urgently needed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the sustained impact of the 'Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time' (ATLAS) obesity prevention program. Methods: Cluster RCT in 14 secondary schools in low-income communities of New South Wales, Australia. Participants were 361 adolescent boys (aged 12-14 years) 'at risk' of obesity. The intervention was based on Self-Determination Theory and Social Cognitive Theory and involved: professional development, fitness equipment for schools, teacher-delivered physical activity sessions, lunch-time activity sessions, researcher-led seminars, a smartphone application, and parental strategies. Assessments for the primary (body mass index [BMI], waist circumference) and secondary outcomes were conducted at baseline, 8- (post-intervention) and 18-months (follow-up). Analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle using linear mixed models. Results: After 18-months, there were no intervention effects for BMI or waist circumference. Sustained effects were found for screen-time, resistance training skill competency, and motivational regulations for school sport. Conclusions: There were no clinically meaningful intervention effects for the adiposity outcomes. However, the intervention resulted in sustained effects for secondary outcomes. Interventions that more intensively target the home environment, as well as other socio-ecological determinants of obesity may be needed to prevent unhealthy weight gain in adolescents from low-income communities. Trial registration: Australian Clinical Trial Registry ACTRN12612000978864.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0420-8
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Kerry Dally, Philip Morgan
2016 Morgan PJ, Young MD, Smith JJ, Lubans DR, 'Targeted Health Behavior Interventions Promoting Physical Activity: A Conceptual Model', Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews, 44 71-80 (2016) [C1]

This article presents a conceptual model illustrating a targeted approach to the design and delivery of health behavior interventions that focus on physical activity promotion. We... [more]

This article presents a conceptual model illustrating a targeted approach to the design and delivery of health behavior interventions that focus on physical activity promotion. We hypothesize that researchers who i) enhance the sociocultural relevance of their core intervention components and ii) recognize the unique contributions of both intervention design and delivery will experience greater intervention engagement and improved outcomes.

DOI 10.1249/JES.0000000000000075
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Myles Young, David Lubans
2016 Lubans DR, Smith JJ, Peralta LR, Plotnikoff RC, Okely AD, Salmon J, et al., 'A school-based intervention incorporating smartphone technology to improve health-related fitness among adolescents: rationale and study protocol for the NEAT and ATLAS 2.0 cluster randomised controlled trial and dissemination study', BMJ OPEN, 6 (2016)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010448
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Narelle Eather, David Lubans, Emma R Pollock Uon, Ron Plotnikoff, Sarah Kennedy, Philip Morgan
2016 Lubans D, Richards J, Hillman C, Faulkner G, Beauchamp M, Nilsson M, et al., 'Physical Activity for Cognitive and Mental Health in Youth: A Systematic Review of Mechanisms', PEDIATRICS, 138 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1542/peds.2016-1642
Citations Scopus - 54Web of Science - 40
Co-authors Michael Nilsson, David Lubans
2016 Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Stodden DF, Lubans DR, 'Mediating effects of resistance training skill competency on health-related fitness and physical activity: the ATLAS cluster randomised controlled trial', Journal of Sports Sciences, 34 772-779 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Taylor &amp; Francis. The purpose of this study was to examine the mediating effect of resistance training skill competency on percentage of body fat, muscular fitness an... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. The purpose of this study was to examine the mediating effect of resistance training skill competency on percentage of body fat, muscular fitness and physical activity among a sample of adolescent boys participating in a school-based obesity prevention intervention. Participants were 361 adolescent boys taking part in the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time (ATLAS) cluster randomised controlled trial: a school-based program targeting the health behaviours of economically disadvantaged adolescent males considered ¿at-risk¿ of obesity. Body fat percentage (bioelectrical impedance), muscular fitness (hand grip dynamometry and push-ups), physical activity (accelerometry) and resistance training skill competency were assessed at baseline and post-intervention (i.e., 8 months). Three separate multi-level mediation models were analysed to investigate the potential mediating effects of resistance training skill competency on each of the study outcomes using a product-of-coefficients test. Analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle. The intervention had a significant impact on the resistance training skill competency of the boys, and improvements in skill competency significantly mediated the effect of the intervention on percentage of body fat and the combined muscular fitness score. No significant mediated effects were found for physical activity. Improving resistance training skill competency may be an effective strategy for achieving improvements in body composition and muscular fitness in adolescent boys.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2015.1069383
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2015 Barnett L, Reynolds J, Faigenbaum AD, Smith JJ, Harries S, Lubans DR, 'Rater agreement of a test battery designed to assess adolescents' resistance training skill competency', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 18 72-76 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2013.11.012
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors David Lubans
2014 Thorne HT, Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Babic MJ, Lubans DR, 'Video game genre preference, physical activity and screen-time in adolescent boys from low-income communities', Journal of Adolescence, 37 1345-1352 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. The primary aim of this study was to examine the association between the types of video games played by adoles... [more]

© 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. The primary aim of this study was to examine the association between the types of video games played by adolescent boys and their participation in physical activity and recreational screen-time. Participants were 320 boys (mean age=12.7, ±0.5 years) from 14 secondary schools located in low-income areas of New South Wales, Australia. Outcomes included height, weight, physical activity (accelerometers), total screen-time, and video game genre preference. Significant differences in both weekday and weekend screen-time were found between video game genre groups. In addition, significant differences in overall activity and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity were found between genre groups on weekdays. Between-group differences in physical activity on weekends were not statistically significant. This cross-sectional study has demonstrated that video game genre preference is associated with physical activity and screen-time in adolescent boys from low-income communities.

DOI 10.1016/j.adolescence.2014.09.012
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2014 Owen KB, Smith J, Lubans DR, Ng JYY, Lonsdale C, 'Self-determined motivation and physical activity in children and adolescents: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Preventive Medicine, 67 270-279 (2014) [C1]

Objective: Self-determination theory is used as a framework for examining the relation between motivation and physical activity. The purpose of this review was to systematically r... [more]

Objective: Self-determination theory is used as a framework for examining the relation between motivation and physical activity. The purpose of this review was to systematically review studies that assessed the association between self-determined motivation and physical activity levels in children and adolescents. Method: We searched electronic databases in April 2013. Included studies assessed the relation between motivation (as outlined in self-determination theory) and physical activity in children and adolescents. Results: Forty-six studies ( n=15,984 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis indicated that overall levels of self-determined motivation had a weak to moderate, positive associations with physical activity ( ¿=.21 to .31). Autonomous forms of motivation (i.e., intrinsic motivation and identified regulation) had moderate, positive associations with physical activity ( ¿=.27 to .38), whereas controlled forms of motivation (i.e., introjection and external regulation) had weak, negative associations with physical activity ( ¿=.03 to 17). Amotivation had a weak, negative association with physical activity ( ¿=.11 to 21). Conclusions: Evidence provides some support for self-determination theory tenets. However, there was substantial heterogeneity in most associations and many studies had methodological shortcomings. © 2014.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.07.033
Citations Scopus - 64Web of Science - 56
Co-authors David Lubans
2014 Lubans DR, Smith JJ, Harries SK, Barnett LM, Faigenbaum AD, 'Development, test-retest reliability, and construct validity of the Resistance Training Skills Battery', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 28 1373-1380 (2014) [C1]

The aim of this study was to describe the development and assess test-retest reliability and construct validity of the Resistance Training Skills Battery (RTSB) for adolescents. T... [more]

The aim of this study was to describe the development and assess test-retest reliability and construct validity of the Resistance Training Skills Battery (RTSB) for adolescents. The RTSB provides an assessment of resistance training skill competency and includes 6 exercises (i.e., body weight squat, push-up, lunge, suspended row, standing overhead press, and front support with chest touches). Scoring for each skill is based on the number of performance criteria successfully demonstrated. An overall resistance training skill quotient (RTSQ) is created by adding participants' scores for the 6 skills. Participants (44 boys and 19 girls, mean age = 14.5 ± 1.2 years) completed the RTSB on 2 occasions separated by 7 days. Participants also completed the following fitness tests, which were used to create a muscular fitness score (MFS): handgrip strength, timed push-up, and standing long jump tests. Intraclass correlation (ICC), paired samples t-tests, and typical error were used to assess test-retest reliability. To assess construct validity, gender and RTSQ were entered into a regression model predicting MFS. The rank order repeatability of the RTSQ was high (ICC = 0.88). The model explained 39% of the variance in MFS (p = 0.001) and RTSQ (r = 0.40, p = 0.001) was a significant predictor. This study has demonstrated the construct validity and test-retest reliability of the RTSB in a sample of adolescents. The RTSB can reliably rank participants in regards to their resistance training competency and has the necessary sensitivity to detect small changes in resistance training skill proficiency. © 2014 National Strength and Conditioning Association.

DOI 10.1519/JSC.0b013e31829b5527
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 24
Co-authors David Lubans
2014 Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Dally KA, Salmon J, Okely AD, et al., 'Rationale and study protocol for the 'Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time' (ATLAS) group randomized controlled trial: An obesity prevention intervention for adolescent boys from schools in low-income communities', Contemporary Clinical Trials, 37 106-119 (2014) [C3]

Introduction: The negative consequences of unhealthy weight gain and the high likelihood of pediatric obesity tracking into adulthood highlight the importance of targeting youth w... [more]

Introduction: The negative consequences of unhealthy weight gain and the high likelihood of pediatric obesity tracking into adulthood highlight the importance of targeting youth who are 'at risk' of obesity. The aim of this paper is to report the rationale and study protocol for the 'Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time' (ATLAS) obesity prevention intervention for adolescent boys living in low-income communities. Methods/design: The ATLAS intervention will be evaluated using a cluster randomized controlled trial in 14 secondary schools in the state of New South Wales (NSW), Australia (2012 to 2014). ATLAS is an 8-month multi-component, school-based program informed by self-determination theory and social cognitive theory. The intervention consists of teacher professional development, enhanced school-sport sessions, researcher-led seminars, lunch-time physical activity mentoring sessions, pedometers for self-monitoring, provision of equipment to schools, parental newsletters, and a smartphone application and website. Assessments were conducted at baseline and will be completed again at 9- and 18-months from baseline. Primary outcomes are body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. Secondary outcomes include BMI z-scores, body fat (bioelectrical impedance analysis), physical activity (accelerometers), muscular fitness (grip strength and push-ups), screen-time, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, resistance training skill competency, daytime sleepiness, subjective well-being, physical self-perception, pathological video gaming, and aggression. Hypothesized mediators of behavior change will also be explored. Discussion: ATLAS is an innovative school-based intervention designed to improve the health behaviors and related outcomes of adolescent males in low-income communities. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2013.11.008
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Geoff Skinner, Kerry Dally
2014 Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Dally KA, Salmon J, Okely AD, et al., 'Smart-phone obesity prevention trial for adolescent boys in low-income communities: The ATLAS RCT', Pediatrics, 134 e723-e731 (2014) [C1]

OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time (ATLAS) intervention for adolescent boys, an obesity prevention interv... [more]

OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time (ATLAS) intervention for adolescent boys, an obesity prevention intervention using smartphone technology.METHODS: ATLAS was a cluster randomized controlled trial conducted in 14 secondary schools in low-income communities in New South Wales, Australia. Participants were 361 adolescent boys (aged 12-14 years) considered at risk of obesity. The 20-week intervention was guided by self-determination theory and social cognitive theory and involved: teacher professional development, provision of fitness equipment to schools, face-to-face physical activity sessions, lunchtime student mentoring sessions, researcher-led seminars, a smartphone application and Web site, and parental strategies for reducing screen-time. Outcome measures included BMI and waist circumference, percent body fat, physical activity (accelerometers), screen-time, sugar-sweetened beverage intake, muscular fitness, and resistance training skill competency.RESULTS: Overall, there were no significant intervention effects for BMI, waist circumference, percent body fat, or physical activity. Significant intervention effects were found for screen-time (mean ± SE:-30 ± 10.08 min/d; P = .03), sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (mean:-0.6 ± 0.26 glass/d; P = .01), muscular fitness (mean: 0.9 ± 0.49 repetition; P = .04), and resistance training skills (mean: 5.7 6 0.67 units; P < .001).CONCLUSIONS: This school-based intervention targeting low-income adolescent boys did not result in significant effects on body composition, perhaps due to an insufficient activity dose. However, the intervention was successful in improving muscular fitness, movement skills, and key weight-related behaviors.

DOI 10.1542/peds.2014-1012
Citations Scopus - 70Web of Science - 63
Co-authors Kerry Dally, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
2014 Smith JJ, Eather N, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Faigenbaum AD, Lubans DR, 'The health benefits of muscular fitness for children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis', Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.), 44 1209-1223 (2014)

BACKGROUND: Physical fitness during childhood and adolescence has been identified as an important determinant of current and future health status. While research has traditionally... [more]

BACKGROUND: Physical fitness during childhood and adolescence has been identified as an important determinant of current and future health status. While research has traditionally focused on the association between cardio-respiratory fitness and health outcomes, the association between muscular fitness (MF) and health status has recently received increased attention. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the potential physiological and psychological benefits associated with MF among children and adolescents. METHODS: A systematic search of six electronic databases (PubMed, SPORTDiscus, Scopus, EMBASE, PsycINFO and OVID MEDLINE) was performed on the 20th May, 2013. Cross-sectional, longitudinal and experimental studies that quantitatively examined the association between MF and potential health benefits among children and adolescents were included. The search yielded 110 eligible studies, encompassing six health outcomes (i.e., adiposity, bone health, cardiovascular disease [CVD] and metabolic risk factors, musculoskeletal pain, psychological health and cognitive ability). The percentage of studies reporting statistically significant associations between MF and the outcome of interest was used to determine the strength of the evidence for an association and additional coding was conducted to account for risk of bias. Meta-analyses were also performed to determine the pooled effect size if there were at least three studies providing standardised coefficients. RESULTS: Strong evidence was found for an inverse association between MF and total and central adiposity, and CVD and metabolic risk factors. The pooled effect size for the relationship between MF and adiposity was r = -0.25 (95% CI -0.41 to -0.08). Strong evidence was also found for a positive association between MF and bone health and self-esteem. The pooled effect size for the relationship between MF and perceived sports competence was r = 0.39 (95% CI 0.34-0.45). The evidence for an association between MF and musculoskeletal pain and cognitive ability was inconsistent/uncertain. Where evidence of an association was found, the associations were generally low to moderate. CONCLUSION: The findings of this review highlight the importance of developing MF in youth for a number of health-related benefits.

DOI 10.1007/s40279-014-0196-4
Citations Scopus - 11
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Narelle Eather, Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Lubans DR, Smith JJ, Skinner G, Morgan PJ, 'Development and implementation of a smartphone application to promote physical activity and reduce screen-time in adolescent boys.', Front Public Health, 2 42 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fpubh.2014.00042
Citations Scopus - 19
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans, Geoff Skinner
2013 Lubans DR, Lonsdale C, Plotnikoff RC, Smith J, Dally K, Morgan PJ, 'Development and evaluation of the Motivation to Limit Screen-time Questionnaire (MLSQ) for adolescents.', Prev Med, 57 561-566 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.07.023
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Kerry Dally, David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2012 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Weaver KE, Callister R, Dewar DL, Costigan SA, et al., 'Rationale and study protocol for the Supporting Children's Outcomes Using Rewards, Exercise and Skills (SCORES) group randomized controlled trial: A physical activity and fundamental movement skills intervention for primary schools in low-income communities', BMC Public Health, 12 1-11 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Sarah Costigan, David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister
Show 27 more journal articles

Conference (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Hulteen RM, Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Barnett LM, Hallal PC, Lubans DR, 'Global Participation In Specific Leisure-Time Physical Activities: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis', MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE, Boston, MA (2016)
DOI 10.1249/01.mss.0000487328.09508.87
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2013 Morgan PJ, Smith J, Plotnikoff R, Dally K, Finn T, Okley A, et al., 'Group randomised controlled trial of the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-Time (ATLAS) obesity prevention intervention for adolescent boys living in low-income communities', The Proceedings of The Australasian Society of Behavioural Health and Medicine 10th Annual Scientific Conference, Newcastle, NSW (2013) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2013 Lubans D, Lonsdale C, Morgan PJ, Smith J, Dally K, Plotnikoff R, 'Instrument development and initial validity for a scale to measure adolescents¿ motivation to limit their screen time', The Proceedings of The Australasian Society of Behavioural Health and Medicine 10th Annual Scientific Conference, Newcastle, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans

Other (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Smith JJP, 'Overcoming resistance: The case for strength training in children and adolescents', Sport Health ( issue.1 pp.15-18). Australia: Sports Medicine Australia (2017)
2016 Smith JJP, '791. Physical activity outcomes in afterschool programs: A group randomized controlled trial', . University of Sydney: GlobalPAnet (2016)
2016 Smith JJP, 'Health check: Should children and adolescents lift weights?', The Conversation (2016)
2016 Smith JJP, 'Health check: how to get off the couch and into exercise', : The Conversation (2016)
2016 Smith JJP, 'How to prevent injury from sport and exercise', The conversation (2016)
Show 2 more others
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 11
Total funding $1,013,453

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20183 grants / $111,500

Faculty matching funding for UON PRC Scheme - Priority Research Centre in Phyical Activity and Nutrition$100,000

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Professor David Lubans; Professor Phil Morgan (Co-Deputy Director); Professor Ron Plotnikoff (Director); Dr Alyce Barnes; Dr Narelle Eather; Dr Nick Riley; Dr Jordan Smith; Dr Myles Young.

Scheme Faculty funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Resistance Training for Teens$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Miss Sarah Kennedy, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Jordan Smith
Scheme Jennie Thomas Medical Research Travel Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800698
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

2018 Sports Medicine Australia (SMA) Conference, Perth, 10 - 13 October 2018$1,500

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Scheme FEDUA Conference Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20176 grants / $890,453

A scalable intervention for increasing vigorous physical activity among older adolescents: The 'Burn to Learn' cluster RCT$653,914

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Charles Hillman, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Michael Nilsson, A/Prof Chris Lonsdale, Doctor Narelle Eather, Doctor Jordan Smith
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1600064
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Burn 2 Learn - improving fitness and well-being in senior school students$127,740

Funding body: NSW Department of Education

Funding body NSW Department of Education
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Doctor Narelle Eather, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Jordan Smith, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Michael Nilsson, Doctor Liz Holliday, Professor Charles Hillman, A/Prof Chris Lonsdale
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1700721
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

Redeveloping Resistance Training for Teens resources to support program dissemination$59,091

Funding body: NSW Department of Education

Funding body NSW Department of Education
Project Team Doctor Jordan Smith, Professor David Lubans, Miss Sarah Kennedy, Professor Philip Morgan, Mr Mike Noetel
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701277
Type Of Funding C2120 - Aust Commonwealth - Other
Category 2120
UON Y

Roll out of Newcastle University's eCoFit program across 4 sites in the Upper Hunter$40,000

Funding body: NSW Department of Family and Community Services

Funding body NSW Department of Family and Community Services
Project Team Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Jordan Smith, Miss Magdalena Wilczynska
Scheme Liveable Communities Grants Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700619
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

HMRI Equipment Grant$8,820

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Doctor Narelle Eather, Doctor Jordan Smith, Doctor Nick Riley, Doctor Drew Miller
Scheme Medical Research Support Program (MRSP)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701226
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON Y

30 ACHPER International Conference, University of Canberra, Canberra, 16-18 January 2017$888

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team

Dr Jordan Smith

Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20161 grants / $10,000

Jennie Thomas Medical Research Travel Grant$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Jordan Smith
Scheme Jennie Thomas Medical Research Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1600722
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

20151 grants / $1,500

ISBNPA 2015 Annual Meeting (International Society of Behavioural Nutrition & Physical Activity), Edinburgh Scotland, 3-6 June 2015$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Doctor Jordan Smith
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1500530
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current4

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Reach, Uptake and Impact of an Efficacious, Multi-Level Physical Activity Intervention PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Improving Fitness and Well-being in Senior School Students: The 'Burn 2 Learn' Program PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD The impact of physical activity on youth mental health and cognition: an exploration of mechanisms PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Dissemination and Evaluation of the NEAT and ATLAS Physical Activity Programs Utilising the RE-AIM Framework PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 Honours Mediators of aggression in a school-based physical activity intervention for adolescent boys: Findings from the ATLAS cluster randomised controlled trial Education, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 32
United States 9
Canada 4
Brazil 2
United Kingdom 2
More...
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News

Health Check: how to get off the couch and into exercise

May 9, 2016

Dr Jordan Smith provides tips on how to get active.

Teen boys swap screens for fitness

February 17, 2015

Teen boys from 14 Hunter and Central Coast high schools are now fitter and spending less time in front of screens.

Dr Jordan Smith

Position

Lecturer
PRC Physical Activity and Nutrition
School of Education
Faculty of Education and Arts

Contact Details

Email jordan.smith@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 49217704
Fax (02) 4921 2084

Office

Room ATC205A
Building Advance Technology Center (ATC) building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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