Dr Tamara Bucher

Dr Tamara Bucher

Senior Lecturer

School of Health Sciences

Nutritional knowledge and food choices

Dr Tamara Bucher started her professional research career as a biochemist – she has a BSc, and MSc and a Nature publication under her belt to prove it. But her interest in the way that chemicals interact with human bodies began to evolve when she made an important realisation.

“At one point, I figured that the food we eat had the biggest impact on your system and your health. So I became more and more interested in nutrition rather than medication.”

Tamara took this fascination with her back to ETH (the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology – or Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule) to study for a Master of Advanced Studies in Human Nutrition and Health.

“I learned all about health and healthy eating and what you should do, but often the problem isn’t knowing what to do. Even if you want to make healthy choices, you still need the support and infrastructure to make it easier.”

Having been inspired by a lecture on Consumer Behaviour given by Professor Michael Siegrist, Tamara commenced her PhD under his supervision in an effort to answer some of her questions about healthy behaviour.

“I got really interested in the psychology of eating and the psychology of food choice.”

However, what Professor Siegrist’s research group really needed was a method to answer these questions, in particular ones regarding meal composition and how people made their meals.

Hailing from a laboratory background, Tamara struggled to conceptualise such a complex experiment with few enough variables to be scientifically reliable. Food choices can be influenced by a huge number of factors, including environment, peers and even the weather.

“I was worried about all of these uncontrollable influences!”

Tamara worked tirelessly to construct a method, which was reproducible, inexpensive and streamlined. Although other researchers had used real food canteens in their studies, these types of experiments can be expensive and time consuming. In addition, they could only be carried out by institutions which already had canteens as a resource. She also thought about developing online resources, but she was concerned that clicking images would not be realistic enough for the participants to make genuine choices relating to food.

“Then I Googled, ‘food props’.”

Döring Lebensmittel Attrappen are a German company who specialise in realistic fake food for use in shop window displays. Their products also facilitated Tamara’s PhD project.

In order to assess consumer behaviour, Tamara built a ‘fake food’ buffet with these German props, along with an accompanying nutritional database. Experiment participants could construct meals according to their experimental instructions. This technique has been validated as being reflective of real consumer choices, by repeating the same conditions and choices using real food versions of the props.

This method is now used by a number of international research institutions researching nutrition and consumer behaviour, including ETH as well as the University of Cologne, Queen’s University, the University of Konstanz, and, of course, the University of Newcastle.

Tamara came to the University of Newcastle after meeting Professor Clare Collins at the International Society of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity Conference in Belgium. After presenting the results of her PhD project, Tamara got talking to Clare and became intrigued by her ‘healthy eating’ research.

“She (Professor Clare Collins) is an inspiring researcher. I gave her my thesis and said, ‘Can I come?!’”

Tamara successfully applied for a Swiss National Science Foundation grant to study the impact of nutrition knowledge on food choice, and she was able to relocate from Zurich to Newcastle.

International standards of food

Researching food habits across so many different countries led Tamara and her research team to become increasingly frustrated with the lack of international standardisation of food measurement. When it comes to teaching how to construct meals, portioning is very important. While healthy eating guidelines are often given in ‘cups’, this term is not a generic one.

“In the UK alone they have two different ‘cup’ measurements!”

As a result of these frustrations, Tamara and a number of international collaborators from the UK, the USA and Switzerland are working to establish a Universal Food Volume measurement.

What's cooking?

Tamara is currently working on a new survey aiming to determine how handy Australian cooks are in the kitchen. It’s part of an international research collaboration aiming to assess which country has the best cooking skills and how this influences healthy eating.

The survey will assess basic proficiency levels of chopping, stirring and mixing – rather than exploring cultural differences.

“We’re putting the focus back on cooking skills to see how closely it relates to healthier eating choices and dietary knowledge,” Tamara explains.

“There’re so many influences (on healthy eating). It’s not just knowing what to eat – it’s a very complex process.”

Tamara Bucher

Nutritional knowledge and food choices

Dr Tamara Bucher is a researcher within the School of Health Sciences, UON.

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Career Summary

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Science, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology - Zurich
  • Bachelor of Science (Human Biology), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology - Zurich
  • Master of Science (Biology), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology - Zurich
  • Master of Adv Studies - Human Nutrition & Health, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology - Zurich

Keywords

  • Consumer Behavior
  • Food
  • Health perception
  • Nudging
  • Nutrient profiling
  • Nutrition
  • Snacking

Languages

  • German (Mother)
  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified 60
170110 Psychological Methodology, Design and Analysis 20
130306 Educational Technology and Computing 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/11/2014 -  Post-Doctoral Research Fellow The University of Newcastle, NSW
Australia
13/01/2013 - 20/11/2014 Post-Doctoral Research Fellow and Lecturer ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich)
Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health
Switzerland
1/07/2011 - 31/07/2011 Statistics Summer School Essex Summer School in Social Science Data Analysis
United Kingdom
1/02/2010 - 13/01/2013 PhD Student and Teaching Assistant ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich)
Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health
Switzerland
20/09/2008 - 20/12/2009 Master of Advanced Studies (MAS) in Human Nutrition and Health

Post graduate studies

ETH Zurich
Department of Health Sciences and Technology
Switzerland
1/05/2008 - 31/07/2008 Research Assistant ETH Zurich
Department of Biology, Institute of Biochemistry
Switzerland
1/04/2007 - 1/04/2008 Master in Biology ETH Zurich
Department of Biology, Institute of Biochemistry
Switzerland
1/10/2003 - 1/04/2007 Bachelor in Biology ETH Zurich
Department of Biology, Institute of Biochemistry
Switzerland

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/11/2008 - 1/07/2013 Project Associate SimplyScience Foundation
Switzerland
1/07/2008 - 31/08/2008 IAESTE Student Internship

IASESTE Student Internship

Swansea University
Center of Sustainable Aquaculture and Research
United Kingdom

Awards

Award

Year Award
2013 Nutrition Society Paper of the Month November 2013
The Nutrition Society

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
752-2122-00L Food and Consumer Behaviour
ETH Zürich
AbstractThis course focuses on food consumer behavior, consumer's decision-making processes and consumer's attitudes towards food products.
ObjectiveThe course provides an overview about the following topics: Factors influencing consumer's food choice, food and health, attitudes towards new foods and food technologies, labeling and food policy issues
Senior Lecturer 17/01/2013 - 31/12/2014
701-0729-00L Methoden der empirischen Sozialforschung
ETH Zurich
KurzbeschreibungZiel dieser Veranstaltung ist es, die methodischen Grundprinzipien sozialwissenschaftlicher Forschung zu vermitteln und somit zu einer kritischen Reflexion von wissenschaftlicher Erkenntnisproduktion anzuregen. Die Veranstaltung gibt einen Einblick in die sozialwissenschaftlicher Forschung, die konkrete Vorgehensweise, die Methoden und Konzepte vor allem der Fragebogenforschung.
LernzielDie Studierenden können
- die Bedeutung von methodengestütztem Vorgehen in der Sozialwissenschaft beschreiben.
- Grundprinzipien sozialwissenschaftlichen Forschens erklären.
- Resultate sozialwissenschaftlicher Forschung kritisch lesen.
- wissenschaftliche Literatur suchen.
- kleinere Fragebogenerhebungen selbst durchführen.
InhaltAlle Teilnehmenden verpflichten sich zur aktiven Mitarbeit in Form von Übungen (Literatursuche, Erstellung von Fragebogen, Auswertung von Daten).
Inhaltsübersicht:
(1) Wozu empirische (Sozial-)Forschung?
(2) Der Forschungsablauf im Überblick
(3) Forschung planen (Fragestellung – Hypothesen – Design)
(4) Daten erheben (Fragebogenerstellung – Stichprobe – Durchführung)
(5) Daten auswerten (Datenkontrolle – Deskription)
(6) Erhaltene Resultate präsentieren (Grafiken – Tabellen)
SkriptDie Dozenten arbeiten mit Folien, die als Handout abgegeben werden.
LiteraturZur ergänzenden Begleitlektüre kann folgendes Buch empfohlen werden:
Schutt, R.K. (2006). Investigating the Social World: The Process and Practice of Research, 5th ed. Pine Forge Press: Thousand Oaks, CA
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesFor English speaking MSc students, a special program is offered. Please contact Michael Stauffacher directly (michael.stauffacher@env.ethz.ch)
Senior Lecturer 1/01/2014 - 30/06/2014
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (30 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Mötteli S, Barbey J, Keller C, Bucher T, Siegrist M, 'Development and Validation of a Brief Instrument to Measure Knowledge About the Energy Content of Meals', Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 49 257-263.e1 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior Objective To develop and validate a brief scale to assess knowledge about the energy content of meals for adults in Switzerlan... [more]

© 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior Objective To develop and validate a brief scale to assess knowledge about the energy content of meals for adults in Switzerland. Methods Based on a random sample, the scale was developed using a Rasch model approach. To assess validity and reliability, the model was replicated and scores were compared with another nutrition knowledge measure and with dietitian trainees¿ scores. A test-retest was performed. Results Survey studies included 477, 505, and 136 participants from the general population and 59 dietician trainees. The Rasch scale consisted of 11 multiple-choice items ranging from easy to difficult and correlated with general nutrition knowledge (r¿=¿.47; P¿ < ¿.001; r 2 ¿=¿.22). Dietitian trainees achieved higher scores (P¿ < ¿.001; d¿=¿2.17) than did people from the general population; test-retest reliability results were r¿=¿.73, P¿ < ¿.001, and r 2 ¿=¿.53. Conclusions and Implications Results showed that the scale is efficient, valid, and reliable for use in the general population in Switzerland.

DOI 10.1016/j.jneb.2016.12.002
Citations Scopus - 3
2017 Bucher T, Weltert M, Rollo ME, Smith SP, Jia W, Collins CE, Sun M, 'The international food unit: A new measurement aid that can improve portion size estimation', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 14 1-11 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0583-y
Co-authors Clare Collins, Shamus Smith, Megan Rollo
2017 De Vlieger NM, Collins C, Bucher T, 'What is a nutritious snack? Level of processing and macronutrient content influences young adults' perceptions', Appetite, 114 55-63 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2017.03.021
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nienke Devlieger Uon, Clare Collins
2017 Dohle S, Bucher T, 'Whether people believe that overweight is unhealthy depends on their BMI', European Journal of Public Health, 27 781-783 (2017) [C1]

© The Author 2016. An online experiment with 536 participants was conducted to investigate how people who differ in body weight perceive scientific information on body weight and... [more]

© The Author 2016. An online experiment with 536 participants was conducted to investigate how people who differ in body weight perceive scientific information on body weight and mortality. The results showed that individuals who were aware that they are overweight were more inclined to trust a study that showed that overweight reduces mortality (P < 0.001). This finding is relevant as the BMI-mortality association remains a matter of scientific and public debate and people's risk perceptions influences their willingness to change behaviour.

DOI 10.1093/eurpub/ckx042
2017 van der Bend D, Bucher T, Schumacher TL, Collins K, de Vlieger N, Rollo M, et al., 'Trends in Food and Beverage Portion Sizes in Australian Children; a Time-Series Analysis Comparing 2007 and 2011-2012 National Data', Children, 4 1-9 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/children4080069
Co-authors Nienke Devlieger Uon, Megan Rollo, Tracy Burrows, Tracy Schumacher, Clare Collins
2017 Bucher T, Hartmann C, Rollo ME, Collins CE, 'What is nutritious snack food? A comparison of expert and layperson assessments', Nutrients, 9 1-14 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu9080874
Co-authors Clare Collins, Megan Rollo
2017 Rollo ME, Bucher T, Smith SP, Collins CE, 'ServAR: An augmented reality tool to guide the serving of food', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 14 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0516-9
Co-authors Clare Collins, Megan Rollo, Shamus Smith
2016 Mötteli S, Barbey J, Keller C, Bucher T, Siegrist M, 'Measuring practical knowledge about balanced meals: Development and validation of the brief PKB-7 scale', European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 70 505-510 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Macmillan Publishers Limited. Background/Objectives:As a high-quality diet is associated with a lower risk for several diseases and all-cause mortality, current nutrition ... [more]

© 2016 Macmillan Publishers Limited. Background/Objectives:As a high-quality diet is associated with a lower risk for several diseases and all-cause mortality, current nutrition education tools provide people with information regarding how to build a healthy and a balanced meal. To assess this basic nutrition knowledge, the research aim was to develop and validate a brief scale to measure the Practical Knowledge about Balanced meals (PKB-7).Subjects/Methods:A pool of 25 items was pretested with experts and laypeople before being tested on a random sample in Switzerland (n=517). For item selection, a Rasch model analysis was applied. The validity and reliability of the new scale were assessed by three additional studies including laypeople (n=597; n=145) and nutrition experts (n=59).Results:The final scale consists of seven multiple-choice items, which met the assumptions of the Rasch model. The validity of the new scale was shown by several aspects: the Rasch model was replicated in a second study, and nutrition experts achieved significantly higher scores than laypeople (t(148)=20.27, P < 0.001, d=1.78). In addition, the PKB-7 scale was correlated with other nutrition-related constructs and associated with reported vegetable consumption. Test-retest reliability (r=0.68, P < 0.001) was acceptable.Conclusions:The PKB-7 scale is a reliable and a valid Rasch-based instrument in Swiss citizens aged between 18 and 80 years for measuring the practical knowledge about balanced meals based on current dietary guidelines. This brief and easy-to-use scale is intended for application in both research and practice.

DOI 10.1038/ejcn.2015.173
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2016 Bucher T, Collins C, Rollo ME, McCaffrey TA, De Vlieger N, Van Der Bend D, et al., 'Nudging consumers towards healthier choices: A systematic review of positional influences on food choice', British Journal of Nutrition, 115 2252-2263 (2016) [C1]

© The Authors 2016. Nudging or &apos;choice architecture&apos; refers to strategic changes in the environment that are anticipated to alter people&apos;s behaviour in a predictab... [more]

© The Authors 2016. Nudging or 'choice architecture' refers to strategic changes in the environment that are anticipated to alter people's behaviour in a predictable way, without forbidding any options or significantly changing their economic incentives. Nudging strategies may be used to promote healthy eating behaviour. However, to date, the scientific evidence has not been systematically reviewed to enable practitioners and policymakers to implement, or argue for the implementation of, specific measures to support nudging strategies. This systematic review investigated the effect of positional changes of food placement on food choice. In total, seven scientific databases were searched using relevant keywords to identify interventions that manipulated food position (proximity or order) to generate a change in food selection, sales or consumption, among normal-weight or overweight individuals across any age group. From 2576 identified articles, fifteen articles comprising eighteen studies met our inclusion criteria. This review has identified that manipulation of food product order or proximity can influence food choice. Such approaches offer promise in terms of impacting on consumer behaviour. However, there is a need for high-quality studies that quantify the magnitude of positional effects on food choice in conjunction with measuring the impact on food intake, particularly in the longer term. Future studies should use outcome measures such as change in grams of food consumed or energy intake to quantify the impact on dietary intake and potential impacts on nutrition-related health. Research is also needed to evaluate potential compensatory behaviours secondary to such interventions.

DOI 10.1017/S0007114516001653
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Nienke Devlieger Uon, Clare Collins, Megan Rollo
2016 Bucher T, Rollo ME, Smith SP, Dean M, Brown H, Sun M, Collins C, 'Position paper on the need for portion-size education and a standardised unit of measurement', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/HE15137
Co-authors Hannah M Brown Uon, Megan Rollo, Shamus Smith, Clare Collins
2016 Mötteli S, Keller C, Siegrist M, Barbey J, Bucher T, 'Consumers' practical understanding of healthy food choices: A fake food experiment', British Journal of Nutrition, 116 559-566 (2016) [C1]

Copyright © The Authors 2016. Little is known about laypeople&apos;s practical understanding of a healthy diet, although this is important to successfully promote healthy eating.... [more]

Copyright © The Authors 2016. Little is known about laypeople's practical understanding of a healthy diet, although this is important to successfully promote healthy eating. The present study is the first to experimentally examine how consumers define healthy and balanced food choices for an entire day compared with normal choices and compared with dietary guidelines. We used an extensive fake food buffet (FFB) with 179 foods commonly consumed in the Swiss diet. The FFB is a validated method to investigate food choice behaviour in a well-controlled laboratory setting. People from the general population in Switzerland (n 187; 51·9 % females), aged between 18 and 65 years, were randomly assigned to one of two conditions. In the control group, the participants were instructed to serve themselves foods they would eat on a normal day, whereas in the 'healthy' group they were instructed to choose foods representing a healthy diet. Participants chose significantly more healthy foods, with 4·5 g more dietary fibre, 2 % more protein and 2 % less SFA in the 'healthy' group compared with the control group. However, in both experimental conditions, participants served themselves foods containing twice as much sugar and salt than recommended by dietary guidelines. The results suggest that laypeople lack knowledge about the recommended portion sizes and the amounts of critical nutrients in processed food, which has important implications for communicating dietary guidelines. Furthermore, the energy of the food served was substantially correlated with the energy needs of the participants, demonstrating the potential of the fake food buffet method.

DOI 10.1017/S0007114516002130
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
2016 Bucher T, Collins C, Diem S, Siegrist M, 'Adolescents' perception of the healthiness of snacks', Food Quality and Preference, 50 94-101 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Changes in snacking habits in developed countries are a growing cause for concern, since foods and beverages commonly consumed as snacks, tend to be both ene... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Changes in snacking habits in developed countries are a growing cause for concern, since foods and beverages commonly consumed as snacks, tend to be both energy dense and nutrient poor. Adolescents are characterised by frequent snack consumption. Therefore, promoting more healthful snack choices to adolescents is important for optimising nutrient intake and lowering the risk of chronic disease.The ability to evaluate the healthiness of snacks is essential to making healthy choices. Previous research has shown that health claims can influence consumers' perceptions of food products. However, little is yet known about consumers' perceptions of how nutritious or healthy specific foods or beverages are. This knowledge is important for planning successful interventions and designing healthy snacks that will also appeal to population groups with a higher dietary risk, including adolescents.The aim was to investigate how adolescents evaluate the healthiness of snacks currently available for consumption in school environments. Seventy-five adolescents participated in a sorting task and evaluated the healthiness of 37 representative snacks.The data were analysed using hierarchical multiple regression and cluster analysis. The sugar (ß = -.51, P < .001), fruit (ß = .49, P < .001), total fat (ß = -.41, P = .002) and nut content (ß = .35, P = .002) were significant predictors of snacks' perceived healthiness.The findings of this study are important for tailoring future interventions to promote healthy eating and setting priorities for nutrition education.

DOI 10.1016/j.foodqual.2016.02.001
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Clare Collins
2016 Brown HM, de Vlieger N, Collins C, Bucher T, 'The influence of front-of-pack nutrition information on consumers.', Health Promot J Austr, (2016)
DOI 10.1071/HE16011
Co-authors Hannah M Brown Uon, Clare Collins, Nienke Devlieger Uon
2016 Rollo ME, Williams RL, Burrows T, Kirkpatrick SI, Bucher T, Collins CE, 'What Are They Really Eating? A Review on New Approaches to Dietary Intake Assessment and Validation', Current Nutrition Reports, 5 307-314 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s13668-016-0182-6
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2015 Keller C, Markert F, Bucher T, 'Nudging product choices: The effect of position change on snack bar choice', FOOD QUALITY AND PREFERENCE, 41 41-43 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.foodqual.2014.11.005
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2015 Collins CE, Bucher T, Taylor A, Pezdirc K, Lucas H, Watson J, et al., 'How big is a food portion? A pilot study in Australian families', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 26 83-88 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Australian Health Promotion Association. Issues addressed It is not known whether individuals can accurately estimate the portion size of foods usually consumed relative t... [more]

© 2015 Australian Health Promotion Association. Issues addressed It is not known whether individuals can accurately estimate the portion size of foods usually consumed relative to standard serving sizes in national food selection guides. The aim of the present cross-sectional pilot study was to quantify what adults and children deem a typical portion for a variety of foods and compare these with the serving sizes specified in the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE). Methods Adults and children were independently asked to serve out their typical portion of 10 common foods (rice, pasta, breakfast cereal, chocolate, confectionary, ice cream, meat, vegetables, soft drink and milk). They were also asked to serve what they perceived a small, medium and large portion of each food to be. Each portion was weighed and recorded by an assessor and compared with the standard AGHE serving sizes. Results Twenty-one individuals (nine mothers, one father, 11 children) participated in the study. There was a large degree of variability in portion sizes measured out by both parents and children, with means exceeding the standard AGHE serving size for all items, except for soft drink and milk, where mean portion sizes were less than the AGHE serving size. The greatest mean overestimations were for pasta (155%; mean 116 g; range 94-139g) and chocolate (151%; mean 38 g; range 25-50g), each of which represented approximately 1.5 standard AGHE servings. Conclusion The findings of the present study indicate that there is variability between parents' and children's estimation of typical portion sizes compared with national recommendations. So what? Dietary interventions to improve individuals' dietary patterns should target education regarding portion size.

DOI 10.1071/HE14061
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Tracy Burrows, Kristine Pezdirc, Megan Rollo
2015 Bucher T, Keller C, 'The web-buffet - Development and validation of an online tool to measure food choice', Public Health Nutrition, 18 1950-1959 (2015)
DOI 10.1017/S1368980014002456
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Bucher T, Keller C, 'The web-buffet - Development and validation of an online tool to measure food choice', Public Health Nutrition, 18 1950-1959 (2015)
DOI 10.1017/S1368980014002456
2015 Bucher T, de Vlieger N, Brown H, Collins C, 'Do energy labels influence served portion sizes and meal composition?', ANNALS OF NUTRITION AND METABOLISM, 67 147-147 (2015)
Co-authors Nienke Devlieger Uon, Clare Collins
2015 Motteli S, Barbey J, Keller C, Bucher T, Siegrist M, 'Nutrition knowledge about food energy & behavioral correlates', ANNALS OF NUTRITION AND METABOLISM, 67 224-224 (2015)
2015 Bucher T, Siegrist M, 'Children's and parents' health perception of different soft drinks', BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, 113 526-535 (2015)
DOI 10.1017/S0007114514004073
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
2015 Bucher T, Mueller B, Siegrist M, 'What is healthy food? Objective nutrient profile scores and subjective lay evaluations in comparison', APPETITE, 95 408-414 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2015.08.005
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
2014 Libotte E, Siegrist M, Bucher T, 'The influence of plate size on meal composition. Literature review and experiment', APPETITE, 82 91-96 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2014.07.010
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16
2014 Bucher T, Siegrist M, van der Horst K, 'Vegetable variety: an effective strategy to increase vegetable choice in children', PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION, 17 1232-1236 (2014)
DOI 10.1017/S1368980013002632
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 15
2013 Bucher T, van der Horst K, Siegrist M, 'Fruit for dessert. How people compose healthier meals', APPETITE, 60 74-80 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2012.10.003
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
2012 Bucher T, van der Horst K, Siegrist M, 'The fake food buffet - a new method in nutrition behaviour research', BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, 107 1553-1560 (2012)
DOI 10.1017/S000711451100465X
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18
2011 Bucher T, Van der Horst K, Siegrist M, 'The fake food buffet's examination of the influence of nutrition guidelines on meal composition', ANNALS OF NUTRITION AND METABOLISM, 58 55-55 (2011)
Citations Web of Science - 1
2011 Bucher T, van der Horst K, Siegrist M, 'Improvement of meal composition by vegetable variety', PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION, 14 1357-1363 (2011)
DOI 10.1017/S136898001100067X
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 20
2010 Andersson M, Aeberli I, Wust N, Piacenza AM, Bucher T, Henschen I, et al., 'The Swiss Iodized Salt Program Provides Adequate Iodine for School Children and Pregnant Women, but Weaning Infants Not Receiving Iodine-Containing Complementary Foods as well as Their Mothers Are Iodine Deficient', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY & METABOLISM, 95 5217-5224 (2010)
DOI 10.1210/jc.2010-0975
Citations Scopus - 60Web of Science - 53
2009 Leidel S, Pedrioli PGA, Bucher T, Brost R, Costanzo M, Schmidt A, et al., 'Ubiquitin-related modifier Urm1 acts as a sulphur carrier in thiolation of eukaryotic transfer RNA', NATURE, 458 228-U9 (2009)
DOI 10.1038/nature07643
Citations Scopus - 121Web of Science - 115
Show 27 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Rollo ME, Bucher T, Smith SP, Collins C, 'The effect of an augmented reality aid on error associated with serving food' (2016)
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Shamus Smith, Clare Collins
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 15
Total funding $5,633,832

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


Highlighted grants and funding

Development of a smart phone based augmented reality application for portion size training and snack evaluation$96,000

Funding body: Swiss National Science Foundation

Funding body Swiss National Science Foundation
Scheme Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

20172 grants / $44,062

Scoping review on the perception of serving and portion size labels$36,562

Funding body: Nestec Ltd

Funding body Nestec Ltd
Project Team Doctor Tamara Bucher, Ms Beatrice Murawski
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1701336
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON Y

2018 International Visitor from Jožef Stefan Institute, Slovenia$7,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Tamara Bucher, Professor Barbara Korousic Seljak
Scheme International Research Visiting Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700935
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20162 grants / $31,670

Wraps Unwrapped$21,000

Funding body: Quality Bakers Australia Pty Limited

Funding body Quality Bakers Australia Pty Limited
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Megan Rollo, Associate Professor Tracy Burrows, Doctor Tamara Bucher, Doctor Kris Pezdirc, Doctor Rebecca Williams
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1601145
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Establishing an Australian Fake Food Buffet$10,670

Funding body: The University of Newcastle

Funding body The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Bucher, T., Rollo, M.

Scheme Research Advantage Early Career Researcher Equipment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20155 grants / $5,002,500

RICHFIELDS Research Infrastructure on Consumer Health and Food Intake using E-science with Linked Data Sharing$4,450,000

RICHFIELDS Research Infrastructure on Consumer Health and Food Intake using E-science with Linked Data Sharing

Funding body: European Commission

Funding body European Commission
Scheme Horizon 2020 Programme - INFRADEV Call
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

SafeFood: Do nutrient and health claims have an impact on the perceived healthiness and the amount of foods/meals eaten by adults on the island of Ireland?$430,000

Funding body: SafeFood

Funding body SafeFood
Scheme SafeFood Call
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Development of a smart phone based augmented reality application for portion size training and snack evaluation$96,000

Funding body: Swiss National Science Foundation

Funding body Swiss National Science Foundation
Scheme Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Investigation of adolescents’ and young adults’ food-portion size and health perceptions$25,000

Funding body: Swiss Foundation for Nutrition Research

Funding body Swiss Foundation for Nutrition Research
Scheme Postdoc mobility grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

FENS: Nutrition and health throughout life cycle, Berlin Germany, 20 October 2015$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Tamara Bucher
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501130
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20141 grants / $508,000

How Nutrition Knowledge and the Social and Food Environment Influences People's Food Choices$508,000

Funding body: Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF)

Funding body Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF)
Project Team

M. Siegrist, S. Dohle, T. Bucher, C. Keller

Scheme Project grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20122 grants / $38,800

Swiss Foundation for Nutrition Research PhD grant$35,000


Funding body: Swiss Foundation for Nutrition Research

Funding body Swiss Foundation for Nutrition Research
Project Team

M. Siegrist, K.v.d.Horst, T. Bucher

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

ISBNPA ANNUAL MEETING Austin 23. – 26. Mai 2012$3,800

Funding body: Swiss Academy of Humanities and Social Sciences (SAGW)

Funding body Swiss Academy of Humanities and Social Sciences (SAGW)
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20112 grants / $7,000

ISBNPA: 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity$5,000

Funding body: Walter Hochstrasser Stiftung

Funding body Walter Hochstrasser Stiftung
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

FENS Madrid 26. – 28. Oktober 2011$2,000

Funding body: Walter Hochstrasser Stiftung

Funding body Walter Hochstrasser Stiftung
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20101 grants / $1,800

EFFoST ANNUAL MEETING 10. – 12. November 2010$1,800

Funding body: Walter Hochstrasser Stiftung

Funding body Walter Hochstrasser Stiftung
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed14
Current3

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.73

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Impact of Experiential Nutrition Education Using 3D Food Models and Mobile Technology in Children Aged 10-13 PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Examining the impact of supportive tools including food labels and an augmented reality application on food and nutrition knowledge and portion size selection in pregnant women PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Social networks and food choice Nutrition & Dietetics, ETH Zurich Consultant Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 Masters The relationship between environmental impact and nutritiousness of a meal Nutrition & Dietetics, ETH Zurich Co-Supervisor
2015 Masters Young adults perceptions of snack foods Nutrition & Dietetics, Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition - The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 Honours The Influence of Health and Energy Information on Consumer’s Portion Size Perceptions Nutrition & Dietetics, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 Masters Nudging product choices: The effect of position change on snack bar choice. Nutrition & Dietetics, ETH Zürich Co-Supervisor
2014 Honours The influence of nutrition labels on health perception of beverages. Nutrition & Dietetics, ETH Zurich Principal Supervisor
2014 Honours Investigation of adolescent’s perception of the healthiness and nutritiousness of snacks. Nutrition & Dietetics, ETH Zurich Principal Supervisor
2014 Honours The influence of food temperature on expected satiety and portion Size Nutrition & Dietetics, ETH Zürich Co-Supervisor
2014 Masters The influence of reduced plate size on meal composition. Nutrition & Dietetics, ETH Zürich Principal Supervisor
2013 Masters The influence of plate size on meal composition. Experimental study. Nutrition & Dietetics, ETH Zurich Principal Supervisor
2013 Masters The effect of different food guide formats on consumers’ meal composition. Experimental study. Nutrition & Dietetics, ETH Zürich Principal Supervisor
2013 Honours Consumers’ acceptance of nudging interventions. Online survey. Family and Consumer Studies, ETH Zürich Co-Supervisor
2012 Honours Food choice based on energy expenditure estimations of physical activity. Experimental study. Nutrition & Dietetics, ETH Zurich Co-Supervisor
2012 Honours Influences of selected aspects on food choice. Experimental study. Nutrition & Dietetics, ETH Zurich Co-Supervisor
2011 Masters Consumers’ reasons and attitudes towards vitamins and mineral supplements consumption in Switzerland. Cross-sectional survey. Nutrition & Dietetics, ETH Zurich Co-Supervisor
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Research Projects

Development of a smart phone based augmented reality application for portion size training and snack evaluation 2014 - 2016


RICHFIELDS 2015 - 2018

Designing a world-class infrastructure to facilitate research

Making “the healthy choice the easy choice” requires knowledge about our dietary habits. This knowledge comes from analysing different types of information such as: What food and drinks are we buying, preparing and eating? Where? Why? How? With whom? In what social and physical context?

New ICT technologies bring opportunities for researchers to monitor and collect information on these behaviours. Every day, consumers and businesses generate “big data” – large volumes of information, that offer detailed descriptions of behaviours, including time and place (e.g. using GPS). If these data-rich sources could be linked and analysed, they have the potential to contribute greatly towards answering key questions to respond to societal challenges regarding food and health (e.g., obesity, cardiovascular disease, sustainability).

RICHFIELDS aims to design a consumer-data platform to collect and connect, compare and share information about our food behaviours, to revolutionise research on every-day choices made across Europe. RICHFIELDS seeks to determine what facilities, resources, and services can support research to learn more about what we choose to eat, and how and why we make those choices.

Stressing the need for world-class research infrastructures, EU Horizon 2020 provided financial support in 2015 for RICHFIELDS.

More information on http://www.richfields.eu/



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Research Opportunities

PhD Food and Consumer Behavior

Increased portion sizes and changes in eating patterns are major causes of the current obesity epidemic. Consumers are confused about portion sizes recommendations and standard serve sizes. The aim of this project is to investigate, develop and test food labels that are easy to understand and have the potential to positively influence dietary behaviors. The project will involve collaboration with various stakeholders including industry partners to provide an evidence base and inform policies.

PHD

Faculty of Health and Medicine

1/11/2017 - 1/12/2020

Contact

Doctor Tamara Bucher
University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
tamara.bucher@newcastle.edu.au

Internship or Honors Project

Procedural nutrition knowledge and diet quality

Internship

Faculty of Health and Medicine

1/02/2018 - 1/08/2018

Contact

Doctor Tamara Bucher
University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
tamara.bucher@newcastle.edu.au

PhD Consumer Behavior and Wine

Further details provided upon request

PHD

Faculty of Health and Medicine

1/02/2018 - 1/02/2021

Contact

Doctor Tamara Bucher
University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
tamara.bucher@newcastle.edu.au

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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Switzerland 21
Australia 14
Germany 2
United States 2
Canada 1
More...
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News

Research explores foods fit for an active lifestyle

December 4, 2015

With the diets of overweight and inactive people having been studied in depth, nutrition researchers at the University of Newcastle are also turning their attention to the healthier end of the spectrum.

Snack study

Tuck into snack study

March 17, 2015

Young Australian adults have a world-leading appetite for snack foods but surprisingly little is known about their perceptions of nutritional value and portion size. Now, a new study at the University of Newcastle is putting the sweet tooth to the test.

Dr Tamara Bucher

Position

Senior Lecturer
PRC for Physical Activity and Nutrition
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email tamara.bucher@newcastle.edu.au
Links Personal webpage
Twitter

Office

Room ATC205
Building Advanced Technology Centre (ATC)
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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