Miss Sarah Kennedy

Miss Sarah Kennedy

Casual Research Assistant

School of Education

Career Summary

Biography

I graduated from the University of Newcastle (UoN) in 2012, attaining a Bachelor of Exercise and Sports Science. During my final year of my bachelor degree, I completed work experience at the Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition (PRC-PAN), which sparked an interest in education. From 2013-2014, I continued to work at the PRC-PAN whilst concurrently completing my Master of Teaching (Primary) at the UoN and my Master of Exercise Science (Strength and Conditioning) through Edith Cowan University. In 2016, I began my PhD studies on the project ‘Resistance Training for Teens’. This project is a health-related fitness program for secondary school students across New South Wales, which aims to equip adolescents with the necessary knowledge, skills and motivation to be physically active across the lifespan. My interests lie in the innovation of evidence-based programs to improve the physical activity levels of children and youth, as well as the methods in which are employed to further develop these programs for large-scale roll out. I am interested in, and passionate about the inclusion of resistance training within physical activity programs, and the ways in which this exercise can improve the overall health of individuals.

Keywords

  • Physical Activity
  • Resistance Training
  • education
  • exercise science
  • school-based health promotion
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (14 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Kennedy S, Chesser-Smyth P, 'Assessment of undergraduate nursing students from an Irish perspective: Decisions and dilemmas?', Nurse Education in Practice, 27 95-100 (2017)

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Assessment of clinical competence plays a pivotal role in the education of undergraduate nursing students in preparation for registration. The challenges that... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Assessment of clinical competence plays a pivotal role in the education of undergraduate nursing students in preparation for registration. The challenges that face preceptors are represented in the international literature yet few studies have focused on the factors that influence the decision-making process by preceptors when students under-perform or appear to be borderline status in relation to clinical practice. This study explored the lived experiences of the preceptors during the assessment process using a phenomenological approach. This was a qualitative study that utilised a phenomenological approach to explore the lived experiences of the preceptors in relation to student assessment of those students who were incompetent and underperformed in clinical practice. Three categories emerged from the findings: First impressions, Emotional turmoil of failing a clinical assessment and competing demands in the workplace. It is proposed that employing a tripartite approach would enhance the assessment process to ensure a more robust and decision-sharing mechanism. This would support decisions that are made in the cases of incompetent or borderline nursing students and increase the objectivity of the competency assessment to ameliorate the emotional turmoil that is experienced by preceptors.

DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2017.08.017
2017 Rhodes RE, Lubans DR, Karunamuni N, Kennedy S, Plotnikoff R, 'Factors associated with participation in resistance training: a systematic review.', Br J Sports Med, 51 1466-1472 (2017)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096950
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
2017 Kennedy SG, Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Peralta LR, Hilland TA, Eather N, et al., 'Implementing Resistance Training in Secondary Schools: A Cluster RCT.', Med Sci Sports Exerc, (2017)
DOI 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001410
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Jordan Smith, Narelle Eather
2017 Smith JJ, DeMarco M, Kennedy SG, Kelson M, Barnett LM, Faigenbaum AD, Lubans DR, 'Prevalence and correlates of resistance training skill competence in adolescents.', J Sports Sci, 1-9 (2017)
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2017.1370822
Co-authors David Lubans, Jordan Smith
2016 Lubans DR, Smith JJ, Peralta LR, Plotnikoff RC, Okely AD, Salmon J, et al., 'A school-based intervention incorporating smartphone technology to improve health-related fitness among adolescents: rationale and study protocol for the NEAT and ATLAS 2.0 cluster randomised controlled trial and dissemination study', BMJ OPEN, 6 (2016)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010448
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Narelle Eather, Jordan Smith, David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2015 Costigan SA, Eather N, Plotnikoff RC, Taaffe DR, Pollock E, Kennedy SG, Lubans DR, 'Preliminary efficacy and feasibility of embedding high intensity interval training into the school day: A pilot randomized controlled trial', Preventive Medicine Reports, 2 973-979 (2015) [C1]

© 2015. Current physical activity and fitness levels among adolescents are low, increasing the risk of chronic disease. Although the efficacy of high intensity interval training ... [more]

© 2015. Current physical activity and fitness levels among adolescents are low, increasing the risk of chronic disease. Although the efficacy of high intensity interval training (HIIT) for improving metabolic health is now well established, it is not known if this type of activity can be effective to improve adolescent health. The primary aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of embedding HIIT into the school day. A 3-arm pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted in one secondary school in Newcastle, Australia. Participants (n= 65; mean age = 15.8(0.6) years) were randomized into one of three conditions: aerobic exercise program (AEP) (n = 21), resistance and aerobic exercise program (RAP) (n = 22) and control (n = 22). The 8-week intervention consisted of three HIIT sessions per week (8-10. min/session), delivered during physical education (PE) lessons or at lunchtime. Assessments were conducted at baseline and post-intervention to detect changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (multi-stage shuttle-run), muscular fitness (push-up, standing long jump tests), body composition (Body Mass Index (BMI), BMI-z scores, waist circumference) and physical activity motivation (questionnaire), by researchers blinded to treatment allocation. Intervention effects for outcomes were examined using linear mixed models, and Cohen's d effect sizes were reported. Participants in the AEP and RAP groups had moderate intervention effects for waist circumference (p = 0.024), BMI-z (p = 0.037) and BMI (not significant) in comparison to the control group. A small intervention effect was also evident for cardiorespiratory fitness in the RAP group.

DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.11.001
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors David Lubans, Sarah Costigan, Narelle Eather, Ron Plotnikoff
2015 Kennedy S, Hardiker N, Staniland K, 'Empowerment an essential ingredient in the clinical environment: A review of the literature', Nurse Education Today, 35 487-492 (2015)

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Empowerment is an important concept worthy of attention in healthcare. The merits of empowerment are irrefutable including benefits to the organisation and t... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Empowerment is an important concept worthy of attention in healthcare. The merits of empowerment are irrefutable including benefits to the organisation and to the individual nurse. Empowered nurses contribute to the clinical learning environment in a positive way. There is a dearth of literature on how or indeed if nursing students are empowered. The process of empowering registered staff/nursing students is not clear. Ward environment and culture are important contributors to patient care, patient safety and staff well-being. It is therefore necessary to address how empowerment can contribute positively to improving the environment in which care is provided.

DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2014.11.014
Citations Scopus - 7
2015 Adshead S, Collier E, Kennedy S, 'A literature review exploring the preparation of mental health nurses for working with people with learning disability and mental illness', Nurse Education in Practice, 15 103-107 (2015)

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. The aim of this literature review is to explore whether mental health nurses are being appropriately prepared to care for learning disabled patients who also... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. The aim of this literature review is to explore whether mental health nurses are being appropriately prepared to care for learning disabled patients who also suffer from mental ill health. A systematic approach was adopted in order to identify relevant literature for review on the topic. Five electronic databases were searched; CINAHL, Medline, ERIC, PubMed and Scopus. Searches were limited to the years 2001-2013. A total of 13 articles were identified as relevant to the topic area for review. Three main themes were identified relating to (a) attitudes (b) practice and (c) education. There appears to be a lack of research that directly addresses this issue and the existing literature suggests that there are considerable deficits in the ability of mental health nurses to be able to provide appropriate care for those with both a learning disability and mental ill health. The findings of this review would suggest that this topic area is in urgent need of further investigation and research. Further research into this area of practice could possibly help to inform education regarding this subject at pre-registration and post qualifying levels, which could therefore in turn, improve the delivery of mental health nursing care to this particular client group.

DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2015.01.004
Citations Scopus - 2
2015 Plotnikoff RC, Costigan SA, Williams RL, Hutchesson MJ, Kennedy SG, Robards SL, et al., 'Effectiveness of interventions targeting physical activity, nutrition and healthy weight for university and college students: A systematic review and meta-analysis', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 12 1-10 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Plotnikoff et al.; licensee BioMed Central. To examine the effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving physical activity, diet, and/or weight-related behaviors among... [more]

© 2015 Plotnikoff et al.; licensee BioMed Central. To examine the effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving physical activity, diet, and/or weight-related behaviors amongst university/college students. Five online databases were searched (January 1970 to April 2014). Experimental study designs were eligible for inclusion. Data extraction was performed by one reviewer using a standardized form developed by the researchers and checked by a second reviewer. Data were described in a narrative synthesis and meta-analyses were conducted when appropriate. Study quality was also established. Forty-one studies were included; of these, 34 reported significant improvements in one of the key outcomes. Of the studies examining physical activity 18/29 yielded significant results, with meta-analysis demonstrating significant increases in moderate physical activity in intervention groups compared to control. Of the studies examining nutrition, 12/24 reported significantly improved outcomes; only 4/12 assessing weight loss outcomes found significant weight reduction. This appears to be the first systematic review of physical activity, diet and weight loss interventions targeting university and college students. Tertiary institutions are appropriate settings for implementing and evaluating lifestyle interventions, however more research is needed to improve such strategies.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0203-7
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Clare Collins, Jennifer Allen, Melinda Hutchesson, Ron Plotnikoff, Sarah Costigan, John Germov, Robin Callister
2000 Kleinert HL, Haigh J, Kearns JF, Kennedy S, 'Alternate assessments: Lessons learned and roads to be taken', Exceptional Children, 67 51-66 (2000)

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Amendments of 1997 (IDEA) require that all states develop and implement, by July 2000, alternate assessment methods for those stude... [more]

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Amendments of 1997 (IDEA) require that all states develop and implement, by July 2000, alternate assessment methods for those students with disabilities who cannot be included within regular state and local district educational assessment and accountability measures. The focus of this article is how two states have addressed a set of seven essential questions in developing their alternate assessments; why they chose the formats, standards, and implementation systems that they did; and the intended and unintended consequences that have resulted thus far from those decisions. To further guide the efforts of others, a set of recommendations are provided for states and practitioners to consider in developing alternate assessments to meet the requirements of IDEA '97.

Citations Scopus - 14
1999 Kearns JF, Kleinert HL, Kennedy S, 'We need not exclude anyone', Educational Leadership, 56 33-38 (1999)

When it comes to ensuring that all students participate in statewide assessments, Kentucky takes the lead.... [more]

When it comes to ensuring that all students participate in statewide assessments, Kentucky takes the lead.

Citations Scopus - 6
1999 Kleinert HL, Kennedy S, Kearns JF, 'The impact of alternate assessments: A statewide teacher survey', Journal of Special Education, 33 93-102 (1999)

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Amendments of 1997 require that all states, by July 2000, will have developed and implemented alternate assessment methods f... [more]

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Amendments of 1997 require that all states, by July 2000, will have developed and implemented alternate assessment methods for those students with disabilities who cannot be included within regular state and local district educational assessment and accountability measures. A statewide survey of teachers involved in the nation's first alternate assessment and accountability system for students with moderate and severe disabilities was conducted to determine the extent to which these teachers perceived benefits of including their students in state and school accountability measures, as well as their perceptions of the instructional impact of the alternate system upon student outcomes. The results of this survey indicated that teachers did realize such benefits, and perceived positive changes in both instructional programming (e.g., students' learning to follow their own individualized schedules, students' learning to assess their own performance) and enhanced student outcomes (an increased percentage of students having functional augmentative communication systems). However, teachers also expressed frustration with the amount of time required to complete student assessment portfolios, and concern over scoring reliability and the extent to which the alternate assessment was more of a teacher assessment than a student assessment.

Citations Scopus - 36
1997 Kleinert HL, Kearns JF, Kennedy S, 'Accountability for All Students: Kentucky's Alternate Portfolio Assessment for Students with Moderate and Severe Cognitive Disabilities', Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities, 22 88-101 (1997)

One of the keys to ensuring high expectations for all students is the requirement for inclusive measures of educational accountability. Recognizing this need, Congress enacted Tit... [more]

One of the keys to ensuring high expectations for all students is the requirement for inclusive measures of educational accountability. Recognizing this need, Congress enacted Title II, National Education Reform Leadership, Standards, and Assessments, calling for the development of state assessment systems that fully include all students, as a major component of the 1994 Goals 2000: Educate America Act. At present, Kentucky is the only state in the nation that fully includes all students within a statewide educational assessment and accountability system. Students with moderate and severe cognitive disabilities participate in Kentucky's assessment system via the Alternate Portfolio. This article describes the development of Kentucky's alternate assessment, including the content and scoring standards for the Alternate Portfolio. Specific examples of entries at each grade level (4th, 8th, and 12th) are given as well. Initial implementation data, including reliability, validity, and instructional impact measures, are presented. Finally, critical issues in the development of alternate statewide assessments are discussed, with recommendations for future research efforts in this area. © 1997, TASH. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1177/154079699702200206
Citations Scopus - 31
1997 Kleinert HL, Kearns JF, Kennedy S, 'A Brief Response to Elliott's and Sailor's Commentaries', Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities, 22 107-108 (1997)
DOI 10.1177/154079699702200209
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $59,092

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $59,092

Redeveloping Resistance Training for Teens resources to support program dissemination$59,092

Funding body: NSW Department of Education

Funding body NSW Department of Education
Project Team Doctor Jordan Smith, Professor David Lubans, Miss Sarah Kennedy, Professor Philip Morgan, Mr Mike Noetel
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1701277
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y
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Miss Sarah Kennedy

Position

Casual Research Assistant
PRC Physical Activity and Nutrition
School of Education
Faculty of Education and Arts

Contact Details

Email sarah.kennedy@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 49217439
Link Twitter

Office

Room ATC-209
Building Advanced Technology Centre
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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