Mrs Emma Pollock

Mrs Emma Pollock

Research Academic

School of Education

Career Summary

Biography

Ms. Emma Pollock is a PhD student at the Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition in the School of Education. In February 2017, Emma received a 'University of Newcastle Postgraduate Research Scholarship' to conduct her thesis titled 'A mixed methods evaluation of the Dads And Daughters Exercising and Empowered (DADEE) Program.'  Emma also completed a Bachelor of Teaching / Bachelor of PDHPE (Hons) at the University of Newcastle in 2009.

Prior to beginning postgraduate studies, Emma has worked as a Research Assistant to Professor Philip Morgan and Professor David Lubans on projects such as 'SCORES' (Supporting Children's Outcomes using Rewards, Exercise and Skills), 'Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds' and 'High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) for Teens'. She also worked as Project Manager on the 'Resistance Training 4 Teens', 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' and 'DADEE' programs. 

Emma has also taught as a PDHPE teacher in local secondary schools and is a current Casual Academic in Health and Physical Education at the University of Newcastle. 


Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Teaching/B Health & Phys Educ (Hons), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Children
  • Community-based research
  • Intervention
  • Obesity
  • Parenting for physical activity
  • Physical activity
  • Physical education
  • Public health

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 50
110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Academic University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia
Casual Academic - WWC University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/1/2015 - 31/12/2016 Project Manager | Resistance Training for Teens Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition - The University of Newcastle
Australia
1/1/2015 - 31/12/2016 Resistance Training for Teens Professional Learning Workshop Deliverer School Sport Unit, NSW Department of Education and Training
Australia
1/1/2014 - 31/12/2014 Project Manager | Translation of the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids Program Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition - The University of Newcastle
Australia
1/1/2014 - 31/1/2017 Research Assistant to Professor Philip Morgan Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition - The University of Newcastle
Australia
1/1/2013 - 31/12/2016 Research Assistant to Professor David Lubans Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition - The University of Newcastle
Australia
1/7/2016 - 6/2/2020 Project Manager | Dads And Daughters Exercising and Empowered Program Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition - The University of Newcastle
Australia

Teaching appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/10/2009 - 31/12/2014 PDHPE Teacher (secondary) NSW Department of Education and Training
Australia

Awards

Scholarship

Year Award
2017 University of Newcastle Postgraduate Research Scholarship
The University of Newcastle

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
EDUC1014 PE Studies 1: Motor Development and Skill Acquisition
School of Education, The University of Newcastle
Tutor 1/2/2013 - 30/6/2013
PUBH1030 Foundation studies in K-6 PDHPE
School of Education, The University of Newcastle
Tutor 1/2/2017 - 30/6/2017
EDUC2514 Primary Kinetics 1
School of Education, The University of Newcastle
Tutor 1/2/2013 - 30/6/2013
EDUC2747 K-6 PDHPE
School of Education, The University of Newcastle
Tutor 1/7/2014 - 30/11/2014
EDUC4017 Applying Physical Education, Physical Activity and health Research in Primary Schools
School of Education, The University of Newcastle
Tutor 1/7/2016 - 30/11/2016
EDUC4017 Applying Physical Education, Physical Activity and health Research in Primary Schools
School of Education, The University of Newcastle
Tutor 1/7/2017 - 30/11/2017
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (12 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Drew RJ, Morgan PJ, Pollock ER, Young MD, 'Impact of male-only lifestyle interventions on men's mental health: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 21 (2020)

© 2020 World Obesity Federation Despite rising mental health problems worldwide, engaging men to seek mental health support is challenging. Male-only lifestyle interventions have ... [more]

© 2020 World Obesity Federation Despite rising mental health problems worldwide, engaging men to seek mental health support is challenging. Male-only lifestyle interventions have shown promise for improving men's physical health, but the overall impact of these programs on psychological outcomes is unclear. This review aimed to evaluate the impact of male-only lifestyle interventions on men's mental health and to identify if any study or intervention features were associated with effectiveness. A systematic literature search with no date restrictions was conducted across four databases and returned 15 946 citations. Nine studies were eligible for inclusion, representing 1427 participants. Risk of bias was generally low across studies, although none were specifically powered to detect changes in mental health. Overall, significant group-by-time effects were reported for 26% of mental health outcomes examined. In the fixed-effects meta-analyses, small-to-medium intervention effects were observed for mental health¿related quality of life (SMD = 0.24), self-esteem (SMD = 0.51), and positive affect (SMD = 0.58). Insights into effective study or intervention features were limited because of the low number of heterogeneous studies. Although male-only lifestyle interventions have improved men's mental health in some circumstances, studies that are specifically powered to detect long-term changes are urgently required, particularly in groups with pre-existing mental health concerns.

DOI 10.1111/obr.13014
Co-authors Myles Young, Philip Morgan
2020 Morgan PJ, Young MD, Barnes AT, Eather N, Pollock ER, Lubans DR, 'Correction That the Analyses Were Adjusted for Clustering: A Response to Tekwe et al', Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, 54 140 (2020)
DOI 10.1093/abm/kaz066
Co-authors Alyce Barnes, Philip Morgan, Narelle Eather, Myles Young, David Lubans
2019 Young MD, Lubans DR, Barnes AT, Eather N, Pollock ER, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of a father-daughter physical activity program on girls' social-emotional well-being: A randomized controlled trial', Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 87 294-307 (2019) [C1]

© PsycINFO Database Record 2019 APA. All rights reserved. Objective: To increase girls' well-being, strategies are needed to optimize their social-emotional competence during... [more]

© PsycINFO Database Record 2019 APA. All rights reserved. Objective: To increase girls' well-being, strategies are needed to optimize their social-emotional competence during childhood. Although positive fathering is important for girls, many fathers discount their unique influence and few participate in interventions. The Dads And Daughters Exercising and Empowered (DADEE) program was developed to engage fathers and their daughters through shared physical activity experiences. This study examined the program's impact on girls' well-being and the father-daughter relationship. Method: Overall, 115 fathers (age range: 29-53 years) and 153 daughters (age range: 4-12 years) were randomized to (1) the DADEE program (9 weekly educational and practical sessions plus home-based challenges) or (2) a wait-list control. Assessments were baseline, 2 months (postintervention), and 9 months (94% retention). Daughters' social-emotional well-being was measured with the Devereux Student Strengths Assessment composite. Secondary outcomes included additional well-being indicators (e.g., global self-perception) plus validated measures of father involvement and father-daughter relationship quality. Results: At 2 months, intervention daughters showed a medium-to-large improvement in overall well-being (+24.9 units, 95% CI [8.6, 41.1], d = 0.6), when compared with controls. Intervention daughters were also more likely to show clinically meaningful improvements in well-being (54%) than controls (18%). Medium-to-large effects were observed for: seven of eight social-emotional competencies (e.g., personal responsibility, d = 0.4-0.9), father-daughter relationship quality (d = 0.8, father-report; d = 0.5, daughter-report), daughters' prosocial behavior (d = 0.3) and several indicators of father involvement. Most outcomes had improved by 9 months. No effects were observed for daughters' emotional difficulties or global self-perception. Conclusions: This study provided the first experimental evidence that father-daughter physical activity programs may improve girls' well-being and the father-daughter relationship.

DOI 10.1037/ccp0000374
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Narelle Eather, Philip Morgan, Alyce Barnes, David Lubans, Myles Young
2019 Morgan PJ, Young MD, Barnes AT, Eather N, Pollock ER, Lubans DR, 'Engaging Fathers to Increase Physical Activity in Girls: The "Dads And Daughters Exercising and Empowered" (DADEE) Randomized Controlled Trial', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 53 39-52 (2019) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2018. Background: Existing strategies to increase girls' physical activity levels have seen limited success. Fathers may influence their children's physi... [more]

© The Author(s) 2018. Background: Existing strategies to increase girls' physical activity levels have seen limited success. Fathers may influence their children's physical activity, but often spend more time with their sons and rarely participate in family-based programs. Purpose: To test a novel program designed to increase the physical activity levels of fathers and their daughters. Methods: In a two-arm RCT, 115 fathers (29-53 years) and 153 daughters (4-12 years) were randomized to (i) the "Dads And Daughters Exercising and Empowered" (DADEE) program, or (ii) a wait-list control. The 8-week program included weekly educational and practical sessions plus home tasks. Assessments were at baseline, 2 months (postintervention), and 9 months. The primary outcomes were father-daughter physical activity levels (pedometry). Secondary outcomes included screen-time, daughters' fundamental movement skill proficiency (FMS: perceived and objective), and fathers' physical activity parenting practices. Results: Primary outcome data were obtained from 88% of daughters and 90% of fathers at 9 months. Intentionto-treat analyses revealed favorable group-by-time effects for physical activity in daughters (p = .02, d = 0.4) and fathers (p < .001, d = 0.7) at postintervention, which were maintained at 9 months. At postintervention and follow-up, significant effects (p < .05) were also identified for daughters' FMS competence (objective: d = 1.1-1.2; perceived: d = 0.4-0.6), a range of fathers' physical activity parenting practices (d = 0.3-0.8), and screen-time for daughters (d = 0.5-0.8) and fathers (d = 0.4-0.6, postintervention only). Program satisfaction and attendance were very high. Conclusions: This study provided the first experimental evidence that efforts to increase physical activity behavior in preadolescent girls would benefit from a meaningful engagement of fathers.

DOI 10.1093/abm/kay015
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 13
Co-authors David Lubans, Alyce Barnes, Philip Morgan, Myles Young, Narelle Eather
2019 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Lubans DR, Callister R, Lloyd AB, Plotnikoff RC, et al., 'Twelve-month outcomes of a father-child lifestyle intervention delivered by trained local facilitators in underserved communities: The Healthy Dads Healthy Kids dissemination trial', Translational Behavioral Medicine, 9 560-569 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 The Author(s). Healthy Dads Healthy Kids (HDHK) was the first program internationally to specifically target overweight and obese fathers to improve their children&apos;s h... [more]

© 2019 The Author(s). Healthy Dads Healthy Kids (HDHK) was the first program internationally to specifically target overweight and obese fathers to improve their children's health. In previous randomized controlled trials, HDHK generated meaningful short-Term improvements in the adiposity, physical activity, and eating behaviors of both fathers and children. The aim of this dissemination trial was to evaluate the 12-month impact of HDHK when delivered by trained facilitators across four low socioeconomic and regional communities in the Hunter Region, Australia. The study was a nonrandomized, prospective trial with minimal eligibility criteria (i.e., father body mass index [BMI] ? 25 kg/m2 and children aged 4-12 years). HDHK included eight weekly practical and theoretical sessions. Assessments were baseline, 3 months (post-intervention), 6-months, and 12-months. The primary outcome was fathers' weight. Secondary outcomes included child BMI z-score and validated lifestyle behavior measures (e.g., physical activity, diet). Overall, 189 fathers (mean age: 40.2 years, BMI: 32.6 kg/m2) and 306 children (mean age: 8.1 years) participated in one of 10 HDHK programs in four areas. Intention-To-Treat linear mixed models revealed a significant mean reduction in fathers' weight at post-intervention (?3.6 kg, 95% confidence interval: ?4.3, ?2.9), which was maintained at 12 months (71% retention). Corresponding improvements were also detected in children's BMI z-score and a range of lifestyle behaviors for both fathers and children. Attendance and satisfaction levels were high. Positive intervention effects observed in previous randomized controlled trials were largely replicated and sustained for 12 months when HDHK was delivered by trained local facilitators in underserved communities. Further investigation into the key systems, processes, and contextual factors required to deliver HDHK at scale appears warranted.

DOI 10.1093/tbm/ibz031
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Robin Callister, Richard Fletcher, David Lubans, Alyce Barnes, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Andrew Miller, Adam Lloyd, Myles Young, Tracy Burrows, Ron Plotnikoff
2018 Kennedy SG, Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Peralta LR, Hilland TA, Eather N, et al., 'Implementing Resistance Training in Secondary Schools: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 50 62-72 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 by the American College of Sports Medicine. Purpose: Guidelines recommend that young people engage in muscle-strengthening activities on at least 3 dIwkj1. The purpose of t... [more]

© 2017 by the American College of Sports Medicine. Purpose: Guidelines recommend that young people engage in muscle-strengthening activities on at least 3 dIwkj1. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a school-based intervention focused on resistance training (RT) for adolescents. Methods: The ''Resistance Training for Teens'' intervention was evaluated using a cluster-randomized, controlled trial with 607 adolescents (50.1% girls; 14.1 T 0.5 yr) from 16 secondary schools. Teachers were trained to deliver the intervention, which included the following: (i) an interactive student seminar; (ii) a structured physical activity program, focused on RT; (iii) lunchtime fitness sessions; and (iv) Web-based smartphone apps. The primary outcome was muscular fitness (MF) and secondary outcomes included body mass index, RT skill competency, flexibility, physical activity, self-efficacy, and motivation. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 6 months (postprogram; primary end point), and 12 months (follow-up). Outcomes were assessed using linear mixed models, with three potential moderators tested using interaction terms (and subgroup analyses where appropriate). Results: For the primary outcome (MF), a group-time effect was observed at 6 months for the upper body (2.0 repetitions; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.8-3.2), but not the lower body (j1.4 cm; 95% CI, j4.7-1.9). At 6 months, there were intervention effects for RT skill competency and self-efficacy, but no other secondary outcomes. Effects for upper body MF and RT skill competency were sustained at 12 months. Despite overall no effect for body mass index, there was a group-time effect at 12 months among students whowere overweight/obese at baseline (j0.55 kgImj2; 95% CI, j1.01 toj0.08). Conclusions: The school-based RT intervention resulted in immediate and sustained improvements in upper body MF and RT skill competency, demonstrating an effective and scalable approach to delivering RT within secondary schools.

DOI 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001410
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Jordan Smith, Ron Plotnikoff, Narelle Eather, Philip Morgan, Sarah Kennedy, David Lubans
2018 Kennedy SG, Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Peralta LR, Hilland TA, Eather N, et al., 'Implementing Resistance Training in Secondary Schools: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.', Med Sci Sports Exerc, 50 62-72 (2018)
DOI 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001410
Co-authors Narelle Eather, Ron Plotnikoff
2018 Eather N, Bull A, Young MD, Barnes AT, Pollock ER, Morgan PJ, 'Fundamental movement skills: Where do girls fall short? A novel investigation of object-control skill execution in primary-school aged girls', Preventive Medicine Reports, 11 191-195 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Fundamental movement skill (FMS) proficiency is positively associated with a range of health outcomes, and is a predictor of lifelong participation in physical activities a... [more]

© 2018 Fundamental movement skill (FMS) proficiency is positively associated with a range of health outcomes, and is a predictor of lifelong participation in physical activities and sport. Yet low FMS proficiency levels in children prevail, particularly among girls performing object-control skills (e.g., kicking, catching). To identify where girls require the most support and inform future teaching resources and interventions, this cross-sectional study investigated proficiency levels of object-control skills and their specific performance components (subskills) in girls; and aimed to determine whether patterns in subskill mastery were evident in girls from two different developmental stages. This study included 153 girls (aged 4¿12 years; mean age = 7.7, SD = 1.8) from the Hunter Region, Australia. Six object-control skills were video-assessed using the Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD-2, TGMD-3); overall skill proficiency levels and mastery levels of subskills were determined. In summary, <5% (of the total group, 4¿8 years or 9¿12 years) demonstrated mastery or advanced skill level in the strike, stationary dribble, overhand throw or kick. Mastery levels were also poor for the majority of the 24 subskills, with mastery levels below 40% for the total group for 17 of the 24 subskills. Deficiencies in specific subskills were evident in the preparation, action and recovery phases of the six object-control skills. Only 6 of the 24 subskills mastery levels were significantly higher in the older age-group. Our investigation provides new evidence that may be useful for practitioners and researchers looking to support the optimal development of FMS proficiency among girls. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12615000022561.

DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2018.06.005
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Narelle Eather, Myles Young, Alyce Barnes, Philip Morgan
2016 Babic MJ, Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Lonsdale C, Plotnikoff RC, Eather N, et al., 'Intervention to reduce recreational screen-time in adolescents: Outcomes and mediators from the Switch-Off 4 Healthy Minds (S4HM) cluster randomized controlled trial', Preventive Medicine, 91 50-57 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. Introduction The primary objective was to evaluate the impact of the ¿Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds¿ (S4HM) intervention on recreational screen-time in adolescen... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. Introduction The primary objective was to evaluate the impact of the ¿Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds¿ (S4HM) intervention on recreational screen-time in adolescents. Methods Cluster randomized controlled trial with study measures at baseline and 6-months (post-intervention). Eligible participants reported exceeding recreational screen-time recommendations (i.e., >¿2¿h/day). In total, 322 adolescents (mean age¿=¿14.4¿±¿0.6¿years) from eight secondary schools in New South Wales, Australia were recruited. The S4HM intervention was guided by Self-Determination Theory and included: an interactive seminar, eHealth messaging, a behavioral contract and parental newsletters. The primary outcome was recreational screen-time. Secondary outcomes included mental health (i.e., well-being, psychological distress, self-perceptions), objectively measured physical activity, and body mass index (BMI). Outcome analyses were conducted using linear mixed models and mediation was examined using a product-of-coefficients test. Results At post-intervention, significant reductions in screen-time were observed in both groups, with a greater reduction observed in the intervention group (-¿50¿min/day versus -¿29¿min, p¿<¿0.05 for both). However, the adjusted difference in change between groups was not statistically significant (mean¿=¿-¿21.3¿min/day, p¿=¿0.255). There were no significant intervention effects for mental health outcomes, physical activity or BMI. Significant mediation effects for autonomous motivation were found. Conclusions Participants in both the S4HM intervention and control groups significantly reduced their screen-time, with no group-by-time effects. Enhancing autonomous motivation might be a useful intervention target for trials aimed at reducing adolescents' recreational screen-time. Trial registration ACTRN12614000163606.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.07.014
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Jordan Smith, Amanda Baker, David Lubans, Geoff Skinner, Narelle Eather, Ron Plotnikoff
2016 Lubans DR, Smith JJ, Peralta LR, Plotnikoff RC, Okely AD, Salmon J, et al., 'A school-based intervention incorporating smartphone technology to improve health-related fitness among adolescents: rationale and study protocol for the NEAT and ATLAS 2.0 cluster randomised controlled trial and dissemination study', BMJ OPEN, 6 (2016)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010448
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Jordan Smith, David Lubans, Narelle Eather, Sarah Kennedy
2015 Costigan SA, Eather N, Plotnikoff RC, Taaffe DR, Pollock E, Kennedy SG, Lubans DR, 'Preliminary efficacy and feasibility of embedding high intensity interval training into the school day: A pilot randomized controlled trial', Preventive Medicine Reports, 2 973-979 (2015) [C1]

© 2015. Current physical activity and fitness levels among adolescents are low, increasing the risk of chronic disease. Although the efficacy of high intensity interval training (... [more]

© 2015. Current physical activity and fitness levels among adolescents are low, increasing the risk of chronic disease. Although the efficacy of high intensity interval training (HIIT) for improving metabolic health is now well established, it is not known if this type of activity can be effective to improve adolescent health. The primary aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of embedding HIIT into the school day. A 3-arm pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted in one secondary school in Newcastle, Australia. Participants (n= 65; mean age = 15.8(0.6) years) were randomized into one of three conditions: aerobic exercise program (AEP) (n = 21), resistance and aerobic exercise program (RAP) (n = 22) and control (n = 22). The 8-week intervention consisted of three HIIT sessions per week (8-10. min/session), delivered during physical education (PE) lessons or at lunchtime. Assessments were conducted at baseline and post-intervention to detect changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (multi-stage shuttle-run), muscular fitness (push-up, standing long jump tests), body composition (Body Mass Index (BMI), BMI-z scores, waist circumference) and physical activity motivation (questionnaire), by researchers blinded to treatment allocation. Intervention effects for outcomes were examined using linear mixed models, and Cohen's d effect sizes were reported. Participants in the AEP and RAP groups had moderate intervention effects for waist circumference (p = 0.024), BMI-z (p = 0.037) and BMI (not significant) in comparison to the control group. A small intervention effect was also evident for cardiorespiratory fitness in the RAP group.

DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.11.001
Citations Scopus - 19
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Sarah Costigan, Narelle Eather, Sarah Kennedy
2015 Babic MJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lonsdale C, Eather N, Skinner G, et al., 'Rationale and study protocol for 'Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds' (S4HM): A cluster randomized controlled trial to reduce recreational screen time in adolescents', Contemporary Clinical Trials, 40 150-158 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier Inc. Introduction: Excessive recreational screen time (i.e., screen use for entertainment) is a global public health issue associated with adverse mental and physi... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Inc. Introduction: Excessive recreational screen time (i.e., screen use for entertainment) is a global public health issue associated with adverse mental and physical health outcomes. Considering the growing popularity of screen-based recreation in adolescents, there is a need to identify effective strategies for reducing screen time among adolescents. The aim of this paper is to report the rationale and study protocol for the 'Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds' (S4HM) study, an intervention designed to reduce recreational screen time among adolescents. Methods: The S4HM intervention will be evaluated using a cluster randomized controlled trial in eight secondary schools (. N=. 322 students) in New South Wales, Australia. The 6-month multi-component intervention will encourage adolescents to manage their recreational screen time using a range of evidence-based strategies. The intervention is grounded in Self-Determination Theory (SDT) and includes the following components: an interactive seminar for students, eHealth messaging, behavioral contract and parental newsletters. All outcomes will be assessed at baseline and at 6-months (i.e., immediate post-test). The primary outcome is recreational screen time measured by the Adolescent Sedentary Activity Questionnaire (ASAQ). Secondary outcomes include: self-reported psychological well-being, psychological distress, global physical self-concept, resilience, pathological video gaming and aggression, and objectively measured physical activity (accelerometry) and body mass index (BMI). Hypothesized mediators of behavior change will also be explored. Discussion: The S4HM study will involve the evaluation of an innovative, theory-driven, multi-component intervention that targets students and their parents and is designed to reduce recreational screen time in adolescents. The intervention has been designed for scalability and dissemination across Australian secondary schools.

DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2014.12.001
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Amanda Baker, David Lubans, Narelle Eather, Geoff Skinner
Show 9 more journal articles
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 5
Total funding $2,888,083

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20192 grants / $2,460,180

Scale up of the ‘Daughters and Dads Active and Empowered’ program throughout NSW$2,400,000

Funding body: Office of Sport

Funding body Office of Sport
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Myles Young, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Narelle Eather, Mrs Emma Pollock
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G1900853
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

The Daughters And Dads Project UK – An adaptation and scale up of the Dads And Daughters Exercising and Empowered (DADEE) program$60,180

Funding body: Women in Sport

Funding body Women in Sport
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Myles Young, Mrs Emma Pollock, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Narelle Eather, Doctor Alyce Barnes, Ms Heather Smith
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1900446
Type Of Funding C3212 - International Not for profit
Category 3212
UON Y

20181 grants / $7,956

DADEE Sports Equipment$7,956

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Myles Young, Mrs Emma Pollock, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Narelle Eather, Doctor Alyce Barnes
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1801363
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

20172 grants / $419,947

Healthy Youngsters, Healthy Dads$399,947

Funding body: Greater Charitable Foundation

Funding body Greater Charitable Foundation
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Myles Young, Doctor Alyce Barnes, Professor Clare Collins, Mrs Emma Pollock
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1700650
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Healthy Youngsters, Healthy Dads: A healthy-lifestyle program targeting fathers and their preschool-aged children$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Myles Young, Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Alyce Barnes, Mrs Emma Pollock
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700700
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y
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Mrs Emma Pollock

Positions

Research Academic
PRC Physical Activity and Nutrition
School of Education
Faculty of Education and Arts

Casual Academic - WWC
PRC Physical Activity and Nutrition
School of Education
Faculty of Education and Arts

Contact Details

Email emma.r.pollock@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 6884
Link Twitter

Office

Room ATC308
Building ATC
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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