Dr Narelle Eather

Dr Narelle Eather

Senior Lecturer

School of Education (Education)

Providing positive sporting experiences for children

Dr Narelle Eather’s research is providing positive sporting experiences to children from an early age to help them achieve life long health and well being.

An accomplished sports woman who has represented Australia in netball and OzTag, Dr Narelle Eather’s research is driven by her desire to help people be active and healthy.

The physical education lecturer is focused on producing exercise programs and strategies that have real world applications and in particular methods for improving children’s physical fitness.

Dr Eather’s latest project, the MASTER coaching program, funded by a Hunter Medical Research Institute project grant, aims to enhance children’s physical, psychological and socio-emotional health and well being through positive sporting experiences.

Dr Eather says that 65% of children enroll in junior sport each year, however as they come into the teenage years they tend to drop out of sport.

“We know kids enjoy sport when it’s positive but they are dropping out for two main reasons; as a result of them not enjoying it and because coaching practices aren’t meeting the needs of players,” Dr Eather said.

The MASTER coaching program addresses this problem by helping coaches improve their skills and confidence, and in turn create positive experiences for children playing sport.

“It’s often the case that parents without any formal training are thrust into coaching positions for their children’s junior sports teams. This project focuses on helping those people make the training environment a positive one. Some turn out to be excellent coaches, but it’s common to see coaches yelling at children, continually picking up on and focusing on their mistakes, or shouting out sideline instructions,” Dr Eather said.

“This takes the decision making process away from the child and doesn’t allow the child to learn through trial and error. Our philosophy in the MASTER coaching program is that success is to just ‘have a go’. We want children to try new things, be creative and come up with new solutions. Allowing the children to learn through mistakes builds some understanding of why it worked or didn’t work and that’s really important for success in sport.”

The program uses the MASTER framework that has six evidence-based elements targeting the fundamentals kids need to enjoy the sporting experience and to also learn and develop through sport.

“There are two things we target in the program – how to create a positive experience and the game based coaching practices. Teaching through games is most effective and engages kids more. They become better players when they are encouraged to think strategically and problem solve,” Dr Eather commented.

“Through helping coaches provide a positive experience for children we then impact on the children’s experience and their potential to stay in sport and be active for rest of their life.”

The program has been piloted with netball teams in Newcastle and will be rolled out further to soccer clubs and primary school teachers as a professional learning workshop via the Department of Education. The program is also embedded in an undergraduate physical education course for primary and secondary pre-service teachers at the University of Newcastle.

Hitting fitness at work

Can you improve the health, well-being and work productivity of sedentary workers with just eight minutes of exercise three days a week? That is the question that Dr Eather is focusing on in her National Heart Foundation funded project that tests the impact of high intensity interval training (HIIT) on office workers at the University of Newcastle.

The ‘Work–HIIT’ project builds on Dr Eather’s involvement in the ‘Burn to Learn’ study which focused on using HIIT training to improve the fitness and cognitive outcomes of adolescents in senior high school, the ‘Uni-HIIT’ program which tested the same theory in university students, as well as her PhD study ‘Fit 4 Fun’ which promoted health and physical fitness in primary school children.

“Through this past research our team found that even with just eight minutes of HIIT exercise three times a week there were significant changes to the participant’s cardiovascular and muscular fitness levels,” Dr Eather observed.

The ‘Work-HIIT’ program participants will exercise for eight minutes three times a week while their heart rates are monitored.

“The key to this training is that they need to be working at 85% of their maximum heart rate for short bursts (e.g., 30 seconds), interspersed with rest periods (e.g.g,30 seconds rest). iPads used during the sessions show the participants their heart rates which helps them push themselves during the work periods.”

“I am are testing whether we can encourage workers to leave their desks for just this short amount of time and do the exercise. To help motivate them I have incorporated variety and choice into the exercise program because new evidence shows that people are more motivated in their workout when they can choose what they want to do and the workout varies,” Dr Eather noted.

“We know HIIT training works for children, adolescents and young people. I want to know if it will work for older, time-poor workers. If it does it will be a program that can be picked up by any employer for use by their own staff.”

Dr Eather, a recipient of University of Newcastle Women in Research Fellowship, says that she is excited to have been given the support that will allow her to focus on her research goals.

“As an early career researcher it is nice to be recognised because often as a female in this line of work you have things other than your research you must juggle.”

“This fellowship will allow me to continue building my track record as a researcher, help me with project tasks and provide support for future grant applications, which is invaluable.”

Encouraging girls in sport

Dr Eather is also on the research team of the award-winning lifestyle program

Dads And Daughters Exercising and Empowered (DADEE) that the NSW Government has invested $2.4million in for a statewide roll out.

“It’s fantastic to see this program which was developed here in the Hunter spreading across NSW, and potentially Australia, through a range of sports. It’s one of the hopes you have as a researcher when you have an idea and you test it and it works,” Dr Eather said.

The program is the first of its kind to teach fathers to be agents of change for daughters. Research findings show that DADEE has successfully improved girls’ self-esteem, resilience, sport skills and physical activity levels as well as spurring greater interest in playing sport.

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A concrete foundation for fitness - Dr Narelle Eather

Providing positive sporting experiences for children

Dr Narelle Eather’s research is providing positive sporting experiences to children from an early age to help them achieve life long health and well being.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Narelle Eather completed her undergraduate degree in Human Movement and Health Education at the University of Sydney before obtaining her Masters of Education (Physical Education) through the University of New England and a PhD through the University of Newcastle. Narelle is the Program Convenor of the Bachelor of Education (Secondary) and the Bachelor of Teaching (Health and Physical Education)(Hons) and also teaches and co-ordinates a range of health and physical education courses in both the primary and secondary teacher education courses at the undergraduate level at the University of Newcastle. The focus of Narelle's research is the promotion of physical activity, physical fitness and sports skills among children, youth and young adults, and with the development and evaluation of theoretically driven interventions in the school and community settings. Narelle is an active researcher and has published in peer-reviewed international journals.

Research Expertise
Dr. Narelle Eather is an active member of the University of Newcastle’s Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, is a senior lecturer in Health and Physical Education at the University of Newcastle and is currently working on several school-based and community-based research projects.

The focus of Narelle's research is the promotion of physical activity, physical fitness and sports skills among children, youth and young adults, and with the development and evaluation of theoretically driven Health and Physical Education interventions in the school and community settings. More recently, Narelle’s research also includes the development of physical fitness and psychological health and cognition in adolescents, and in the development of health through family-based physical activity programs.

Teaching Expertise
Narelle Eather is a senior lecturer in Health and Physical Education at the University of Newcastle. Narelle has been lecturing at the university as both a full-time and part-time employee for over 10 years and co-ordinates a number of Secondary and Primary Teacher Education Courses. Narelle is also the current Program Convenor of the Bachelor of Education (Secondary) and the Bachelor of Teaching (Health and Physical Education)(Hons). She also has 10 years teaching experience in secondary schools as a PDHPE teacher, sport organiser and pastoral care leader. In this role Narelle specialised in teaching Senior PDHPE, Sport Leisure and Recreation and Sport Science, and also co-ordinated courses in Outdoor Education, Junior PDHPE and Gifted and Talented Physical Education. Narelle also taught in Primary Schools as both a generalist and PDHPE specialist prior to taking on a lecturing role at the University of Newcastle. Narelle has extensive experience in coaching and training children of all ages in a range of sports and physical activities. She also has extensive experience in the development of physical fitness for groups and individual of all ages and backgrounds. Course Co-ordination: Secondary EDUC1014 EDUC1016 EDUC4015 EDUC2057 EDUC4015 Primary PUBH2030 EDUC2515 EDUC2514 PUBH1020

Administrative Expertise
Narelle Eather is the current Program Convenor for the Bachelor of Teaching (secondary) / Bachelor of Health and Physical Education and is an active member of the Teaching and Learning Committee, Secondary Management Group and Primary Management Groups in the Faculty of Education and Arts at the University of Newcastle. She is also a representative of The School of Education on the FEDUA Teaching and Learning Committee and the School of Education Board.

Collaborations
I am currently working in collaboration with members of the Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition at the University of Newcastle on several research projects including:

Table 1: Research projects and Funding for Narelle Eather 

Research Projects Research Team  / Role Funding / Role
Thinking while Moving in English Dr N Riley, Dr N Eather (CI) Prof D Lubans Prof P Morgan Dr K Shaw A/Prof C Lonsdale Department of Education $200,000 (2017-2019)
Burn 2 Learn: A scalable intervention for increasing vigorous activity in older adolescents Prof D Lubans, Prof C Hillman, Prof P Morgan, Prof R Plotnikoff, Prof M Nilsson, A/Prof C Lonsdale, Dr N Eather (CI), Dr J Smith NHMRC Grant $636,912 (2017-2020)
Department of Education (1127, 740)
Variety Study: Investigating the impact of variety on adolescent motivation and well-being Dr. N Eather (Lead), Prof D Lubans A/Prof  M Beauchamp, Prof R Rhodes, Dr B Sylvester Higher Degree by Research (HDR) Candidate Scholarship (2017) $150,000
Equipment Grant Dr Narelle Eather, Dr Jordan Smith, Dr Drew Miller, Dr Nick Riley $8,820 HMRI
 
The Physical Literacy Program- evaluating student outcomes Dr. Drew Miller, Dr. Narelle Eather, Dr Nick Riley International Football School (2017-2020) $57,140
PDA in PE: Peer Dialogue Assessment in Higher Education Physical Education Dr. N Eather (Lead),  Dr. A Miller, Dr. N. Riley. UoN Travel Grant (2016) $1000, UoN SNAPP Funding $15,000 (2017)
The DADEE (Dads And Daughters Exercising and Empowered) program Prof. P Morgan, Prof. D Lubans, Dr. N Eather (CI), Dr. A Barnes, Dr. M Young, E Pollock. HMRI $379,459 (2017) & $25,000 (2014); Port Waratah Coal Services Ltd.$327,813 (2015-7) & $200,000 (2018-2020)
Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teens (NEAT) and Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time (ATLAS) Prof D.R. Lubans, Prof. P.J.Morgan, Dr.T. Hilland, A/Prof C. Lonsdale, Dr. N Eather (CI5), Dr J.Smith, Prof. R.Plotnikoff Funded under Prof Lubans ARC Fellows Grant $800,282
HIIT: The impact of high intensity interval training on physical and psycho-social outcomes in adolescents Prof D Lubans, S. Costigan, Dr. N Eather (CI3), Prof. R Plotnikoff, S Kennedy, E. Pollock Hunter Medical Research Institute $20,000 (2014)
 
Stand Up for Healthy Minds study: Evaluation of a multi-component intervention to reduce screen-time in adolescents Prof. D Lubans, Prof.Ron Plotnikoff, Prof.P Morgan, Dr. N Eather (CI4), M Babic, Dr. L Peralta, Prof. A Baker Hunter Medical Research Institute $25,000 (2014)
 
Cross Fit Teens Program: Improving health-related fitness in adolescents Dr. N Eather (Lead), Prof. P Morgan & A/Prof. D Lubans
 
UoN Research Grant $6000 (2014) Travel Grant $1500 (2015) NSW IER Research Grant $1200 (2014),
The Fit-4-Fun Study: Promoting physical activity and physical fitness in primary school-aged children. Dr. N Eather (Lead), Prof. P Morgan and Prof. D Lubans
 
UoN Travel Grant (2013) $1500 Sport Medicine Australia Grant $2000
PLUNGE: Professional Learning for Understanding Games Education
1. PLUNGE (2012) 2. PLUNGE (plus) (2014), 3. PLUNGE SPORT (15)
Dr. A Miller, Dr. N Eather (CI2), A/Prof. D Lubans, Dr. E Christensen JRE Funding $13000 (2013)
PRC PAN UoN SEED Funding $5000 (2012) 
Enhancing secondary-tertiary transition Dr. E Christensen, S McQueen, Dr. N Eather (CI3), T Kelty, Dr. K Ferguson Teacher Ed. Research Network $3300 PRC UoN SEED Grant $4000 (2012)
Variety Study: Investigating the impact of variety on adolescent motivation and well-being Dr. N Eather (Lead), Prof D Lubans A/Prof  M Beauchamp, Prof R Rhodes, Dr B Sylvester FEDUA fellowship (2016) $15,000
PDA in PE: Peer Dialogue Assessment in Higher Education Physical Education Dr. N Eather (Lead),  Dr. A Miller, Dr. N. Riley. UoN Travel Grant (2016) $1000, UoN SNAPP Funding $15,000 (2017)
Total funding > $1,800,000


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Education, University of Sydney
  • Master of Education (Physical Education), University of New England

Keywords

  • Children & Youth
  • Coaching
  • Curriculum Development
  • Health & Physical Education (Primary)
  • Health & Physical Education (Secondary)
  • Physical Activity
  • Physical Fitness
  • Physical Fitness
  • School-based interventions
  • Sport Education
  • Sports Coaching
  • Teaching and Learning in PDHPE
  • cognition
  • health and wellbeing

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
130105 Primary Education (excl. Maori) 30
111712 Health Promotion 30
130210 Physical Education and Development Curriculum and Pedagogy 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/09/2018 -  Deputy Head of School Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle, Australia
Education
Australia
1/09/2017 -  Program Convenor Bachelor of Education (Secondary) The University of Newcastle, Australia
Australia
1/01/2012 -  Program Convenor Bachelor of Teaching (Secondary) / Bachelor of Health and Physical Education University of Newcastle
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/1997 - 1/01/2008 PDHPE teacher NSW Department of Education and Communities

Awards

Prize

Year Award
2017 Early Career RhD Scholarship
The University of Newcastle, Australia
2017 The University of Newcastle Early-Career Researcher of the Year
The University of Newcastle | Australia
2017 The University of Newcastle Early-Career Researcher of the Year
The University of Newcastle | Australia
2016 Dean's Award for Teaching Excellence
Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Recognition

Year Award
2014 Faculty of Education and Arts RHD Publication Prize 2014
University of Newcastle
2013 Best Published Paper Award 2013
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition - The University of Newcastle
2012 Best Published Paper Award 2012
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition - The University of Newcastle
2011 3min Thesis Competition
University of Newcastle
2011 Vice Chancellor's Award for Teaching Excellence
University of Newcastle
1996 Dean's List of Scholars
The University of Sydney

Research Award

Year Award
2016 Faculty of Education and Arts Early Career Fellowship 2016
The University of Newcastle
2011 Research Award
Sports Medicine Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
EDUC1014 PE Studies 1: Motor Development and Skill Acquisition
University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

This course provides students with an opportunity to gain knowledge, understanding and skills in movement skill acquisition to facilitate the planning, assessment, implementation and evaluation of a fundamental movement intervention program in a primary school setting.

Students will gain valuable theoretical and practical experience while attending lectures and participating in tutorials as well as learn a variety of planning, assessment and teaching techniques for the implementation and evaluation of a fundamental movement skills program in a primary school setting.

Course Co-ordinator 1/08/2016 - 31/07/2018
EDUC2514 Primary Kinetics 1
The University of Newcastle
This elective course examines the programming of Team Sports in the Primary K-6 curriculum. Effective coaching strategies will be examined to enhance student performance.
Course Co-ordinator 1/08/2009 - 31/07/2018
PUBH1030 Foundation Studies in K-6 PDHPE
The University of Newcastle
This course aims to provide students with a broad and critical understanding of the study of personal development, health and physical education (PDHPE). It provides a foundation and context for future study and courses in the theory and practice of teaching the PDHPE syllabus in primary school years. The course introduces future teachers to the nature and role of PDHPE and the health promoting school model in supporting the development of health and wellbeing, with a focus on contemporary PDHPE issues.
PE strand course co-ordinator 1/08/2009 - 31/07/2018
educ2515 Primary Kinetics 2
The University of Newcastle
This elective course examines a range of individual practical pursuits that are incorporated in the Physical Education domain of the K-6 syllabus. Emphasis is given to promoting healthy lifestyles especially through recreational (non-competitive) practical activities.
Course Co-ordinator 1/08/2009 - 31/07/2018
EDUC4015 PE Studies 8 - Sociology of Sport and Physical Activity
The University of Newcastle
In this course students will examine how physical activity and sport, and through them HPE, are products of particular historical, social and cultural conditions. Through identifying and discussing key sociocultural issues relating to the body, physical activity and sport, students will recognise different viewpoints and their impact on contemporary practices. Students will critically analyse approaches to issues such as: the social meanings of sport in Australia; health and the body; gender, sexuality and physical activity; the media and sport; ethnicity and race; youth cultures; and sport and politics; with a view to incorporating a sociocultural perspective within health and physical education teaching practices.
Course Co-ordinator 1/01/2012 - 31/07/2018
EDUC2057 PE Studies 3: Performance Activities
The University of Newcastle
Students will apply movement principles and develop skill competencies and teaching techniques across a range of core physical activities. Specifically, students will examine the areas of dance and gymnastics.
Course Co-ordinator 1/01/2012 - 31/07/2018
EDUC2058 PE Studies 4: Invasion Games
The University of Newcastle
Students will develop knowledge and teaching skills relating to the principles and practices of teaching a range of invasion games. Students will apply movement principles and develop both performance and teaching skill competencies across a range of core team sports that focus on invasion as the major game strategy. Specifically, students will examine the rules, tactics and appropriate pedagogical strategies that enable the design and delivery of learning experiences in Soccer, Touch, Rugby League, Rugby Union and Australian Rules.
Lecturer 1/01/2012 - 31/07/2018
EDUC1016 PE Studies 2: Court and Striking Games
The University of Newcastle
This course introduces students to a range of court and striking sports and to the application of theoretically-based teaching and coaching strategies used to facilitate effective learning in these sports. The sports to be covered are: cricket, softball, netball, basketball, volleyball and tennis. Students will be given the opportunity to apply teaching and coaching strategies to practical game situations and to develop their knowledge, skills and understanding in each sport. PDHPE curriculum links will be made and practical assessment techniques will be explored for each of the sports.
Course Co-ordinator 1/01/2012 - 31/07/2018
PUBH1020 Foundations of Early Childhood Health and Well-Being
The University of Newcastle
PE Co-ordinator 1/01/2014 - 31/07/2018
EDUC4016 Physical Education, Physical Activity and Health Research in Primary Schools
NEWCASTLE UNIVERSITY
Students will be introduced to current research in the field of physical education, physical activity and health in children - with a major focus on the primary school setting. Students will gain an understanding of a range of research trends and issues and will investigate the strengths and weaknesses of research projects to improve a range of physical education, physical activity and health outcomes.
Course Co-ordinator 1/08/2016 - 31/07/2018
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Lloyd A, Eather N, Riley N, 'Physical Education and Numeracy', Numeracy in Authentic Contexts: Making Meaning Across the Curriculum, Springer, Singapore 341-372 (2018) [B1]
Co-authors Adam Lloyd, Nicholas Riley

Journal article (41 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Young MD, Lubans DR, Barnes AT, Eather N, Pollock ER, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of a father-daughter physical activity program on girls' social-emotional well-being: A randomized controlled trial', Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 87 294-307 (2019) [C1]

© PsycINFO Database Record 2019 APA. All rights reserved. Objective: To increase girls' well-being, strategies are needed to optimize their social-emotional competence during... [more]

© PsycINFO Database Record 2019 APA. All rights reserved. Objective: To increase girls' well-being, strategies are needed to optimize their social-emotional competence during childhood. Although positive fathering is important for girls, many fathers discount their unique influence and few participate in interventions. The Dads And Daughters Exercising and Empowered (DADEE) program was developed to engage fathers and their daughters through shared physical activity experiences. This study examined the program's impact on girls' well-being and the father-daughter relationship. Method: Overall, 115 fathers (age range: 29-53 years) and 153 daughters (age range: 4-12 years) were randomized to (1) the DADEE program (9 weekly educational and practical sessions plus home-based challenges) or (2) a wait-list control. Assessments were baseline, 2 months (postintervention), and 9 months (94% retention). Daughters' social-emotional well-being was measured with the Devereux Student Strengths Assessment composite. Secondary outcomes included additional well-being indicators (e.g., global self-perception) plus validated measures of father involvement and father-daughter relationship quality. Results: At 2 months, intervention daughters showed a medium-to-large improvement in overall well-being (+24.9 units, 95% CI [8.6, 41.1], d = 0.6), when compared with controls. Intervention daughters were also more likely to show clinically meaningful improvements in well-being (54%) than controls (18%). Medium-to-large effects were observed for: seven of eight social-emotional competencies (e.g., personal responsibility, d = 0.4-0.9), father-daughter relationship quality (d = 0.8, father-report; d = 0.5, daughter-report), daughters' prosocial behavior (d = 0.3) and several indicators of father involvement. Most outcomes had improved by 9 months. No effects were observed for daughters' emotional difficulties or global self-perception. Conclusions: This study provided the first experimental evidence that father-daughter physical activity programs may improve girls' well-being and the father-daughter relationship.

DOI 10.1037/ccp0000374
Co-authors David Lubans, Emma R Pollock Uon, Alyce Barnes, Philip Morgan, Myles Young
2019 Mavilidi MF, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Miller A, Eather N, Karayanidis F, et al., 'Integrating physical activity into the primary school curriculum: rationale and study protocol for the "Thinking while Moving in English" cluster randomized controlled trial', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 19 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-019-6635-2
Co-authors Nicholas Riley, Frini Karayanidis, David Lubans, Andrew Miller, Kylie Shaw, Philip Morgan
2019 Leahy AA, Eather N, Smith JJ, Hillman CH, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, et al., 'Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of a Teacher-Facilitated High-Intensity Interval Training Intervention for Older Adolescents.', Pediatr Exerc Sci, 31 107-117 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1123/pes.2018-0039
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Michael Nilsson, David Lubans, Jordan Smith, Ron Plotnikoff, Sarah Costigan
2019 Eather N, Riley N, Miller A, Smith V, Poole A, Vincze L, et al., 'Efficacy and feasibility of HIIT training for university students: The Uni-HIIT RCT', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 22 596-601 (2019)

© 2018 Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the preliminary efficacy and feasibility of an 8-week high-intensity interval training program (Uni-HIIT) for youn... [more]

© 2018 Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the preliminary efficacy and feasibility of an 8-week high-intensity interval training program (Uni-HIIT) for young adult students in a university setting. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Method: Uni-HIIT was conducted at the University of Newcastle, Australia (February-June, 2017). Participants were university students 18-25yrs (n = 53; 20.38 ± 1.88yrs) randomized into the Uni HIIT program (n = 26) or wait-list control (n = 27) condition. Participants were required to attend up to three HIIT sessions/week for 8-weeks which included a variety of aerobic and muscular fitness exercise combinations lasting 8¿12 minutes (using 30:30 sec rest:work intervals). The primary outcome was cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF) (20mSRT), and secondary outcomes included muscular fitness (standing jump, push-ups), body composition (InBody), executive function (Trail Making Test), anxiety levels (State Trait Anxiety Inventory) and perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale). Linear mixed models were used to analyse outcomes and Cohen's d effect sizes were calculated. Process evaluation measures of recruitment, retention, attendance and satisfaction were conducted. Results: A large significant group-by-time effect resulted for CRF [8.4 shuttles (95% CI(2.9-13.9), P = 0.004,d = 1.08] and muscular fitness [4.0 repetitions (95% CI(1.2-6.8), P = 0.006,d = 0.99], and moderate effect size was observed for Trail B [-5.9 seconds (95% CI(-11.8-0.1.0), P = 0.052, d = 0.63]. No significant intervention effects were found for body composition, standing jump, anxiety or perceived stress (P > 0.05). High ratings of participant satisfaction (4.73), enjoyment (4.54) and perceived value (4.54) were observed. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the efficacy and feasibility of delivering a novel HIIT program in the university setting.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2018.11.016
Co-authors Andrew Miller, Nicholas Riley, David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2019 Smith JJ, Eather N, Weaver RG, Riley N, Beets MW, Lubans DR, 'Behavioral Correlates of Muscular Fitness in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review.', Sports Med, 49 887-904 (2019)
DOI 10.1007/s40279-019-01089-7
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Nicholas Riley, David Lubans, Jordan Smith
2019 Miller A, Eather N, Duncan M, Lubans DR, 'Associations of object control motor skill proficiency, game play competence, physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness among primary school children', Journal of Sports Sciences, 37 173-179 (2019) [C1]

© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This study investigated if object control relates to children¿s game play competence, and examined thes... [more]

© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This study investigated if object control relates to children¿s game play competence, and examined these competencies as correlates of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness. Game play (Game Performance Assessment Instrument), object control (The Test Gross Motor Development-3), moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (Accelerometry), and cardiorespiratory fitness (20-metre shuttle) assessments were completed for 107 children (57% Female, 43% Male) aged 9¿12¿years (M 10.53, SD 0.65). Two-level regression of object control on game play competence, and object control and game play competence on physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness assessed associations. Object control competence was positively associated with game play competence (Std. B¿=¿0.25, t (104.77)¿=¿2.38, p¿=¿0.001). Game play competence (Std. B¿=¿0.33, t (99.81)¿=¿5.21, p¿<¿0.000) was more strongly associated with moderate-to-vigorous physical activity than object control competence (Std. B¿=¿0.20, t (106.93)¿=¿2.96, p¿=¿0.003). Likewise, game competence (Std. B¿=¿0.39, t (104.41)¿=¿4.36, p¿<¿0.000) was more strongly associated with cardiorespiratory fitness than object control competence (Std. B¿=¿0.22, t (106.69)¿=¿2.63, p¿=¿0.002). Object control and game competence are both important as correlates of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness in children.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2018.1488384
Co-authors Mitch Duncan, David Lubans, Andrew Miller
2019 Leahy AA, Eather N, Smith JJ, Hillman C, Morgan PJ, Nilsson M, et al., 'School-based physical activity intervention for older adolescents: rationale and study protocol for the Burn 2 Learn cluster randomised controlled trial', BMJ OPEN, 9 (2019)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-026029
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Sarah Costigan, Sarah Valkenborghs, Liz Holliday, Ron Plotnikoff, Jordan Smith, Michael Nilsson, Rohan Walker, David Lubans
2019 Eather N, Jones B, Miller A, Morgan PJ, 'Evaluating the impact of a coach development intervention for improving coaching practices in junior football (soccer): The MASTER pilot study', Journal of Sports Sciences, 1-13 (2019)
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2019.1621002
Co-authors Andrew Miller, Philip Morgan
2019 Morgan PJ, Young MD, Barnes AT, Eather N, Pollock ER, Lubans DR, 'Engaging Fathers to Increase Physical Activity in Girls: The "Dads And Daughters Exercising and Empowered" (DADEE) Randomized Controlled Trial', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 53 39-52 (2019) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2018. Background: Existing strategies to increase girls&apos; physical activity levels have seen limited success. Fathers may influence their children&apos;s physi... [more]

© The Author(s) 2018. Background: Existing strategies to increase girls' physical activity levels have seen limited success. Fathers may influence their children's physical activity, but often spend more time with their sons and rarely participate in family-based programs. Purpose: To test a novel program designed to increase the physical activity levels of fathers and their daughters. Methods: In a two-arm RCT, 115 fathers (29-53 years) and 153 daughters (4-12 years) were randomized to (i) the "Dads And Daughters Exercising and Empowered" (DADEE) program, or (ii) a wait-list control. The 8-week program included weekly educational and practical sessions plus home tasks. Assessments were at baseline, 2 months (postintervention), and 9 months. The primary outcomes were father-daughter physical activity levels (pedometry). Secondary outcomes included screen-time, daughters' fundamental movement skill proficiency (FMS: perceived and objective), and fathers' physical activity parenting practices. Results: Primary outcome data were obtained from 88% of daughters and 90% of fathers at 9 months. Intentionto-treat analyses revealed favorable group-by-time effects for physical activity in daughters (p = .02, d = 0.4) and fathers (p < .001, d = 0.7) at postintervention, which were maintained at 9 months. At postintervention and follow-up, significant effects (p < .05) were also identified for daughters' FMS competence (objective: d = 1.1-1.2; perceived: d = 0.4-0.6), a range of fathers' physical activity parenting practices (d = 0.3-0.8), and screen-time for daughters (d = 0.5-0.8) and fathers (d = 0.4-0.6, postintervention only). Program satisfaction and attendance were very high. Conclusions: This study provided the first experimental evidence that efforts to increase physical activity behavior in preadolescent girls would benefit from a meaningful engagement of fathers.

DOI 10.1093/abm/kay015
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Myles Young, Emma R Pollock, Philip Morgan, David Lubans, Alyce Barnes
2018 Costigan SA, Ridgers ND, Eather N, Plotnikoff RC, Harris N, Lubans DR, 'Exploring the impact of high intensity interval training on adolescents objectively measured physical activity: Findings from a randomized controlled trial', Journal of Sports Sciences, 36 1087-1094 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor &amp; Francis Group. High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) may be effective for accumulating VPA. However, the contribution of HII... [more]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) may be effective for accumulating VPA. However, the contribution of HIIT to overall physical activity is unknown. Our primary aim was to explore the impact of school-based HIIT on physical activity. The secondary aim was to explore within-individual changes in physical activity after participating in HIIT. Participants [n = 65; 15.8(0.6)years] were randomized to a HIIT or control group. Intervention groups participated in three HIIT sessions/week. GENEActiv accelerometers assessed objective physical activity at baseline and week-one, to detect changes in MPA and VPA. Intervention effects were examined using linear mixed models and evidence of a change in physical activity (i.e., compensation) were examined using multilevel linear regression models. The group-by-time interaction effects for MPA and VPA were small and moderate, respectively. Adjusted difference between groups for VPA was 1.70 min/day, 95%CI ¿1.96 to 5.36; p = 0.354; d = 0.55). Embedding HIIT within the school-day had a moderate effect on VPA compared to controls. Compensation analyses (i.e., individual level) suggested that adolescents were more active on days when they participated in HIIT. Further studies are needed to test the effects of HIIT on adolescents¿ physical activity over extended time periods.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2017.1356026
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Sarah Costigan
2018 Kennedy SG, Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Peralta LR, Hilland TA, Eather N, et al., 'Implementing Resistance Training in Secondary Schools: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 50 62-72 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 by the American College of Sports Medicine. Purpose: Guidelines recommend that young people engage in muscle-strengthening activities on at least 3 dIwkj1. The purpose of t... [more]

© 2017 by the American College of Sports Medicine. Purpose: Guidelines recommend that young people engage in muscle-strengthening activities on at least 3 dIwkj1. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a school-based intervention focused on resistance training (RT) for adolescents. Methods: The ''Resistance Training for Teens'' intervention was evaluated using a cluster-randomized, controlled trial with 607 adolescents (50.1% girls; 14.1 T 0.5 yr) from 16 secondary schools. Teachers were trained to deliver the intervention, which included the following: (i) an interactive student seminar; (ii) a structured physical activity program, focused on RT; (iii) lunchtime fitness sessions; and (iv) Web-based smartphone apps. The primary outcome was muscular fitness (MF) and secondary outcomes included body mass index, RT skill competency, flexibility, physical activity, self-efficacy, and motivation. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 6 months (postprogram; primary end point), and 12 months (follow-up). Outcomes were assessed using linear mixed models, with three potential moderators tested using interaction terms (and subgroup analyses where appropriate). Results: For the primary outcome (MF), a group-time effect was observed at 6 months for the upper body (2.0 repetitions; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.8-3.2), but not the lower body (j1.4 cm; 95% CI, j4.7-1.9). At 6 months, there were intervention effects for RT skill competency and self-efficacy, but no other secondary outcomes. Effects for upper body MF and RT skill competency were sustained at 12 months. Despite overall no effect for body mass index, there was a group-time effect at 12 months among students whowere overweight/obese at baseline (j0.55 kgImj2; 95% CI, j1.01 toj0.08). Conclusions: The school-based RT intervention resulted in immediate and sustained improvements in upper body MF and RT skill competency, demonstrating an effective and scalable approach to delivering RT within secondary schools.

DOI 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001410
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Emma R Pollock Uon, Ron Plotnikoff, Jordan Smith, Philip Morgan, Sarah Kennedy, David Lubans
2018 Mavilidi MF, Lubans DR, Eather N, Morgan PJ, Riley N, 'Preliminary Efficacy and Feasibility of the "Thinking While Moving in English": A Program with Integrated Physical Activity into the Primary School English Lessons.', Children (Basel, Switzerland), 5 1-13 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/children5080109
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Nicholas Riley, Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2018 Eather N, Bull A, Young MD, Barnes AT, Pollock ER, Morgan PJ, 'Fundamental movement skills: Where do girls fall short? A novel investigation of object-control skill execution in primary-school aged girls', Preventive Medicine Reports, 11 191-195 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Fundamental movement skill (FMS) proficiency is positively associated with a range of health outcomes, and is a predictor of lifelong participation in physical activities a... [more]

© 2018 Fundamental movement skill (FMS) proficiency is positively associated with a range of health outcomes, and is a predictor of lifelong participation in physical activities and sport. Yet low FMS proficiency levels in children prevail, particularly among girls performing object-control skills (e.g., kicking, catching). To identify where girls require the most support and inform future teaching resources and interventions, this cross-sectional study investigated proficiency levels of object-control skills and their specific performance components (subskills) in girls; and aimed to determine whether patterns in subskill mastery were evident in girls from two different developmental stages. This study included 153 girls (aged 4¿12 years; mean age = 7.7, SD = 1.8) from the Hunter Region, Australia. Six object-control skills were video-assessed using the Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD-2, TGMD-3); overall skill proficiency levels and mastery levels of subskills were determined. In summary, <5% (of the total group, 4¿8 years or 9¿12 years) demonstrated mastery or advanced skill level in the strike, stationary dribble, overhand throw or kick. Mastery levels were also poor for the majority of the 24 subskills, with mastery levels below 40% for the total group for 17 of the 24 subskills. Deficiencies in specific subskills were evident in the preparation, action and recovery phases of the six object-control skills. Only 6 of the 24 subskills mastery levels were significantly higher in the older age-group. Our investigation provides new evidence that may be useful for practitioners and researchers looking to support the optimal development of FMS proficiency among girls. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12615000022561.

DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2018.06.005
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Alyce Barnes, Philip Morgan, Emma R Pollock Uon, Myles Young
2017 Morgan PJ, Young MD, Lloyd AB, Wang ML, Eather N, Miller A, et al., 'Involvement of Fathers in Pediatric Obesity Treatment and Prevention Trials: A Systematic Review', PEDIATRICS, 139 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1542/peds.2016-2635
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Alyce Barnes, Myles Young, Philip Morgan, Andrew Miller, Adam Lloyd
2017 Miller A, Eather N, Gray S, Sproule J, Williams C, Gore J, Lubans D, 'Can continuing professional development utilizing a game-centred approach improve the quality of physical education teaching delivered by generalist primary school teachers?', European Physical Education Review, 23 171-195 (2017) [C1]

© 2016, © The Author(s) 2016. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a continuing professional development (CPD) intervention in producing changes in ... [more]

© 2016, © The Author(s) 2016. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a continuing professional development (CPD) intervention in producing changes in physical education (PE) teaching practice and PE teaching quality by generalist primary school teachers when the CPD addressed the use of a game-centred approach. A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted in seven primary schools in the Hunter Region, New South Wales, Australia. One year six teacher from each school was randomized into the Professional Learning for Understanding Games Education (PLUNGE) intervention (n = 4 teachers) or the 7-week wait-list control (n = 3) condition. The PLUNGE intervention (weeks 1¿5) used an instructional framework to improve teachers¿ knowledge, understanding and delivery of a game-centred curriculum, and included an information session and weekly in-class mentoring. The intervention was designed to enhance content and pedagogical knowledge for the provision of pedagogy focused on a broad range of learning outcomes. Teaching quality was assessed at baseline and follow-up (weeks 6 and 7) via observation of two consecutive PE lessons using the Quality Teaching Lesson Observation Scales. Linear mixed models revealed significant group-by-time intervention effects (p < 0.05) for the quality of teaching (effect size: d = 1.7). CPD using an information session and mentoring, and a focus on the development of the quality of teaching using a game-centred pedagogical approach was efficacious in improving the quality of PE teaching among generalist primary school teachers.

DOI 10.1177/1356336X16642716
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jenny Gore, Andrew Miller, David Lubans
2017 McComb VR, Eather N, 'Exploring the Personal, Social and Occupational Elements of Teacher Professional Development', Journal of Education and Training Studies, 5 60-66 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.11114/jets.v5i12.2794
Co-authors Vivien Mccomb
2017 Eather N, Riley N, Miller D, Jones B, 'Evaluating the effectiveness of using peer-dialogue assessment (PDA) for improving pre-service teachers' perceived confidence and competence to teach physical education', Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 42 69-83 (2017) [C1]

Developing effective methods for improving student learning in higher education is a priority. Recent findings have shown that feedback on student work can effectively facilitate ... [more]

Developing effective methods for improving student learning in higher education is a priority. Recent findings have shown that feedback on student work can effectively facilitate learning if students are engaged as active participants in the feedback cycle, where they seek, generate and use feedback in the form of dialogue. This novel study investigates the use of peer dialogue assessment as an assessment for learning tool used in an existing undergraduate physical education course. Our findings demonstrate that when thirty six undergraduate physical education students were provided with instruction and practice using peer dialogue assessment after consecutive teaching performances, they exhibit significant improvements in perceived teaching confidence and competence, and teaching self-efficacy. Process evaluation results implying thatembedding peer dialogue assessment in higher education courses may be a feasible approach for facilitating learning, and that students were satisfied with using peer dialogue as a feedback method for improving teaching practices.

DOI 10.14221/ajte.2017v42n1.5
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Nicholas Riley, Andrew Miller
2017 Babic MJ, Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Eather N, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, 'Longitudinal associations between changes in screen-time and mental health outcomes in adolescents', Mental Health and Physical Activity, 12 124-131 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Introduction The primary aim was to examine longitudinal associations between changes in screen-time and mental health outcomes among adolescents. Methods Adol... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Introduction The primary aim was to examine longitudinal associations between changes in screen-time and mental health outcomes among adolescents. Methods Adolescents (N¿=¿322, 65.5% females, mean age¿=¿14.4¿±¿0.6 years) reported screen-time and mental health at two time points over a school year. Multi-level linear regression analyses were conducted after adjusting for covariates. Results Changes in total recreational screen-time (ß¿=¿-0.09 p¿=¿0.048) and tablet/mobile phone use (ß¿=¿-0.18, p¿<¿0.001) were negatively associated with physical self-concept. Changes in total recreational screen-time (ß¿=¿-0.20, p¿=¿0.001) and computer use (ß¿=¿-0.23, p¿=¿0.003) were negatively associated with psychological well-being. A positive association was found with television/DVD use and psychological difficulties (ß¿=¿0.16, p¿=¿0.015). No associations were found for non-recreational screen-time. Conclusion Changes in recreational screen-time were associated with changes in a range of mental health outcomes.

DOI 10.1016/j.mhpa.2017.04.001
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans, Jordan Smith, Ron Plotnikoff
2017 Lander N, Eather N, Morgan PJ, Salmon J, Barnett LM, 'Characteristics of Teacher Training in School-Based Physical Education Interventions to Improve Fundamental Movement Skills and/or Physical Activity: A Systematic Review', Sports Medicine, 47 135-161 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s40279-016-0561-6
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2017 Miller A, Harvey S, Morley D, Nemes R, Janes M, Eather N, 'Exposing athletes to playing form activity: outcomes of a randomised control trial among community netball teams using a game-centred approach', Journal of Sports Sciences, 35 1846-1857 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor &amp; Francis Group. This study evaluated whether exposing junior netball players to greater amounts of competition relevant activit... [more]

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This study evaluated whether exposing junior netball players to greater amounts of competition relevant activity (playing form activity) had an effect on game play outcomes and session involvement. A group-randomised controlled trial in one junior netball club in the Hunter Region, NSW, Australia. Ninety female athletes (mean age = 9.04 years, SD 1.53) were randomised by team (n = 11) into the intervention (n = 41) or 9-week wait-list control (n = 49) condition. The Professional Learning for Understanding Games Education into Sport (PLUNGE into Sport) programme was undertaken in the first half of nine training sessions (9 × 30 min). The intervention exposed athletes to playing form activity through a coach development programme within training sessions. Athletes¿ decision-making, support and skill outcomes during a small-sided invasion game, and session involvement (pedometer step/min), were measured at baseline and 9-week follow-up. Linear mixed models revealed significant group-by-time intervention effects (P < 0.05) for decision-making (d = 0.4) and support (d = 0.5) during game play, and in-session activity (d = 1.2). An intervention exposing athletes to greater levels of playing form activity, delivered via a coach education programme, was efficacious in improving athlete decision-making and support skills in game play and increasing athlete involvement during sessions.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2016.1240371
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Andrew Miller
2017 Lubans DR, Lonsdale C, Cohen K, Eather N, Beauchamp MR, Morgan PJ, et al., 'Framework for the design and delivery of organized physical activity sessions for children and adolescents: rationale and description of the 'SAAFE' teaching principles', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 14 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0479-x
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 23
Co-authors David Lubans, Jordan Smith, Philip Morgan
2016 Babic MJ, Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Lonsdale C, Plotnikoff RC, Eather N, et al., 'Intervention to reduce recreational screen-time in adolescents: Outcomes and mediators from the Switch-Off 4 Healthy Minds (S4HM) cluster randomized controlled trial', Preventive Medicine, 91 50-57 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. Introduction The primary objective was to evaluate the impact of the ¿Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds¿ (S4HM) intervention on recreational screen-time in adolescen... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. Introduction The primary objective was to evaluate the impact of the ¿Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds¿ (S4HM) intervention on recreational screen-time in adolescents. Methods Cluster randomized controlled trial with study measures at baseline and 6-months (post-intervention). Eligible participants reported exceeding recreational screen-time recommendations (i.e., >¿2¿h/day). In total, 322 adolescents (mean age¿=¿14.4¿±¿0.6¿years) from eight secondary schools in New South Wales, Australia were recruited. The S4HM intervention was guided by Self-Determination Theory and included: an interactive seminar, eHealth messaging, a behavioral contract and parental newsletters. The primary outcome was recreational screen-time. Secondary outcomes included mental health (i.e., well-being, psychological distress, self-perceptions), objectively measured physical activity, and body mass index (BMI). Outcome analyses were conducted using linear mixed models and mediation was examined using a product-of-coefficients test. Results At post-intervention, significant reductions in screen-time were observed in both groups, with a greater reduction observed in the intervention group (-¿50¿min/day versus -¿29¿min, p¿<¿0.05 for both). However, the adjusted difference in change between groups was not statistically significant (mean¿=¿-¿21.3¿min/day, p¿=¿0.255). There were no significant intervention effects for mental health outcomes, physical activity or BMI. Significant mediation effects for autonomous motivation were found. Conclusions Participants in both the S4HM intervention and control groups significantly reduced their screen-time, with no group-by-time effects. Enhancing autonomous motivation might be a useful intervention target for trials aimed at reducing adolescents' recreational screen-time. Trial registration ACTRN12614000163606.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.07.014
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Jordan Smith, Amanda Baker, Emma R Pollock Uon, David Lubans, Geoff Skinner
2016 Sylvester BD, Lubans DR, Eather N, Standage M, Wolf SA, McEwan D, et al., 'Effects of Variety Support on Exercise-Related Well-Being', Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being, 8 213-231 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The International Association of Applied Psychology Background: The purpose of this study was to experimentally examine the extent to which variety support in a resistance ... [more]

© 2016 The International Association of Applied Psychology Background: The purpose of this study was to experimentally examine the extent to which variety support in a resistance exercise program influences exercise-related well-being among inactive adults. Methods: A sample of 121 inactive university students were randomly assigned and participated in either a high or low variety support 6-week exercise program. Measures of exercise-related perceived variety, positive affect, negative affect, and subjective vitality were completed at baseline, after 3 weeks, and after 6 weeks (i.e. post-test). Results: Through use of structural equation¿modelling, the results showed that for those who completed measures at post-test (i.e. n = 55), and for all participants who received variety support (i.e. a modified intention-to-treat analysis; N = 121), exercise-related variety support indirectly explained higher levels of exercise-related positive affect, and subjective vitality, and lower levels of negative affect, through the mediating role of perceived variety. Conclusions: The provision of variety support in a resistance exercise program influences exercise-related well-being through perceptions of variety. Results are discussed in relation to the potential utility of providing variety support to promote exercise-related well-being in people who are physically inactive.

DOI 10.1111/aphw.12069
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
Co-authors David Lubans
2016 Costigan SA, Eather N, Plotnikoff RC, Hillman CH, Lubans DR, 'High-Intensity Interval Training for Cognitive and Mental Health in Adolescents', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 48 1985-1993 (2016) [C1]

© Copyright 2016 by the American College of Sports Medicine. Purpose Emerging literature suggests that physical activity and fitness may have a positive effect on cognitive and me... [more]

© Copyright 2016 by the American College of Sports Medicine. Purpose Emerging literature suggests that physical activity and fitness may have a positive effect on cognitive and mental health in adolescents. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of two high-intensity interval training (HIIT) protocols for improving cognitive and mental health outcomes (executive function, psychological well-being, psychological distress, and physical self-concept) in adolescents. Methods Participants (n = 65; mean age = 15.8 ± 0.6 yr) were randomized to three conditions: aerobic exercise program (AEP; n = 21), resistance and aerobic program (RAP; n = 22), and control (n = 22). HIIT sessions (8-10 min per session) were delivered during physical education lessons or at lunchtime three times per week for 8 wk. Assessments were conducted at baseline and immediately postintervention to detect changes in executive function (trail making test), psychological well-being, psychological distress, and physical self-description by researchers blinded to treatment allocation. Intervention effects were examined using linear mixed models. Cohen's d effect sizes and clinical inference were also calculated. Results While results were not significant, small improvements in executive function (mean change (95% CI) -6.69 (-22.03, 8.64), d = -0.32) and psychological well-being (mean change (95% CI) 2.81 (-2.06, 7.68), d = 0.34) were evident in the AEP group; and moderate improvements in executive function (mean change (95% CI) -10.73 (-26.22, 4.76), d = -0.51), and small improvements in well-being (mean change (95% CI) 2.96 (-1.82, 7.75), d = 0.36) and perceived appearance (mean change (95% CI) 0.32 (-0.25, 0.86), d = 0.35), were observed for the RAP group. Mean feeling state scores improved from preworkout to postworkout in both HIIT conditions, with significant results for the AEP (P = 0.001). Conclusions This study highlights the potential of embedding HIIT within the school day for improving cognitive and mental health among adolescents.

DOI 10.1249/MSS.0000000000000993
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Sarah Costigan
2016 Lubans DR, Smith JJ, Peralta LR, Plotnikoff RC, Okely AD, Salmon J, et al., 'A school-based intervention incorporating smartphone technology to improve health-related fitness among adolescents: rationale and study protocol for the NEAT and ATLAS 2.0 cluster randomised controlled trial and dissemination study', BMJ OPEN, 6 (2016)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010448
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Sarah Kennedy, Emma R Pollock Uon, Ron Plotnikoff, Jordan Smith
2016 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Effects of exercise on mental health outcomes in adolescents: Findings from the CrossFit teens randomized controlled trial', Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 26 14-23 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of the CrossFit¿ Teens resistance training program for improving mental health outcomes in adolescents, and to ex... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of the CrossFit¿ Teens resistance training program for improving mental health outcomes in adolescents, and to explore potential moderators and mediators. Design: Assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial. Methods: Ninety-six students (15.4 (0.5) years, 51.5% female) from one NSW secondary school, Australia 2013, were randomized into the 8-week CrossFit¿ Teens intervention (n = 51) or control conditions (n = 45). Measures of mental health (psychological distress and self-esteem) were assessed using the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire and Physical Self-Description Questionnaire. Hypothesized mediators were perceived body fat, strength and appearance; and general physical self-concept. Mediation was assessed using Preacher and Hayes' multiple mediation regression SPSS macro. Hypothesized moderators (sex and baseline levels of psychological distress) were assessed using linear mixed models and Cohen's d effect sizes were evaluated. Results: There were no significant intervention effects on mental health or potential mediators in the full study sample. Intervention participants categorized as 'at risk' of psychological distress demonstrated improvements in self-esteem (d = 1.35); perceived body fat (d = 1.05), perceived appearance (d = 0.95); physical self-concept (d = 1.96); and total difficulties score (d = 0.70). A medium-large positive effect on perceived body fat was also observed in boys. Conclusions: Participation in the CrossFit¿ Teens resistance training program did not improve mental health outcomes in the full study sample. However, the results from this study provides preliminary evidence for improving mental health in adolescents 'at risk' of developing psychological disorders.Trial Registration No: ACTRN12611000976987.

DOI 10.1016/j.psychsport.2016.05.008
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2016 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Improving health-related fitness in adolescents: the CrossFit Teens randomised controlled trial', Journal of Sports Sciences, 34 209-223 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2015.1045925
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 16
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2016 Sylvester BD, Standage M, McEwan D, Wolf SA, Lubans DR, Eather N, et al., 'Variety support and exercise adherence behavior: experimental and mediating effects', Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 39 214-224 (2016) [C1]

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which the provision of variety (i.e., variety support) is related to exerc... [more]

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which the provision of variety (i.e., variety support) is related to exercise behavior among physically inactive adults and the extent to which the ¿experience of variety¿ mediates those effects. One hundred and twenty one inactive university students were randomly assigned to follow a high or low variety support exercise program for 6¿weeks. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 3- and 6-weeks. Participants in the high variety support condition displayed higher levels of adherence to the exercise program than those in the low variety support condition [F(1, 116)¿=¿5.55, p¿=¿.02, ¿p2¿=¿.05] and the relationship between variety support and adherence was mediated by perceived variety (ß¿=¿.16, p¿<¿.01). Exercise-related variety support holds potential to be an efficacious method for facilitating greater exercise adherence behaviors of previously inactive people by fostering perceptions of variety.

DOI 10.1007/s10865-015-9688-4
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
Co-authors David Lubans
2016 Miller A, Christensen E, Eather N, Gray S, Sproule J, Keay J, Lubans D, 'Can physical education and physical activity outcomes be developed simultaneously using a game-centered approach?', European Physical Education Review, 22 113-133 (2016) [C1]

© 2015, © The Author(s) 2015. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a pilot intervention using a gamecentered approach for improvement of physical ac... [more]

© 2015, © The Author(s) 2015. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a pilot intervention using a gamecentered approach for improvement of physical activity (PA) and physical education (PE) outcomes simultaneously, and if this had an impact on enjoyment of PE. A group-randomized controlled trial with a 7-week wait-list control group was conducted in one primary school in the Hunter Region, NSW, Australia. Participants (n<107 students; mean age<10.7 years, SD 0.87) were randomized by class group into the Professional Learning for Understanding Games Education (PLUNGE) pilot intervention (n<52 students) or the control (n<55) conditions. PLUNGE involved 6 × 60 min PE lessons based on game-centered curriculum delivered via an in-class teacher mentoring program. Students were assessed at baseline and 7-week follow-up for fundamental movement skills (FMS) of throw and catch, game play abilities of decision making, support and skill performance; in-class PA; and enjoyment of PA. Linear mixed models revealed significant group-by-time intervention effects (p = 0.05) for throw (effect size: d<0.9) and catch (d<0.4) FMS, decision making (d<0.7) and support (d<0.9) during game play, and in-class PA (d<1.6). No significant intervention effects (p = 0.05) were observed for skills outcome during game play (d<¿0.2) or student enjoyment (d<0.1). Game-centered pedagogy delivered via a teacher professional learning program was efficacious in simultaneously improving students¿ FMS skills, in-class PA and their decision making and support skills in game play.

DOI 10.1177/1356336X15594548
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Andrew Miller, David Lubans
2015 Costigan SA, Eather N, Plotnikoff RC, Taaffe DR, Pollock E, Kennedy SG, Lubans DR, 'Preliminary efficacy and feasibility of embedding high intensity interval training into the school day: A pilot randomized controlled trial', Preventive Medicine Reports, 2 973-979 (2015) [C1]

© 2015. Current physical activity and fitness levels among adolescents are low, increasing the risk of chronic disease. Although the efficacy of high intensity interval training (... [more]

© 2015. Current physical activity and fitness levels among adolescents are low, increasing the risk of chronic disease. Although the efficacy of high intensity interval training (HIIT) for improving metabolic health is now well established, it is not known if this type of activity can be effective to improve adolescent health. The primary aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of embedding HIIT into the school day. A 3-arm pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted in one secondary school in Newcastle, Australia. Participants (n= 65; mean age = 15.8(0.6) years) were randomized into one of three conditions: aerobic exercise program (AEP) (n = 21), resistance and aerobic exercise program (RAP) (n = 22) and control (n = 22). The 8-week intervention consisted of three HIIT sessions per week (8-10. min/session), delivered during physical education (PE) lessons or at lunchtime. Assessments were conducted at baseline and post-intervention to detect changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (multi-stage shuttle-run), muscular fitness (push-up, standing long jump tests), body composition (Body Mass Index (BMI), BMI-z scores, waist circumference) and physical activity motivation (questionnaire), by researchers blinded to treatment allocation. Intervention effects for outcomes were examined using linear mixed models, and Cohen's d effect sizes were reported. Participants in the AEP and RAP groups had moderate intervention effects for waist circumference (p = 0.024), BMI-z (p = 0.037) and BMI (not significant) in comparison to the control group. A small intervention effect was also evident for cardiorespiratory fitness in the RAP group.

DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.11.001
Citations Scopus - 13
Co-authors Emma R Pollock Uon, Sarah Kennedy, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Sarah Costigan
2015 Miller A, Christensen EM, Eather N, Sproule J, Annis-Brown L, Lubans DR, 'The PLUNGE randomized controlled trial: Evaluation of a games-based physical activity professional learning program in primary school physical education', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 74 1-8 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.02.002
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
Co-authors David Lubans, Andrew Miller
2015 Costigan SA, Eather N, Plotnikoff RC, Taaffe DR, Lubans DR, 'High-intensity interval training for improving health-related fitness in adolescents: A systematic review and meta-analysis', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 49 1253-1261 (2015) [C1]

© Br J Sports Med 2015. Background: High-intensity interval training (HIIT) may be a feasible and efficacious strategy for improving health-related fitness in young people. The ob... [more]

© Br J Sports Med 2015. Background: High-intensity interval training (HIIT) may be a feasible and efficacious strategy for improving health-related fitness in young people. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the utility of HIIT to improve health-related fitness in adolescents and to identify potential moderators of training effects. Methods: Studies were considered eligible if they: (1) examined adolescents (13-18 years); (2) examined health-related fitness outcomes; (3) involved an intervention of =4 weeks in duration; (4) included a control or moderate intensity comparison group; and (5) prescribed high-intensity activity for the HIIT condition. Meta-analyses were conducted to determine the effect of HIIT on health-related fitness components using Comprehensive Meta-analysis software and potential moderators were explored (ie, study duration, risk of bias and type of comparison group). Results: The effects of HIIT on cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition were large, and medium, respectively. Study duration was a moderator for the effect of HIIT on body fat percentage. Intervention effects for waist circumference and muscular fitness were not statistically significant. Conclusions: HIIT is a feasible and time-efficient approach for improving cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition in adolescent populations.

DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2014-094490
Citations Scopus - 75Web of Science - 69
Co-authors Sarah Costigan, David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff
2015 Babic MJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lonsdale C, Eather N, Skinner G, et al., 'Rationale and study protocol for 'Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds' (S4HM): A cluster randomized controlled trial to reduce recreational screen time in adolescents', Contemporary Clinical Trials, 40 150-158 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier Inc. Introduction: Excessive recreational screen time (i.e., screen use for entertainment) is a global public health issue associated with adverse mental and physi... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Inc. Introduction: Excessive recreational screen time (i.e., screen use for entertainment) is a global public health issue associated with adverse mental and physical health outcomes. Considering the growing popularity of screen-based recreation in adolescents, there is a need to identify effective strategies for reducing screen time among adolescents. The aim of this paper is to report the rationale and study protocol for the 'Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds' (S4HM) study, an intervention designed to reduce recreational screen time among adolescents. Methods: The S4HM intervention will be evaluated using a cluster randomized controlled trial in eight secondary schools (. N=. 322 students) in New South Wales, Australia. The 6-month multi-component intervention will encourage adolescents to manage their recreational screen time using a range of evidence-based strategies. The intervention is grounded in Self-Determination Theory (SDT) and includes the following components: an interactive seminar for students, eHealth messaging, behavioral contract and parental newsletters. All outcomes will be assessed at baseline and at 6-months (i.e., immediate post-test). The primary outcome is recreational screen time measured by the Adolescent Sedentary Activity Questionnaire (ASAQ). Secondary outcomes include: self-reported psychological well-being, psychological distress, global physical self-concept, resilience, pathological video gaming and aggression, and objectively measured physical activity (accelerometry) and body mass index (BMI). Hypothesized mediators of behavior change will also be explored. Discussion: The S4HM study will involve the evaluation of an innovative, theory-driven, multi-component intervention that targets students and their parents and is designed to reduce recreational screen time in adolescents. The intervention has been designed for scalability and dissemination across Australian secondary schools.

DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2014.12.001
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Geoff Skinner, David Lubans, Amanda Baker, Ron Plotnikoff, Emma R Pollock Uon, Philip Morgan
2014 Smith JJ, Eather N, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Faigenbaum AD, Lubans DR, 'The health benefits of muscular fitness for children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis.', Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.), 44 1209-1223 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s40279-014-0196-4
Citations Scopus - 157Web of Science - 146
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Smith JJ, Eather N, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Faigenbaum AD, Lubans DR, 'The health benefits of muscular fitness for children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis', Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.), 44 1209-1223 (2014)

BACKGROUND: Physical fitness during childhood and adolescence has been identified as an important determinant of current and future health status. While research has traditionally... [more]

BACKGROUND: Physical fitness during childhood and adolescence has been identified as an important determinant of current and future health status. While research has traditionally focused on the association between cardio-respiratory fitness and health outcomes, the association between muscular fitness (MF) and health status has recently received increased attention. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the potential physiological and psychological benefits associated with MF among children and adolescents. METHODS: A systematic search of six electronic databases (PubMed, SPORTDiscus, Scopus, EMBASE, PsycINFO and OVID MEDLINE) was performed on the 20th May, 2013. Cross-sectional, longitudinal and experimental studies that quantitatively examined the association between MF and potential health benefits among children and adolescents were included. The search yielded 110 eligible studies, encompassing six health outcomes (i.e., adiposity, bone health, cardiovascular disease [CVD] and metabolic risk factors, musculoskeletal pain, psychological health and cognitive ability). The percentage of studies reporting statistically significant associations between MF and the outcome of interest was used to determine the strength of the evidence for an association and additional coding was conducted to account for risk of bias. Meta-analyses were also performed to determine the pooled effect size if there were at least three studies providing standardised coefficients. RESULTS: Strong evidence was found for an inverse association between MF and total and central adiposity, and CVD and metabolic risk factors. The pooled effect size for the relationship between MF and adiposity was r = -0.25 (95% CI -0.41 to -0.08). Strong evidence was also found for a positive association between MF and bone health and self-esteem. The pooled effect size for the relationship between MF and perceived sports competence was r = 0.39 (95% CI 0.34-0.45). The evidence for an association between MF and musculoskeletal pain and cognitive ability was inconsistent/uncertain. Where evidence of an association was found, the associations were generally low to moderate. CONCLUSION: The findings of this review highlight the importance of developing MF in youth for a number of health-related benefits.

DOI 10.1007/s40279-014-0196-4
Citations Scopus - 11
Co-authors David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, Jordan Smith
2013 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Improving the fitness and physical activity levels of primary school children: Results of the Fit-4-Fun group randomized controlled trial', Preventive Medicine, 56 12-19 (2013) [C1]

Objective: To evaluate the impact of a multi-component school-based physical activity intervention (Fit-4-Fun) on health-related fitness and objectively measured physical activity... [more]

Objective: To evaluate the impact of a multi-component school-based physical activity intervention (Fit-4-Fun) on health-related fitness and objectively measured physical activity in primary school children. Methods: Four Hunter primary schools were recruited in April, 2011 and randomized by school into treatment or control conditions. Participants included 213 children (mean age=10.72years±0.6; 52.2% female) with the treatment group (n=118) completing the 8-week Fit-4-Fun Program. Participants were assessed at baseline and 6-month follow-up, with a 91% retention rate. Cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF) (20m shuttle run) was the primary outcome, and secondary outcomes included body composition (BMI, BMIZ), muscular fitness (7-stage sit-up test, push-up test, basketball throw test, Standing Jump), flexibility (sit and reach) and physical activity (7days pedometry). Results: After 6-months, significant treatment effects were found for CRF (adjusted mean difference, 1.14 levels, p<0.001), body composition (BMI mean, -0.96kg/m2, p<0.001 and BMI z-score mean -0.47 z-scores, p<0.001), flexibility (sit and reach mean, 1.52cm, p=0.0013), muscular fitness (sit-ups) (mean 0.62 stages, p=0.003) and physical activity (mean, 3253 steps/day, p<0.001). There were no group by time effects for the other muscular fitness measures. Conclusions: A primary school-based intervention focusing on fitness education significantly improved health-related fitness and physical activity levels in children. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.10.019
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 35
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2013 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Social support from teachers mediates physical activity behavior change in children participating in the Fit-4-Fun intervention', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 10 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-10-68
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2013 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Feasibility and preliminary efficacy of the Fit4Fun intervention for improving physical fitness in a sample of primary school children: a pilot study', PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT PEDAGOGY, 18 389-411 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/17408989.2012.690375
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2011 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Improving health-related fitness in children: The Fit-4-Fun randomized controlled trial study protocol', BMC Public Health, 11 902 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-11-902
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2011 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Eather N, Riley N, Smith CJ, 'Test-retest reliability of a battery of field-based health-related fitness measures for adolescents', Journal of Sports Sciences, 29 685-693 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2010.551215
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 37
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister, David Lubans, Nicholas Riley, Philip Morgan
Eather N, Riley N, Miller D, Imig S, 'Evaluating the Impact of Two Dialogical Feedback Methods for Improving Pre-Service Teacher's Perceived Confidence and Competence to Teach Physical Education Within Authentic Learning Environments', Journal of Education and Training Studies, 7 32-32
DOI 10.11114/jets.v7i8.4053
Co-authors Nicholas Riley
Show 38 more journal articles

Conference (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Sylvester BD, Lubans DR, Eather N, Standage M, Wolf S, McEwan D, et al., 'Experimental effects of variety support on exercise-related well-being', JOURNAL OF SPORT & EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors David Lubans
2012 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Improving health-related fitness in children: The Fit-4-Fun randomized controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2011 Eather N, Morgan PJ, 'The Fit 4 Fun Program: promoting fitness and health in primary school children', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2010 Eather A, Morgan PJ, 'The Fit 4 Fun Program: A curriculum-based approach to promoting health-related fitness in primary school children', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2009 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Rationale and intervention description of a health-related fitness program for primary school children.' (2009) [E3]
Show 2 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 27
Total funding $2,108,398

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20195 grants / $162,096

Faculty matching funding for UON PRC Scheme - Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition$100,000

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Professor Ron Plotnikoff (Director); Professor Philip Morgan (Co-Deputy Director); Dr Alyce Barnes; Dr Narelle Eather; Professor David Lubans; Dr Nick Riley; Dr Jordan Smith; Dr Myles Young

Scheme Faculty funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

2018 Women in Research (WIR) Fellowship$26,661

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Narelle Eather
Scheme Women in Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1801229
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

The Daughters And Dads Project UK – An adaptation and scale up of the Dads And Daughters Exercising and Empowered (DADEE) program$23,435

Funding body: Women in Sport

Funding body Women in Sport
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Myles Young, Miss Emma Pollock, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Narelle Eather, Doctor Alyce Barnes, Ms Heather Smith
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1900446
Type Of Funding C3212 - International Not for profit
Category 3212
UON Y

Work-HIIT$10,000

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Doctor Narelle Eather, Professor David Lubans
Scheme Innovation Challenge
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1900143
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

AIESEP International Conference, 19-22 June 2019, New York$2,000

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Scheme FEDUA Conference Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20185 grants / $132,956

Faculty matching funding for UON PRC Scheme - Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition$100,000

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Professor David Lubans; Professor Phil Morgan (Co-Deputy Director); Professor Ron Plotnikoff (Director); Dr Alyce Barnes; Dr Narelle Eather; Dr Nick Riley; Dr Jordan Smith; Dr Myles Young.

Scheme Faculty funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Enhancing children’s physical, psychological and socio-emotional health and well-being through positive sporting experiences: A pilot study of the MASTER Coaching program$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Narelle Eather, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Drew Miller, Doctor Myles Young
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1900032
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

DADEE Sports Equipment$7,956

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Myles Young, Miss Emma Pollock, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Narelle Eather, Doctor Alyce Barnes
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1801363
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

The MASTER Coaching Program: Creating positive sporting experiences for players through coach education$3,000

Funding body: Souths Rugby League Club

Funding body Souths Rugby League Club
Project Team Doctor Narelle Eather, Doctor Drew Miller, Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800909
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON Y

International Society of Behavioural Nutrition and Physcial Activity, Hong Kong, 3-6 June 2018$2,000

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Narelle Eather

Scheme FEDUA Conference Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20177 grants / $1,391,033

A scalable intervention for increasing vigorous physical activity among older adolescents: The 'Burn to Learn' cluster RCT$653,914

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Charles Hillman, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Michael Nilsson, A/Prof Chris Lonsdale, Doctor Narelle Eather, Doctor Jordan Smith
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1600064
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Embedding the DADEE Program in local communities: Sustainability through innovative partnerships$379,959

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Myles Young, Doctor Alyce Barnes, Doctor Narelle Eather, Mrs Emma Pollock
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1700702
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

Thinking while Moving in English: a curriculum based physical activity intervention to enhance learning and health outcomes in primary school$200,000

Funding body: NSW Department of Education

Funding body NSW Department of Education
Project Team Doctor Nick Riley, Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Narelle Eather, Associate Professor Kylie Shaw, A/Prof Chris Lonsdale
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1700722
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

Burn 2 Learn - improving fitness and well-being in senior school students$127,740

Funding body: NSW Department of Education

Funding body NSW Department of Education
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Doctor Narelle Eather, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Jordan Smith, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Michael Nilsson, Associate Professor Liz Holliday, Professor Charles Hillman, A/Prof Chris Lonsdale
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1700721
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

Evaluating the effectiveness of using Peer-Dialogue Assessment (PDA) for improving teacher confidence and competence within undergraduate Master's teacher education programs$14,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Scheme FEDUA Strategic Networks and Pilot Projects (SNaPP)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

HMRI Equipment Grant$8,820

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Doctor Narelle Eather, Doctor Jordan Smith, Doctor Nick Riley, Doctor Drew Miller
Scheme Medical Research Support Program (MRSP)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701226
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON Y

The Physical Literacy Program - evaluation of student outcomes$6,600

Funding body: International Football School

Funding body International Football School
Project Team Doctor Drew Miller, Doctor Narelle Eather, Doctor Nick Riley
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2028
GNo G1700833
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON Y

20161 grants / $15,000

FEDUA Early Career Fellowship$15,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Scheme Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20151 grants / $1,000

2015 Asics Sports Medicine Australia Conference, Gold Coats, 21-24 October 2015$1,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Doctor Narelle Eather
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500877
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20145 grants / $399,313

Engaging dads and daughters to increase physical activity and social and emotional well-being in pre-adolescent girls: The DADEE (Dads And Daughters Exercising and Empowered) program$327,813

Funding body: Port Waratah Coal Services Limited

Funding body Port Waratah Coal Services Limited
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Alyce Barnes, Doctor Narelle Eather, Doctor Myles Young
Scheme Community Investment and Partnership Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1401411
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Engaging fathers to improve physical activity levels and social-emotional well-being in their daughters: The DADEE (Dads And Daughters Enjoying Exercise) study$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Narelle Eather, Doctor Alyce Barnes
Scheme Youth Research Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301335
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Evaluation of a multi-component intervention to reduce screen-time in adolescents: The ‘Stand Up for Healthy Minds’ study$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Amanda Baker, Doctor Geoffrey Skinner, Doctor Narelle Eather
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301432
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

The impact of high intensity interval training on physical and psycho-social outcomes in low-active adolescents: A randomised controlled trial$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Doctor Narelle Eather
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1500311
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

AISEP World Congress 2014, Auckland New Zealand, 10-13 February 2013$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Doctor Narelle Eather
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301241
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20131 grants / $3,000

The effects of a resistance training program (Cross-Fit Teens) on physiological and psychological health in adolescents: A randomized controlled trial.$3,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Narelle Eather
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300089
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20111 grants / $2,000

The Fit-4-Fun Program: promoting fitness and health in primary school children$2,000

Funding body: Sports Medicine Australia

Funding body Sports Medicine Australia
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Narelle Eather
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100582
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20101 grants / $2,000

The Fit-4-Fun RCT: Promoting health and physical fitness in primary school children.$2,000

Funding body: Sports Medicine Austrlaia

Funding body Sports Medicine Austrlaia
Project Team

Narelle Eather

Scheme Pilot Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed6
Current10

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD An Investigation into the Teaching & Learning of Martial Arts PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD Evaluate the Effectiveness of the MASTER Coaching Program as a Coach Development Tool for Improving Coaching Practices of Football Coaches and for Improving a Range of Player Outcomes PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Applying Positive Psychology Principles to Individual Teacher Identity in the Educational Reform Context PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Kinaesthetic Learning Processes Need to be Taken Off the Back Burner. What is the Importance of Kinaesthetic Learning in BOSTES Stage 4 Teaching and Learning Programs for Boys' Education? PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Improving Fitness and Well-being in Senior School Students: The 'Burn 2 Learn' Program PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Impact of Variety in Physical Activity Settings in Adolescents PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD An Evaluation of 'Best Practice' Models of Improving Resilience and Well-being in Adolescents PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 Masters To Evaluate the Impact of a School-Based Health and Wellbeing Program for Adolescent Girls on Mental Health Outcomes and Physical Activity Levels M Philosophy (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD The impact of High Intensity Interval Training on physical activity, fitness and mental health in adolescents. Education, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD The Impact of High Intensity Interval Training on Physical and Psycho-Social Outcomes in Low-Active Adolescents PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 Honours Impact of the University High Intensity Interval Training (UNI HIIT) Program
Veronica Smith was awarded first class honours for her thesis reporting on the effectiveness of UNI-HIIT for improving fitness and cognition in young adults studying at University.
Education, School of Education, The University of Newcastle Sole Supervisor
2017 Honours Uni-HIIT: Evaluating the impact of High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) on the physical fitness, cognitive function and psychological health of young adults’ in university settings
Ashleigh Poole was awarded the Faculty Medal and First Class Honours for her thesis reporting the impact of Uni-HIIT on psychological health in young adults studying at University.
Education, School of Education, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 Honours Plunge into Football
Bradley Jones was awarded First Class Honours for his study evaluating the impact of a professional development workshop for football coaches and the MASTER Coaching framework for improving coaching practices.&nbsp;
Education, School of Education, The University of Newcastle Sole Supervisor
2016 Honours Effectiveness of the ‘Dads and Daughters Exercising and Empowered’ (DADEE) Program
<p>&nbsp;</p><p><span style="font-size:9.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:'Verdana',sans-serif;color:black;">Adrienne Bull was awarded the Faculty Medal and First Class Honours for her thesis "Effectiveness of the Dads and Daughters Exercising and&nbsp;</span><span style="font-variant-ligatures:normal;font-variant-caps:normal;orphans:2;text-align:start;widows:2;-webkit-text-stroke-width:0px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial;float:none;word-spacing:0px;">Empowered" (DADEE) Program. Specifically, her thesis reported on the impact of the DADEE program for improving fundamental movement skills in primary-school aged girls participating in the program.</span></p>
Education, The University of Newcastle | Australia Principal Supervisor
2015 Honours Professional Learning for Understanding Games Education in Sport (PLUNGE into SPORT) Education, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 Honours The impact of CrossFit Teens resistance training program on psychological health in adolescents Education, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
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News

Goal to improve player well-being in junior sports

December 24, 2018

A new study being conducted by University of Newcastle physical education researcher Dr Narelle Eather, with funding from First National Newcastle City, aims to improve positive sporting experiences focused on player well-being.

Female researchers sponsored in academic journey

November 22, 2018

Seven promising University of Newcastle researchers are helping to pave the way for their female peers, as recipients of a Women in Research (WIR) Fellowship designed to support the development of their academic careers.

Fathers often overlooked in children’s obesity prevention programs

February 1, 2017

Study finds dads often absent from studies that test best ways to treat obesity in children.

Research Directions 2016

July 7, 2016

This issue of Research Directions has a focus on researchers in the early and mid-stages of their careers.

2016 FEDUA Fellows

May 12, 2016

2016 FEDUA Fellowship recipients aims to increase the research capacity for their research through internal Fellowships.

Newcastle researchers tackle teen fitness

June 23, 2015

Watch Dr Narelle Eather's interview with NBN News on the University of Newcastle's Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition CrossFit...

Dr Narelle Eather

Position

Senior Lecturer
Physical Education
School of Education
Faculty of Education and Arts

Focus area

Education

Contact Details

Email narelle.eather@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 6232
Links Research and Innovation Cluster
Research and Innovation Cluster
Personal webpage

Office

Room HPE310
Building Health and Physical Education HPE
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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