Profile Image

Dr Nick Riley

Senior Lecturer

School of Education (Education)

Let's get physical

Nick Riley believes integrating physical activity into core school subjects can improve not only students' health but their behaviour and their academic performance.

Nick Riley

The idea that classroom learning and physical education can be complementary is the concept behind a novel PhD project being conducted by Nick Riley, a lecturer in the School of Education and researcher with the Faculty's new Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition.

"There are lot of health benefits that come from increased activity and there is a lot of research that suggests that active children actually have the potential to perform better cognitively and academically," Riley says.

Riley, who trained in physical education but spent 18 years as a classroom teacher in primary schools in the north of England, has developed a program called EASY Minds (Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young Minds) as a research project.

His program integrates physical activity into maths, English, science and HISE (history/social science) lessons. Riley has completed a feasibility study in one school and will repeat the program across four schools in a pilot study next year.

For the initial study he went into a school three times a week over a six-week period and taught hour-long lessons in core subjects, employing physical activity as a learning tool.

"If I was teaching multiplication, for example, rather than have the students do an exercise on paper, I might take them outside and time them running over 20 metres then get them to calculate how long it would take them to run 100 metres, or 90 metres, using that information," Riley explains.

"Or, rather than measuring area and perimeter in a book, they might go out and measure the area and perimeter of the playground.

"It's still a maths lesson but it integrates physical activity, and because the kids have ownership of the data, they are more engaged in the exercise."

The children in the study wear an accelerometer, a device that records their activity levels, over the school week.

The primary aim of the intervention program is to increase daily activity but Riley says it can influence classroom behaviour and self-esteem as well.

While all children responded well in the feasibility study, Riley says integrated activity can be particularly beneficial for kinesthetic, or physically oriented, learners who are more inclined to become disengaged with traditional classroom teaching methods.

"Often they are the kids who end up getting in trouble and get a reputation for being disruptive," he says.

"I believe all kids have huge potential and as educators and teachers we have to find the key to unlock that potential."

Nick Riley

Let's get physical

Riley believes integrating physical activity into core school subjects can improve not only students' health but their behaviour and their academic performance.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Nick has consistently demonstrated teaching excellence and a commitment to quality teaching and learning across a diverse range of courses at The University of Newcastle. He is a highly valued member of the School of Education, specialising in Primary and Secondary School Health and Physical Education. He is also the program Convenor for Secondary Education (PDHPE and STEM).

Nick has won numerous awards for both his teaching at UoN and the  dissemination of his research across NSW Public Schools. The DVC(A) Merit List for Teaching and Learning Excellence was established in 2018 to recognise exemplary teaching practices and outstanding student outcomes. Nick was an inaugural  inductee to this list. The Merit List is determined by a number of factors including student outcomes in one or more courses, as well as consistent affirmations from students regarding the quality of the learning experience.

Research Expertise

Since the completion of his  PhD in April 2016, Nick has  secured multiple research grants as Lead Investigator ( to enhance the evidence base for both the physical, academic and cognitive benefits of school-based physical activity. Building on the success of his  PhD he  has designed evidence-based professional learning workshops (Thinking while Moving in Maths and English) and online resource for dissemination across department public schools. During 2016-2020, he has also presented 32 Professional NESA accredited workshops across regional and metropolitan NSW, for teachers (n=682) from public schools (n=382). He has  recruited and trained seven teachers to act as facilitators across all NSW regions for TWM and teachers are trained at the NESA highly accomplished level. This level of ‘knowledge translation’ is difficult to achieve and highlights the novelty and substantial impact of his current research in Australian schools. The Department of Education promote Thinking While Moving as a recommended strategy for all department schools to meet the mandatory school physical activity policy requirements, and they have provided the online platform for all teachers to access the resources he has have created. (https://app.education.nsw.gov.au/sport/psc/Resources) Nick's most recent research is looking at the effect of cognitively demanding physical activity within Secondary school Mathematics lessons.

Teaching Expertise
Secondary and Primary School Health and Physical Education.

Nick currently teaches /coordinates/ lectures on a variety of Secondary and Primary school HPE courses at the University.

Course Coordinator for  EDUC2747, EDUC6747, EDUC 2058, EDUC1014, EDIC4016, EDUC1058


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), Lancaster University - England
  • Certificate in Education, University of Liverpool - UK
  • Certificate III in Information Technology, University of Central Lancashire

Keywords

  • Cognitively engaging physical activity
  • Health and Physical Education
  • Movement-based Learning
  • PDHPE
  • Physical Activity
  • Primary School
  • Sedentary Behaviour
  • Student engagement

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
390111 Physical education and development curriculum and pedagogy 60
390304 Primary education 20
390307 Teacher education and professional development of educators 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/2/2010 - 31/12/2018 Lecturer Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle, Australia
Australia
10/1/2008 - 1/1/2010 Casual Academic Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/9/2001 - 1/12/2007 Teacher Adviser Lancashire Education Authority
United Kingdom

Awards

Award

Year Award
2019 DVC (A) Merit List for Teaching Excellence
Office of the DVC (A), The University of Newcastle, Australia

Recognition

Year Award
2018 FEDUA Dean's Excellence Award for Collaboration
Faculty of Education and Arts
2016 2016 Faculty of Educaion and Arts Award for Excellence
Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
2011 Vice Chancellors award for teaching excellence
University of Newcastle

Research Award

Year Award
2020 2020 Faculty of Education and Arts Early Career Research Award Recipient
Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
2019 ECR Scholarship Award
Office of DVC (Research and Innovation), University of Newcastle, Australia
2018 PRC Innovation Award
Priority Research Centre for Physical Acivity and Nutrition
2017 PRC Physical Activity and Nutrition Innovation Award 2017
Priority Research Centre for Physical Acivity and Nutrition

Teaching Award

Year Award
2020 2020 Faculty of Education and Arts Teaching Excellence Award
Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle, Australia

Invitations

Keynote Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2014 Myuna Bay
Organisation: Sport and Recreation Annual Conference Description: Integrating Maths in Ourdoor Education Centres
2013 ACHPER
Organisation: Academic Performance and physical Activity Description: ACHPER Regional Conferences March Western Sydney. July- Central Coast Sept- Mid Noth Coast Coffs Harbour
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Lloyd A, Eather N, Riley N, 'Physical Education and Numeracy', Numeracy in Authentic Contexts: Making Meaning Across the Curriculum, Springer, Singapore 341-372 (2018) [B1]
Co-authors Adam Lloyd, Narelle Eather

Journal article (21 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Riley N, Mavilidi M, Kennedy S, Morgan P, Lubans D, 'Dissemination of Thinking while Moving in Maths: Implementation Barriers and Facilitators', Translational Journal of the American College of Sports Medicine, 6 1-12 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1249/TJX.0000000000000148
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2021 Riley N, Mavilidi M, Kennedy S, Morgan P, Lubans D, 'Dissemination of Thinking while Moving in Maths: Implementation Barriers and Facilitators', Translational Journal of the American College of Sports Medicine, 6 1-12 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1249/TJX.0000000000000148
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2020 Eather N, Babic M, Riley N, Harris N, Jung M, Jeffs M, et al., 'Integrating high-intensity interval training into the workplace: The Work-HIIT pilot RCT', Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 30 2445-2455 (2020) [C1]

The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a high-intensity interval training (HIIT) intervention integrated into the workplace on physica... [more]

The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a high-intensity interval training (HIIT) intervention integrated into the workplace on physical and mental health outcomes in a sample of adults. The Work-HIIT intervention was evaluated at the University of Newcastle (March-July 2019). University employees (18+¿years) who self-identified as predominantly sedentary at work (n¿=¿47, 43.0¿±¿10.7¿years; 41 female) were recruited, screened, and randomized after baseline assessments into Work-HIIT (n¿=¿24) or wait-list control (n¿=¿23) conditions. Participants were asked to attend 2-3 researcher-facilitated HIIT sessions/week (weeks 1-8). Sessions included a 2-minute gross-motor warm-up, followed by various combinations of aerobic and muscular fitness exercises lasting 8¿minutes (using 30:30¿second work: rest intervals). Program feasibility was assessed using measures of satisfaction, compliance, adherence, fidelity, and retention. Physiological and psychological outcomes were measured at baseline and 9¿weeks. Feasibility data were investigated using descriptive statistics and efficacy outcomes determined using linear mixed models and Cohen's d effect sizes. Participant ratings showed high levels of satisfaction (4.6/5); 71% of participants attended =2 sessions/wk and averaged 85.9% HRmax across all sessions (including rest and work intervals). Small-to-medium positive effects resulted for cardiorespiratory fitness [+2.9 laps, 95% CI (-4.19-10.14); d¿=¿0.34] and work productivity [+0.26, d¿=¿0.47]. Large positive effects resulted for muscular fitness [push-ups +3.5, d¿=¿0.95; standing jump +10.1¿cm, d¿=¿1.12]; HIIT self-efficacy [+16.53, d¿=¿1.57]; sleep [weekday +0.76¿hours, d¿=¿1.05]; and autonomous motivation [+0.23, d¿=¿0.76]. This study supports the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of facilitator-led Work-HIIT as a time-efficient, enjoyable, and convenient workplace exercise option for adults.

DOI 10.1111/sms.13811
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Narelle Eather, David Lubans
2020 Mavilidi MF, Lubans DR, Miller A, Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lonsdale C, et al., 'Impact of the Thinking while Moving in English intervention on primary school children s academic outcomes and physical activity: A cluster randomised controlled trial', International Journal of Educational Research, 102 101592-101592 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ijer.2020.101592
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Frini Karayanidis, Kylie Shaw, David Lubans, Narelle Eather, Andrew Miller, Philip Morgan
2020 Mavilidi MF, Mason C, Leahy AA, Kennedy SG, Eather N, Hillman CH, et al., 'Effect of a Time-Efficient Physical Activity Intervention on Senior School Students' On-Task Behaviour and Subjective Vitality: the 'Burn 2 Learn' Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial', EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY REVIEW, 33 299-323 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10648-020-09537-x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Narelle Eather, Philip Morgan, Sarah Kennedy, David Lubans, Angus Leahy
2020 Mavilidi MF, Drew R, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Schmidt M, Riley N, 'Effects of different types of classroom physical activity breaks on children s on-task behaviour, academic achievement and cognition', Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics, 109 158-165 (2020) [C1]

Aim: This study examined the effects of different types of classroom physical activity breaks on children¿s on-task behaviour, academic achievement and cognition. Methods: Partici... [more]

Aim: This study examined the effects of different types of classroom physical activity breaks on children¿s on-task behaviour, academic achievement and cognition. Methods: Participants were 87 Australian primary school students (mean age 9.11¿±¿0.62¿years), recruited from one school. Three classes were randomly assigned either to activity breaks only (n¿=¿29), activity breaks and mathematics combined (n¿=¿29), or control conditions involving only mathematical content (n¿=¿29). Students were engaged in five minutes of classroom physical activity breaks, three times per week, for four weeks (divided into two minutes at the beginning of the usual mathematics curriculum lesson and three minutes in the middle of the lesson). Assessments were conducted at baseline and post-test. Results: Significant group-by-time effects were found for on-task behaviour (active engagement: activity breaks and mathematics combined versus control, p¿=¿0.001; activity breaks versus control, p¿=¿0.001; activity breaks and mathematics combined versus activity breaks, p¿=¿0.037; passive engagement: activity breaks and mathematics combined versus control, p¿=¿0.001) and mathematics scores (activity breaks versus control, p¿=¿0.045). Conclusion: Physical activity breaks with and without integrated mathematics content were effective in improving children¿s on-task behaviour and learning scores.

DOI 10.1111/apa.14892
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 22
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Ryan Drew
2020 Mavilidi MF, Ouwehand K, Riley N, Chandler P, Paas F, 'Effects of an acute physical activity break on test anxiety and math test performance', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 (2020) [C1]

(1) Background: Test anxiety has been found to negatively affect students¿ mental health and academic performance. A primary explanation for this is that anxiety-related thoughts ... [more]

(1) Background: Test anxiety has been found to negatively affect students¿ mental health and academic performance. A primary explanation for this is that anxiety-related thoughts occupy working memory resources during testing that cannot be used for test-related processes (such as information retrieval and problem-solving). The present intervention study investigated whether physical activity could decrease anxiety levels and improve maths test performance in sixth-grade children. (2) Methods: Sixty-eight children of 11¿12 years from two primary schools in New South Wales, Australia were categorised as low or high anxious from their scores on a trait-anxiety questionnaire. After this assessment, they were randomly assigned to the activity break condition, in which they had to do several physical activities of moderate intensity (i.e., star jumps) for 10 min, or the control condition, in which they played a vocabulary game for 10 min. The outcome measures were children¿s anxiety levels at the beginning, during, and at the end of the test, invested mental effort, perceived task difficulty and maths test performance. (3) Results: Results showed that regardless of the condition, low anxious students performed better on the maths test than high anxious children. No differences were found for any of the variables between the activity break condition and the control condition. (4) Conclusions: Although test anxiety was not reduced as expected, this study showed that short physical activity breaks can be used before examinations without impeding academic performance.

DOI 10.3390/ijerph17051523
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2020 de Vlieger N, van Rossum J, Riley N, Miller A, Collins C, Bucher T, 'Nutrition Education in the Australian New South Wales Primary School Curriculum: Knowledge and Attitudes of Students and Parents.', Children, 7 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/children7040024
Citations Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Clare Collins, Nienke Devlieger, Tamara Bucher, Andrew Miller
2019 Mavilidi MF, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Miller A, Eather N, Karayanidis F, et al., 'Integrating physical activity into the primary school curriculum: rationale and study protocol for the "Thinking while Moving in English" cluster randomized controlled trial', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 19 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-019-6635-2
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Andrew Miller, Narelle Eather, Philip Morgan, Frini Karayanidis, Kylie Shaw, David Lubans
2019 Eather N, Riley N, Miller A, Imig S, 'Evaluating the Impact of Two Dialogical Feedback Methods for Improving Pre-Service Teacher's Perceived Confidence and Competence to Teach Physical Education Within Authentic Learning Environments', Journal of Education and Training Studies, 7 32-46 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.11114/jets.v7i8.4053
Co-authors Narelle Eather, Scott Imig, Andrew Miller
2019 Smith JJ, Eather N, Weaver RG, Riley N, Beets MW, Lubans DR, 'Behavioral Correlates of Muscular Fitness in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review', SPORTS MEDICINE, 49 887-904 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s40279-019-01089-7
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Narelle Eather, Jordan Smith, David Lubans
2019 Eather N, Riley N, Miller A, Smith V, Poole A, Vincze L, et al., 'Efficacy and feasibility of HIIT training for university students: The Uni-HIIT RCT', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 22 596-601 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2018.11.016
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans, Andrew Miller, Narelle Eather
2019 de Vlieger N, Riley N, Miller A, Collins CE, Bucher T, 'Nutrition education in the Australian New South Wales primary school curriculum: An exploration of time allocation, translation and attitudes in a sample of teachers', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 30 94-101 (2019) [C1]

Issue addressed: The dietary intakes of Australian children are not optimal, with few meeting recommended vegetable and fruit intake targets. Nutrition education in childhood is i... [more]

Issue addressed: The dietary intakes of Australian children are not optimal, with few meeting recommended vegetable and fruit intake targets. Nutrition education in childhood is important for developing healthy eating patterns, with schools an ideal setting for a wide reach. The aims of this study were to examine nutrition education within the NSW primary school syllabus, explore how much time teachers spend teaching nutrition, what is taught, what materials are used, and to identify attitudes towards nutrition education. Method: An online survey consisting of 29 closed questions (with options for comments) was specifically developed for the purpose of this study. Teachers currently teaching at a NSW primary school were eligible to participate. Results: A total of 33 NSW primary school teachers completed the survey. Results indicate that limited time is spent on teaching nutrition with some important nutrition education components currently missed, resources perceived to be inadequate and lack of time reported as the largest barrier to teaching nutrition. Conclusion: In order to improve the quality of nutrition education in NSW primary schools, several important topics need to be integrated into the curriculum, and time constraints of teachers should be taken into account. So what?: Findings from the current survey will inform the development of future nutrition education programs and resources with the aim of integrating nutrition education within the primary school curriculum.

DOI 10.1002/hpja.188
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Clare Collins, Andrew Miller, Tamara Bucher, Nienke Devlieger
2018 Mavilidi MF, Lubans DR, Eather N, Morgan PJ, Riley N, 'Preliminary Efficacy and Feasibility of the "Thinking While Moving in English": A Program with Integrated Physical Activity into the Primary School English Lessons.', Children (Basel, Switzerland), 5 1-13 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/children5080109
Citations Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Narelle Eather, David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2017 Riley N, Lubans D, Holmes K, Gore JM, Hansen V, Morgan P, 'Movement-based mathematics: Enjoyment and engagement without compromising learning through the EASY Minds program', Eurasia Journal of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education, 13 1653-1673 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.12973/eurasia.2017.00690a
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 22
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Jenny Gore
2017 Eather N, Riley N, Miller D, Jones B, 'Evaluating the effectiveness of using peer-dialogue assessment (PDA) for improving pre-service teachers' perceived confidence and competence to teach physical education', Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 42 69-83 (2017) [C1]

Developing effective methods for improving student learning in higher education is a priority. Recent findings have shown that feedback on student work can effectively facilitate ... [more]

Developing effective methods for improving student learning in higher education is a priority. Recent findings have shown that feedback on student work can effectively facilitate learning if students are engaged as active participants in the feedback cycle, where they seek, generate and use feedback in the form of dialogue. This novel study investigates the use of peer dialogue assessment as an assessment for learning tool used in an existing undergraduate physical education course. Our findings demonstrate that when thirty six undergraduate physical education students were provided with instruction and practice using peer dialogue assessment after consecutive teaching performances, they exhibit significant improvements in perceived teaching confidence and competence, and teaching self-efficacy. Process evaluation results implying thatembedding peer dialogue assessment in higher education courses may be a feasible approach for facilitating learning, and that students were satisfied with using peer dialogue as a feedback method for improving teaching practices.

DOI 10.14221/ajte.2017v42n1.5
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Andrew Miller, Narelle Eather
2016 Riley N, Lubans DR, Holmes K, Morgan PJ, 'Findings from the EASY minds cluster randomized controlled trial: Evaluation of a physical activity integration program for mathematics in primary schools', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 13 198-206 (2016) [C1]

To evaluate the impact of a primary school-based physical activity (PA) integration program delivered by teachers on objectively measured PA and key educational outcomes. Methods:... [more]

To evaluate the impact of a primary school-based physical activity (PA) integration program delivered by teachers on objectively measured PA and key educational outcomes. Methods: Ten classes from 8 Australian public schools were randomly allocated to treatment conditions. Teachers from the intervention group were taught to embed movement-based learning in their students' (n = 142) daily mathematics program in 3 lessons per week for 6 weeks. The control group (n = 98) continued its regular mathematics program. The primary outcome was accelerometer-determined PA across the school day. Linear mixed models were used to analyze treatment effects. Results: Significant intervention effects were found for PA across the school day (adjusted mean difference 103 counts per minute [CPM], 95% confidence interval [CI], 36.5-169.7, P =.008). Intervention effects were also found for PA (168 CPM, 95% CI, 90.1-247.4, P =.008) and moderate-to-vigorous PA (2.6%, 95% CI, 0.9-4.4, P =.009) in mathematics lessons, sedentary time across the school day (-3.5%, 95% CI,-7.0 to-0.13, P =.044) and during mathematics (-8.2%, CI,-13.0 to-2.0, P =.010) and on-task behavior (13.8%, 95% CI, 4.0-23.6, P =.011)-but not for mathematics performance or attitude. Conclusion: Integrating movement across the primary mathematics syllabus is feasible and efficacious.

DOI 10.1123/jpah.2015-0046
Citations Scopus - 64Web of Science - 61
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2015 Riley N, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Young M, 'Outcomes and process evaluation of a programme integrating physical activity into the primary school mathematics curriculum: The EASY Minds pilot randomised controlled trial', JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND MEDICINE IN SPORT, 18 656-661 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2014.09.005
Citations Scopus - 52Web of Science - 48
Co-authors David Lubans, Myles Young, Philip Morgan
2014 Riley N, Lubans DR, Holmes K, Morgan PJ, 'Rationale and study protocol of the EASY Minds (Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young Minds) program: cluster randomized controlled trial of a primary school-based physical activity integration program for mathematics.', BMC Public Health, 14 816 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-816
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2011 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Eather N, Riley N, Smith CJ, 'Test-retest reliability of a battery of field-based health-related fitness measures for adolescents', Journal of Sports Sciences, 29 685-693 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2010.551215
Citations Scopus - 57Web of Science - 48
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Robin Callister, Narelle Eather
Burt LD, Riley N, Parkes RJ, Eather N, 'The Kick-Smart Program: A Randomised Feasibility Trial Evaluating the Feasibility and Efficacy of a Primary-School Based Martial Arts Program Integrating Mathematics, Physical Fitness and Well-Being', Journal of Education and Training Studies, 9 47-47
DOI 10.11114/jets.v9i3.5142
Co-authors Narelle Eather
Show 18 more journal articles

Conference (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 De Vlieger N, Riley N, Miller A, Collins C, Bucher T, 'Development and Reliability Testing of a Nutrition Knowledge Questionnaire for Australian Children (CNK-AU)', SNEB.org (2020)
Co-authors Nienke Devlieger, Clare Collins, Tamara Bucher
2012 Riley N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Preliminary findings of the E.A.S.Y. (Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young) Minds feasibility study: A curriculum-based physical activity integration program in the primary school', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2011 Riley N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Methodology of the E.A.S.Y. (Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young) minds study: evaluation of a curriculum-based physical activity integration program in the primary school', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2010 Riley N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Rationale and intervention description of a primary school-based program to integrate physical activity across the curriculum and engage children in movement-based learning', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2009 Riley N, 'Rationale and intervention description of a primary school-based program to integrate physical activity across the curriculum and engage parents in movement-based learning at home', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
Show 2 more conferences
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 19
Total funding $897,806

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20215 grants / $147,263

2021 College matching funding for UON PRC scheme - Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition$100,000

Funding body: College of Human and Social Futures, University of Newcastle

Funding body College of Human and Social Futures, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Professor Ron Plotnikoff (Director); A/Professor Narelle Eather; Professor David Lubans; Professor Philip Morgan (Deputy Director); Dr Nick Riley

Scheme 2021 College matching funding for UON PRC scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Best Start- creation of an APP to measure Fundamental movement Skills$22,863

Funding body: NSW Department of Education

Funding body NSW Department of Education
Project Team Doctor Nick Riley, Mr Andrew Lyell, Professor David Lubans, Associate Professor Narelle Eather
Scheme NSW School Support Unit
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G2100296
Type Of Funding C2400 – Aust StateTerritoryLocal – Other
Category 2400
UON Y

Thinking While Moving- Dissemination and creation of online learning Modules$12,000

Funding body: NSW Department of Education

Funding body NSW Department of Education
Project Team Doctor Nick Riley, Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme NSW School Support Unit
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G2100715
Type Of Funding C2400 – Aust StateTerritoryLocal – Other
Category 2400
UON Y

Muscle Movers$10,000

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Doctor Jordan Smith, Associate Professor Narelle Eather, Doctor Nick Riley, Miss Sarah Kennedy, Professor David Lubans
Scheme Active Australia Innovation Challenge
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G2001469
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON Y

Research Output Scheme Funding$2,400

Funding body: College of Human and Social Futures, University of Newcastle

Funding body College of Human and Social Futures, University of Newcastle
Scheme 2021 CHSF Research Output Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20202 grants / $102,441

2020 Faculty matching funding for UON PRC Scheme - Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition$100,000

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Prof Ron Plotnikoff (Director); Prof Philip Morgan (Co-Deputy Director); Dr Alyce Barnes; Dr Narelle Eather; Prof David Lubans; Dr Nick Riley; Dr Jordan Smith.

Scheme 2020 Faculty matching funding for UON PRC scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

PRCPAN “Research Booster” scheme.$2,441

Funding body: PRCPAN

Funding body PRCPAN
Project Team

Nicholas Riley

Scheme PRCPAN
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20193 grants / $145,750

Faculty matching funding for UON PRC Scheme - Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition$100,000

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Professor Ron Plotnikoff (Director); Professor Philip Morgan (Co-Deputy Director); Dr Alyce Barnes; Dr Narelle Eather; Professor David Lubans; Dr Nick Riley; Dr Jordan Smith; Dr Myles Young.

Scheme Faculty funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Project Title Investigating the impact of cognitively demanding physical activity breaks on adolescents’ cognition, brain structure and function$23,750

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Nick Riley, Doctor Myrto Mavilidi, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Sarah Valkenborghs, Doctor Daniel Barker, Professor Charles Hillman, Assistant Professor Mirko Schmidt
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1901494
Type Of Funding C3300 – Aust Philanthropy
Category 3300
UON Y

Project Title EMU (Education, Movement and Understanding): A community-based Indigenous games program targeting health and well-being, literacy and cultural appreciation in children and their families$22,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Narelle Eather, Doctor Nick Riley, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor John Maynard, Dr Andrew Bennie
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1901487
Type Of Funding C3300 – Aust Philanthropy
Category 3300
UON Y

20183 grants / $148,364

Faculty matching funding for UON PRC Scheme - Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition$100,000

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Professor David Lubans; Professor Phil Morgan (Co-Deputy Director); Professor Ron Plotnikoff (Director); Dr Alyce Barnes; Dr Narelle Eather; Dr Nick Riley; Dr Jordan Smith; Dr Myles Young.

Scheme Faculty funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Evaluation and dissemination of TWM using the RE-AIM framework$46,364

Funding body: NSW Department of Education

Funding body NSW Department of Education
Project Team Doctor Nick Riley, Doctor Myrto Mavilidi, Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme NSW School Support Unit
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1800815
Type Of Funding C2400 – Aust StateTerritoryLocal – Other
Category 2400
UON Y

AISEP World Congress, Edinburgh, 25-28 July 2018$2,000

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Scheme FEDUA Conference Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20174 grants / $229,420

Thinking while Moving in English: a curriculum based physical activity intervention to enhance learning and health outcomes in primary school$200,000

Funding body: NSW Department of Education

Funding body NSW Department of Education
Project Team Doctor Nick Riley, Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan, Associate Professor Narelle Eather, Professor Kylie Shaw, A/Prof Chris Lonsdale
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1700722
Type Of Funding C2300 – Aust StateTerritoryLocal – Own Purpose
Category 2300
UON Y

Evaluating the effectiveness of using Peer-Dialogue Assessment (PDA) for improving teacher confidence and competence within undergraduate Master's teacher education programs$14,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team

Dr Narelle Eather; Dr Nicholas Riley; Dr Scott Imig

Scheme FEDUA Strategic Networks and Pilot Projects (SNaPP)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

HMRI Equipment Grant$8,820

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Associate Professor Narelle Eather, Doctor Jordan Smith, Doctor Nick Riley, Doctor Drew Miller
Scheme Medical Research Support Program (MRSP)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701226
Type Of Funding C2400 – Aust StateTerritoryLocal – Other
Category 2400
UON Y

The Physical Literacy Program - evaluation of student outcomes$6,600

Funding body: International Football School

Funding body International Football School
Project Team Doctor Drew Miller, Associate Professor Narelle Eather, Doctor Nick Riley
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2028
GNo G1700833
Type Of Funding C3100 – Aust For Profit
Category 3100
UON Y

20161 grants / $70,000

Thinking while Moving (EASY Minds)$70,000

Funding body: Department of Education

Funding body Department of Education
Project Team Doctor Nick Riley, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans
Scheme NSW School Support Unit
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600482
Type Of Funding C2200 - Aust Commonwealth – Other
Category 2200
UON Y

20121 grants / $54,568

Thinking while moving: Development of a curriculum-based physical activity integration program in the primary school$54,568

Funding body: NSW Department of Education and Communities

Funding body NSW Department of Education and Communities
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Nick Riley, Associate Professor Kathryn Holmes
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1201201
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed4
Current5

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2021 Masters Is the Balance Right? A Critical Analysis of How 'Soft Skills' and Emotional Competencies Present in Initial Teacher Education Programs in Order to Prepare Classroom Ready and Life Ready Teacher Education Students Upon Graduation M Philosophy (Education), College of Human and Social Futures, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2021 Honours The feasibility of time efficient muscular strengthening curriculum breaks on adolescents muscular fitness and on task behaviour Education, School of Education, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2020 Masters Comparing the Utility and Effectiveness of Three Distinct Pedagogical Approaches for Developing Fundamental Movement Skills (FMS) In Children; Bothmer Gymnastics, Linear, and a Games Centred Approach (GCA) for Fundamental Movement Skill Acquisition and Improving Cognitive Outcomes in Children M Philosophy (Education), College of Human and Social Futures, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2019 PhD Investigating the Impact of Cognitively Demanding Physical Activity Breaks in Secondary School Mathematics Lessons: An Efficacy and Feasibility Trial PhD (Education), College of Human and Social Futures, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD An Investigation into the Teaching & Learning of Martial Arts PhD (Education), College of Human and Social Futures, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 PhD Nutrition Education and Assessment Methods for Children: an Investigation of Methods, Current Nutrition Education Practices and Opportunities in Australian Primary Schools PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 Honours Examining the Effects of Integrating Physical Activity into English Lessons in the ‘Thinking While Moving in English’ Study on On-Task Behaviour and Academic Achievement Education, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle, Australia Co-Supervisor
2018 Honours Thinking While Moving in English: a school-based physical activity intervention to enhance learning and health outcomes in the primary school Education, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle, Australia Co-Supervisor
2017 Honours Uni-HIIT: Evaluating the impact of High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) on the physical fitness, cognitive function and psychological health of young adults’ in university settings Education, University of Newcastle Faculty of Education and Arts Co-Supervisor
Edit

Dr Nick Riley

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Education
College of Human and Social Futures

Focus area

Education

Contact Details

Email nicholas.riley@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4985 4254
Fax (02) 4985 4254

Office

Room HPE311
Edit