Dr Emily Cox

Dr Emily Cox

Lecturer

School of Environmental and Life Sciences

Career Summary

Biography

Emily completed a Bachelor of Exercise and Sports Science with a major in Clinical Exercise Physiology in 2015 at The University of Queensland. Following graduation, she worked as an Accredited Exercise Physiologist at a chronic disease management clinic for people aged 55+ years. This sparked her interest in optimizing the prescription of, and adherence to, exercise for people with cardiometabolic disease. In 2020, Emily completed a PhD at The University of Queensland; her thesis explored the short- and long-term efficacy, safety and feasibility of a novel low-volume combined aerobic and resistance high-intensity interval training protocol in people with type 2 diabetes. Emily has presented at both national and international conferences, and published multiple peer reviewed papers.

Emily's teaching and administrative experience spans lecturing, coordination of practicals and student-led exercise clinics, and clinical education at both the undergraduate and postgraduate level. Her teaching expertise includes exercise prescription and programming for ageing, metabolic disease and cancer, and health promotion. 


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Queensland

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Exercise Adherence
  • Exercise Physiology
  • Metabolic Disease
  • Physical Activity

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia

Awards

Research Award

Year Award
2020 Michael L. Pollock Student Scholarship
American College of Sports Medicine

Scholarship

Year Award
2019 Postgraduate Professional Development Bursary
The University of Queensland
2018 School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Travel Award
The University of Queensland
2018 The University of Queensland Research Training Scholarship
The University of Queensland

Teaching Award

Year Award
2020 Tutor and Demonstrator Award (Commendation)
The University of Queensland

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
EXSS6010 Foundations of Exercise Physiology Practice
School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle
Lecturer 22/2/2021 - 21/6/2021
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Cox ER, Coombes JS, Keating SE, Burton NW, Coombes BK, 'Not a painless condition: Rheumatological and musculoskeletal symptoms in type 2 diabetes, and the implications for exercise participation', Current Diabetes Reviews, 16 211-219 (2020)

© 2020 Bentham Science Publishers. Objectives: People with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are more likely to develop a range of rheu-matological and musculoskeletal symptoms (RMS), and exp... [more]

© 2020 Bentham Science Publishers. Objectives: People with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are more likely to develop a range of rheu-matological and musculoskeletal symptoms (RMS), and experience both chronic and widespread pain, compared with the general population. However, these symptoms are not commonly acknowledged by researchers, which hampers our understanding of the impact on this population. Since exercise is a key lifestyle management strategy for T2D and participation levels are typically low, understanding the potential impact of RMS on exercise participation is critical. The aim of this review is to summarise the literature regarding the prevalence and pathophysiology of RMS in T2D, the evidence for the benefits and risks associated with exercise on RMS, and the currently available tools for the reporting of RMS in both research studies and community settings. Methods: A narrative review. Results: There are numerous exercise trials in T2D, but few have sufficiently reported pain-related ad-verse events and even fewer have investigated the effects of exercise on RMS and chronic pain. Discussion: Recommendations for future research are provided.

DOI 10.2174/1573399815666190531083504
Citations Scopus - 1
2020 Cox ER, Gajanand T, Burton NW, Coombes JS, Coombes BK, 'Effect of different exercise training intensities on musculoskeletal and neuropathic pain in inactive individuals with type 2 diabetes ? Preliminary randomised controlled trial', DIABETES RESEARCH AND CLINICAL PRACTICE, 164 (2020)
Citations Scopus - 1
2019 Cox ER, Keating SE, Coombes JS, Burton NW, 'Potential Utility of Self-Report Measures of Affect to Optimise Exercise Adherence in People with Type 2 Diabetes.', Curr Diabetes Rev, 15 302-308 (2019)
DOI 10.2174/1573399814666180816165351
Citations Scopus - 1
2019 Coombes BK, Tucker K, Hug F, Scott A, Geytenbeek M, Cox ER, et al., 'Relationships between cardiovascular disease risk factors and achilles tendon structural and mechanical properties in people with type 2 diabetes', Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal, 9 395-404 (2019)

© 2019, CIC Edizioni Internazionali s.r.l. All rights reserved. Background. Patients with diabetes have 44% greater risk of tendon rupture requiring hospitalisation. Despite this,... [more]

© 2019, CIC Edizioni Internazionali s.r.l. All rights reserved. Background. Patients with diabetes have 44% greater risk of tendon rupture requiring hospitalisation. Despite this, in vivo research of the associations of diabetes and other cardiovascular disease risk factors on structural and mechanical properties of the Achilles tendon are sparsely studied. Methods. Inactive individuals with type 2 diabetes (n=33) underwent ultrasound and shear wave elastography imaging of their Achilles tendons bilaterally to measure thickness and shear wave velocity (SWV), an index of tendon elastic modulus. In a separate session, participants underwent assessment of body composition, cardiorespiratory fitness and blood biomarkers. Seven inactive individuals without type 2 diabetes were recruited for comparison of tendon structural and mechanical properties. Results. In participants with diabetes, free tendon SWV displayed large negative correlations with hip circumference (r=-0.67, P <0.001), waist circumference (r=-0.59, P <0.001) and body mass index (r=-0.52, P <0001), and a moderate positive correlation with VO2 peak (r=0.34, P =0.006). SWV was lower in participants with diabetes taking statins compared to not taking statins (Free tendon: median difference 8%, P=0.004); insertion: 11%, P =0.001). Compared to the control group, the diabetes group had thicker Achilles free tendon (median difference 15%, P<0.001) and Achilles insertion (17%, P=0.006), but no differences in SWV (P=0.490 or 0.577 respectively). Conclusions. Achilles tendons from individuals with type 2 diabetes were thicker compared to inactive individuals without diabetes. Adiposity, statin use and low cardiorespiratory fitness were associated with inferior Achilles tendon mechanical properties in people with diabetes.

DOI 10.32098/mltj.03.2019.14
Citations Scopus - 1
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Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Cox E, Coombes J, Keating S, Burton N, Gajanand T, 'Effect of exercise intensity on positive affect in patients with type 2 diabetes', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2017.09.326

Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
Cox E, The Physiological, Biochemical and Psychological Effects of Low-Volume Combined Aerobic and Resistance High-Intensity Interval Training in People with Type 2 Diabetes,
DOI 10.14264/5707332
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Dr Emily Cox

Position

Lecturer
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
College of Engineering, Science and Environment

Contact Details

Email emily.cox10@newcastle.edu.au
Link Twitter

Office

Room EXSB-204
Building Exercise and Sports Science B
Location Ourimbah
10 Chittaway Road
Ourimbah, NSW 2258
Australia
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