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Professor Mitch Duncan

NHMRC Career Development Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health

Could sleep be the missing piece of the weight loss puzzle?

We all know that what we eat and how much we exercise can affect our weight. We also know that sleep quality has a huge impact on our health. But how important is sleep for weight loss? This is the question Associate Professor Mitch Duncan is aiming to answer, and the huge investigation has been a long time coming.

Mitch’s exemplary public health expertise has developed through years of working with some of the best researchers in the business. He was drawn to Newcastle thanks to the stellar reputation of the Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition (PRC PAN).

“PRC PAN are known for their high quality research and so I wanted to come here and get involved with their intervention projects,” says Mitch.

Throughout his Health and Human Performance undergraduate degree, Mitch had a number of ideas about what he might like to do in the future. He considered working in education, cardiac rehabilitation or the health and safety sector. But in his final year, his fate was sealed – as part of one of his course requirements, he undertook a workplace placement. The workplace in question? The birthplace of 10,000 Steps – just as the project was kicking off.

The 10,000 Steps project is one of Australia’s greatest public health success stories. The project started at Central Queensland University in Rockhampton, and has since attracted more than 350,000 members from all over the world.

“That was where I first got experience in community level intervention research. I just knew, ‘This is for me, this is what I want to do,’” Mitch remembers. He continued working with the project, and also going on to complete his Honours and PhD research. He progressed from work experience student to project leader – and saw a number of changes along the way.

When 10,000 Steps was first conceived, participants were given pedometers and kept a physical log-book of their activity. With the increasing availability and popularity of smart-phones and fitness tracking devices, the project looks very different today. As Mitch witnessed this evolution of technology, he became interested in just how we can use these advances in health research, as well as to encourage physical activity in the  general community.

This technology evolution also plays into the PRC  PAN’s Move, Eat, Sleep trial, which is funded by Diabetes Australia and the Heart Foundation.

“This project is almost like an amalgamation of a few different interventions that we’ve had along the way.

“What we're now doing is bringing together activity, diet and sleep to ask: what is the added benefit of improving sleep in combination with diet and physical activity?

“We know that people with poor quality sleep tend to lose less weight compared to those with good quality sleep in a standard weight loss trial.

“No one has really tested to see whether improving the sleep of people can help them lose more weight, and keep it off for longer.

“It’s a big project, it’s super exciting!”

The project has been put together by Mitch, his colleagues in the PRC PAN and collaborators from universities across the country. Participants will receive personalised feedback on their health habits throughout the trail via a mobile app, and also in person.

“What we’d like to do is see how these basic lifestyle interventions can work in clinical populations.

“So we’d look at helping people who with diabetes, or people with existing sleep conditions.

“Ideally we’d be able to disseminate these interventions more widely - like we did with 10,000 Steps.”

Mitch has also been recognised for his work with the community – not just in disseminating health intervention strategies, but in communicating health research to the general public. In 2010, Mitch was presented with a Young Tall Poppy Award in recognition of his outstanding research and communications achievements. He was also a selected speaker for the international 2017 Pint of Science festival.

Could sleep be the missing piece of the weight loss puzzle?

UON Associate Professor Mitch Duncan is investigating how important sleep is for weight loss.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

My research is centred on getting people to be more physically active throughout the day and improving their sleep quality. This research is currently supported by a NHMRC Career Development Fellowship. I have also received funding for my research from the National Heart Foundation (Fellowships and Project Grants), the National Health and Medical Research Council, Australian Research Council and the Queensland Government.

The two key areas of my research are:
1) understanding how physical activity and sleep work together to influence health outcomes; 
2) developing and testing interventions to improve these behaviours. Much of this intervention work uses technologies such as mobile devices and the internet to deliver the interventions.

If you wish to undertake study or work in these areas, please contact me to discuss what opportunities may be available.

My research has received several awards including the National Heart Foundation Queensland Researcher of the Year and the Australian Institute of policy & Science Queensland Young Tall Poppy Award.

Research Expertise
The role of physical activity and sleep behaviours as joint influences of health status including obesity, CVD risk, diabetes and mental health. Clarifying the role of personal, social and environmental factors as influences of health behaviours with a focus on physical activity and sleep. The use of IT-based interventions to promote engagement in health behaviours. Including the use of smartphones, wearable technology. 



Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Central Queensland
  • Bachelor of Health&Human Perf(Hons)(Hum Move Sc), University of Central Queensland

Keywords

  • IT-based interventions
  • e-health
  • m-health
  • physical activity
  • sleep health

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111712 Health Promotion 50
111716 Preventive Medicine 30
110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/7/2006 - 1/12/2007 Career Development Fellow in Population Health and Physical Activity Central Queensland University
Australia
1/1/2011 - 30/4/2014 Research Fellow in Population Health Central Queensland University
Institute for Health and Social Science Research
1/1/2008 - 30/12/2010 Senior-postdoctoral Research Fellow in Population Health CQUniversity
Institute for Health and Social Science Research
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.

Highlighted Publications

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Murawski B, Wade L, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Duncan MJ, 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of cognitive and behavioral interventions to improve sleep health in adults without sleep disorders', Sleep Medicine Reviews, 40 160-169 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.smrv.2017.12.003
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Beatrice Murawski, Ron Plotnikoff, Beatrice Murawski Uon, David Lubans
2018 Murawski B, Plotnikoff RC, Rayward AT, Vandelanotte C, Brown WJ, Duncan MJ, 'Randomised controlled trial using a theory-based m-health intervention to improve physical activity and sleep health in adults: the Synergy Study protocol', BMJ OPEN, 8 (2018)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-018997
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Beatrice Murawski Uon, Beatrice Murawski
2019 Murawski B, Plotnikoff RC, Rayward AT, Oldmeadow C, Vandelanotte C, Brown WJ, Duncan M, 'Efficacy of an m-health physical activity and sleep health intervention for adults: a randomized waitlist-controlled trial.', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 57 503-514 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2019.05.009
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Christopher Oldmeadow, Beatrice Murawski Uon, Beatrice Murawski
2019 Oftedal S, Smith J, Vandelanotte C, Burton NW, Duncan MJ, 'Resistance training in addition to aerobic activity is associated with lower likelihood of depression and comorbid depression and anxiety symptoms: A cross sectional analysis of Australian women', Preventive Medicine, 126 1-8 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.105773
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Jordan Smith

Chapter (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Burke M, Stanley J, Duncan M, Stone J, Giles-Corti B, Hodge S, Bourke P, 'Action area 4: Active transport', Blueprint for an Active Australia, National Heart Foundation of Australia, Melbourne (2019)
2014 Burke M, Stanley J, Duncan MJJ, Stone J, Giles-Corti B, 'Action area 4 - Active travel', Blueprint for an active Australia, National Heart Foundation of Australia, Melbourne 32-37 (2014)
2010 Whitzman C, Romero V, Duncan M, Curtis C, Tranter P, Burke M, 'Links between Children's Independent Mobility, Active Transport, Physical Activity and Obesity', Preventing Childhood Obesity: Evidence Policy and Practice 105-112 (2010)
Citations Scopus - 16

Journal article (177 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Jansson AK, Lubans DR, Duncan MJ, Smith JJ, Plotnikoff M, Robards SL, Plotnikoff RC, 'Descriptive epidemiology of outdoor gym use in an Australian regional setting', Journal of Public Health (Germany), (2020)

© 2020, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature. Background: Outdoor gym installations have become a popular initiative by local government agencies globally to incr... [more]

© 2020, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature. Background: Outdoor gym installations have become a popular initiative by local government agencies globally to increase community-based physical activity. Despite their rapid spread, usage rates and user characteristics are not well described, particularly the mode/type of activity performed. This study aims to investigate the proportion and timing of outdoor gym use, and demographic characteristics of gym users across seven locations. Method: The current study employed a cross-sectional research design with observational measures to examine outdoor gym use across seven locations in a large regional area in New South Wales, Australia. An outdoor gym audit including the number of pieces and names of the equipment, and type of outdoor gym was undertaken in the month prior to data collection. Results: A total of 56¿h of observation periods were conducted, during which 2950 individuals were observed moving through the observation target areas. Across all parks, 3.8% of individuals (n = 112) were observed using the outdoor gyms for exercise purposes. Males (65%) were more likely to be observed using the equipment than females (35%) and there were more young-to-middle aged adult (83.9%) users than seniors (6.3%), adolescents (4.5%) and children (3.6%). Conclusion: Outdoor gyms have the potential to influence community-based physical inactivity rates as they appear to be a popular strategy by many government jurisdictions globally. To increase usage, local government agencies would benefit from working collaboratively with researchers to determine effective education and promotion strategies and in developing interventions to increase usage of outdoor gym equipment, particularly among women and older adults.

DOI 10.1007/s10389-020-01275-2
Co-authors Jordan Smith, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
2020 Antczak D, Lonsdale C, Lee J, Hilland T, Duncan MJ, del Pozo Cruz B, et al., 'Physical activity and sleep are inconsistently related in healthy children: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Sleep Medicine Reviews, 51 1-14 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.smrv.2020.101278
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2020 Deroover K, Bucher T, Vandelanotte C, de Vries H, Duncan M, 'Practical nutrition knowledge mediates the relationship between socio-demographic characteristics and diet quality in adults: A cross-sectional analysis.', American Journal of Health Promotion, 34 59-62 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0890117119878074
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Kristine Deroover, Tamara Bucher
2020 Rayward AT, Murawski B, Duncan MJ, Holliday EG, Vandelanotte C, Brown WJ, Plotnikoff RC, 'Efficacy of an m-Health Physical Activity and Sleep Intervention to Improve Sleep Quality in Middle-Aged Adults: The Refresh Study Randomized Controlled Trial', Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, 54 470-483 (2020) [C1]

© Society of Behavioral Medicine 2020. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. BACKGROUND: Poor sleep health is highly prevalent. Physic... [more]

© Society of Behavioral Medicine 2020. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. BACKGROUND: Poor sleep health is highly prevalent. Physical activity is known to improve sleep quality but not specifically targeted in sleep interventions. PURPOSE: To compare the efficacy of a combined physical activity and sleep intervention with a sleep-only intervention and a wait-list control, for improving sleep quality in middle-aged adults without a diagnosed sleep disorder. METHODS: Three-arm randomized controlled trial (Physical Activity and Sleep Health (PAS), Sleep Health Only (SO), Wait-list Control (CON) groups; 3-month primary time-point, 6-month follow-up) of 275 (PAS = 110, SO = 110, CON = 55) inactive adults (40-65 years) reporting poor sleep quality. The main intervention component was a smartphone/tablet "app" to aid goal setting and self-monitoring physical activity and/or sleep hygiene behaviors (including stress management), and a pedometer for PAS group. Primary outcome was Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) global score. Secondary outcomes included several self-reported physical activity measures and PSQI subcomponents. Group differences were examined stepwise, first between pooled intervention (PI = PAS + SO) and CON groups, then between PAS and SO groups. RESULTS: Compared with CON, PI groups significantly improved PSQI global and subcomponents scores at 3 and 6 months. There were no differences in sleep quality between PAS and SO groups. The PAS group reported significantly less daily sitting time at 3 months and was significantly more likely to report =2 days/week resistance training and meeting physical activity guidelines at 6 months than the SO group. CONCLUSIONS: PIs had statistically significantly improved sleep quality among middle-aged adults with poor sleep quality without a diagnosed sleep disorder. The adjunctive physical activity intervention did not additionally improve sleep quality. CLINICAL TRIAL INFORMATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry: ACTRN12617000680369; Universal Trial number: U1111-1194-2680; Human Research Ethics Committee, Blinded by request of journal: H-2016-0267.

DOI 10.1093/abm/kaz064
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Beatrice Murawski, Liz Holliday, Beatrice Murawski Uon, Ron Plotnikoff
2020 Oftedal S, Glozier N, Holliday EG, Duncan MJ, 'Diet quality and depressive symptoms. Assessing the direction of the association in a population-based cohort study', Journal of Affective Disorders, 274 347-353 (2020) [C1]

© 2020 Background: Emerging evidence links a poor diet with mental ill-health although the direction of this association is unclear. The aim was to examine the bidirectional prosp... [more]

© 2020 Background: Emerging evidence links a poor diet with mental ill-health although the direction of this association is unclear. The aim was to examine the bidirectional prospective relationships between core (and non-core food consumption, and symptoms of depression. Methods: Depressive symptoms (Mental Health Index-5, MHI-5), current/prior depression and consumption of core (recommended food groups) and non-core (discretionary) foods were assessed in the population-based 2013 and 2017 Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia cohort study. Three cross-lagged linear models assessed associations between all three baseline variables in 2013, alternating 2017 variables as outcomes. Results: In the population (n = 10,003; 48.3% women; 48.5[15.7] years), core food score in 2013 was associated with MHI-5 (ß:0.102, 95%CI: 0.010,0.193) in 2017, while the non-core food score was not (ß:-0.030, 95%CI:-0.099,0.160). Depressive symptom score in 2013 was not associated with either food score in 2017. Current/prior diagnosis of depression in 2013 was associated with core (ß:-0.198, 95%CI:-0.329,-0.067) but not non-core (ß:-0.036, 95%CI: -0.151,0.080) food score in 2017. Limitations: Results may not be generalizable to the whole population due to some selection bias, self-report depression diagnosis may have led to misclassification of previous mental illness, and core and non-core food scores are not validated measures of diet quality. Conclusions: There is a prospective association between core food consumption and depressive symptoms. This association is of small magnitude and we cannot discount insufficient core food consumption reflecting an effect of prior mental illness. Our results suggest that, for depression, public health focus should be on improving core food intake.

DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2020.05.046
Co-authors Liz Holliday
2020 Soprovich AL, Seaton CL, Bottorff JL, Duncan MJ, Caperchione CM, Oliffe JL, et al., 'A systematic review of workplace behavioral interventions to promote sleep health in men', Sleep Health, 6 418-430 (2020) [C1]

© 2020 National Sleep Foundation Sleep health is an important aspect of wellbeing and merits incorporation into workplace health promotion programs for employees. Men are a unique... [more]

© 2020 National Sleep Foundation Sleep health is an important aspect of wellbeing and merits incorporation into workplace health promotion programs for employees. Men are a unique population with whom many traditional workplace health promotion programs have had limited success. This systematic review posed the question do workplace health promotion programs improve sleep among men, and what program design features contribute to improving sleep among working men? Databases searched were MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, CINHAL, Academic Search Complete and Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition and Google Scholar. Empirical research reporting non-pharmacological behavioral sleep programs and/or interventions for working men were eligible for review. 1049 articles were identified; 15 intervention studies were included: 13 interventions were delivered through workplaces, and two recruited workers to programs delivered outside of work. Interventions incorporated health education, stress reduction/relaxation, and/or physical activity components. Eleven studies reported positive findings for sleep health outcome(s) in men. A moderate level of evidence exists for sleep health programs with physical activity and stress management components. Evidence for the effectiveness of sleep health education programs was mixed. That only one study included a gender-sensitized intervention, where men's preferences shaped the content of a stress-reduction program which resulted in improved sleep quality, attests to the insufficient evidence and lack of gender-specific content and analyses. Next research steps should include considering cultural constructions of masculinity in program design in order to strengthen the appeal and engagement of men, and optimize health benefits for working men.

DOI 10.1016/j.sleh.2020.04.008
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Carole James
2020 Inan-Eroglu E, Powell L, Hamer M, O donovan G, Duncan MJ, Stamatakis E, 'Is there a link between different types of alcoholic drinks and obesity? An analysis of 280,183 UK biobank participants', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 1-18 (2020) [C1]

© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Understanding the associations between types of alcoholic drinks and adiposity has public health relevance, considering t... [more]

© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Understanding the associations between types of alcoholic drinks and adiposity has public health relevance, considering that adult overweight and obesity prevalence are increasing worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the association between overall alcohol consumption and types of alcohol drinks with markers of adiposity from the UK Biobank baseline data (n = 280,183, 48.3% female). Generalized linear models were used to examine the associations between alcohol consumption with body mass index (BMI) and body fat percentage. Those drinking within the public health guidelines had a lower BMI by 1.34 kg/m2 (95% CI 1.42, 1.26 kg/m2) compared to never drinkers. Association between alcohol consumption and body fat percentage were not statistically significant. Compared to those who never drink wines (red wine, champagne and fortified wine), drinkers of these alcoholic beverages had lower BMI (difference of -0.75 kg/m2, 95% CI -0.78, -0.72 kg/m2; -0.48 kg/m2, 95% CI -0.52, -0.45 kg/m2; and -0.24 kg/m2, 95% CI -0.29, -0.18 kg/m2, respectively). Beer and spirits drinkers had higher BMI compared to never drinkers of beer and spirits (difference of 0.18 kg/m2, 95% CI 0.14, 0.22 kg/m2 and 0.64 kg/m2, 95% CI 0.61, 0.68 kg/m2, respectively). Our data did not find a link between alcohol drinking and higher risk of obesity.

DOI 10.3390/ijerph17145178
2020 Oftedal S, Holliday EG, Attia J, Brown WJ, Collins CE, Ewald B, et al., 'Daily steps and diet, but not sleep, are related to mortality in older Australians', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 23 276-282 (2020)

© 2019 Sports Medicine Australia Objectives: Supporting healthy ageing is a key priority worldwide. Physical activity, diet quality and sleep are all associated with health outcom... [more]

© 2019 Sports Medicine Australia Objectives: Supporting healthy ageing is a key priority worldwide. Physical activity, diet quality and sleep are all associated with health outcomes, but few studies have explored their independent associations with all-cause mortality in an older population in the same model. The study aim was to examine associations between step-count, self-reported diet quality, restless sleep, and all-cause mortality in adults aged 55¿85 years. Design: A prospective cohort study of adults in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. Method: Data were from 1697 participants (49.3% women; baseline mean age 65.4 ± 7.1 years). Daily steps (measured by pedometer), diet quality (from a modified Australian Recommended Food Score), and frequency of restless sleep (by self-report) were assessed in relation to all-cause mortality using Cox proportional hazard regression with adjustment for sex, age, household income and smoking. Baseline data were collected between January 2005 and April 2008, and last follow-up was in March 2017 (median follow-up 9.6 years). Results: Higher step count (HR: 0.93, 95%CI: 0.88¿0.98 per 1000-step increment) and higher diet quality (HR: 0.86, 95%CI: 0.74¿0.99 per 8-point increment in diet quality score) were associated with reduced mortality risk. Restless sleep for =3 nights/week was not associated with mortality risk (HR: 1.03, 95%CI: 0.78¿1.39). Sensitivity analyses, adjusting for chronic disease and excluding deaths <1 year after baseline, did not change these estimates. Conclusions: Increased daily steps and consumption of a greater variety of nutrient-dense foods every week would result in substantial health benefits for older people. Future research should include a greater variety of sleep measures.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2019.09.018
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, John Attia, Ben Ewald, Liz Holliday, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Mark Mcevoy
2020 Wade L, Leahy A, Lubans DR, Smith JJ, Duncan MJ, 'A systematic review of cognitive assessment in physical activity research involving children and adolescents', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 23 740-745 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2019.12.020
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jordan Smith, Angus Leahy, David Lubans
2020 Vincent GE, Gupta CC, Sprajcer M, Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, Tucker P, et al., 'Are prolonged sitting and sleep restriction a dual curse for the modern workforce? a randomised controlled trial protocol', BMJ OPEN, 10 (2020)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-040613
2020 Memon AR, Vandelanotte C, Olds T, Duncan MJ, Vincent GE, 'Research Combining Physical Activity and Sleep: A Bibliometric Analysis', Perceptual and Motor Skills, 127 154-181 (2020) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2019. This study used a bibliometric analysis through the Scopus database to examine papers that combined physical activity and sleep, published between 1979 and 2... [more]

© The Author(s) 2019. This study used a bibliometric analysis through the Scopus database to examine papers that combined physical activity and sleep, published between 1979 and 2018. Bibliometric indicators of productivity included publication volume and citation distribution, top 10 authors, average authors per paper, single- and multicountry collaboration, collaborative index, top 10 countries, leading journals, highly cited papers and network visualization for coauthorship, international collaboration, and co-occurrence of author keywords. The initial search identified 1,509 papers, of which 607 passed through comprehensive screening and were included in the final analysis. Most of the papers were research articles (90.8%) and published in English (90.8%). Most papers (81.4%) were published within the past decade, 2009¿2018. The mean number of papers published per year was 15.2, the mean number of citations per paper was 257.3, and the mean number of authors per paper was 5.5. International collaboration was evident for 21.6% of the papers, and 95.6% of papers were multiauthored. The most prolific publishing institutions and authors were from the United States, Canada, Australia, Switzerland, and Brazil. Keyword analysis suggested that almost all age groups and study designs were covered, but most papers focus on noncommunicable diseases. Although there has been a rise in scientific production on combined physical activity and sleep research in recent years, future work in this area should include researchers from developing countries.

DOI 10.1177/0031512519889780
Citations Scopus - 1
2020 Austin G, Duncan MJ, Bell T, 'Codesigning Parks for Increasing Park Visits and Physical Activity in a Low-Socioeconomic Community: The Active By Community Design Experience', HEALTH PROMOTION PRACTICE, (2020)
DOI 10.1177/1524839919900768
Citations Scopus - 1
2020 Burrows T, Fenton S, Duncan M, 'Diet and sleep health: a scoping review of intervention studies in adults.', J Hum Nutr Diet, 33 308-329 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jhn.12709
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Tracy Burrows
2020 Murawski B, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Rayward AT, Brown WJ, Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, 'Examining mediators of intervention efficacy in a randomised controlled m-health trial to improve physical activity and sleep health in adults.', Psychol Health, 1-22 (2020)
DOI 10.1080/08870446.2020.1756288
Co-authors Beatrice Murawski, Beatrice Murawski Uon, David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff
2020 Vandelanotte C, Van Itallie A, Brown W, Mummery WK, Duncan MJ, 'Every Step Counts: Understanding the Success of Implementing the 10,000 Steps Project', Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 268 15-30 (2020) [C1]

© 2020 The authors and IOS Press. All rights reserved. The 10,000 Steps program originated from a landmark whole-of-community multi-strategy intervention to increase physical acti... [more]

© 2020 The authors and IOS Press. All rights reserved. The 10,000 Steps program originated from a landmark whole-of-community multi-strategy intervention to increase physical activity (PA) in Rockhampton, Australia in 2001-2003. It used a social ecological framework to promote physical activity at the individual, population, environmental and policy level. Two of the fundamental aspects of the original program were goal setting (10,000 steps per day) and self-monitoring (use of a pedometer for daily step counts). A project website (www.10000steps.org.au) allowed registered participants to record their physical activity. Over time the program morphed into an e- & mHealth intervention without face-to-face elements. The program is now delivered via website and smartphone apps and employs activity trackers (pedometers, Fitbit, Garmin). To date the project has signed-up over 425,000 members who have logged 221 billion steps (?43 million a day) on the website or app. More than 14,000 workplaces and community organisations have been involved with the program. A central element of the program, the 'Workplace Challenge' has been used by ?65% of 10,000 Steps members, which on average increases physical activity by 159 min/week for those who participate in it. In 2011, the Queensland Government designated the 10,000 Steps program as their key physical activity workplace health promotion strategy. Multiple factors underpin the success of the program. The message is simple and clear: the project name, with its distinctive logo and tagline ('Every Step Counts') provides a clear and prescriptive target for the physical activity 'dose'. Using effective behaviour change techniques: goal setting (the 10,000 Steps concept), self-monitoring (steps are tracked), social support (participants organise as 'teams' to reach certain step goals) and gamification (teams competing against each other creating 'friendly competition'). Ongoing redevelopment: since inception, there have been three complete redesigns of the website (including a branding redesign), and new smartphone apps. More recently, the website was modified to allow syncing of steps using popular activity trackers. Resources to support implementation: the program provides resources (e.g. 'Active Workplace Guide') and has dedicated staff to respond to queries from workplaces and individuals to help overcome implementation barriers. Project staff continuously promote the program via media interviews, attendance at events, social media and marketing, advertising, and networking and collaboration. Ongoing evaluation has contributed to continuous funding: to ensure the program remains successful in a fast-changing technology environment, continuous evaluation has been necessary. These evaluation strategies, the success of the original project and the strong partnership with the program funder (Queensland Health) have all contributed to the long-term (19 years) support for the project.

DOI 10.3233/SHTI200003
Citations Scopus - 1
2020 Kolt GS, Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, Rosenkranz RR, Maeder AJ, Savage TN, et al., 'Successes and Challenges of an IT- ased Health Behaviour Change Program to Increase Physical Activity', Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 268 31-43 (2020)

© 2020 The authors and IOS Press. All rights reserved. Health behaviour change programs that utilise IT-based delivery have great potential to improve health. Whilst more static W... [more]

© 2020 The authors and IOS Press. All rights reserved. Health behaviour change programs that utilise IT-based delivery have great potential to improve health. Whilst more static Web 1.0 technologies have been somewhat effective, they often failed to promote longer-term user engagement required for greater health promotion impact. With Web 2.0 technologies, however, there is potential for greater engagement and retention, through allowing individuals to determine how information is generated, modified, and shared collaboratively. The WALK 2.0 study utilised a Web 2.0-based platform to engage participants in health behaviour change aimed at increasing physical activity levels. The program included two trials: (1) a three-arm randomised controlled trial (RCT) that compared the effectiveness of Web 2.0, Web 1.0, and paper-based logbook interventions; and (2) a real-world randomised ecological trial (RET) that compared a Web 2.0 and Web 1.0 intervention. The aim of this paper is not to focus on the research trial results per se, but rather the success factors and challenges in both the RCT and RET. Both the RCT and RET demonstrated successful outcomes, with greater improvements in physical activity for the Web 2.0 groups. A range of challenges, however, were identified in designing, implementing, and evaluating such interventions. These include IT-based intervention development within a research context, the ability to establish a self-sustaining online community, the rapid pace of change in web-based technology and implications for trial design, the selection of best outcome measures for ecological trials, and managing engagement, non-usage and study attrition in real-world trials. Future research and developments in this area must look to broader research designs that allow for the ever-changing IT-user landscape and behaviour, and greater reliance on development and testing in real-world settings.

DOI 10.3233/SHTI200004
2020 Duncan MJ, Fenton S, Brown WJ, Collins CE, Glozier N, Kolt GS, et al., 'Efficacy of a Multi-component m-Health Weight-loss Intervention in Overweight and Obese Adults: A Randomised Controlled Trial.', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17176200
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Beatrice Murawski, Tracy Burrows
2020 Duncan MJ, Oftedal S, Rebar AL, Murawski B, Short CE, Rayward AT, Vandelanotte C, 'Patterns of physical activity, sitting time, and sleep in Australian adults: A latent class analysis', Sleep Health, (2020)

© 2020 National Sleep Foundation Objective: To identify the patterns of activity, sitting and sleep that adults engage in, the demographic and biological correlates of activity-sl... [more]

© 2020 National Sleep Foundation Objective: To identify the patterns of activity, sitting and sleep that adults engage in, the demographic and biological correlates of activity-sleep patterns and the relationship between identified patterns and self-rated health. Design and Setting: Online panel of randomly selected Australian adults (n = 2034) completing a cross-sectional survey in October-November 2013. Participants: Panel members who provided complete data on all variables were included (n = 1532). Measurements: Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, height, weight, self-rated health, duration of physical activity, frequency of resistance training, sitting time, sleep duration, sleep quality, and variability in bed and wake times. Activity-sleep patterns were determined using latent class analysis. Latent class regression was used to examine the relationships between identified patterns, demographic and biological characteristics, and self-rated health. Results: A 4-class model fit the data best, characterized by very active good sleepers, inactive good sleepers, inactive poor sleepers, moderately active good sleepers, representing 38.2%, 22.2%, 21.2%, and 18.4% of the sample, respectively. Relative to the very active good sleepers, the inactive poor sleepers, and inactive good sleepers were more likely to report being female, lower education, higher body mass index, and lower self-rated health, the moderately active good sleepers were more likely to be older, report lower education, higher body mass index and lower self-rated health. Associations between activity-sleep pattern and self-rated health were the largest in the inactive poor sleepers. Conclusions: The 4 activity-sleep patterns identified had distinct behavioral profiles, sociodemographic correlates, and relationships with self-rated health. Many adults could benefit from behavioral interventions targeting improvements in physical activity and sleep.

DOI 10.1016/j.sleh.2020.04.006
Co-authors Beatrice Murawski
2020 Wade L, Lubans DR, Smith JJ, Duncan MJ, 'The impact of exercise environments on adolescents cognitive and psychological outcomes: A randomised controlled trial', Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 49 1-9 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.psychsport.2020.101707
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors David Lubans, Jordan Smith
2020 Hamer M, Ding D, Chau J, Duncan MJ, Stamatakis E, 'Association between TV viewing and heart disease mortality: Observational study using negative control outcome', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 74 391-394 (2020) [C1]

© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. Aims Sedentary behaviour (particularly television (TV) viewing) is tho... [more]

© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. Aims Sedentary behaviour (particularly television (TV) viewing) is thought to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We employed a negative control outcome to explore whether the association between TV viewing and heart disease mortality is explained by confounding. Methods The sample was drawn from the UK Biobank study and comprised 479 658 participants (aged 56.5±8.0 years; 45.7% men) followed up over a mean of 10.4 years. TV viewing was measured from self-report. Results There were 1437 ischaemic heart disease (IHD) deaths, and 214 accidental deaths (employed as the negative control outcome). TV viewing was related to the following confounding variables: age, smoking, alcohol, diet, obesity, physical inactivity, cardiovascular disease and education. The confounding structures were similar for both outcomes. TV viewing (per hour/d) was associated with IHD (hazard ratio (HR)=1.30, 95% CI, 1.27 to 1.33) and accidental death (HR=1.15, 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.24) in unadjusted models. Associations were attenuated for both outcomes and were considerably converged after adjustment for confounders; IHD (HR=1.09, 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.12) and accidental death (HR=1.06, 95% CI, 0.98 to 1.15). Conclusion The pattern of results for TV with an implausible outcome mirrored that of IHD, suggesting that observed associations between TV and heart disease are likely to be driven by confounding.

DOI 10.1136/jech-2019-212739
Citations Scopus - 2
2020 van Waveren A, Duncan MJ, Coulson F, Fenning A, 'Moderate-intensity physical activity reduces systemic inflammation and maintains cardiorespiratory function following chronic particulate matter

© 2019 Aims: The purpose of the current study is to 1) examine the beneficial effects of moderate levels of physical activity (PA) on functional and biochemical markers of the car... [more]

© 2019 Aims: The purpose of the current study is to 1) examine the beneficial effects of moderate levels of physical activity (PA) on functional and biochemical markers of the cardiorespiratory system, 2) establish the detrimental effects of a single, daily particulate matter (PM) exposure event on cardiorespiratory function and 3) determine if exercising during daily PM exposure increases the deleterious effects caused by PM exposure due to increased inhalation of particulates on cardiorespiratory function. Methods: Four groups of 16 rats were used: control (CON), PA, PM2.5 exposed and PA combined with PM2.5 exposure (PA + PM). Animals were purchased at 4 weeks old. However, both PA and PM exposure was initiated when the animals reached 8 weeks of age, for 8 weeks. Results: PA alone did not alter body weight or blood pressure (BP) compared to control animals. However, there was a significant decrease in epididymal fat pad mass in the PA group. The PM exposed rats were hypertensive, showed increased systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, and had decreased spleen mass without pathological changes in the cardiac action potential or impaired vascular function. PA was able to decrease systemic inflammation in PM exposed animals, including a reduction in IL-6 serum levels, however, this did not translate to an improvement in BP or vascular reactivity. Smooth muscle relaxation in the trachea from the combination PA + PM group was not significantly different to CON and PA groups but was significantly higher than the PM group. Conclusions: The current study showed that while there is an increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk associated with PM exposure, engaging in PA during exposure events imposes no increased risk with exercise providing a protective mechanism against some of the biochemical signaling changes caused by inhaled PM.

DOI 10.1016/j.toxrep.2019.12.004
2020 Powell L, Feng Y, Duncan MJ, Hamer M, Stamatakis E, 'Does a physically active lifestyle attenuate the association between alcohol consumption and mortality risk? Findings from the UK biobank', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 130 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.105901
2019 Alley S, van Uffelen JGZ, Schoeppe S, Parkinson L, Hunt S, Power D, et al., 'Efficacy of a computer-tailored web-based physical activity intervention using Fitbits for older adults: a randomised controlled trial protocol', BMJ OPEN, 9 (2019)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-033305
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors L Parkinson
2019 Biddle SJH, Bennie JA, De Cocker K, Dunstan D, Gardiner PA, Healy GN, et al., 'Controversies in the Science of Sedentary Behaviour and Health: Insights, Perspectives and Future directions from the 2018 Queensland Sedentary Behaviour Think Tank', International journal of environmental research and public health, 16 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph16234762
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2019 Oftedal S, Kolt GS, Holliday EG, Stamatakis E, Vandelanotte C, Brown WJ, Duncan MJ, 'Associations of health-behavior patterns, mental health and self-rated health', Preventive Medicine, 118 295-303 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Diet quality, physical activity, alcohol use, smoking, sleep and sitting-time are behaviors known to influence health. The aims of this study were to identify how these beh... [more]

© 2018 Diet quality, physical activity, alcohol use, smoking, sleep and sitting-time are behaviors known to influence health. The aims of this study were to identify how these behaviors co-occur to form distinct health-behavior patterns, and to investigate the relationship between these patterns, and mental and self-rated health. Members of the Australian 10,000 Steps project were invited to participate in an online survey in November¿December 2011. The participants self-reported demographic and behavioral characteristics (fruit and vegetable intake, fast food, soft drink and alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, sitting-time and sleep), frequency of mental distress and self-rated health. Latent Class Analysis was used to identify health-behavior patterns. Latent class regression was used to examine relationships between behavior patterns, mental and self-rated health, and socio-demographic and economic factors. Data were analyzed in October 2017. Complete datasets were obtained from 10,638 participants. Four latent classes were identified, characterized by ¿Low-Risk Behavior¿, ¿Poor Sleep, Low-Risk Daytime Behavior¿, 'sound Sleep, High-Risk Daytime Behavior¿ and ¿High-Risk Behavior¿. The latter two classes, both characterized by high-risk daytime behaviors, were associated with poor self-rated health. Participants in classes with high-risk daytime behaviors were more likely to be younger, non-partnered, non-university educated, from lower income households and work longer hours. Classes characterized by poor sleep quality were associated with higher frequency of mental distress. Findings suggest that experiencing poor sleep is partly independent of daytime behaviors, demographic and socioeconomic factors, but has a strong association with mental health.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.11.017
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Liz Holliday
2019 Oftedal S, Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, 'Patterns of Diet, Physical Activity, Sitting and Sleep Are Associated with Socio-Demographic, Behavioural, and Health-Risk Indicators in Adults', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 16 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph16132375
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
2019 Duncan MJ, Caperchione CM, Corry K, Van Itallie A, Vandelanotte C, 'A RE-AIM Evaluation of a Workplace Physical Activity Microgrant Initiative', Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 61 718-723 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/jom.0000000000001653
2019 Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, Stanton R, Rosenkranz RR, Caperchione CM, Rebar AL, et al., 'Validity and responsiveness to change of the Active Australia Survey according to gender, age, BMI, education, and physical activity level and awareness', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 19 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12889-019-6717-1
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2019 Miller A, Eather N, Duncan M, Lubans DR, 'Associations of object control motor skill proficiency, game play competence, physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness among primary school children', Journal of Sports Sciences, 37 173-179 (2019) [C1]

© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor &amp; Francis Group. This study investigated if object control relates to children¿s game play competence, and examined thes... [more]

© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This study investigated if object control relates to children¿s game play competence, and examined these competencies as correlates of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness. Game play (Game Performance Assessment Instrument), object control (The Test Gross Motor Development-3), moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (Accelerometry), and cardiorespiratory fitness (20-metre shuttle) assessments were completed for 107 children (57% Female, 43% Male) aged 9¿12¿years (M 10.53, SD 0.65). Two-level regression of object control on game play competence, and object control and game play competence on physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness assessed associations. Object control competence was positively associated with game play competence (Std. B¿=¿0.25, t (104.77)¿=¿2.38, p¿=¿0.001). Game play competence (Std. B¿=¿0.33, t (99.81)¿=¿5.21, p¿<¿0.000) was more strongly associated with moderate-to-vigorous physical activity than object control competence (Std. B¿=¿0.20, t (106.93)¿=¿2.96, p¿=¿0.003). Likewise, game competence (Std. B¿=¿0.39, t (104.41)¿=¿4.36, p¿<¿0.000) was more strongly associated with cardiorespiratory fitness than object control competence (Std. B¿=¿0.22, t (106.69)¿=¿2.63, p¿=¿0.002). Object control and game competence are both important as correlates of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness in children.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2018.1488384
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Narelle Eather, Andrew Miller, David Lubans
2019 Bergeron M, Duncan MJ, West LR, 'Focus on the 'E' in SEM: Sports Medicine Australia invites you to the Sunshine Coast on 23-26 October 2019', BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, 53 457-458 (2019)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2018-100527
2019 Alley SJ, Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, Short CE, Maher JP, Schoeppe S, Rebar AL, 'Should i sit or stand: Likelihood of adherence to messages about reducing sitting time', BMC Public Health, 19 1-9 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12889-019-7189-z
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2019 Rayward AT, Vandelanotte C, Corry K, Van Itallie A, Duncan MJ, 'Impact of a Social Media Campaign on Reach, Uptake, and Engagement with a Free Web- and App-Based Physical Activity Intervention: The 10,000 Steps Australia Program', International journal of environmental research and public health, 16 1-17 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph16245076
Citations Web of Science - 1
2019 Jansson AK, Lubans DR, Smith JJ, Duncan MJ, Bauman A, Attia J, et al., 'Integrating smartphone technology, social support and the outdoor built environment to promote community-based aerobic and resistance-based physical activity: Rationale and study protocol for the ecofit randomized controlled trial', Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications, 16 1-11 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.conctc.2019.100457
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors David Lubans, John Attia, Ron Plotnikoff, Jordan Smith
2019 Jansson AK, Lubans DR, Smith JJ, Duncan MJ, Haslam R, Plotnikoff RC, 'A systematic review of outdoor gym use: Current evidence and future directions', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 22 1335-1343 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Sports Medicine Australia Objectives: While outdoor gyms are being rapidly installed around the globe, little is known about their implications on physical activity, and fi... [more]

© 2019 Sports Medicine Australia Objectives: While outdoor gyms are being rapidly installed around the globe, little is known about their implications on physical activity, and fitness and other health-related outcomes. The primary objective of this systematic review was to examine the effects of outdoor gyms on physical activity, fitness and other health-related outcomes. Secondary objectives were to describe outdoor gym characteristics, user characteristics, and outdoor gym usage. Design: Systematic review. Methods: Peer-reviewed papers published in English were obtained through online database searches of the following databases; EBSCO, SPORTdiscus, Medline, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Scopus and Informit. Searches covered the periods from database inception to January 2019. Studies that reported on the efficacy of outdoor gym use for physical activity, health-related outcomes or descriptive aspects of outdoor gyms and their users were eligible for inclusion. Results: There was some support that outdoor gyms may improve physical activity, fitness and other health-related outcomes, however few experimental studies have been conducted. There was no consistency between outdoor gyms in terms types and number of installed equipment for each facility. Further, this review found discrepancies of whom were the most likely users of outdoor gyms and when they were mainly used. Conclusions: This review contributes to the limited evidence on the impact and characteristics of outdoor gyms on physical activity and fitness and health-related outcomes.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2019.08.003
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Jordan Smith, David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff
2019 Gordon S, Vandelanotte C, Rayward AT, Murawski B, Duncan MJ, 'Sociodemographic and behavioral correlates of insufficient sleep in Australian adults', SLEEP HEALTH, 5 12-17 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.sleh.2018.06.002
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Beatrice Murawski Uon, Beatrice Murawski
2019 Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, Kolt GS, Caperchione CM, Savage TN, Van Itallie A, et al., 'More real-world trials are needed to establish if web-based physical activity interventions are effective', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 53 1553-1554 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2018-099437
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow
2019 Paterson JL, Reynolds AC, Duncan M, Vandelanotte C, Ferguson SA, 'Barriers and Enablers to Modifying Sleep Behavior in Adolescents and Young Adults: A Qualitative Investigation', Behavioral Sleep Medicine, 17 1-11 (2019) [C1]

© 2018, © 2018 Taylor &amp; Francis Group, LLC. Objective: Many young adults obtain less than the recommended sleep duration for healthy and safe functioning. Behavior change in... [more]

© 2018, © 2018 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Objective: Many young adults obtain less than the recommended sleep duration for healthy and safe functioning. Behavior change interventions have had only moderate success in increasing sleep duration for this cohort. This may be because the way young adults think about sleep, including their willingness and ability to change sleep behavior, is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine what changes, if any, young adults are willing to make to their sleep behavior, and to identify factors that may enable or prevent these changes. Participants: Fifty-seven young adults (16¿25 years; 57% female) took part in focus groups addressing (a) willingness to change, (b) desired outcomes of change, and (c) barriers to change in regards to sleep behavior. Methods: An inductive approach to data analysis was employed, involving data immersion, coding, categorization, and theme generation. Results: Participants were willing to change sleep behavior, and had previously employed strategies including advancing bedtime and minimizing phone use, with limited success. Desired changes were improved waking function, advanced sleep onset, optimized sleep periods, and improved sleep habits. Barriers to making these changes included time demands, technology use, difficulty switching off, and unpredictable habits. Young adults want to improve sleep behavior and waking function; this is an important first step in modifying behavior. Notably, participants wanted more efficient and better quality sleep, rather than increasing sleep duration. Conclusion: The reported barriers to sleep, particularly using technology for social purposes, will require innovative and specialized strategies if they are to be overcome.

DOI 10.1080/15402002.2016.1266489
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 13
2019 Oftedal S, Burrows T, Fenton S, Murawski B, Rayward AB, Duncan MJ, 'Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of an m-Health Intervention Targeting Physical Activity, Diet, and Sleep Quality in Shift-Workers', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 16 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph16203810
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Beatrice Murawski Uon, Beatrice Murawski
2019 Murawski B, Plotnikoff RC, Rayward AT, Oldmeadow C, Vandelanotte C, Brown WJ, Duncan M, 'Efficacy of an m-health physical activity and sleep health intervention for adults: a randomized waitlist-controlled trial.', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 57 503-514 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2019.05.009
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Christopher Oldmeadow, Beatrice Murawski Uon, Beatrice Murawski
2019 Hobbs M, Duncan MJ, Collins P, McKenna J, Schoeppe S, Rebar AL, et al., 'Clusters of health behaviours in Queensland adults are associated with different socio-demographic characteristics', Journal of Public Health (United Kingdom), 41 268-277 (2019)

© 2018 The Author(s). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of 268 Public Health. All rights reserved. Background The co-occurrence of unhealthy lifestyles, ca... [more]

© 2018 The Author(s). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of 268 Public Health. All rights reserved. Background The co-occurrence of unhealthy lifestyles, calls for interventions that target multiple health behaviours. This study investigates the clustering of health behaviours and examines demographic differences between each cluster. Methods In total, 934 adults from Queensland, Australia completed a cross-sectional survey assessing multiple health behaviours. A two-step hierarchical cluster analysis using multiple iterations identified the optimal number of clusters and the subset of distinguishing health behaviour variables. Univariate analyses of variance and chi-squared tests assessed difference in health behaviours by socio-demographic factors and clusters. Results Three clusters were identified: The 'lower risk' cluster (n = 436) reported the healthiest profile and met all public health guidelines. The 'elevated risk' cluster (n = 105) reported a range of unhealthy behaviours such as excessive alcohol consumption, sitting time, fast-food consumption, smoking, inactivity and a lack of fruit and vegetables. The 'moderate risk behaviour' cluster (n = 393) demonstrated some unhealthy behaviours with low physical activity levels and poor dietary outcomes. The 'elevated risk' cluster were significantly younger and more socio-economically disadvantaged than both the 'lower and moderate risk' clusters. Discussion Younger people who live in more deprived areas were largely within the 'elevated risk' cluster and represent an important population for MHBC interventions given their wide range of unhealthy behaviours.

DOI 10.1093/pubmed/fdy043
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2019 Duncan MJ, Kolt GS, 'Learning from community-led and co-designed m-health interventions', The Lancet Digital Health, 1 e248-e249 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/S2589-7500(19)30125-6
2019 Oftedal S, Smith J, Vandelanotte C, Burton NW, Duncan MJ, 'Resistance training in addition to aerobic activity is associated with lower likelihood of depression and comorbid depression and anxiety symptoms: A cross sectional analysis of Australian women', Preventive Medicine, 126 1-8 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.105773
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Jordan Smith
2019 Murawski B, Plotnikoff RC, Duncan MJ, 'Development and psychometric testing of an instrument to assess psychosocial determinants of sleep hygiene practice', JOURNAL OF HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY, (2019)
DOI 10.1177/1359105319891524
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Beatrice Murawski, Beatrice Murawski Uon
2018 Rayward A, Plotnikoff R, Vandelanotte C, Brown WJ, Holliday E, Duncan MJJ, 'A randomised controlled trial to test the efficacy of an m-health delivered physical activity and sleep intervention to improve sleep quality in middle-aged adults: The Refresh Study Protocol', Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications, 73 36-50 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2018.08.007
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Beatrice Murawski, Beatrice Murawski Uon, Liz Holliday, Ron Plotnikoff
2018 Alley SJ, Kolt GS, Duncan MJ, Caperchione CM, Savage TN, Maeder AJ, et al., 'The effectiveness of a web 2.0 physical activity intervention in older adults - a randomised controlled trial', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 15 1-11 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0641-5
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
2018 Duncan MJ, Brown WJ, Burrows TL, Collins CE, Fenton S, Glozier N, et al., 'Examining the efficacy of a multicomponent m-Health physical activity, diet and sleep intervention for weight loss in overweight and obese adults: randomised controlled trial protocol', BMJ OPEN, 8 (2018)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-026179
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Liz Holliday, Michael Hensley, Beatrice Murawski, Tracy Burrows, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Beatrice Murawski Uon
2018 Alley S, Van Uffelen JGZ, Duncan MJ, De Cocker K, Schoeppe S, Rebar AL, Vandelanotte C, 'Sitting time in adults 65 years and over: Behavior, knowledge, and intentions to change', Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 26 276-283 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Human Kinetics, Inc. This study examined sitting time, knowledge, and intentions to change sitting time in older adults. An online survey was completed by 494 Australians a... [more]

© 2018 Human Kinetics, Inc. This study examined sitting time, knowledge, and intentions to change sitting time in older adults. An online survey was completed by 494 Australians aged 65+. Average daily sitting was high (9.0 hr). Daily sitting time was the highest during TV (3.3 hr), computer (2.1 hr), and leisure (1.7 hr). A regression analysis demonstrated that women were more knowledgeable about the health risks of sitting compared to men. The percentage of older adults intending to sit less were the highest for TV (24%), leisure (24%), and computer (19%) sitting time. Regression analyses demonstrated that intentions varied by gender (for TV sitting), education (leisure and work sitting), body mass index (computer, leisure, and transport sitting), and physical activity (TV, computer, and leisure sitting). Interventions should target older adults' TV, computer, and leisure time sitting, with a focus on intentions in older males and older adults with low education, those who are active, and those with a normal weight.

DOI 10.1123/japa.2016-0304
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2018 Haapasalo V, de Vries H, Vandelanotte C, Rosenkranz RR, Duncan MJ, 'Cross-sectional associations between multiple lifestyle behaviours and excellent well-being in Australian adults', Preventive Medicine, 116 119-125 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Research into associations between lifestyle behaviours and health has largely focused on morbidity, mortality and disease prevention. Greater focus is needed to examine re... [more]

© 2018 Research into associations between lifestyle behaviours and health has largely focused on morbidity, mortality and disease prevention. Greater focus is needed to examine relationships between lifestyle behaviours and positive health outcomes such as well-being. This study aims to examine the associations between multiple lifestyle behaviours and excellent well-being. Participants (n = 6788) were adults in the member database of the 10,000 Steps Australia project who were asked to participate in an online survey in November¿December 2016. Well-being (WHO-5) Smoking, dietary behaviour, alcohol consumption, physical activity, sitting time, sleep duration, and sleep quality were assessed by self-report. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine relationships between excellent well-being (top quintile) and the individual lifestyle behaviours and also a lifestyle behaviour index (the number of lower-risk behaviours performed). Lower-risk dietary behaviour (OR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.10¿1.51), physical activity (OR = 1.90, 95% CI: 1.48¿2.42), sitting time (OR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.26¿1.69), sleep duration (OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.32¿1.75) and higher sleep quality (OR = 2.98, 95% CI: 2.55¿3.48) were positively associated with excellent well-being, after adjusting for socio-demographics, chronic disease, depression, anxiety and all other lifestyle behaviours. Engaging in a higher number of lower risk lifestyle behaviours was positively associated with excellent well-being. These results highlight the need for multiple lifestyle behaviour interventions to improve and maintain higher well-being.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.09.003
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2018 Alley SJ, Rebar AL, Duncan MJ, Hayman M, Schoeppe S, Vandelanotte C, 'Ten-year physical activity trends by location in Queensland', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, 26 298-299 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/ajr.12415
Citations Web of Science - 2
2018 Murawski B, Wade L, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Duncan MJ, 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of cognitive and behavioral interventions to improve sleep health in adults without sleep disorders', Sleep Medicine Reviews, 40 160-169 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.smrv.2017.12.003
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Beatrice Murawski, Ron Plotnikoff, Beatrice Murawski Uon, David Lubans
2018 Humphries B, Stanton R, Duncan MJJ, 'The prevalence and performance of resistance exercise training activities in an Australian population in relation to health authority guidelines', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 21 616-620 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2017.09.018
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2018 Schoeppe S, Vandelanotte C, Rebar AL, Hayman M, Duncan MJ, Alley SJ, 'Do singles or couples live healthier lifestyles? Trends in Queensland between 2005-2014', PLoS ONE, 13 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0192584
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2018 Batacan RB, Duncan MJ, Dalbo VJ, Buitrago GL, Fenning AS, 'Effect of different intensities of physical activity on cardiometabolic markers and vascular and cardiac function in adult rats fed with a high-fat high-carbohydrate diet', Journal of Sport and Health Science, 7 109-119 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Background: Physical activity (PA) and diet are 2 lifestyle factors that affect cardiometabolic risk. However, data on how a high-fat high-carbohydrate (HFHC) diet influenc... [more]

© 2018 Background: Physical activity (PA) and diet are 2 lifestyle factors that affect cardiometabolic risk. However, data on how a high-fat high-carbohydrate (HFHC) diet influences the effect of different intensities of PA on cardiometabolic health and cardiovascular function in a controlled setting are yet to be fully established. This study investigated the effect of sedentary behavior, light-intensity training (LIT), and high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on cardiometabolic markers and vascular and cardiac function in HFHC-fed adult rats. Methods: Twelve-week-old Wistar rats were randomly allocated to 4 groups (12 rats/group): control (CTL), sedentary (SED), LIT, and HIIT. Biometric indices, glucose and lipid control, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, vascular reactivity, and cardiac electrophysiology of the experimental groups were examined after 12 weeks of HFHC-diet feeding and PA interventions. Results: The SED group had slower cardiac conduction (p = 0.0426) and greater thoracic aortic contractile responses (p < 0.05) compared with the CTL group. The LIT group showed improved cardiac conduction compared with the SED group (p = 0.0003), and the HIIT group showed decreased mesenteric artery contractile responses compared with all other groups and improved endothelium-dependent mesenteric artery relaxation compared with the LIT group (both p < 0.05). The LIT and HIIT groups had lower visceral (p = 0.0057 for LIT, p = 0.0120 for HIIT) and epididymal fat (p < 0.0001 for LIT, p = 0.0002 for HIIT) compared with the CTL group. Conclusion: LIT induced positive adaptations on fat accumulation and cardiac conduction, and HIIT induced a positive effect on fat accumulation, mesenteric artery contraction, and endothelium-dependent relaxation. No other differences were observed between groups. These findings suggest that few positive health effects can be achieved through LIT and HIIT when consuming a chronic and sustained HFHC diet.

DOI 10.1016/j.jshs.2016.08.001
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
2018 Nikoloudakis IA, Crutzen R, Rebar AL, Vandelanotte C, Quester P, Dry M, et al., 'Can you elaborate on that? Addressing participants need for cognition in computer-tailored health behavior interventions', Health Psychology Review, 12 437-452 (2018) [C1]

© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor &amp; Francis Group. Computer-tailored interventions, which deliver health messages adjusted based on characteristics of the... [more]

© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Computer-tailored interventions, which deliver health messages adjusted based on characteristics of the message recipient, can effectively improve a range of health behaviours. Typically, the content of the message is tailored to user demographics, health behaviours and social cognitive factors (e.g., intentions, attitudes, self-efficacy, perceived social support) to increase message relevance, and thus the extent to which the message is read, considered and translated into attitude and behaviour change. Some researchers have suggested that the efficacy of computer-tailored interventions may be further enhanced by adapting messages to suit recipients¿ need for cognition (NFC)¿a personality trait describing how individuals tend to process information. However, the likely impact of doing so, especially when tailored in conjunction with other variables, requires further consideration. It is possible that intervention effects may be reduced in some circumstances due to interactions with other variables (e.g., perceived relevance) that also influence information processing. From a practical point of view, it is also necessary to consider how to optimally operationalise and measure NFC if it is to be a useful tailoring variable. This paper aims to facilitate further research in this area by critically examining these issues based on relevant theories and existing evidence.

DOI 10.1080/17437199.2018.1525571
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2018 Li JTE, Pursey KM, Duncan MJ, Burrows T, 'Addictive Eating and Its Relation to Physical Activity and Sleep Behavior.', Nutrients, 10 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu10101428
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Kirrilly Pursey, Tracy Burrows
2018 Murawski B, Plotnikoff RC, Rayward AT, Vandelanotte C, Brown WJ, Duncan MJ, 'Randomised controlled trial using a theory-based m-health intervention to improve physical activity and sleep health in adults: the Synergy Study protocol', BMJ OPEN, 8 (2018)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-018997
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Beatrice Murawski Uon, Beatrice Murawski
2018 Wade L, Smith JJ, Duncan MJ, Lubans DR, 'Mediators of aggression in a school-based physical activity intervention for low-income adolescent boys', Mental Health and Physical Activity, 14 39-46 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Objective The present study examined the effect of a school-based multicomponent physical activity intervention on aggression in adolescent males from low-inco... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Objective The present study examined the effect of a school-based multicomponent physical activity intervention on aggression in adolescent males from low-income areas, and explored potential mediators of change in aggression. Methods Participants were adolescent males (N = 361; 12.7 ± 0.5 years) enrolled in the ¿Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time¿ cluster RCT. Self-report measures for aggression, perceived strength and recreational screen-time were collected at baseline and 8-months. The effect of the intervention on aggression was tested using multi-level linear regression and potential mediators (i.e., screen-time and perceived strength) were explored using a product-of-coefficients test. Results There was no significant intervention effects for aggression (C [SE] = -0.038 [0.044], p =.384) or perceived strength (A [SE] = -0.0 [0.0], p =.884). However, a statistically significant effect was found for screen-time (A [SE] = -0.160 [0.04], p= <0.01). Changes in screen-time significantly mediated changes in aggression at post-test (AB [SE] = -0.021 [0.009], 95% CI = -0.042 to -0.005). Conclusion Limiting recreational screen-time may help to reduce aggression in adolescent boys. Interventions targeting adolescents' recreational screen-time should examine their ¿flow-on¿ effects on externalising behaviours in adolescent populations.

DOI 10.1016/j.mhpa.2017.12.006
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors David Lubans, Jordan Smith
2018 Rosenkranz RR, Geller KS, Duncan MJ, Caperchione CM, Vandelanotte C, Maeder AJ, et al., 'Validity and reliability of measures assessing social-cognitive determinants of physical activity in low-active Australian adults', Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, 22 322-331 (2018) [C1]

© 2018, © 2018 Taylor &amp; Francis. This cross-sectional study of 504 community-dwelling Australian adults (328 females, 176 males, mean age 50.8¿±¿13.0¿years) sought to examin... [more]

© 2018, © 2018 Taylor & Francis. This cross-sectional study of 504 community-dwelling Australian adults (328 females, 176 males, mean age 50.8¿±¿13.0¿years) sought to examine the reliability and validity of measurement scales for physical activity (PA) self-efficacy and outcome expectations. Participants completed demographic and anthropometric measurements, and a 23-item psychosocial questionnaire pertinent to an intervention target of 10,000 steps per day. Exploratory (n¿=¿252) and confirmatory (n¿=¿252) factor analyses were conducted to determine psychometric properties of the measures. Based on theory and goodness-of-fit indices, six factors were extracted from the questionnaire: PA self-efficacy; PA barriers self-efficacy (including general, personal, and conflict); and physical and mental outcome expectations. From confirmatory factor analysis, the model demonstrated good data fit in four out of five indices: CFI¿=¿0.99; TLI¿=¿0.99; SRMR¿=¿0.03; RMSEA¿=¿0.03, 90%CI¿=¿0.01¿0.05, ¿2¿=¿113.14 (88), p¿=¿0.04; including good fit by sex, age, weight status, education, and birth country. PA interventions can employ our psychometrically sound social cognitive measures.

DOI 10.1080/1091367X.2018.1457963
2018 Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, Maher CA, Schoeppe S, Rebar AL, Power DA, et al., 'The Effectiveness of a Web-Based Computer-Tailored Physical Activity Intervention Using Fitbit Activity Trackers: Randomized Trial', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, 20 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/11321
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
2018 Rayward AT, Burton NW, Brown WJ, Holliday EG, Plotnikoff RC, Duncan MJ, 'Associations between Changes in Activity and Sleep Quality and Duration over Two Years.', Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 50 2425-2432 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1249/mss.0000000000001715
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Ron Plotnikoff
2018 Nikoloudakis IA, Vandelanotte C, Rebar AL, Schoeppe S, Alley S, Duncan MJ, Short CE, 'Examining the Correlates of Online Health Information-Seeking Behavior Among Men Compared With Women.', American journal of men's health, 12 1358-1367 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1557988316650625
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 11
2018 Caperchione CM, Vandelanotte C, Corry K, Power D, Gill N, Duncan MJ, 'Qualitative Exploration of the Feasibility and Acceptability of Workplace-Based Microgrants to Improve Physical Activity The 10,000 Steps Pedometer Microgrant Scheme', JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, 60 E406-E411 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001376
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2018 Duncan MJ, Brown WJ, Mummery WK, Vandelanotte C, '10,000 Steps Australia: a community-wide eHealth physical activity promotion programme', BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, 52 885-886 (2018)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2017-097625
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
2017 Jennings CA, Berry TR, Carson V, Culos-Reed SN, Duncan MJ, Loitz CC, et al., 'UWALK: the development of a multi-strategy, community-wide physical activity program', TRANSLATIONAL BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 7 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s13142-016-0417-5
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3
2017 Vandelanotte C, Kolt GS, Caperchione CM, Savage TN, Rosenkranz RR, Maeder AJ, et al., 'Effectiveness of a Web 2.0 Intervention to Increase Physical Activity in Real-World Settings: Randomized Ecological Trial.', Journal of medical Internet research, 19 e390 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.8484
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow
2017 Short C, James E, Rebar AL, Duncan MJJ, Courneya K, Plotnikoff R, et al., 'Designing more engaging computer-tailored physical activity behaviour change interventions for breast cancer survivors: lessons from the iMove More for Life study', Supportive Care in Cancer, 25 3569-3585 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-017-3786-5
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Erica James
2017 Kolt GS, Rosenkranz RR, Vandelanotte C, Caperchione CM, Maeder AJ, Tague R, et al., 'Using web 2.0 applications to promote health-related physical activity: Findings from the WALK 2.0 randomised controlled trial', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 51 1433-1440 (2017) [C1]

Background/Aim Web 2.0 internet technology has great potential in promoting physical activity. This trial investigated the effectiveness of a Web 2.0-based intervention on physica... [more]

Background/Aim Web 2.0 internet technology has great potential in promoting physical activity. This trial investigated the effectiveness of a Web 2.0-based intervention on physical activity behaviour, and the impact on website usage and engagement. Methods 504 (328 women, 126 men) insufficiently active adult participants were randomly allocated to one f two web-based interventions or a paper-based Logbook group. The Web 1.0 group participated in the existing 10 000 Steps programme, while the Web 2.0 group participated in a Web 2.0-enabled physical activity intervention including user-to-user interaction through social networking capabilities. ActiGraph GT3X activity monitors were used to assess physical activity at four points across the intervention (0, 3, 12 and 18 months), and usage and engagement were assessed continuously through website usage statistics. Results Treatment groups differed significantly in trajectories of minutes/day of physical activity (p=0.0198), through a greater change at 3 months fo Web 2.0 than Web 1.0 (7.3 min/day, 95% CI 2.4 to 12.3). In the Web 2.0 group, physical activity increased at 3 (mean change 6.8 min/day, 95% CI 3.9 to 9.6) and 12 months (3.8 min/day, 95% CI 0.5 to 7.0), but not 18 months. The Logbook group also increased physical activity at 3 (4.8 min/day, 95% CI 1.8 to 7.7) and 12 months (4.9 min/day, 95% CI 0.7 to 9.1), but not 18 months. The Web 1.0 group increased physical activity at 12 months only (4.9 min/day, 95% CI 0.5 to 9.3). The Web 2.0 group demonstrated higher levels of website engagement (p=0.3964).Conclusions In comparison to a Web 1.0 intervention, a more interactive Web 2.0 intervention, as well as the paper-based Logbook intervention, improved physicalactivity in the short term, but that effect reduced over time, despite higher levels of engagement of the Web 2.0 group. Trial registration number ACTRN12611000157976.

DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096890
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow
2017 Clark BK, Kolbe-Alexander TL, Duncan MJ, Brown W, 'Sitting time, physical activity and sleep by work type and pattern-the Australian longitudinal study on Women s health', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 14 1-15 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph14030290
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
2017 Kwasnicka D, Vandelanotte C, Rebar A, Gardner B, Short C, Duncan M, et al., 'Comparing motivational, self-regulatory and habitual processes in a computer-tailored physical activity intervention in hospital employees - protocol for the PATHS randomised controlled trial', BMC Public Health, 17 518 (2017)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4415-4
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2017 Duncan M, Murawski B, Short CE, Rebar AL, Schoeppe S, Alley S, et al., 'Activity Trackers Implement Different Behavior Change Techniques for Activity, Sleep, and Sedentary Behaviors.', Interactive journal of medical research, 6 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/ijmr.6685
Citations Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Beatrice Murawski Uon, Beatrice Murawski
2017 Alley SJ, Duncan MJ, Schoeppe S, Rebar AL, Vandelanotte C, '8-year trends in physical activity, nutrition, TV viewing time, smoking, alcohol and BMI: A comparison of younger and older Queensland adults', PLOS ONE, 12 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0172510
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2017 Alley S, Wellens P, Schoeppe S, de Vries H, Rebar AL, Short CE, et al., 'Impact of increasing social media use on sitting time and body mass index', Health promotion journal of Australia : official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals, 28 91-95 (2017) [C1]

Issue addressed Sedentary behaviours, in particular sitting, increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity and poorer mental health status. In Australia, ... [more]

Issue addressed Sedentary behaviours, in particular sitting, increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity and poorer mental health status. In Australia, 70% of adults sit for more than 8h per day. The use of social media applications (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram) is on the rise; however, no studies have explored the association of social media use with sitting time and body mass index (BMI). Methods Cross-sectional self-report data on demographics, BMI and sitting time were collected from 1140 participants in the 2013 Queensland Social Survey. Generalised linear models were used to estimate associations of a social media score calculated from social media use, perceived importance of social media, and number of social media contacts with sitting time and BMI. Results Participants with a high social media score had significantly greater sitting times while using a computer in leisure time and significantly greater total sitting time on non-workdays. However, no associations were found between social media score and sitting to view TV, use motorised transport, work or participate in other leisure activities; or total workday, total sitting time or BMI. Conclusions These results indicate that social media use is associated with increased sitting time while using a computer, and total sitting time on non-workdays. So what? The rise in social media use may have a negative impact on health by contributing to computer sitting and total sitting time on non-workdays. Future longitudinal research with a representative sample and objective sitting measures is needed to confirm findings.

DOI 10.1071/HE16026
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2017 Batacan RB, Duncan MJ, Dalbo VJ, Tucker PS, Fenning AS, 'Effects of high-intensity interval training on cardiometabolic health: A systematic review and meta-analysis of intervention studies', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 51 494-503 (2017) [C1]

The current review clarifies the cardiometabolic health effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) in adults. A systematic search (PubMed) examining HIIT and cardiometabol... [more]

The current review clarifies the cardiometabolic health effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) in adults. A systematic search (PubMed) examining HIIT and cardiometabolic health markers was completed on 15 October 2015. Sixty-five intervention studies were included for review and the methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the Downs and Black score. Studies were classified by intervention duration and body mass index classification. Outcomes with at least 5 effect sizes were synthesised using a random-effects meta-analysis of the standardised mean difference (SMD) in cardiometabolic health markers (baseline to postintervention) using Review Manager 5.3. Short-term (ST) HIIT (<12 weeks) significantly improved maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max; SMD 0.74, 95% CI 0.36 to 1.12; p<0.001), diastolic blood pressure (DBP; SMD -0.52, 95% CI -0.89 to -0.16; p<0.01) and fasting glucose (SMD -0.35, 95% CI -0.62 to -0.09; p<0.01) in overweight/obese populations. Long-term (LT) HIIT (=12 weeks) significantly improved waist circumference (SMD -0.20, 95% CI -0.38 to -0.01; p<0.05), % body fat (SMD -0.40, 95% CI -0.74 to -0.06; p<0.05), VO2 max (SMD 1.20, 95% CI 0.57 to 1.83; p<0.001), resting heart rate (SMD -0.33, 95% CI -0.56 to -0.09; p<0.01), systolic blood pressure (SMD -0.35, 95% CI -0.60 to -0.09; p<0.01) and DBP (SMD -0.38, 95% CI -0.65 to -0.10; p<0.01) in overweight/obese populations. HIIT demonstrated no effect on insulin, lipid profile, C reactive protein or interleukin 6 in overweight/obese populations. In normal weight populations, ST-HIIT and LT-HIIT significantly improved VO2 max, but no other significant effects were observed. Current evidence suggests that ST-HIIT and LT-HIIT can increase VO2 max and improve some cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight/obese populations.

DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2015-095841
Citations Scopus - 159Web of Science - 152
2017 Gilson ND, Pavey TG, Wright OR, Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, Gomersall S, et al., 'The impact of an m-Health financial incentives program on the physical activity and diet of Australian truck drivers', BMC Public Health, 17 1-11 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4380-y
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
2017 Rayward AT, Duncan MJ, Brown WJ, Plotnikoff RC, Burton NW, 'A cross-sectional cluster analysis of the combined association of physical activity and sleep with sociodemographic and health characteristics in mid-aged and older adults', Maturitas, 102 56-61 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.maturitas.2017.05.013
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2017 Kolt GS, George E, Rebar AL, Duncan MJJ, Vandelanotte C, Maeder A, et al., 'Associations Between Quality of Life and Duration and Frequency of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour: Baseline findings from the WALK 2.0 Trial', PLoS ONE, 12 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0180072
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2017 Short CE, Rebar A, James EL, Duncan MJ, Courneya KS, Plotnikoff RC, et al., 'How do different delivery schedules of tailored web-based physical activity advice for breast cancer survivors influence intervention use and efficacy?', JOURNAL OF CANCER SURVIVORSHIP, 11 80-91 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11764-016-0565-0
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Erica James, Ron Plotnikoff
2017 Batacan RB, Fenning AS, Dalbo VJ, Scanlan AT, Duncan MJ, Moore RJ, Stanley D, 'A gut reaction: the combined influence of exercise and diet on gastrointestinal microbiota in rats', Journal of Applied Microbiology, 122 1627-1638 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology Aims: Intestinal microbiota modulates the development of clinical conditions, including metabolic syndrome and obesity. Many of these c... [more]

© 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology Aims: Intestinal microbiota modulates the development of clinical conditions, including metabolic syndrome and obesity. Many of these conditions are influenced by nutritional and exercise behaviours. This study aimed to investigate the ability of exercise to re-shape the intestinal microbiota and the influence of the diet on the process. Methods and Results: A rat model was used to examine the intestinal microbiota responses to four activity conditions, including: high-intensity interval training (HIIT), light-intensity training (LIT), sedentary and normal control, each containing two nutritional conditions: high-fat high-fructose diet (HF) and standard chow (SC) diet. No significant differences in microbiota were apparent between activity conditions in rats fed a HF diet but changes in the presence/absence of phylotypes were observed in the LIT and HIIT groups. In rats fed SC, significant differences in intestinal microbiota were evident between exercised and nonexercised rats. Both LIT and HIIT induced significant differences in intestinal microbiota in SC-fed rats compared to their respective SC-fed controls. Characterization of the exercise-induced bacterial phylotypes indicated an increase in bacteria likely capable of degrading resistant polysaccharides and an increase in short chain fatty acid producers. Conclusions: While a significant effect of exercise on microbiota composition occurred in SC-fed rats, the HF-fed rats microbiota showed little response. These data suggest that a HF diet prevented microbiota differentiation in response to exercise. Significance and Impact of the Study: The importance of diet¿exercise interaction is extended to the level of intestinal bacteria and gut health.

DOI 10.1111/jam.13442
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
2016 Gilson ND, Pavey TG, Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, Gomersall SR, Trost SG, Brown WJ, 'Chronic disease risks and use of a smartphone application during a physical activity and dietary intervention in Australian truck drivers.', Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, 40 91-93 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12501
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 19
2016 Caperchione CM, Duncan M, Kolt GS, Vandelanotte C, Rosenkranz RR, Maeder A, et al., 'Examining an Australian physical activity and nutrition intervention using RE-AIM', Health Promotion International, 31 450-458 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/heapro/dav005
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
2016 Schoeppe S, Duncan MJ, Badland HM, Rebar AL, Vandelanotte C, 'Too far from home? Adult attitudes on children's independent mobility range', Children's Geographies, 14 482-489 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Taylor &amp; Francis. The purpose of this study was to investigate adult attitudes on distances children should be allowed to travel to places and play in outdoor areas w... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. The purpose of this study was to investigate adult attitudes on distances children should be allowed to travel to places and play in outdoor areas without adult supervision, with consideration of differences in adult attitudes by socio-demographics and urbanisation. In 2013, Australian adults (N = 1293) were asked what distances children aged 8¿12 years should be allowed to walk/cycle to places, and play outdoors without adults. Descriptive analyses and chi-square tests were conducted to assess adult attitudes on children's independent mobility range. Overall, 62% of adults would restrict children's independent travel to places <500 m from home, and 74% would restrict independent outdoor play <500 m from home. Women and adults with lower education were more likely to report restrictive attitudes than men and adults with higher education, respectively. The promotion of active travel and outdoor play in children may require increasing adults¿ acceptance of greater independent mobility range.

DOI 10.1080/14733285.2015.1116685
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
2016 Batacan RB, Duncan MJ, Dalbo VJ, Connolly KJ, Fenning AS, 'Light-intensity and high-intensity interval training improve cardiometabolic health in rats', APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY NUTRITION AND METABOLISM, 41 945-952 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1139/apnm-2016-0037
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
2016 Alley S, Schoeppe S, Guertler D, Jennings C, Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, 'Interest and preferences for using advanced physical activity tracking devices: Results of a national cross-sectional survey', BMJ Open, 6 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011243
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 32
2016 Stanton R, Guertler D, Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, 'Agreement between activPAL3c accelerometers placed at different thigh positions', GAIT & POSTURE, 48 230-236 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.06.013
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2016 Schoeppe S, Alley S, Van Lippevelde W, Bray NA, Williams SL, Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, 'Efficacy of interventions that use apps to improve diet, physical activity and sedentary behaviour: A systematic review', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 13 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Health and fitness applications (apps) have gained popularity in interventions to improve diet, physical activity and sedentary behaviours but th... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Health and fitness applications (apps) have gained popularity in interventions to improve diet, physical activity and sedentary behaviours but their efficacy is unclear. This systematic review examined the efficacy of interventions that use apps to improve diet, physical activity and sedentary behaviour in children and adults. Methods: Systematic literature searches were conducted in five databases to identify papers published between 2006 and 2016. Studies were included if they used a smartphone app in an intervention to improve diet, physical activity and/or sedentary behaviour for prevention. Interventions could be stand-alone interventions using an app only, or multi-component interventions including an app as one of several intervention components. Outcomes measured were changes in the health behaviours and related health outcomes (i.e., fitness, body weight, blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, quality of life). Study inclusion and methodological quality were independently assessed by two reviewers. Results: Twenty-seven studies were included, most were randomised controlled trials (n = 19; 70%). Twenty-three studies targeted adults (17 showed significant health improvements) and four studies targeted children (two demonstrated significant health improvements). Twenty-one studies targeted physical activity (14 showed significant health improvements), 13 studies targeted diet (seven showed significant health improvements) and five studies targeted sedentary behaviour (two showed significant health improvements). More studies (n = 12; 63%) of those reporting significant effects detected between-group improvements in the health behaviour or related health outcomes, whilst fewer studies (n = 8; 42%) reported significant within-group improvements. A larger proportion of multi-component interventions (8 out of 13; 62%) showed significant between-group improvements compared to stand-alone app interventions (5 out of 14; 36%). Eleven studies reported app usage statistics, and three of them demonstrated that higher app usage was associated with improved health outcomes. Conclusions: This review provided modest evidence that app-based interventions to improve diet, physical activity and sedentary behaviours can be effective. Multi-component interventions appear to be more effective than stand-alone app interventions, however, this remains to be confirmed in controlled trials. Future research is needed on the optimal number and combination of app features, behaviour change techniques, and level of participant contact needed to maximise user engagement and intervention efficacy.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0454-y
Citations Scopus - 210Web of Science - 173
2016 Granger D, Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, Alley S, Schoeppe S, Short C, Rebar A, 'Is preference for mHealth intervention delivery platform associated with delivery platform familiarity?', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 16 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3316-2
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2016 Pimm R, Vandelanotte C, Rhodes RE, Short C, Duncan MJ, Rebar AL, 'Cue Consistency Associated with Physical Activity Automaticity and Behavior', Behavioral Medicine, 42 248-253 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/08964289.2015.1017549
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
2016 Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, Trost SG, Rebar AL, Rogers N, Burton NW, et al., 'Balanced: a randomised trial examining the efficacy of two self-monitoring methods for an app-based multi-behaviour intervention to improve physical activity, sitting and sleep in adults', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 16 (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3256-x
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Beatrice Murawski Uon, Beatrice Murawski
2016 Schoeppe S, Tranter P, Duncan MJ, Curtis C, Carver A, Malone K, 'Australian children's independent mobility levels: secondary analyses of cross-sectional data between 1991 and 2012', Children's Geographies, 14 408-421 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Taylor &amp; Francis. This study investigated changes in Australian children&apos;s independent mobility levels between1991 and 2012. Data from five cross-sectional studi... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. This study investigated changes in Australian children's independent mobility levels between1991 and 2012. Data from five cross-sectional studies conducted in 1991, 1993, 2010, 2011 and 2012 were analysed. Parent and child surveys were used to assess parental licences for independent mobility and actual independent mobility behaviour in children aged 8¿13 years. Findings show declines in the proportion of young children (=10 years of age) being allowed to travel home from school alone (1991: 68%, 1993: 50%, 2010: 43%, 2011: 45%, 2012: 31%) and travel on buses alone (1991: 31%, 1993: 15%, 2010: 8%, 2011: 6%, 2012: 9%). Furthermore, the proportion of children travelling independently to school decreased (1991: 61%, 1993: 42%, 2010: 31%, 2011: 32%, 2012: 32%). Significantly fewer girls than boys travelled independently to school at each time point (p =.001). Overall, the findings suggest that Australian children's independent mobility levels declined between 1991 and 2012.

DOI 10.1080/14733285.2015.1082083
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 25
2016 Duncan MJ, Kline CE, Rebar AL, Vandelanotte C, Short CE, 'Greater bed- and wake-time variability is associated with less healthy lifestyle behaviors: a cross-sectional study', Journal of Public Health (Germany), 24 31-40 (2016) [C1]

© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Aim: This study examines associations between the variability in bed/rise times, usual bed/rise time and dietary quality, physical activ... [more]

© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Aim: This study examines associations between the variability in bed/rise times, usual bed/rise time and dietary quality, physical activity, alcohol consumption, sitting time, sleep insufficiency and a composite index of behaviors. Subject and methods: A random sample of Australian adults drawn from an online Panel cohort in 2013 completed a cross-sectional online survey. A total of 1,317 participants, median age 57 (IQR = 20) completed the survey. Bed- and wake times, variability in bed- and wake-times, dietary quality, physical activity, alcohol consumption, sitting time, sleep insufficiency and socio-demographics were assessed using a questionnaire. Associations were examined with generalized linear models. Results: Having bed - times that varied by >30¿min were associated with lower dietary quality, higher alcohol consumption, higher sitting time, more frequent insufficient sleep and poorer overall pattern of lifestyle behaviors. Greater variability in wake times, usual bed times and usual wake times were inconsistently associated with lifestyle behaviours. Conclusions: Greater bed-time variability is associated with a less healthy pattern of lifestyle behaviors. Greater consistency in sleep timing may contribute to, or be reflective of, a healthier lifestyle.

DOI 10.1007/s10389-015-0693-4
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2016 Rebar AL, Boles C, Burton N, Duncan MJ, Short CE, Happell B, et al., 'Healthy mind, healthy body: A randomized trial testing the efficacy of a computer-tailored vs. interactive web-based intervention for increasing physical activity and reducing depressive symptoms', Mental Health and Physical Activity, 11 29-37 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Physical activity is an effective primary or adjunctive treatment to reduce depressive symptoms. Computer-tailored and interactive web-based physical activity ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Physical activity is an effective primary or adjunctive treatment to reduce depressive symptoms. Computer-tailored and interactive web-based physical activity interventions are potentially effective and accessible means for promoting physical activity, but little evidence exists regarding their efficacy in reducing depressive symptoms. We conducted a 2-arm randomised trial to compare the efficacy of these web-based interventions for increasing physical activity and reducing depressive symptoms. Participants (18 years or older and had no health condition limiting physical activity) were randomised to have access to a web-based physical activity intervention program with either computer-tailored advice (MyPAA) or interactive features (Walk 2.0). Only half of participants accessed the website at least once (MyPAA: allocated n¿=¿252, accessed program n¿=¿154, 61.1%; Walk 2.0: allocated n¿=¿262, accessed program n¿=¿120, 45.8%). Participants and the research team were blinded to group assignment. There were no significant between-group differences in change of self-reported physical activity or depressive symptoms. Physical activity significantly increased from baseline to one month (g¿=¿0.21) and three months (g¿=¿0.20), and depressive symptoms significantly decreased from baseline to one month (g¿=¿0.36) and three months (g¿=¿0.42). People who visited the website more and for longer had larger changes in physical activity and depressive symptoms than those who visited less. Web-based interventions with computer-tailoring and interactive features show promise as a method for increasing physical activity and reducing depressive symptoms, particularly for those who engage with the program. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613001215718.

DOI 10.1016/j.mhpa.2016.08.001
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Brenda Happell
2016 Caperchione CM, Duncan MJ, Rosenkranz RR, Vandelanotte C, Van Itallie AK, Savage TN, et al., 'Recruitment, screening, and baseline participant characteristics in the WALK 2.0 study: A randomized controlled trial using web 2.0 applications to promote physical activity', Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications, 2 25-33 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Authors. Objective To describe in detail the recruitment methods and enrollment rates, the screening methods, and the baseline characteristics of a sample of adults par... [more]

© 2016 The Authors. Objective To describe in detail the recruitment methods and enrollment rates, the screening methods, and the baseline characteristics of a sample of adults participating in the Walk 2.0 Study, an 18 month, 3-arm randomized controlled trial of a Web 2.0 based physical activity intervention. Methods A two-fold recruitment plan was developed and implemented, including a direct mail-out to an extract from the Australian Electoral Commission electoral roll, and other supplementary methods including email and telephone. Physical activity screening involved two steps: a validated single-item self-report instrument and the follow-up Active Australia Questionnaire. Readiness for physical activity participation was also based on a two-step process of administering the Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire and, where needed, further clearance from a medical practitioner. Results Across all recruitment methods, a total of 1244 participants expressed interest in participating, of which 656 were deemed eligible. Of these, 504 were later enrolled in the Walk 2.0 trial (77% enrollment rate) and randomized to the Walk 1.0 group (n = 165), the Walk 2.0 group (n = 168), or the Logbook group (n = 171). Mean age of the total sample was 50.8 years, with 65.2% female and 79.1% born in Australia. Conclusion The results of this recruitment process demonstrate the successful use of multiple strategies to obtain a diverse sample of adults eligible to take part in a web-based physical activity promotion intervention. The use of dual screening processes ensured safe participation in the intervention. This approach to recruitment and physical activity screening can be used as a model for further trials in this area.

DOI 10.1016/j.conctc.2015.12.004
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2016 Short CE, Hayman M, Rebar A, Gunn K, De Cocker K, Duncan MJJ, et al., 'Physical activity recommendations from general practitioners in Australia. Results from a national survey', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 40 83-90 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12455
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 18
2016 Duncan MJ, Rosenkranz RR, Vandelanotte C, Caperchione CM, Rebar AL, Maeder AJ, et al., 'What is the impact of obtaining medical clearance to participate in a randomised controlled trial examining a physical activity intervention on the socio-demographic and risk factor profiles of included participants?', TRIALS, 17 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13063-016-1715-4
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2016 James E, Freund M, Booth A, Duncan MJ, Johnson N, Short CE, et al., 'Comparative efficacy of simultaneous versus sequential multiple health behavior change interventions among adults: A systematic review of randomised trials', Preventive Medicine, 89 211-223 (2016) [C1]

© 2016. Background: Growing evidence points to the benefits of addressing multiple health behaviors rather than single behaviors. Purpose: This review evaluates the relative effec... [more]

© 2016. Background: Growing evidence points to the benefits of addressing multiple health behaviors rather than single behaviors. Purpose: This review evaluates the relative effectiveness of simultaneous and sequentially delivered multiple health behavior change (MHBC) interventions. Secondary aims were to identify: a) the most effective spacing of sequentially delivered components; b) differences in efficacy of MHBC interventions for adoption/cessation behaviors and lifestyle/addictive behaviors, and c) differences in trial retention between simultaneously and sequentially delivered interventions. Methods: MHBC intervention trials published up to October 2015 were identified through a systematic search. Eligible trials were randomised controlled trials that directly compared simultaneous and sequential delivery of a MHBC intervention. A narrative synthesis was undertaken. Results: Six trials met the inclusion criteria and across these trials the behaviors targeted were smoking, diet, physical activity, and alcohol consumption. Three trials reported a difference in intervention effect between a sequential and simultaneous approach in at least one behavioral outcome. Of these, two trials favoured a sequential approach on smoking. One trial favoured a simultaneous approach on fat intake. There was no difference in retention between sequential and simultaneous approaches. Conclusions: There is limited evidence regarding the relative effectiveness of sequential and simultaneous approaches. Given only three of the six trials observed a difference in intervention effectiveness for one health behavior outcome, and the relatively consistent finding that the sequential and simultaneous approaches were more effective than a usual/minimal care control condition, it appears that both approaches should be considered equally efficacious. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42015027876.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.06.012
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Megan Freund, Angela Booth, Frances Kaylambkin, Luke Wolfenden, Natalie Johnson, Erica James
2015 Vandelanotte C, Stanton R, Rebar AL, Van Itallie AK, Caperchione CM, Duncan MJ, et al., 'Physical activity screening to recruit inactive randomized controlled trial participants: how much is too much?', TRIALS, 16 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13063-015-0976-7
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2015 Batacan RB, Duncan MJ, Dalbo VJ, Tucker PS, Fenning AS, 'Effects of Light Intensity Activity on CVD Risk Factors: A Systematic Review of Intervention Studies', BIOMED RESEARCH INTERNATIONAL, 2015 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1155/2015/596367
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 19
2015 Rebar AL, Stanton R, Geard D, Short C, Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, 'A meta-meta-analysis of the effect of physical activity on depression and anxiety in non-clinical adult populations', Health Psychology Review, 9 366-378 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Taylor &amp; Francis. Amidst strong efforts to promote the therapeutic benefits of physical activity for reducing depression and anxiety in clinical populations, little f... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. Amidst strong efforts to promote the therapeutic benefits of physical activity for reducing depression and anxiety in clinical populations, little focus has been directed towards the mental health benefits of activity for non-clinical populations. The objective of this meta-meta-analysis was to systematically aggregate and quantify high-quality meta-analytic findings of the effects of physical activity on depression and anxiety for non-clinical populations. A systematic search identified eight meta-analytic outcomes of randomised trials that investigated the effects of physical activity on depression or anxiety. The subsequent meta-meta-analyses were based on a total of 92 studies with 4310 participants for the effect of physical activity on depression and 306 study effects with 10,755 participants for the effect of physical activity on anxiety. Physical activity reduced depression by a medium effect [standardised mean difference (SMD) = -0.50; 95% CI: -0.93 to -0.06] and anxiety by a small effect (SMD = -0.38; 95% CI: -0.66 to -0.11). Neither effect showed significant heterogeneity across meta-analyses. These findings represent a comprehensive body of high-quality evidence that physical activity reduces depression and anxiety in non-clinical populations.

DOI 10.1080/17437199.2015.1022901
Citations Scopus - 207Web of Science - 190
2015 Guertler D, Vandelanotte C, Short C, Alley S, Schoeppe S, Duncan MJ, 'The Association Between Physical Activity, Sitting Time, Sleep Duration, and Sleep Quality as Correlates of Presenteeism', JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, 57 321-328 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/JOM.0000000000000355
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
2015 Vandelanotte C, Short C, Plotnikoff RC, Hooker C, Canoy D, Rebar A, et al., 'TaylorActive - Examining the effectiveness of web-based personally-tailored videos to increase physical activity: A randomised controlled trial protocol', BMC Public Health, (2015) [C3]

Background: Physical inactivity levels are unacceptably high and effective interventions that can increase physical activity in large populations at low cost are urgently needed. ... [more]

Background: Physical inactivity levels are unacceptably high and effective interventions that can increase physical activity in large populations at low cost are urgently needed. Web-based interventions that use computer-tailoring have shown to be effective, though people tend to 'skim' and 'scan' text on the Internet rather than thoroughly read it. The use of online videos is, however, popular and engaging. Therefore, the aim of this 3-group randomised controlled trial is to examine whether a web-based physical activity intervention that provides personally-tailored videos is more effective when compared with traditional personally-tailored text-based intervention and a control group. Methods/design: In total 510 Australians will be recruited through social media advertisements, e-mail and third party databases. Participants will be randomised to one of three groups: text-tailored, video-tailored, or control. All groups will gain access to the same web-based platform and a library containing brief physical activity articles. The text-tailored group will additionally have access to 8 sessions of personalised physical activity advice that is instantaneously generated based on responses to brief online surveys. The theory-based advice will be provided over a period of 3 months and address constructs such as self-efficacy, motivation, goal setting, intentions, social support, attitudes, barriers, outcome expectancies, relapse prevention and feedback on performance. Text-tailored participants will also be able to complete 7 action plans to help them plan what, when, where, who with, and how they will become more active. Participants in the video-tailored group will gain access to the same intervention content as those in the text-tailored group, however all sessions will be provided as personalised videos rather than text on a webpage. The control group will only gain access to the library with generic physical activity articles. The primary outcome is objectively measured physical activity. Secondary outcomes include website engagement and retention, quality of life, depression, anxiety, stress, sitting time, sleep and psychosocial correlates of physical activity. Outcomes will be measured at baseline, 3, and 9 months. Discussion: This study presents an ideal opportunity to study the effectiveness of an isolated feature within a web-based physical activity intervention and the knowledge generated from this study will help to increase intervention effectiveness. Trial registration: Australian New-Zealand Clinical Trial Registry: ACTRN12615000057583. Registered 22 January 2015.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2363-4
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2015 Rosenkranz RR, Duncan MJ, Caperchione CM, Kolt GS, Vandelanotte C, Maeder AJ, et al., 'Validity of the Stages of Change in Steps instrument (SoC-Step) for achieving the physical activity goal of 10,000 steps per day', BMC Public Health, 15 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Rosenkranz et al. Background: Physical activity (PA) offers numerous benefits to health and well-being, but most adults are not sufficiently physically active to afford suc... [more]

© 2015 Rosenkranz et al. Background: Physical activity (PA) offers numerous benefits to health and well-being, but most adults are not sufficiently physically active to afford such benefits. The 10,000 steps campaign has been a popular and effective approach to promote PA. The Transtheoretical Model posits that individuals have varying levels of readiness for health behavior change, known as Stages of Change (Precontemplation, Contemplation, Preparation, Action, and Maintenance). Few validated assessment instruments are available for determining Stages of Change in relation to the PA goal of 10,000 steps per day. The purpose of this study was to assess the criterion-related validity of the SoC-Step, a brief 10,000 steps per day Stages of Change instrument. Methods: Participants were 504 Australian adults (176 males, 328 females, mean age = 50.8 ± 13.0 years) from the baseline sample of the Walk 2.0 randomized controlled trial. Measures included 7-day accelerometry (Actigraph GT3X), height, weight, and self-reported intention, self-efficacy, and SoC-Step: Stages of Change relative to achieving 10,000 steps per day. Kruskal-Wallis H tests with pairwise comparisons were used to determine whether participants differed by stage, according to steps per day, general health, body mass index, intention, and self-efficacy to achieve 10,000 steps per day. Binary logistic regression was used to test the hypothesis that participants in Maintenance or Action stages would have greater likelihood of meeting the 10,000 steps goal, in comparison to participants in the other three stages. Results: Consistent with study hypotheses, participants in Precontemplation had significantly lower intention scores than those in Contemplation (p = 0.003) or Preparation (p < 0.001). Participants in Action or Maintenance stages were more likely to achieve =10,000 steps per day (OR = 3.11; 95 % CI = 1.66,5.83) compared to those in Precontemplation, Contemplation, or Preparation. Intention (p < 0.001) and self-efficacy (p < 0.001) to achieve 10,000 steps daily differed by stage, and participants in the Maintenance stage had higher general health status and lower body mass index than those in Precontemplation, Contemplation and Preparation stages (p < 0.05). Conclusions: This brief SoC-Step instrument appears to have good criterion-related validity for determining Stages of Change related to the public health goal of 10,000 steps per day. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry reference: ACTRN12611000157976 World Health Organization Universal Trial Number: U111-1119-1755.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2539-y
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
2015 Hodgetts D, Duncan MJ, 'Quantitative analysis of sport development event legacy: an examination of the Australian Surf Life Saving Championships', European Sport Management Quarterly, 15 364-380 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/16184742.2015.1021824
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
2015 Duncan MJ, Short C, Rashid M, Cutumisu N, Vandelanotte C, Plotnikoff RC, 'Identifying correlates of breaks in occupational sitting: A cross-sectional study', Building Research and Information, 43 646-658 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Taylor &amp; Francis. Office workers are commonly targeted in interventions to modify their sitting behaviour, yet there is limited evidence of the correlates of breaks i... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. Office workers are commonly targeted in interventions to modify their sitting behaviour, yet there is limited evidence of the correlates of breaks in sitting to inform intervention development. This study identifies the individual, workplace and spatial configuration correlates of the frequency of breaks in sitting (number/hour) in office workers (n = 5531) stratified by office type (private-enclosed, shared, open plan). All behaviours and potential correlates were measured via self-report using an online cross-sectional survey. Regression analyses revealed age was the only socio-demographic characteristic associated with frequency of breaks in sitting in all office types. Greater job autonomy and local connectivity were positively associated with frequency of breaks in sitting in shared and open-plan offices. In open-plan offices co-worker proximity was negatively associated with frequency of breaks in sitting. Co-worker visibility was positively associated with frequency of breaks in sitting in all office types. This study demonstrates that individual, workplace and spatial configuration factors are all associated with the frequency of breaks in sitting and that these relationships differ by office type. These observations extend prior studies that have only examined correlates at a single level (e.g. the individual). This evidence could be useful to guide future interventions in the design of workplaces to increase breaks in sitting and workers physical activity.

DOI 10.1080/09613218.2015.1045712
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2015 Schoeppe S, Duncan MJJ, Badland HM, Alley S, Williams S, Rebar AL, Vandelanotte C, 'Socio-demographic factors and neighbourhood social cohesion influence adults' willingness to grant children greater independent mobility: A cross-sectional study', BMC Public Health, 15 1-8 (2015) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 20
2015 Vandelanotte C, Short C, Rockloff M, Di Millia L, Ronan K, Happell B, Duncan MJ, 'How do Different Occupational Factors Influence Total, Occupational, and Leisure-Time Physical Activity?', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY & HEALTH, 12 200-207 (2015)
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2013-0098
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Brenda Happell
2015 Guertler D, Vandelanotte C, Kirwan M, Duncan MJJ, 'Engagement and non-usage attrition with a free physical activity promotion program: The case of 10,000 Steps Australia', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 17 1-14 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.4339
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 46
2015 Schoeppe S, Duncan MJ, Badland HM, Oliver M, Browne M, 'Associations between children's active travel and levels of physical activity and sedentary behavior', Journal of Transport and Health, 2 336-342 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jth.2015.05.001
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
2015 Hemmis L, de Vries H, Vandelanotte C, Short CE, Duncan MJ, Burton NW, Rebar AL, 'Depressive symptoms associated with psychological correlates of physical activity and perceived helpfulness of intervention features', MENTAL HEALTH AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 9 16-23 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.mhpa.2015.08.001
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2014 Short CE, Vandelanotte C, Dixon MW, Rosenkranz R, Caperchione C, Hooker C, et al., 'Examining participant engagement in an information technology-based physical activity and nutrition intervention for men: The manup randomized controlled trial', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 16 (2014)
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 15
2014 Rebar AL, Vandelanotte C, van Uffelen J, Short C, Duncan MJ, 'Associations of overall sitting time and sitting time in different contexts with depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms', MENTAL HEALTH AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 7 105-110 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.mhpa.2014.02.004
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 28
2014 van Waveren A, Duncan MJ, Coulson FR, Fenning A, 'Moderate intensity physical activity prevents increased blood glucose concentrations, fat pad deposition and cardiac action potential prolongation following diet-induced obesity in a juvenile-adolescent rat model', BMC Obesity, 1 (2014)

© 2014 van Waveren et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Background: Both obesity and a lack of physical activity have been associated with an elevated risk of cardiovascular disea... [more]

© 2014 van Waveren et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Background: Both obesity and a lack of physical activity have been associated with an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The incidence of obesity is increasing, especially in juvenile-adolescents. While there is limited research examining the chronic effects of obesity in adolescent humans and animal models of this condition, little is also known concerning how moderate physical activity might prevent or attenuate secondary cardiovascular complications induced by obesity during adolescence. We investigated the effects of diet-induced obesity (consisting of a high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet (HFHC)) on biometric indices, vascular and airway function, cardiovascular function, systemic oxidative stress and markers of inflammation in a juvenile-adolescent rodent model. Four groups were used: control (CON), physical activity (PA) treated, HFHC and HFHC + PA (n = 16 per group). HFHC feeding started at 4 weeks of age for a period of 12 weeks. Physical activity treatment was initiated (PA and HFHC + PA groups) when the animals were 8 weeks of age, for 8 weeks. Results: Physical activity in juvenile-adolescent healthy rats showed no change in comparison to the CON group in all experimental parameters except for increases in lipid peroxidation, decreases in inflammatory cytokines, improvements in vascular reactivity and decreased atrial responses to positive chronotropic agents. The HFHC animals were mildly hyperglycemic, hypertensive, displayed renal hypertrophy and showed increased retroperitoneal fat pad deposition compared to the CON group. HFHC + PA rats were also hypertensive, however showed improvements in cardiac electrophysiology, body weight, fat pad deposition and inflammatory signaling, in comparison to the HFHC fed rats and CON animals. Conclusion: In conclusion, in a juvenile-adolescent animal model of diet-induced obesity engagement in physical activity is beneficial in reducing the inflammatory effects of obesity.

DOI 10.1186/2052-9538-1-11
Citations Scopus - 4
2014 Short CE, James EL, Vandelanotte C, Courneya KS, Duncan MJ, Rebar A, Plotnikoff RC, 'Correlates of resistance training in post-treatment breast cancer survivors', SUPPORTIVE CARE IN CANCER, 22 2757-2766 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-014-2273-5
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Erica James, Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Short CE, Vandelanotte C, Rebar A, Duncan MJ, 'A Comparison of Correlates Associated With Adult Physical Activity Behavior in Major Cities and Regional Settings', HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY, 33 1319-1327 (2014)
DOI 10.1037/hea0000027
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2014 Stanton R, Guertler D, Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, 'Validation of a pouch-mounted activPAL3 accelerometer', GAIT & POSTURE, 40 688-693 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2014.07.024
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2014 Caperchione CM, Kolt GS, Savage TN, Rosenkranz RR, Maeder AJ, Vandelanotte C, et al., 'WALK 2.0: Examining the effectiveness of Web 2.0 features to increase physical activity in a 'real world' setting: an ecological trial', BMJ OPEN, 4 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006374
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 9
2014 Brunker AS, Nguyen QV, Maeder AJ, Tague R, Kolt GS, Savage TN, et al., 'A time-based visualization for web user classification in social networks', ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, 2014-August 9-18 (2014)

Copyright 2014 ACM. This paper presents a new visual analytics framework for analyzing health-related physical activity data. Existing techniques mostly rely on node-links visuali... [more]

Copyright 2014 ACM. This paper presents a new visual analytics framework for analyzing health-related physical activity data. Existing techniques mostly rely on node-links visualizations to represent the usage patterns as social networks. This work takes a different approach that provides interactive scatter-plot visualizations on classified and time-based data. By providing a flexible visualization that can provide different angles on the multidimensional and classified data, the analyst could have better understanding and insight on web user behavior compared to the traditional social network methods. The effectiveness of our method has been demonstrated with a case study on an online portal system for tracking passive physical activity, called Walk 2.0.

DOI 10.1145/2636240.2636842
2014 Caperchione CM, Kolt GS, Savage TN, Rosenkranz RR, Maeder AJ, Vandelanotte C, et al., 'WALK 2.0: Examining the effectiveness of Web 2.0 features to increase physical activity in a 'real world' setting: An ecological trial', BMJ Open, 4 (2014)

Introduction Low levels of healthenhancing physical activity require novel approaches that have the potential to reach broad populations. Webbased interventions are a popular appr... [more]

Introduction Low levels of healthenhancing physical activity require novel approaches that have the potential to reach broad populations. Webbased interventions are a popular approach for behaviour change given their wide reach and accessibility. However, challenges with participant engagement and retention reduce the longterm maintenance of behaviour change. Web 2.0 features present a new and innovative online environment supporting greater interactivity, with the potential to increase engagement and retention. In order to understand the applicability of these innovative interventions for the broader population, 'realworld' interventions implemented under 'everyday conditions' are required. The aim of this study is to investigate the difference in physical activity behaviour between individuals using a traditional Web 1.0 website with those using a novel Web 2.0 website.

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen2014006374
Citations Scopus - 4
2014 Schoeppe S, Oliver M, Badland HM, Burke M, Duncan MJ, 'Recruitment and Retention of Children in Behavioral Health Risk Factor Studies: REACH Strategies', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 21 794-803 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s12529-013-9347-5
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 33
2014 Vandelanotte C, Kirwan M, Rebar A, Alley S, Short C, Fallon L, et al., 'Examining the use of evidence-based and social media supported tools in freely accessible physical activity intervention websites', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 11 (2014)
DOI 10.1186/s12966-014-0105-0
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 21
2014 Duncan M, Vandelanotte C, Kolt GS, Rosenkranz RR, Caperchione CM, George ES, et al., 'Effectiveness of a web- and mobile phone-based intervention to promote physical activity and healthy eating in middle-Aged males: Randomized controlled trial of the manup study', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 16 1-21 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.3107
Citations Scopus - 74Web of Science - 69
2014 Duncan MJ, Kline CE, Vandelanotte C, Sargent C, Rogers NL, Di Milia L, 'Cross-sectional associations between multiple lifestyle behaviors and health-related quality of life in the 10,000 steps cohort', PLoS ONE, 9 1-9 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0094184
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 35
2014 Schoeppe S, Duncan MJ, Badland HM, Oliver M, Browne M, 'Associations between children's independent mobility and physical activity', BMC Public Health, 14 (2014)
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 41
2014 Stanton R, Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, 'Interdevice baseline signal magnitude variability of the ActivPAL3 activity monitor', Gait and Posture, 39 618-620 (2014)
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Short CE, Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, 'Individual characteristics associated with physical activity intervention delivery mode preferences among adults', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 11 (2014)
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 24
2014 Duncan MJ, Gilson N, Vandelanotte C, 'Which population groups are most unaware of CVD risks associated with sitting time?', Preventive Medicine, 65 103-108 (2014)
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
2014 De Cocker K, Duncan MJ, Short C, van Uffelen JGZ, Vandelanotte C, 'Understanding occupational sitting: Prevalence, correlates and moderating effects in Australian employees', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 67 288-294 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.07.031
Citations Scopus - 46Web of Science - 46
2014 Rebar AL, Duncan MJ, Short C, Vandelanotte C, 'Differences in health-related quality of life between three clusters of physical activity, sitting time, depression, anxiety, and stress', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 14 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-1088
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 18
2013 Duncan S, Stewart TI, Oliver M, Mavoa S, MacRae D, Badland HM, Duncan MJ, 'Portable global positioning system receivers: Static validity and environmental conditions', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 44 e19-e29 (2013)
Citations Scopus - 62Web of Science - 58
2013 Ding H, Karunanithi M, Duncan MJJ, Ireland D, Noakes M, Hooker C, 'A mobile phone enabled health promotion program for middle-aged males', Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society., 1 (2013)
2013 Di Milia L, Vandelannote C, Duncan MJ, 'Short sleep and obesity: other factors to be considered Response', SLEEP MEDICINE, 14 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.sleep.2013.03.007
2013 Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, Short C, Rockloff M, Ronan K, Happell B, Di Milia L, 'Associations between occupational indicators and total, work-based and leisure-time sitting: A cross-sectional study', BMC Public Health, 13 (2013)
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 37
Co-authors Brenda Happell
2013 Kolt GS, Rosenkranz RR, Savage TN, Maeder AJ, Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, et al., 'WALK 2.0 - Using Web 2.0 applications to promote health-related physical activity: A randomised controlled trial protocol', BMC Public Health, 13 (2013)
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 25
2013 Rosenkranz RR, Duncan MJ, Rosenkranz SK, Kolt GS, 'Active lifestyles related to excellent self-rated health and quality of life: Cross sectional findings from 194,545 participants in the 45 and Up Study', BMC Public Health, 13 (2013)
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 35
2013 Kirwan M, Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, Mummery WK, 'Design, Development, and Formative Evaluation of a Smartphone Application for Recording and Monitoring Physical Activity Levels: The 10,000 Steps "iStepLog"', Health Education and Behavior, 40 140-151 (2013)
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 24
2013 Clark RA, Tideman P, Tirimacco R, Wanguhu K, Poulsen V, Simpson P, et al., 'A Pilot Study of the Feasibility of an Internet-based Electronic Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation (eOCR) Program in Rural Primary Care', Heart Lung and Circulation, 22 352-359 (2013)
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 12
2013 Vandelanotte C, Caperchione CM, Ellison M, George ES, Maeder A, Kolt GS, et al., 'What kinds of website and mobile phone-delivered physical activity and nutrition interventions do middle-aged men want?', Journal of Health Communication, 18 1070-1083 (2013)
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 27
2013 Kirwan M, Vandelanotte C, Fenning A, Duncan MJ, 'Diabetes self-management smartphone application for adults with type 1 diabetes: Randomized controlled trial', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 15 (2013)
Citations Scopus - 160Web of Science - 141
2013 Hanley C, Duncan MJ, Mummery WK, 'The effect of changes to question order on the prevalence of 'sufficient' physical activity in an Australian population survey', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 10 390-396 (2013)
2013 Schoeppe S, Duncan MJ, Badland H, Oliver M, Curtis C, 'Associations of children's independent mobility and active travel with physical activity, sedentary behaviour and weight status: A systematic review', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 16 312-319 (2013)
Citations Scopus - 132Web of Science - 137
2013 Di Milia L, Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, 'The association between short sleep and obesity after controlling for demographic, lifestyle, work and health related factors', Sleep Medicine, 14 319-323 (2013)
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 37
2013 Duncan S, Stewart TI, Oliver M, Mavoa S, MacRae D, Badland HM, Duncan MJ, 'Portable Global Positioning System Receivers', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 44 e19-e29 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2012.10.013
2013 Di Milia L, Vandelannote C, Duncan MJ, 'Letter to the Editor [response]', Sleep Medicine, (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.sleep.2013.03.007
2013 Duncan MJ, Rashid M, Vandelanotte C, Cutumisu N, Plotnikoff RC, 'Development and reliability testing of a self-report instrument to measure the office layout as a correlate of occupational sitting', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 10 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-10-16
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Caperchione CM, Vandelanotte C, Kolt GS, Duncan M, Ellison M, George E, Mummery WK, 'What a Man Wants: Understanding the Challenges and Motivations to Physical Activity Participation and Healthy Eating in Middle-Aged Australian Men', American Journal of Men's Health, 6 453-461 (2012)
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 51
2012 Davies C, Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, Hall S, Corry K, Hooker C, 'Exploring the feasibility of implementing a pedometer-based physical activity program in primary school settings: A case study of 10,000 steps', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 23 141-144 (2012)
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
2012 Kirwan M, Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, Kerry Mummery W, 'Using smartphone technology to monitor physical activity in the 10,000 steps program: A matched case-control trial', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 14 176-185 (2012)
2012 Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, Caperchione C, Hanley C, Mummery WK, 'Temporal trends in and relationships between screen time, physical activity, overweight and obesity', BMC Public Health, 12 (2012)
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 40
2012 Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, Rosenkranz RR, Caperchione CM, Ding H, Ellison M, et al., 'Effectiveness of a website and mobile phone based physical activity and nutrition intervention for middle-aged males: trial protocol and baseline findings of the ManUp Study.', BMC public health, 12 656 (2012)
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 22
2012 Kirwan M, Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, Mummery WK, 'Using smartphone technology to monitor physical activity in the 10,000 Steps program: a matched case-control trial.', Journal of medical Internet research, 14 (2012)
Citations Scopus - 110Web of Science - 103
2012 Davies CA, Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, van Uffelen JGZ, 'Associations of physical activity and screen-time on health related quality of life in adults', Preventive Medicine, 55 46-49 (2012)
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 36
2012 Badland HM, Oliver M, Kearns RA, Mavoa S, Witten K, Duncan MJ, Batty GD, 'Association of neighbourhood residence and preferences with the built environment, work-related travel behaviours, and health implications for employed adults: Findings from the URBAN study', Social Science and Medicine, 75 1469-1476 (2012)
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 24
2012 George ES, Kolt GS, Duncan MJ, Caperchione CM, Mummery WK, Vandelanotte C, et al., 'A review of the effectiveness of physical activity interventions for adult males', Sports Medicine, 42 281-300 (2012)
Citations Scopus - 54Web of Science - 57
2012 Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, Plotnikoff RC, Mummery WK, 'Do participants' preferences for mode of delivery (text, video, or both) influence the effectiveness of a web-based physical activity intervention?', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 14 e37-e37 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.1998
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2011 Badland HM, Oliver M, Duncan MJ, Schantzc P, 'Measuring children's independent mobility: Comparing objective and self-report approaches', Children's Geographies, 9 263-271 (2011)
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
2011 Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, Hanley C, Mummery WK, 'Identifying population subgroups at risk for underestimating weight health risks and overestimating physical activity health benefits', Journal of Health Psychology, 16 760-769 (2011)
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
2011 Caperchione C, Mummery WK, Duncan M, 'Investigating the relationship between leader behaviours and group cohesion within women's walking groups', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 14 325-330 (2011)
Citations Scopus - 13
2011 Caperchione C, Mummery WK, Duncan M, 'Investigating the relationship between leader behaviours and group cohesion within women's walking groups', JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND MEDICINE IN SPORT, 14 325-330 (2011)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2011.03.005
Citations Web of Science - 11
2011 Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, Hanley C, Caperchione C, Mummery K, 'Australian Award - Population Trends in Adults Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour and Overweight and Obesity', MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE, 43 535-535 (2011)
DOI 10.1249/01.MSS.0000401474.18246.2d
2010 Badland HM, Duncan MJ, Oliver M, Duncan JS, Mavoa S, 'Examining commute routes: Applications of GIS and GPS technology', Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine, 15 327-330 (2010)
Citations Scopus - 31
2010 Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, Caperchione C, Hanley C, Mummery WK, 'Physical activity trends in Queensland (2002 to 2008): Are women becoming more active than men?', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 34 248-254 (2010)
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 22
2010 Humphries B, Duncan MJ, Mummery WK, 'Prevalence and correlates of resistance training in a regional Australian population', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 44 653-656 (2010)
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 29
2010 Duncan MJ, Badland HM, Mummery WK, 'Physical activity levels by occupational category in non-metropolitan australian adults', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 7 718-723 (2010)
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 33
2010 Oliver M, Badland H, Mavoa S, Duncan MJ, Duncan S, 'Combining GPS, GIS, and accelerometry: Methodological issues in the assessment of location and intensity of travel behaviors', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 7 102-108 (2010)
Citations Scopus - 84Web of Science - 82
2010 Duncan MJ, Winkler E, Sugiyama T, Cerin E, Dutoit L, Leslie E, Owen N, 'Relationships of land use mix with walking for transport: Do land uses and geographical scale matter?', Journal of Urban Health, 87 782-795 (2010)
Citations Scopus - 96Web of Science - 88
2009 Badland HM, Duncan MJ, 'Perceptions of air pollution during the work-related commute by adults in Queensland, Australia', Atmospheric Environment, 43 5791-5795 (2009)
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 34
2009 Badland HM, Duncan MJ, Schofield GM, 'Using census data to travel through time in New Zealand: Patterns in journey to work data 1981-2006', New Zealand Medical Journal, 122 15-20 (2009)
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
2009 Duncan MJ, Badland HM, Mummery WK, 'Applying GPS to enhance understanding of transport-related physical activity', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 12 549-556 (2009)
Citations Scopus - 94Web of Science - 88
2009 Duncan MJ, Mummery WK, Steele RM, Caperchione C, Schofield G, 'Geographic location, physical activity and perceptions of the environment in Queensland adults', Health and Place, 15 204-209 (2009)
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 21
2008 Caperchione C, Lauder W, Kolt GS, Duncan MJ, Mummery WK, 'Associations between social capital and health status in an Australian population', Psychology, Health and Medicine, 13 471-482 (2008)
Citations Scopus - 8
2008 Caperchione CM, Duncan MJ, Mummery K, Steele R, Schofield G, 'Mediating relationship between body mass index and the direct measures of the Theory of Planned Behaviour on physical activity intention', Psychology, Health and Medicine, 13 168-179 (2008)
Citations Scopus - 21
2008 Duncan MJ, Kerry Mummery W, Kift RL, 'Geographical location and sunburn in Queensland adults', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 16 181-182 (2008)
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
2008 Badland HM, Duncan MJ, Mummery WK, 'Travel perceptions, behaviors, and environment by degree of urbanization', Preventive Medicine, 47 265-269 (2008)
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
2007 Duncan MJ, Mummery WK, 'GIS or GPS? A Comparison of Two Methods For Assessing Route Taken During Active Transport', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 33 51-53 (2007)
Citations Scopus - 119Web of Science - 108
2007 Mummery WK, Duncan M, Kift R, 'Socio-economic differences in public opinion regarding water fluoridation in Queensland', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 31 336-339 (2007)
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
2007 Duncan MJ, Mummery WK, Dascombe BJ, 'Utility of global positioning system to measure active transport in urban areas', MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE, 39 1851-1857 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1249/mss.0b013e31811ff31e
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 38
Co-authors Ben Dascombe
2005 Duncan MJ, Spence JC, Mummery WK, 'Perceived environment and physical activity: A meta-analysis of selected environmental characteristics', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2 (2005)
Citations Scopus - 273
2005 Duncan M, Mummery K, 'Psychosocial and environmental factors associated with physical activity among city dwellers in regional Queensland', Preventive Medicine, 40 363-372 (2005)
Citations Scopus - 193Web of Science - 176
Show 174 more journal articles

Conference (13 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Kwasnicka D, Rebar AL, Vandelanotte C, Gardner B, Short CE, Hagger MS, Duncan MJ, 'PHYSICAL ACTIVITY TAILORED INTERVENTION IN HOSPITAL STAFF (PATHS): A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL ON ONLINE TAILORED PROGRAM', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2019)
2019 Oftedal S, Duncan M, Holliday E, Brown W, Collins C, Ewald B, et al., 'Daily steps and diet quality, but not sleep, are related to mortality in older Australians', Daily steps and diet quality, but not sleep, are related to mortality in older Australians, Novotel Twin Waters (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2019.08.244
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Liz Holliday
2019 Oftedal S, Duncan M, Smith J, Vandelanotte C, Burton N, 'Resistance training plus aerobic activity associated with lower likelihood of depression and comorbid depression and anxiety in Australian women', Resistance training plus aerobic activity associated with lower likelihood of depression and comorbid depression and anxiety in Australian women, Novotel Twin Waters (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2019.08.215
Co-authors Jordan Smith
2018 Kolt GS, Wood T, Duncan MJ, Caperchione CM, Maeder AJ, Rosenkranz RR, et al., 'The Effect ofa Web-based Physical Activity Promotion Program on Sedentary Behavior: The Walk 2.0 Trial', MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE, Minneapolis, MN (2018)
2016 Paterson J, Bowen H, Reynolds A, Duncan M, Vandelanotte C, Ferguson S, 'THE YAWN (YOUNG ADULTS WORKING NIGHTS) STUDY: BARRIERS AND ENABLERS TO MODIFYING SLEEP BEHAVIOUR IN YOUNG ADULTS', JOURNAL OF SLEEP RESEARCH (2016)
2016 Alley S, Schoeppe S, Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, 'Queensland Older Adults' Physical Activity, Diet, Screen Time, Smoking, Alcohol, and BMI: Trends from 2007-2014', JOURNAL OF AGING AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (2016)
2015 Rebar A, Martina A, Boles C, Burton N, Duncan MJJ, Short C, et al., 'Healthy Mind, Healthy Body: a randomized trial of a computer-tailored vs interactive web-based physical activity intervention for people with depressive symptoms', ISBNPA 2015: Advancing Behavior Change Science, Edinburgh, UK (2015) [E3]
2013 Ding H, Karunanithi M, Duncan M, Ireland D, Noakes M, Hooker C, 'A mobile phone enabled health promotion program for middle-aged males' (2013)
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2013 Ding H, Karunanithi M, Duncan M, Ireland D, Noakes M, Hooker C, 'A mobile phone enabled health promotion program for middle-aged males.', Conference proceedings : ... Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Conference (2013)

The prevalence of chronic diseases among middle aged males outweigh their female counterparts in developed countries. To prevent this, delivery of health promotion programs target... [more]

The prevalence of chronic diseases among middle aged males outweigh their female counterparts in developed countries. To prevent this, delivery of health promotion programs targeting lifestyle modifications of physical activity and nutrition in middle-aged males has been essential, but often difficult. ManUp health promotion program was a recent initiative that uses current advances in information and communication technology (ICT) to reach the middle-aged males. One of the key components of the ICT approach was the development of smartphone application to enable middle-aged men to uptake the program with their own mobile phone. The smart phone application was aimed at providing varied level of challenges towards physical activity and healthy eating behavior, with interactive and motivational feedback SMS messages. The ManUp program was recently implemented and trialed in a randomized control trial in Gladstone and Rockhampton, Queens. This paper describes the components of the smart phone application integrated within the ManUp health promotion program.

Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Caperchione CM, Duncan MJ, Kolt GS, Vandelanotte C, Maeder A, Rosenkranz RR, et al., 'Translating Health Promotion Research Into Community Practice: The Manup Project', MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE, Indianapolis, IN (2013)
2012 Vandelanotte C, Duncan M, Plotnikoff R, Mummery K, 'DOPARTICIPANTS' PREFERENCES FOR MODE OF DELIVERY (TEXT, VIDEO OR BOTH) INFLUENCE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF AN ONLINE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTION?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2012)
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Schoeppe S, Duncan M, Oliver M, Badland H, Burke M, 'RECRUIT, ENGAGE AND ATTAIN CHILDREN IN BEHAVIORAL HEALTH RESEARCH - THE REACH FRAMEWORK', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2012)
2012 Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, Hanley C, Caperchione C, Mummery K, 'Australian Award - Population Trends in Adults Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour and Overweight and Obesity', JOURNAL OF GENERAL INTERNAL MEDICINE (2012)
Show 10 more conferences
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 22
Total funding $7,412,491

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


Highlighted grants and funding

Sleepy and sitting: a dual curse for the modern workforce?$626,825

This proposal expects to generate new knowledge about the impact of inadequate sleep and prolonged sitting on
health markers and performance using an innovative multi-disciplinary laboratory study. Many workers,
particularly those working outside ‘standard hours’ experience both prolonged sitting and inadequate sleep.
Expected outcomes of this project include critical evidence to address the dual burden experienced by a large
population of workers who are both sleepy and sitting, new international collaborations, and capacity building in
early career researchers. This should provide significant benefits for the many working Australians whose health
and safety is compromised due to their exposure to inadequate sleep and prolonged sitting.

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Sally Ferguson, Grace Vincent, Sarah Jay, Corneel Vandelanotte, Mitch J Duncan, Philip Tucker

Scheme Discovery Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding C1200 - Aust Competitive - ARC
Category 1200
UON N

Enhancing understanding of the combined influence of physical activity and sleep as CVD risk factors$493,746

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Mitch Duncan
Scheme Career Development Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G1700197
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Improving understanding of Sleep, Physical Activity & Diet as CVD risk factors: combining evidence from intervention and epidemiological studies$190,609

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Professor Mitch Duncan, Professor Nicholas Glozier, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Associate Professor Emmanuel Stamatakis, Dr Gregory Kolt, Associate Professor Liz Holliday, Conjoint Associate Professor Mark McEvoy, Emeritus Professor Michael Hensley, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Philip Morgan, Associate Professor Comeel Vandelanotte, Professor Wendy Brown
Scheme NSW Cardiovascular Research Network Research Development Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1600996
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Sleep, Move & Eat. Testing novel intervention strategies to improve the efficacy of behavioural weight loss interventions$59,808

Funding body: Diabetes Australia

Funding body Diabetes Australia
Project Team Professor Mitch Duncan, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Philip Morgan, Associate Professor Comeel Vandelanotte, Professor Wendy Brown
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1600738
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Reducing population level CVD risk by improving physical activity, sitting and sleep behaviours$520,000

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Professor Mitch Duncan
Scheme Future Leader Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1400694
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20193 grants / $888,479

Sleepy and sitting: a dual curse for the modern workforce?$626,825

This proposal expects to generate new knowledge about the impact of inadequate sleep and prolonged sitting on
health markers and performance using an innovative multi-disciplinary laboratory study. Many workers,
particularly those working outside ‘standard hours’ experience both prolonged sitting and inadequate sleep.
Expected outcomes of this project include critical evidence to address the dual burden experienced by a large
population of workers who are both sleepy and sitting, new international collaborations, and capacity building in
early career researchers. This should provide significant benefits for the many working Australians whose health
and safety is compromised due to their exposure to inadequate sleep and prolonged sitting.

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Sally Ferguson, Grace Vincent, Sarah Jay, Corneel Vandelanotte, Mitch J Duncan, Philip Tucker

Scheme Discovery Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding C1200 - Aust Competitive - ARC
Category 1200
UON N

POWERPLAY: Building employee health and safety through prevention$186,919

Few workplace health programs take into consideration the unique context of male-dominated industries such as oil/gas, transportation, forestry, and mining. The goal of this project is to evaluate a workplace health program (“POWERPLAY”) designed to promote physical activity and mental wellness in male-dominated industries in Alberta and also develop an additional sleep health module.

Funding body: Alberta Government

Funding body Alberta Government
Project Team

Steve Johnson, Joan Bortoff, Cristina Caperchione, Collaborators (Simon Rice, Mitch J Duncan, Carole James, Jane Rich, Allan Holmes

Scheme Alberta Ministry of Labour - Occupational Health and Safety Futures Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding C3232 - International Govt - Other
Category 3232
UON N

Truck-Fit: Testing of a scalable high intensity interval training program for male long distance truck drivers with cardio-metabolic risks and conditions$74,735

In this study we propose to test the efficacy of ‘Truck-Fit”, assessing heart health impact on the primary outcome of CRF in long-distance truck drivers. We will also assess the secondary outcomes of HIIT compliance, driver sleep quality and fatigue, with the latter two outcomes investigating how changes in CRF may benefit transport industry priorities associated with road safety.

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team

Nicholas Gilson, Wendy J Brown, Mitch J Duncan, Guy Wallis

Scheme Vanguard Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

20182 grants / $503,246

Enhancing understanding of the combined influence of physical activity and sleep as CVD risk factors$493,746

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Mitch Duncan
Scheme Career Development Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G1700197
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

SDVCRI Research Support for NHMRC CDF$9,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Mitch Duncan
Scheme NHMRC CDF Support
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1800343
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20173 grants / $1,346,805

Partnering with local government councils for scalable physical activity promotion in community parks$1,096,388

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor David Lubans, Professor Adrian Bauman, Professor Mitch Duncan, Professor John Attia
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2023
GNo G1601350
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Improving understanding of Sleep, Physical Activity & Diet as CVD risk factors: combining evidence from intervention and epidemiological studies$190,609

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Professor Mitch Duncan, Professor Nicholas Glozier, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Associate Professor Emmanuel Stamatakis, Dr Gregory Kolt, Associate Professor Liz Holliday, Conjoint Associate Professor Mark McEvoy, Emeritus Professor Michael Hensley, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Philip Morgan, Associate Professor Comeel Vandelanotte, Professor Wendy Brown
Scheme NSW Cardiovascular Research Network Research Development Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1600996
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Sleep, Move & Eat. Testing novel intervention strategies to improve the efficacy of behavioural weight loss interventions$59,808

Funding body: Diabetes Australia

Funding body Diabetes Australia
Project Team Professor Mitch Duncan, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Philip Morgan, Associate Professor Comeel Vandelanotte, Professor Wendy Brown
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1600738
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20161 grants / $9,765

Partnering with local government councils for scalable physical activity promotion; integrating physical and environmental change, innovative technology and social support$9,765

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor David Lubans, Professor Mitch Duncan
Scheme Linkage Pilot Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600766
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20151 grants / $68,650

Reducing CVD risk by moving more and improving sleep: the Balance study$68,650

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Professor Mitch Duncan, Professor Naomi Rogers, Professor Wendy Brown, Professor Stewart Trost
Scheme Vanguard Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1400681
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20142 grants / $521,500

Reducing population level CVD risk by improving physical activity, sitting and sleep behaviours$520,000

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Professor Mitch Duncan
Scheme Future Leader Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1400694
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

National Physical Activity Conference, Canberra Australia, 15 - 18 October 2014.$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Professor Mitch Duncan
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400939
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20133 grants / $1,543,127

10,000 Steps$732,500

This funding supports the continued dissemination of the 10,000 Steps project www.10000steps.org.au

Funding body: University of Central Queensland

Funding body University of Central Queensland
Project Team

Dr Mitch Duncan

Scheme Queensland Health
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON N

My Personal Activity Advice – A RCT investigating the effectiveness of tailored videos in promoting physical activity using the Internet$690,627

 

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Corneel Vandelanotte

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

The Shifting Gears Project: active living and healthy eating in Queensland truck drivers$120,000

Funding body: Queensland Government

Funding body Queensland Government
Project Team

Nicholas Gilson

Scheme Health Department
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

20121 grants / $285,986

Web-based physical activity interventions for people with mental health conditions$285,986

Funding body: CQUniversity

Funding body CQUniversity
Project Team

Vandelanotte, C., Duncan, MJ., & Happell, B

Scheme Research Advancement Award Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20105 grants / $2,182,350

Walk 2.0: Investigating the internal and external validity of Web 2.0 applications in promoting physical activity$896,350

The overall aim of the project is to study the effectiveness of new generation Web 2.0 applications in health promotion. Spcifically we seek to test the efficacy of Web 2.0 applications in the engagement and retention of, and physical activity behaviour in, people who access a publicly available physical activity promotion website (www.10000steps.org.au). The project consists of two studies 1) a randomised control trial (RCT), and 2) a ‘real world’ ecological trial (ECT). The RCT will allow us to examine our research questions in a tightly controlled manner. The ECT takes advantage of the unique ‘real world’ sample available to the research team through the 10,000 Steps website to examine our research questions in a way that is more aligned with how the public uses health promotion websites.

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Gregory Kolt

Scheme unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

CATCH: Children, Active Travel, Connectedness and Health$479,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Carey Curtis

Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

10,000 Steps $284,000

Funding body: Queensland Department of Health

Funding body Queensland Department of Health
Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

10,000 Steps$283,000

Funding body: National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health

Funding body National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health
Scheme Workplaces for Wellness
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

iMATCH: Independent Mobility, Active Travel and Children’s Health$240,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Matthew Burke

Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20081 grants / $62,583

7 year follow-up of regional city dwellers: Longitudinal changes in the built environment and physical activity$62,583

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team

Dr Mitch Duncan

Scheme Grant-In-Aid
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed14
Current3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 PhD Understanding and Enhancing Activity, Diet and Sleep Behaviours in Shift-Workers PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Examining the relationship between sleep health and dietary intake in adults PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD The Acute Effects of Physical Activity on Adolescents’ Mental Health and Cognition: An Exploration of Moderators PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 PhD The Combined Effects of Physical Activity and Sleep on the Health and Wellbeing of Middle-Aged Adults PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2019 PhD Development and Evaluation of a Mobile Health Intervention to Improve Physical Activity and Sleep Health in Adults: the Synergy Study PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 Honours Influence of a multi-behaviour lifestyle weight loss intervention on the eating behaviours of adults Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 Honours Research Masters Thesis Project: Practical nutrition knowledge mediates the relationship between socio-demographic characteristics and diet quality in adults: A cross-sectional analysis. Public Health, Maastricht University Principal Supervisor
2017 Honours Sociodemographic and behavioural correlates of insufficient sleep in Australian Adults Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 Masters Research Masters Thesis Project - Cross-sectional associations between multiple lifestyle behaviours and excellent well-being in Australian adults. Public Health, Maastricht University Principal Supervisor
2016 Masters The effectiveness of the 10,000 Steps Workplace Challenge to increase physical activity Behavioural Science, Central Queensland University Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD The effect of different intensities of physical activity and diet on cardiometabolic markers, cardiac and vascular function, and gut microbiota Health, University of Central Queensland Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Impact of physical activity, obesity and particulate matter on cardiovascular and respiratory function in young rats. Health, University of Central Queensland Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Children’s independent mobility, active travel, physical activity and health Health, University of Central Queensland Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Children off the Couch: The efficacy of an integrated curriculum and web-supported class-based walking challenge on physical activity Health Promotion, University of Central Queensland Principal Supervisor
2012 Masters An examination of question form on responses in CATI surveys Health, University of Central Queensland Principal Supervisor
2012 PhD Application of smart phones to improve self management of diabetes Health, University of Central Queensland Co-Supervisor
2011 PhD Investigations and recommendations for sport development legacies resulting from the conduct of major sporting events Health, University of Central Queensland Principal Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 183
Canada 52
United States 31
New Zealand 17
United Kingdom 13
More...
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News

A refreshing way to get more activity and better sleep

August 28, 2017

In the REFRESH Study, Associate Professor Mitch Duncan and his team from the Hunter Medical Research Institute’s Cardiovascular Program are investigating whethe

Can a good night’s sleep be secret to diabetes prevention?

March 14, 2017

A new project from UON and HMRI is hoping to unlock whether sleep is the missing link in long-term, healthy weight loss.

UON Heart Foundation 2017 Research Funding

December 5, 2016

University of Newcastle researchers awarded highly competitive Heart Foundation grants.

Professor Mitch Duncan

Position

NHMRC Career Development Fellow
School of Medicine & Public Health, Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email mitch.duncan@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 49217805
Fax (02) 4921 2084
Link Research and Innovation Cluster

Office

Room ATC315
Building Advanced Technology Centre
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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