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Dr Megan Rollo

Post Doctoral Research Fellow

School of Health Sciences (Nutrition and Dietetics)

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
The development and validation of new methods for the assessment of dietary intake, in particular smartphone photographic records, and the design and evaluation of innovative uses of interactive technologies to enhance dietetic practice, support individuals make and sustain healthy behaviours in management of chronic diseases such as obesity.

Qualifications

  • PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Queensland University of Technology
  • Bachelor of Applied Science, Queensland University of Technology
  • Bachelor of Health Science (Nut & Diet) Hons, Queensland University of Technology

Keywords

  • dietary intake methods
  • dietetics
  • dietietics
  • eHealth
  • mHealth
  • nutrition
  • nutrition assessment
  • telehealth

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified 100
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Probst Y, Nguyen DT, Rollo ME, Li W, 'mHealth Diet and Nutrition Guidance', mHealth Multidisciplinary Verticals, CRC Press, Boca Raton 65-83 (2014)

Journal article (47 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 van der Bend D, Bucher T, Schumacher TL, Collins K, De Vlieger N, Rollo M, et al., 'Trends in Food and Beverage Portion Sizes in Australian Children; a Time-Series Analysis Comparing 2007 and 2011-2012 National Data.', Children (Basel), 4 (2017)
DOI 10.3390/children4080069
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Schumacher, Tamara Bucher, Nienke Devlieger Uon, Tracy Burrows
2017 Burrows TL, Rollo ME, Williams R, Wood LG, Garg ML, Jensen M, Collins CE, 'A Systematic Review of Technology-Based Dietary Intake Assessment Validation Studies That Include Carotenoid Biomarkers.', Nutrients, 9 (2017)
DOI 10.3390/nu9020140
Co-authors Clare Collins, Manohar Garg, Megan Jensen, Tracy Burrows, Lisa Wood
2017 Rollo ME, Burrows T, Vincze LJ, Harvey J, Collins CE, Hutchesson MJ, 'Cost evaluation of providing evidence-based dietetic services for weight management in adults: In-person versus eHealth delivery', Nutrition & Dietetics, (2017)
DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12335
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2017 Ashman AM, Collins CE, Brown LJ, Rae KM, Rollo ME, 'Validation of a Smartphone Image-Based Dietary Assessment Method for Pregnant Women', NUTRIENTS, 9 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu9010073
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Clare Collins, Leanne Brown, Kym Rae
2017 Pezdirc K, Rollo ME, Whitehead R, Hutchesson MJ, Ozakinci G, Perrett D, Collins CE, 'Perceptions of carotenoid and melanin colouration in faces among young Australian adults', Australian Journal of Psychology, (2017)

© 2017 The Australian Psychological Society. Objective: Human skin colour is influenced by three pigments: haemoglobin, carotenoids, and melanin. Carotenoids are abundant in frui... [more]

© 2017 The Australian Psychological Society. Objective: Human skin colour is influenced by three pigments: haemoglobin, carotenoids, and melanin. Carotenoids are abundant in fruits and vegetables, and when consumed accumulate in all layers of the skin, predominantly imparting yellowness (b*). This study investigated the effect of the manipulation of carotenoid-based skin colour, relative to the skin colour conferred by melanin on the perceptions of health amongst a group of Australian adults. Method: Fifty-seven participants (n=4 male; mean age 27.9±7.5years) completed three computer-based experiments on 50 trial faces. In the first two experiments, face image colour was manipulated along one or two independent single carotenoid or melanin axes on each trial to 'make the face appear as healthy as possible'. In the third trial, face colour was manipulated on both the carotenoid and melanin axes simultaneously. Results: For the single axis, participants significantly increased melanin colouration and added carotenoid colouration to facial images that were initially low in skin yellowness (b*). When carotenoid and melanin axes were simultaneously manipulated, carotenoid colouration was raised (¿E =3.15 ( SE ±0.19)) and melanin colouration was lowered (¿E =-1.04 ( SE ±0.1)). Conclusions: Young Australian adults perceive facial skin colouration, associated with both carotenoid intake from fruit and vegetables and melanin due to sun exposure as conveying the appearance of health in young adults. However, carotenoid colouration was more important to health perception.

DOI 10.1111/ajpy.12163
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Kristine Pezdirc
2017 Vincze L, Rollo ME, Hutchesson MJ, Burrows TL, MacDonald-Wicks L, Blumfield M, Collins CE, 'A cross sectional study investigating weight management motivations, methods and perceived healthy eating and physical activity influences in women up to five years following childbirth.', Midwifery, 49 124-133 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2017.01.003
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Lesley Wicks
2017 Hayes C, Brain K, Rollo M, Burrows T, Hodson F, Collins C, 'Population Characteristics in a Tertiary Pain Service Cohort Experiencing Chronic Non-Cancer Pain: Weight Status, Comorbidities, and Patient Goals', Healthcare, 5 (2017)
DOI 10.3390/healthcare5020028
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2017 Rollo ME, Collins CE, MacDonald-Wicks L, 'Evaluation of the Introduction of an e-Health Skills Component for Dietetics Students.', Telemed J E Health, (2017)
DOI 10.1089/tmj.2016.0250
Co-authors Clare Collins, Lesley Wicks
2017 Rollo ME, Bucher T, Smith SP, Collins CE, 'ServAR: An augmented reality tool to guide the serving of food', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 14 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0516-9
Co-authors Shamus Smith, Tamara Bucher, Clare Collins
2017 Ashton LM, Morgan PJ, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Collins CE, 'Feasibility and preliminary efficacy of the 'HEYMAN' healthy lifestyle program for young men: a pilot randomised controlled trial.', Nutr J, 16 2 (2017)
DOI 10.1186/s12937-017-0227-8
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Philip Morgan, Lee Ashton, Clare Collins
2017 Bucher T, Hartmann C, Rollo ME, Collins CE, 'What Is Nutritious Snack Food? A Comparison of Expert and Layperson Assessments.', Nutrients, 9 (2017)
DOI 10.3390/nu9080874
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tamara Bucher
2017 Williams RL, Rollo ME, Schumacher T, Collins CE, 'Diet Quality Scores of Australian Adults Who Have Completed the Healthy Eating Quiz.', Nutrients, 9 (2017)
DOI 10.3390/nu9080880
Co-authors Tracy Schumacher, Clare Collins
2017 Ashton LM, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'Motivators and Barriers to Engaging in Healthy Eating and Physical Activity: A Cross-Sectional Survey in Young Adult Men', American Journal of Men's Health, 11 330-343 (2017)

© 2016, © The Author(s) 2016. Many Australian young men (18-25 years) fail to meet recommendations in national dietary or physical activity (PA) guidelines. However, there is a ... [more]

© 2016, © The Author(s) 2016. Many Australian young men (18-25 years) fail to meet recommendations in national dietary or physical activity (PA) guidelines. However, there is a lack of understanding of their perspectives on PA and diet to inform intervention design. This study examined young men¿s motivators and barriers to healthy eating and PA, along with differences by demographic and behavioral factors. A cross-sectional online survey was completed by 282 men aged 18 to 25 years in Australia. Results identified the most common motivators for healthy eating included improving health (63.5%), body image (52.3%), and increasing energy (32.1%). Motivators for PA included improving body image (44.6%), fitness (44.2%), and health (41.0%). Common barriers to healthy eating were access to unhealthy foods (61.1%), time to cook/prepare healthy foods (55.0%), and motivation to cook healthy foods (50.7%). Barriers for PA included motivation (66.3%), time (57.8%), and cost of equipment/facilities (33.3%). Significant differences (p < .01) in motivators to healthy eating and/or PA were identified for BMI category, marital status, PA level, alcohol intake, and stress levels. Significant differences were identified for barriers to healthy eating and/or PA by BMI, PA level, stress, and fruit and vegetable intake, assessed using Pearson¿s chi-square test. Findings suggest that promotion of benefits related to health, appearance/body image, increased energy and fitness, and addressing key barriers including motivation, time, financial restraints, and accessibility of unhealthy foods, could engage young men in improving lifestyle behaviors. Differences by demographic and behavioral factors suggest development of tailored programs to address diversity among young men may be required.

DOI 10.1177/1557988316680936
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Melinda Hutchesson, Lee Ashton
2017 Ashman AM, Brown LJ, Collins CE, Rollo ME, Rae KM, 'Factors Associated with Effective Nutrition Interventions for Pregnant Indigenous Women: A Systematic Review', Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 117 1222-1253 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jand.2017.03.012
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Clare Collins, Kym Rae
2017 Ashton LM, Morgan PJ, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Collins CE, 'Young Men's Preferences for Design and Delivery of Physical Activity and Nutrition Interventions: A Mixed-Methods Study.', Am J Mens Health, 11 1588-1599 (2017)
DOI 10.1177/1557988317714141
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Lee Ashton
2017 Burrows T, Skinner J, McKenna R, Rollo M, 'Food Addiction, Binge Eating Disorder, and Obesity: Is There a Relationship?', Behav Sci (Basel), 7 (2017)
DOI 10.3390/bs7030054
Co-authors Tracy Burrows
2017 Ashton L, Williams R, Wood L, Schumacher T, Burrows T, Rollo M, et al., 'Comparison of Australian Recommended Food Score (ARFS) and Plasma Carotenoid Concentrations: A Validation Study in Adults.', Nutrients, 9 (2017)
DOI 10.3390/nu9080888
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Schumacher, Lisa Wood, Lee Ashton, Tracy Burrows
2016 Pezdirc K, Hutchesson MJ, Williams RL, Rollo ME, Burrows TL, Wood LG, et al., 'Consuming High-Carotenoid Fruit and Vegetables Influences Skin Yellowness and Plasma Carotenoids in Young Women: A Single-Blind Randomized Crossover Trial', Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 116 1257-1265 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Background Consumption of dietary carotenoids from fruits and vegetables (F/V) leads to accumulations in human skin, altering skin yello... [more]

© 2016 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Background Consumption of dietary carotenoids from fruits and vegetables (F/V) leads to accumulations in human skin, altering skin yellowness. The influence of the quantity of F/V consumed on skin yellowness and plasma carotenoid concentrations has not been examined previously. Objective To compare the influence of consuming high-carotenoid-containing F/V (HCFV) (176,425 µg beta carotene/wk) vs low-carotenoid F/V (LCFV) (2,073 µg beta carotene/wk) on skin yellowness and plasma carotenoid concentrations, over 4 weeks. Design and intervention A single-blind randomized controlled crossover trial from October 2013 to March 2014. Thirty women were randomized to receive 7 daily servings of HCFV or LCFV for 4 weeks. Following a 2-week washout period they followed the alternate intervention. Main outcome measures Skin color (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage L*a*b* color space, where L* represents skin lightness and positive values of a* and b* represent degrees of redness and yellowness, respectively) was assessed by reflectance spectroscopy in both sun-exposed and nonexposed skin areas. Fasting plasma carotenoids were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, before and after each intervention period. Statistical analyses performed Linear mixed models were used to determine the HCFV and LCFV response on skin color and plasma carotenoids, adjusting for intervention order, time, and interaction between baseline differences and time. Results There were no significant differences in mean daily fruit (P=0.42) and vegetable (P=0.17) intakes between HCFV and LCFV groups. Dietary alpha carotene, beta carotene, lutein, and beta cryptoxanthin intakes were significantly different between the two groups (P < 0.01). Following HCFV there was a significantly greater increase in skin yellowness (b*) in both sun-exposed (P < 0.001) and unexposed areas, (P < 0.001), with no change in skin lightness (L*) or redness (a*). Significantly higher plasma alpha carotene (P=0.004), beta carotene (P=0.001), and lutein (P=0.028) concentrations were found following the HCFV intervention. Skin yellowness correlated with alpha carotene and beta carotene. Conclusions Skin yellowness (b*) and fasting plasma carotenoid concentrations were significantly higher following HCFV than LCFV over 4 weeks.

DOI 10.1016/j.jand.2016.03.012
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Melinda Hutchesson, Kristine Pezdirc, Clare Collins, Lisa Wood, Tracy Burrows
2016 Rollo ME, Aguiar EJ, Williams RL, Wynne K, Kriss M, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Ehealth technologies to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in diabetes self-management', Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy, 9 381-390 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Rollo et al. Diabetes is a chronic, complex condition requiring sound knowledge and self-management skills to optimize glycemic control and health outcomes. Dietary intake... [more]

© 2016 Rollo et al. Diabetes is a chronic, complex condition requiring sound knowledge and self-management skills to optimize glycemic control and health outcomes. Dietary intake and physical activity are key diabetes self-management (DSM) behaviors that require tailored education and support. Electronic health (eHealth) technologies have a demonstrated potential for assisting individuals with DSM behaviors. This review provides examples of technologies used to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in the context of DSM. Technologies covered include those widely used for DSM, such as web-based programs and mobile phone and smartphone applications. In addition, examples of novel tools such as virtual and augmented reality, video games, computer vision for dietary carbohydrate monitoring, and wearable devices are provided. The challenges to, and facilitators for, the use of eHealth technologies in DSM are discussed. Strategies to support the implementation of eHealth technologies within practice and suggestions for future research to enhance nutrition and physical activity behaviors as a part of broader DSM are provided.

DOI 10.2147/DMSO.S95247
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2016 Hemsley B, Georgiou A, Hill S, Rollo M, Steel J, Balandin S, 'An Integrative Review of Patient Safety in Studies on the Care and Safety of Patients with Communication Disabilities in Hospital. Patient Education and Counseling.', Patient Education and Counseling, 99 501-511 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2015.10.022
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Bronwyn Hemsley
2016 Schumacher T, Burrows T, Rollo M, Spratt N, Callister R, Collins C, 'Effectiveness of a Brief Dietetic Intervention for Hyperlipidaemic Adults Using Individually-Tailored Dietary Feedback', Healthcare, 4 75-75 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/healthcare4040075
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Tracy Schumacher, Neil Spratt, Robin Callister
2016 Schumacher TL, Burrows TL, Rollo ME, Wood LG, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Comparison of fatty acid intakes assessed by a cardiovascular-specific food frequency questionnaire with red blood cell membrane fatty acids in hyperlipidaemic Australian adults: A validation study', European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 70 1433-1438 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature. All rights reserved. Background/Objectives:Limited dietary intake tools have been validated specifically for hyperli... [more]

© 2016 Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature. All rights reserved. Background/Objectives:Limited dietary intake tools have been validated specifically for hyperlipidaemic adults. The Australian Eating Survey (AES) Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) was adapted to include foods with cardio-protective properties (CVD-AES). The aims were to estimate dietary fatty acid (FA) intakes derived from the CVD-AES and AES and compare them with red blood cell (RBC) membrane FA content.Subjects/Methods:Dietary intake was measured using the semi-quantitative 120-item AES and 177-item CVD-AES. Nutrient intakes were calculated using AUSNUT 2011-2013. Fasting RBC membrane FAs were assessed using gas chromatography. Extent of agreement between intakes estimated by AES or CVD-AES and RBC membrane composition (% of total FAs) for linoleic acid (LA), alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentanoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were assessed using Spearman's correlation coefficients, adjusted linear regressions and Kappa statistics.Results:Data from 39 participants (72% female, 59.3±11.1 years) indicate stronger positive correlations between RBC membrane FAs and CVD-AES dietary estimates compared with the AES. Significant (P < 0.05) moderate-strong correlations were found between CVD-AES FAs and FA proportions in RBC membranes for EPA (r=0.62), DHA (r=0.53) and DPA (r=0.42), with a moderate correlation for LA (r=0.39) and no correlation with ALA. Significant moderate correlations were found with the AES for DHA (r=0.39), but not for LA, ALA, EPA or DPA.Conclusions:The CVD-AES provides a more accurate estimate of long chain FA intakes in hyperlipidaemic adults, compared with AES estimates. This indicates that a CVD-specific FFQ should be used when evaluating FA intakes in this population.

DOI 10.1038/ejcn.2016.144
Co-authors Lisa Wood, Tracy Schumacher, Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2016 Ashman AM, Collins CE, Weatherall LJ, Keogh L, Brown LJ, Rollo ME, et al., 'Dietary intakes and anthropometric measures of Indigenous Australian women and their infants in the Gomeroi gaaynggal cohort', Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, 7 481-497 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S2040174416000325
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Roger Smith, Kym Rae, Leanne Brown, Clare Collins
2016 Ashman AM, Collins CE, Weatherall L, Brown LJ, Rollo ME, Clausen D, et al., 'A cohort of Indigenous Australian women and their children through pregnancy and beyond: The Gomeroi gaaynggal study', Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, 7 357-368 (2016) [C1]

© Cambridge University Press and the International Society for Developmental Origins of Health and Disease 2016. Indigenous Australians have high rates of chronic diseases, the c... [more]

© Cambridge University Press and the International Society for Developmental Origins of Health and Disease 2016. Indigenous Australians have high rates of chronic diseases, the causes of which are complex and include social and environmental determinants. Early experiences in utero may also predispose to later-life disease development. The Gomeroi gaaynggal study was established to explore intrauterine origins of renal disease, diabetes and growth in order to inform the development of health programmes for Indigenous Australian women and children. Pregnant women are recruited from antenatal clinics in Tamworth, Newcastle and Walgett, New South Wales, Australia, by Indigenous research assistants. Measures are collected at three time points in pregnancy and from women and their children at up to eight time points in the child's first 5 years. Measures of fetal renal development and function include ultrasound and biochemical biomarkers. Dietary intake, infant feeding and anthropometric measurements are collected. Standardized procedures and validated tools are used where available. Since 2010 the study has recruited over 230 women, and retained 66 postpartum. Recruitment is ongoing, and Gomeroi gaaynggal is currently the largest Indigenous pregnancy-through-early-childhood cohort internationally. Baseline median gestational age was 39.1 weeks (31.5-43.2, n=110), median birth weight was 3180 g (910-5430 g, n=110). Over one third (39.3%) of infants were admitted to special care or neonatal nursery. Nearly half of mothers (47.5%) reported tobacco smoking during pregnancy. Results of the study will contribute to knowledge about origins of chronic disease in Indigenous Australians and nutrition and growth of women and their offspring during pregnancy and postpartum. Study strengths include employment and capacity-building of Indigenous staff and the complementary ArtsHealth programme.

DOI 10.1017/S204017441600009X
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Caroline Blackwell, Roger Smith, E Lumbers, Kym Rae, Clare Collins, Kirsty Pringle, Leanne Brown, John Attia
2016 Bucher T, Collins C, Rollo ME, McCaffrey TA, De Vlieger N, Van Der Bend D, et al., 'Nudging consumers towards healthier choices: A systematic review of positional influences on food choice', British Journal of Nutrition, 115 2252-2263 (2016) [C1]

© The Authors 2016. Nudging or 'choice architecture' refers to strategic changes in the environment that are anticipated to alter people's behaviour in a predictable way, without... [more]

© The Authors 2016. Nudging or 'choice architecture' refers to strategic changes in the environment that are anticipated to alter people's behaviour in a predictable way, without forbidding any options or significantly changing their economic incentives. Nudging strategies may be used to promote healthy eating behaviour. However, to date, the scientific evidence has not been systematically reviewed to enable practitioners and policymakers to implement, or argue for the implementation of, specific measures to support nudging strategies. This systematic review investigated the effect of positional changes of food placement on food choice. In total, seven scientific databases were searched using relevant keywords to identify interventions that manipulated food position (proximity or order) to generate a change in food selection, sales or consumption, among normal-weight or overweight individuals across any age group. From 2576 identified articles, fifteen articles comprising eighteen studies met our inclusion criteria. This review has identified that manipulation of food product order or proximity can influence food choice. Such approaches offer promise in terms of impacting on consumer behaviour. However, there is a need for high-quality studies that quantify the magnitude of positional effects on food choice in conjunction with measuring the impact on food intake, particularly in the longer term. Future studies should use outcome measures such as change in grams of food consumed or energy intake to quantify the impact on dietary intake and potential impacts on nutrition-related health. Research is also needed to evaluate potential compensatory behaviours secondary to such interventions.

DOI 10.1017/S0007114516001653
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tamara Bucher, Nienke Devlieger Uon
2016 Bucher T, Rollo ME, Smith SP, Dean M, Brown H, Sun M, Collins C, 'Position paper on the need for portion-size education and a standardised unit of measurement', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/HE15137
Co-authors Hannah M Brown Uon, Shamus Smith, Tamara Bucher, Clare Collins
2016 Ashman AM, Collins CE, Brown LJ, Rae KM, Rollo ME, 'A Brief Tool to Assess Image-Based Dietary Records and Guide Nutrition Counselling Among Pregnant Women: An Evaluation', JMIR MHEALTH AND UHEALTH, 4 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/mhealth.6469
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Clare Collins, Kym Rae
2016 Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Krukowski R, Ells L, Harvey J, Morgan PJ, et al., 'EHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Diabetes Technology and Therapeutics, 18 S67 (2016)
DOI 10.1089/dia.2016.2506
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2016 Blumfield ML, Schreurs M, Rollo ME, Macdonald-Wicks LK, Kokavec A, Collins CE, 'The association between portion size, nutrient intake and gestational weight gain: A secondary analysis in the WATCH study 2006/7', Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 29 271-280 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The British Dietetic Association Ltd. Background: Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with adverse maternal-child health outcomes. Managing energy intake... [more]

© 2016 The British Dietetic Association Ltd. Background: Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with adverse maternal-child health outcomes. Managing energy intake and GWG versus optimising nutrient intake can be challenging. The present study aimed to examine the relationships between dietary portion size, GWG and nutrient intakes during pregnancy. It is hypothesised that, after adjustment for potential confounders, portion size would be positively associated with both GWG and nutrient intakes during pregnancy. Methods: Prospective data were obtained for 179 Australian women from the Women and Their Children's Health Study. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used at 18-24 and 36-40 weeks of gestation to quantify diet and portion size during the previous 3 months of pregnancy. Nutrient intakes were compared with Australian Nutrient Reference Values (NRVs). GWG was measured up to 36 weeks and compared with the Institute of Medicine weight gain recommendations (WtAdh). Results: In multivariate regression models, portion size factor (PSF) was positively associated with GWG in women with high socio-economic status (SES; ß = 0.20, P = 0.04) and those with an overweight/obese pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) (ß = 0.28, P = 0.04). PSF uniquely accounted for 8.2% and 3.7% of the variability in GWG for women with high SES and overweight/obese pre-pregnancy BMIs, respectively. Nutrient intakes and PSF were similar regardless of WtAdh. Women achieved NRVs for calcium and zinc in all PSF categories. Most of the women with large PSF still failed to achieve the NRVs for folate (95.7%), iron (89.6%) and fibre (85.5%). Conclusions: All women require advice on quality food choices during pregnancy to optimise health outcomes. Targeting portion size alone is insufficient to manage GWG but may prove to be a valuable tool in pregnant women of high SES and/or those who are overweight/obese pre-pregnancy.

DOI 10.1111/jhn.12330
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Clare Collins, Lesley Wicks
2016 Rollo ME, Williams RL, Burrows T, Kirkpatrick SI, Bucher T, Collins CE, 'What Are They Really Eating? A Review on New Approaches to Dietary Intake Assessment and Validation', Current Nutrition Reports, 5 307-314 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s13668-016-0182-6
Co-authors Tamara Bucher, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2015 Collins CE, Bucher T, Taylor A, Pezdirc K, Lucas H, Watson J, et al., 'How big is a food portion? A pilot study in Australian families', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 26 83-88 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Australian Health Promotion Association. Issues addressed It is not known whether individuals can accurately estimate the portion size of foods usually consumed relative t... [more]

© 2015 Australian Health Promotion Association. Issues addressed It is not known whether individuals can accurately estimate the portion size of foods usually consumed relative to standard serving sizes in national food selection guides. The aim of the present cross-sectional pilot study was to quantify what adults and children deem a typical portion for a variety of foods and compare these with the serving sizes specified in the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE). Methods Adults and children were independently asked to serve out their typical portion of 10 common foods (rice, pasta, breakfast cereal, chocolate, confectionary, ice cream, meat, vegetables, soft drink and milk). They were also asked to serve what they perceived a small, medium and large portion of each food to be. Each portion was weighed and recorded by an assessor and compared with the standard AGHE serving sizes. Results Twenty-one individuals (nine mothers, one father, 11 children) participated in the study. There was a large degree of variability in portion sizes measured out by both parents and children, with means exceeding the standard AGHE serving size for all items, except for soft drink and milk, where mean portion sizes were less than the AGHE serving size. The greatest mean overestimations were for pasta (155%; mean 116 g; range 94-139g) and chocolate (151%; mean 38 g; range 25-50g), each of which represented approximately 1.5 standard AGHE servings. Conclusion The findings of the present study indicate that there is variability between parents' and children's estimation of typical portion sizes compared with national recommendations. So what? Dietary interventions to improve individuals' dietary patterns should target education regarding portion size.

DOI 10.1071/HE14061
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Tamara Bucher, Kristine Pezdirc, Tracy Burrows, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2015 Collins CE, Burrows TL, Rollo ME, Boggess MM, Watson JF, Guest M, et al., 'The comparative validity and reproducibility of a diet quality index for adults: The Australian recommended food score', Nutrients, 7 785-798 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu7020785
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Kristine Pezdirc, Tracy Burrows
2015 Burrows T, Hutchesson M, Chai LK, Rollo M, Skinner G, Collins C, 'Nutrition interventions for prevention and management of childhood obesity: What do parents want from an ehealth program?', Nutrients, 7 10469-10479 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. With the growth of Internet technologies, offering interventions for child and family weight management in an online for... [more]

© 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. With the growth of Internet technologies, offering interventions for child and family weight management in an online format may address barriers to accessing services. This study aimed to investigate (i) whether an eHealth family healthy lifestyle program would be of interest to parents; and (ii) preferences and/or expectations for program components and features. Parents of children aged four to18 years were recruited through social media and completed an online survey (54 items) including closed and open-ended questions. Responses were collated using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. Seventy-five participants were included (92% mothers, mean age 39.1 ± 8.6 years, mean BMI 27.6 ± 6.3 kg/m 2 ). The index child had a mean age of 11 ± 6.2 years with 24% overweight/obese. The majority of parents (90.3%) reported interest in an online program, with preference expressed for a non-structured program to allow flexibility users to log-on and off as desired. Parents wanted a program that was easy to use, practical, engaging, endorsed by a reputable source, and able to provide individual tailoring and for their children to be directly involved. The current study supports the need for online delivery of a healthy lifestyle program that targets greater parental concerns of diet rather than child weight.

DOI 10.3390/nu7125546
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Geoff Skinner, Li K Chai
2015 Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Self-Monitoring of Dietary Intake by Young Women: Online Food Records Completed on Computer or Smartphone Are as Accurate as Paper-Based Food Records but More Acceptable', Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 115 87-94 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Adherence and accuracy of self-monitoring of dietary intake influences success in weight management interventions. Information technolo... [more]

© 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Adherence and accuracy of self-monitoring of dietary intake influences success in weight management interventions. Information technologies such as computers and smartphones have the potential to improve adherence and accuracy by reducing the burden associated with monitoring dietary intake using traditional paper-based food records. We evaluated the acceptability and accuracy of three different 7-day food record methods (online accessed via computer, online accessed via smartphone, and paper-based). Young women (N=18; aged 23.4±2.9 years; body mass index 24.0±2.2) completed the three 7-day food records in random order with 7-day washout periods between each method. Total energy expenditure (TEE) was derived from resting energy expenditure (REE) measured by indirect calorimetry and physical activity level (PAL) derived from accelerometers (TEE=REE×PAL). Accuracy of the three methods wasassessed by calculating absolute (energy intake [EI]-TEE) and percentage difference (EI/TEE×100) between self-reported EI and TEE. Acceptability was assessed via questionnaire. Mean±standard deviation TEE was 2,185±302 kcal/day and EI was 1,729±249 kcal/day, 1,675±287kcal/day, and 1,682±352 kcal/day for computer, smartphone, and paper records, respectively. There were no significant differences between absolute and percentage differences between EI and TEE for the three methods: computer, -510±389 kcal/day (78%); smartphone, -456±372 kcal/day (80%); and paper, -503±513 kcal/day (79%). Half of participants (n=9) preferred computer recording, 44.4% preferred smartphone, and 5.6% preferred paper-based records. Most participants (89%) least preferred the paper-based record. Because online food records completed on either computer or smartphone were as accurate as paper-based records but more acceptable to young women, they should be considered when self-monitoring of intake is recommended to young women.

DOI 10.1016/j.jand.2014.07.036
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Melinda Hutchesson
2015 Rollo ME, Ash S, Lyons-Wall P, Russell AW, 'Evaluation of a mobile phone image-based dietary assessment method in adults with type 2 diabetes', Nutrients, 7 4897-4910 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu7064897
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 15
2015 Robinson LN, Rollo ME, Watson J, Burrows TL, Collins CE, 'Relationships between dietary intakes of children and their parents: A cross-sectional, secondary analysis of families participating in the Family Diet Quality Study', Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 28 443-451 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd. Background: Being overweight and obese in Australian children is common. Current evidence related to parental influence on child diet... [more]

© 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd. Background: Being overweight and obese in Australian children is common. Current evidence related to parental influence on child dietary intake is conflicting, and is particularly limited in terms of which parent exerts the stronger relationship. The present study aimed to assess mother-father and parent-child dietary relationships and to identify which parent-child relationship is stronger. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis was performed of dietary intake data from 66 families with one parent and one child aged 8-12 years who were participating in the Family Diet Quality Study, in the Hunter and Forster regions of New South Wales, Australia. Dietary intakes were assessed using adult and child specific, validated semi-quantitative 120-item food frequency questionnaires. Diet quality and variety subscores were assessed using the Australian Recommended Food Scores for adults and children/adolescents. Pearson's correlations were used to assess dietary relationships between mother-father, father-child and mother-child dyads. Results: Weak-to-moderate correlations were found between mother-child dyads for components of dietary intake (r = 0.27-0.47). Similarly, for father-child dyads, predominantly weak-to-moderate correlations were found (r = 0.01-0.52). Variety of fruit intake was the most strongly correlated in both parent-child dyads, with the weakest relationships found for fibre (g 1000 kJ < sup > -1 < /sup > ) in father-child and percentage energy from total fats for mother-child dyads. Mother-father dyads demonstrated mostly moderate-to-strong correlations (r = 0.13-0.73), with scores for condiments showing the weakest relationship and vegetables the strongest. For all dyads, strong correlations were observed for overall diet quality (r = 0.50-0.59). Conclusions: Parent-child dietary intake is significantly related but differs for mother versus fathers. Further research is required to examine whether differing dietary components should be targeted for mothers versus fathers in interventions aiming to improve family dietary patterns.

DOI 10.1111/jhn.12261
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2015 Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Krukowski R, Ells L, Harvey J, Morgan PJ, et al., 'eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 16 376-392 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/obr.12268
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 39
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2015 Spencer L, Rollo M, Hauck Y, MacDonald-Wicks L, Wood L, Hutchesson M, et al., 'The effect of weight management interventions that include a diet component on weight-related outcomes in pregnant and postpartum women: a systematic review protocol.', JBI Database System Rev Implement Rep, 13 88-98 (2015)
DOI 10.11124/jbisrir-2015-1812
Co-authors Roger Smith, Lisa Wood, Melinda Hutchesson, Lesley Wicks
2015 Ashton LM, Morgan PJ, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Young MD, Collins CE, 'A systematic review of SNAPO (Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol, Physical activity and Obesity) randomized controlled trials in young adult men', Preventive Medicine, 81 221-231 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol, Physical activity and Obesity (SNAPO) interventions in young men exclusively. Th... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol, Physical activity and Obesity (SNAPO) interventions in young men exclusively. The secondary aim was to evaluate the recruitment, retention and engagement strategies. Methods: A search with no date restrictions was conducted across seven databases. Randomized controlled trials recruiting young men only (aged 18-35. years) into interventions targeting any SNAPO risk factors were included. Results: Ten studies were included (two nutrition, six alcohol use, two targeting multiple SNAPO risk factors). Six studies (two nutrition, three alcohol use and one targeting multiple SNAPO risk factors) demonstrated significant positive short-term intervention effects, but impact was either not assessed beyond the intervention (n = 3), had short-term follow-up (= 6 months) (n = 2) or not sustained beyond six months (n = 1). Overall, a high risk of bias was identified across studies. Only one study undertook a power calculation and recruited the required sample size. Adequate retention was achieved in three studies. Effectiveness of engagement strategies was not reported in any studies. Conclusions: Despite preliminary evidence of short-term effectiveness of SNAPO interventions in young men, few studies characterized by a high risk of bias were identified. High quality SNAPO interventions for young men are warranted.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.09.005
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Lee Ashton, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Melinda Hutchesson, Myles Young
2015 Burrows TL, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Boggess MM, Guest M, Collins CE, 'Fruit and Vegetable Intake Assessed by Food Frequency Questionnaire and Plasma Carotenoids: A Validation Study in Adults', NUTRIENTS, 7 3240-3251 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu7053240
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Tracy Burrows
2015 Burrows TL, Williams R, Rollo M, Wood L, Garg ML, Jensen M, Collins CE, 'Plasma carotenoid levels as biomarkers of dietary carotenoid consumption: A systematic review of the validation studies', Journal of Nutrition and Intermediary Metabolism, 2 15-64 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Background Previous research has demonstrated that plasma carotenoids are a reliable biomarker of usual fruit and vegetable intake.... [more]

© 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Background Previous research has demonstrated that plasma carotenoids are a reliable biomarker of usual fruit and vegetable intake. The review aims were to synthesize (i) the mean dietary intake and (ii) plasma concentrations of carotenoids reported from validation studies (iii) compare the strength of the relationship between the two, measured using different dietary assessment methods. Methods Six databases were used to locate studies that included: adult populations, assessment of dietary intake, measurement of plasma carotenoids and reported the comparison between the two measures. Results One hundred and forty-two studies were included with 95,480 participants, the majority of studies were cross-sectional (n = 86), with randomized controlled trials (RCTs) (n = 18), 14 case-control studies and 13 cohorts. The most common reported dietary carotenoid and plasma carotenoid was lycopene: weighted dietary mean intake (4555.4 ug/day), and plasma concentration 0.62 umol/L (95% CI: 0.61, 0.63, n = 56studies. The strongest weighted correlation between the two measures was found for cryptoxanthin (r = 0.38, 95% CI 0.34, 0.42) followed by a-carotene (r = 0.34, 95% CI 0.31, 0.37). Conclusion This review summarizes typical dietary intakes and plasma concentrations and their expected associations based on validation studies conducted to date which provides a benchmark for future validation studies.

DOI 10.1016/j.jnim.2015.05.001
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Lisa Wood, Megan Jensen, Manohar Garg, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2015 Rollo ME, Hutchesson MJ, Burrows TL, Krukowski RA, Harvey JR, Hoggle LB, Collins CE, 'Video consultations and virtual nutrition care for weight management', Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 115 1213-1220 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jand.2015.03.016
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2015 Ashton LM, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Morgan PJ, Thompson DI, Collins CE, 'Young adult males' motivators and perceived barriers towards eating healthily and being active: A qualitative study', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 12 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0257-6
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Lee Ashton
2014 Burrows TL, Collins K, Watson J, Guest M, Boggess MM, Neve M, et al., 'Validity of the Australian Recommended Food Score as a diet quality index for Pre-schoolers', Nutrition Journal, 13 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Burrows et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Background: Diet quality tools provide researchers with brief methods to assess the nutrient adequacy of usual dietary intake.... [more]

© 2014 Burrows et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Background: Diet quality tools provide researchers with brief methods to assess the nutrient adequacy of usual dietary intake. This study describes the development and validation of a pediatric diet quality index, the Australian Recommended Food Scores for Pre-schoolers (ARFS-P), for use with children aged two to five years. Methods. The ARFS-P was derived from a 120-item food frequency questionnaire, with eight sub-scales, and was scored from zero to 73. Linear regressions were used to estimate the relationship between diet quality score and nutrient intakes, in 142 children (mean age 4 years) in rural localities in New South Wales, Australia. Results: Total ARFS-P and component scores were highly related to dietary intake of the majority of macronutrients and micronutrients including protein, ß-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin A. Total ARFS-P was also positively related to total consumption of nutrient dense foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and negatively related to total consumption of discretionary choices, such as sugar sweetened drinks and packaged snacks. Conclusion: ARFS-P is a valid measure that can be used to characterise nutrient intakes for children aged two to five years. Further research could assess the utility of the ARFS-P for monitoring of usual dietary intake over time or as part of clinical management.

DOI 10.1186/1475-2891-13-87
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2014 Collins CE, Boggess MM, Watson JF, Guest M, Duncanson K, Pezdirc K, et al., 'Reproducibility and comparative validity of a food frequency questionnaire for Australian adults', Clinical Nutrition, 33 906-914 (2014) [C1]

Background: Food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) are used in epidemiological studies to investigate the relationship between diet and disease. There is a need for a valid and relia... [more]

Background: Food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) are used in epidemiological studies to investigate the relationship between diet and disease. There is a need for a valid and reliable adult FFQ with a contemporary food list in Australia. Aims: To evaluate the reproducibility and comparative validity of the Australian Eating Survey (AES) FFQ in adults compared to weighed food records (WFRs). Methods: Two rounds of AES and three-day WFRs were conducted in 97 adults (31 males, median age and BMI for males of 44.9 years, 26.2 kg/m 2 , females 41.3 years, 24.0 kg/m 2 . Reproducibility was assessed over six months using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and comparative validity was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) estimated by fitting a mixed effects model for each nutrient to account for age, sex and BMI to allow estimation of between and within person variance. Results: Reproducibility was found to be good for both WFR and FFQ since there were no significant differences between round 1 and 2 administrations. For comparative validity, FFQ ICCs were at least as large as those for WFR. The ICC of the WFR-FFQ difference for total energy intake was 0.6 (95% CI 0.43, 0.77) and the median ICC for all nutrients was 0.47, with all ICCs between 0.15 (%E from saturated fat) and 0.7 (g/day sugars). Conclusions: Compared to WFR the AES FFQ is suitable for reliably estimating the dietary intakes of Australian adults across a wide range of nutrients. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.

DOI 10.1016/j.clnu.2013.09.015
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Kristine Pezdirc, Tracy Burrows
2014 Ashton LM, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'A scoping review of risk behaviour interventions in young men.', BMC public health, 14 957 (2014) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Lee Ashton
2011 Rollo ME, Ash S, Lyons-Wall P, Russell A, 'Trial of a mobile phone method for recording dietary intake in adults with type 2 diabetes: Evaluation and implications for future applications', Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, 17 318-323 (2011)

We evaluated a mobile phone application (Nutricam) for recording dietary intake. It allowed users to capture a photograph of food items before consumption and store a voice record... [more]

We evaluated a mobile phone application (Nutricam) for recording dietary intake. It allowed users to capture a photograph of food items before consumption and store a voice recording to explain the contents of the photograph. This information was then sent to a website where it was analysed by a dietitian. Ten adults with type 2 diabetes (BMI 24.1-47.9 kg/m 2 ) recorded their intake over a three-day period using both Nutricam and a written food diary. Compared to the food diary, energy intake was under-recorded by 649 kJ (SD 810) using the mobile phone method. However, there was no trend in the difference between dietary assessment methods at levels of low or high energy intake. All subjects reported that the mobile phone system was easy to use. Six subjects found that the time taken to record using Nutricam was shorter than recording using the written diary, while two reported that it was about the same. The level of detail provided in the voice recording and food items obscured in photographs reduced the quality of the mobile phone records. Although some modifications to the mobile phone method will be necessary to improve the accuracy of self-reported intake, the system was considered an acceptable alternative to written records and has the potential to be used by adults with type 2 diabetes for monitoring dietary intake by a dietitian.

DOI 10.1258/jtt.2011.100906
Citations Scopus - 25
Show 44 more journal articles

Conference (49 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Ashman A, Collins C, Brown LJ, Rae K, Rollo M, 'Acceptability and usability of a mobile phone method for image-based dietary assessment and provision of nutrition counselling amongst pregnant women', Dietitians Association of Australia 34th National Conference 'Cultivating Fresh Evidence' (2017)
DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12354
Co-authors Kym Rae, Clare Collins, Leanne Brown
2017 Vincze L, Rollo M, Callister R, Hutchesson MJ, Collins C, 'VITAL change for mums: A feasibility study investigating tailored video-coaching for nutrition and exercise care for postpartum women.', Nutrition & Dietetics (2017)
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Robin Callister
2017 Ashton L, Morgan P, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo M, Collins C, 'Preliminary efficacy of the ''HEYMAN'' program for young men on dietary outcomes: A pilot randomised controlled trial', Nutrition & Dietetics (2017)
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2017 Rollo M, Macdonald-Wicks L, Burrows T, Hutchesson MJ, Collins C, Kerr D, Truby H, 'Telehealth practices of Australian dietitians', Nutrition & Dietetics (2017)
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Lesley Wicks, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2017 Rollo ME, MacDonald-Wicks L, Collins CE, 'Evaluation of the introduction of eHealth skills training for dietetic students', Nutrition & Dietetics (2017)
Co-authors Clare Collins, Lesley Wicks
2017 Ashman A, Collins CE, Brown LJ, Rae KM, Rollo ME, 'Validity and acceptability of a smartphone image-based dietary assessment method for pregnant women' (2017)
Co-authors Clare Collins, Leanne Brown, Kym Rae
2016 Rollo ME, Bucher T, Smith SP, Collins C, 'The effect of an augmented reality aid on error associated with serving food' (2016)
Co-authors Tamara Bucher, Shamus Smith, Clare Collins
2016 Ashman AM, Collins CE, Brown LJ, Rae KM, Rollo ME, 'Evaluation of a mobile phone tool for dietary assessment and to guide nutrition counselling among pregnant women.' (2016)
Co-authors Clare Collins, Leanne Brown, Kym Rae
2016 Ashman AM, Collins CE, Brown LJ, Rae KM, Rollo ME, 'Validation of an image-based dietary assessment method using smartphones for pregnant women.' (2016)
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Kym Rae, Clare Collins
2016 Rollo M, Ashman A, Brown L, Rae KM, Weatherall L, Skinner G, et al., 'The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (2016)
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Kym Rae, Roger Smith, Clare Collins
2016 Morgan PJ, Aguiar EJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Rollo ME, Callister R, 'Improved diet quality and body weight in men after participating in the pulse T2DM prevention randomised controlled trial' (2016)
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Myles Young
2016 Hemsley BA, Georgiou A, Adams N, Rollo M, McCarthy S, Hill S, et al., 'Consumer health informatics for people who use AAC: Views on e-health records at home', ISAAC 2016 Toronto Bringing us together: Full program (2016) [E1]
Co-authors Paulette Vanvliet, Bronwyn Hemsley
2016 Brain K, Rollo M, Burrows TL, Hayes C, Hodson F, Collins C, 'THE NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF PATIENTS ATTENDING HUNTER INTEGRATED PAIN SERVICE', Yes (2016)
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2016 Spencer L, Rollo M, Hutchesson M, Collins C, 'A cross sectional study investigating motivations for weight change and weight loss methods used in women following child birth', http://www.alswh.org.au/scientificmeeting2016/program (2016)
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2016 Spencer L, Rollo M, Hutchesson M, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Study protocol. VITAL for mums- A feasibility study investigating tailored video-coaching for exercise and nutrition care for postpartum women' (2016)
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2016 Hemsley B, Rollo M, Balandin S, Georgiou A, Hill S, 'Health literacy demands of personally-controlled electronic health record systems: A conceptual review to inform the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities', JOURNAL OF INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY RESEARCH (2016)
Co-authors Bronwyn Hemsley
2015 Rollo M, Hutchesson M, 'Challenges influencing weight management among postpartum women: insights to support program design' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson
2015 Hutchesson MJ, Rollo M, Krukowski R, Ells L, Harvey J, Morgan P, et al., 'Are weight loss interventions delivered using eHealth technologies effective? A systematic review with meta-analysis.', ISBNPA 2015: Advancing Behavior Change Science: Abstract Book (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Melinda Hutchesson
2015 Ashton L, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo M, Morgan P, Thompson D, Collins CE, 'Motivators and barriers to engaging in healthy eating and physical activity in young adult men' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Melinda Hutchesson, Lee Ashton
2015 Collins CE, Rollo ME, Burrows TL, 'The adaptation of the Australian Eating Survey to an online system with immediate analysis and tailored feedback on usual dietary intake', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2015 Collins CE, Burrows TL, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, 'Translating Australian dietary guidelines to an online diet quality scoring tool with immediate feedback: The Healthy Eating Quiz', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2015 Hemsley BA, Georgiou A, Balandin S, Hill S, Rollo M, Steel J, 'Improving the care and safety of adults with severe communication disability in hospital: Applying the generic model of patient safety', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Bronwyn Hemsley
2015 Rollo M, Ashman A, Brown L, Rae KM, Weatherall L, Skinner G, Smith R, 'A brief tool for assessing diet quality and selected nutrient intakes from image-based dietary records: Design and preliminary results from use in pregnant women' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Roger Smith, Leanne Brown, Geoff Skinner, Kym Rae
2015 Schumacher TL, Burrows TL, Rollo ME, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Initiating and measuring appropriate dietary changes in cardiovascular populations', 23rd Annual Conference for Cardiovascular Health and Rehabilitation Association of NSW and ACT (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Tracy Schumacher, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2015 Schumacher TL, Burrows TL, Rollo ME, Spratt NJ, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Effectiveness of a dietary intervention to reduce cardiovascular risk factors in a hyperlipidaemic population', Australian Cardiac Rehabilitation Association 25th Annual Scientific Meeting (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Neil Spratt, Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Tracy Schumacher
2015 Spencer L, Rollo M, Collins CE, Hutchesson MJ, 'Weight management after childbirth: Factors perceived to influence healthy eating and physical activity', Developmental Origins of Health and Disease Society of Australia and New Zealand Annual Conference (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2015 Ashton L, Hutchesson M, Rollo M, Morgan P, Collins C, 'Motivators and barriers to engaging in healthy eating and physical activity in young adult men: a cross-sectional study.' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Melinda Hutchesson, Lee Ashton
2015 Ashton L, Hutchesson M, Rollo M, Morgan P, Collins C, 'Young men's motivators and barriers to healthy eating and their preferences for a healthy eating intervention' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Lee Ashton, Philip Morgan
2015 Ashman A, Collins C, Brown LJ, Rollo M, Rae K, 'Investigating dietary intakes of Indigenous Australian women and their infants in the Gomeroi gaaynggal study', A Healthy Start for the Human Race... 2015 DOHaD Conference. (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Clare Collins, Kym Rae
2014 Ashton L, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo M, Morgan P, Collins CE, 'Have young men been targeted to change risk behaviours? A scoping review of the literature.', Obesity Reviews (2014)
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Lee Ashton
2014 Collins CE, Pezdirc K, Whitehead R, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo M, Perrett D, Ozakinci G, 'Higher BMI Is Associated With Lower Skin Carotenoid Concentration Measured By Spectrophotometry: Implications For Vegetable And Fruit Consumption.', Obesity Reviews (2014)
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2014 Collins CE, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo M, MacDonald-Wicks L, Giglia R, Hauck L, Burrows T, 'What women want: a survey of needs of women.', Obesity Reviews (2014)
Co-authors Lesley Wicks, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2014 Probst Y, Nguyen DT, Li W, Rollo ME, 'Diet and nutrition guidance based on food image classification for dietary intake reporting', Nutrition and Dietetics (2014)
2014 Spencer L, Rollo M, Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, 'Perceived healthy eating and physical activty factors influencing weight management in postpartum women: A mixed methods analysis', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Volume 8, Pages 96-96 (2014)
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2014 Burrows T, Hutchesson M, Rollo M, Callister R, Collins CE, 'A review of Australian adult obesity research funding', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Volume 8, Pages 11-12, (2014)
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Tracy Burrows, Robin Callister
2014 Rollo M, Hutchesson M, McCoy P, Collins CE, 'Dietitian Connect: A feasibility study to evaluate the addition of video consultations with a dietitian to a web-based weight loss program', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Volume 8, Pages 88-89, (2014)
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2014 Rollo M, Harvey A, Hutchesson M, Jones P, Crook A, Skinner G, Collins C, 'Development of a virtual clinic platform within an existing web-based weight loss program' (2014)
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Geoff Skinner, Clare Collins
2014 Rollo M, Hutchesson M, Krukowski R, Ells L, Harvey J, Morgan P, et al., 'Effectiveness of weight loss interventions delivered using eHealth technologies: A systematic review' (2014)
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Melinda Hutchesson, Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Ashman A, Weatherall L, Brown LJ, Collins C, Naden M, Rae K, et al., 'Infant feeding practices in an Aboriginal cohort of pregnancy and infancy - the Gomeroi gaaynggal study', Aboriginal Health Conference 2014 (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Roger Smith, Leanne Brown, Clare Collins, Kym Rae
2013 Burrows T, Collins CE, Hutchesson M, Rollo M, Guest M, Boggess M, 'Validation of fruit and vegetable intakes assessed by food frequency questionnaire using plasma carotenoids in adults', Australasian Medical Journal (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2013 Ashton L, Rollo M, Hutchesson M, Young MD, Morgan P, Callister R, et al., 'A comparison of outcomes of young and old adult males in the SHED-IT weight loss program for men', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Myles Young, Melinda Hutchesson, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Lee Ashton
2013 Rollo ME, Sheard J, Ash S, 'Use of a photographic food diary method to document dietary intake in people with Parkinson¿s disease.', Nutrition & Dietetics (2013)
2012 Rollo ME, Te Kloot A, Ash S, 'Digital dietetics: Practices and attitudes relating to technology use among Australian dietitians', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics (2012) [E3]
2012 Rollo ME, Te Kloot A, Ash S, 'Is there a place for pixels in our practice? Dietitians' attitudes towards the use of photographic dietary records within the nutrition care process', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics (2012) [E3]
2012 Hutchesson M, Rollo M, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Is a web, smartphone, or paper based food record more accurate or acceptable?' (2012)
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2011 Rollo ME, Ash S, Lyons-Wall P, Russell A, 'Diet Bytes: Can mobile phones be used to accurately measure intake in adults with type 2 diabetes?', Nutrition & Dietetics (2011)
2009 Rollo ME, Ash S, Lyons-Wall P, Russell A, 'The useability and acceptability of a mobile phone device to record dietary intake' (2009)
2009 Kelly A, Rollo ME, Ash S, 'The PEAs Study: Comparison of reference food photograph and food models in assisting portion size estimation from photographs' (2009)
2008 Rollo ME, Ash S, Banks M, Suter M, 'Body composition and mortality in a group of adults with severe developmental disabilities', Nutrition & Dietetics (2008)
Show 46 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 17
Total funding $303,537

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20175 grants / $145,537

Evaluation of a type 2 diabetes risk reduction program for women with recent gestational diabetes$59,911

Funding body: Diabetes Australia

Funding body Diabetes Australia
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Megan Rollo, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson, Professor Robin Callister, Dr Katie-Jane Wynne, Mr Ashley Young, Dr Elroy Aguiar
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1600701
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Efficacy of lifestyle programs (with a diet and physical activity component) tailored for individuals with T2DM. $27,816

Funding body: Ethos Health

Funding body Ethos Health
Project Team Doctor Megan Rollo
Scheme TechVoucher Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700535
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Evidence check on dietary patterns and cardiovascular disease outcomes$26,000

Funding body: The Sax Institute

Funding body The Sax Institute
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Megan Rollo, Associate Professor Tracy Burrows, Doctor Tracy Schumacher, Doctor Lesley MacDonald-Wicks, Doctor Amanda Patterson
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700018
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Demand, acceptability and preliminary efficacy of a type 2 diabetes risk reduction program for women with recent gestational diabetes$21,853

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Megan Rollo, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Robin Callister, Dr Katie-Jane Wynne, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson, Dr Elroy Aguiar
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700567
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

2017 International Visitor from University of Waterloo, Canada$9,957

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Megan Rollo, Assistant Professor Sharon Kirkpatrick
Scheme International Research Visiting Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1600896
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20161 grants / $21,000

Wraps Unwrapped$21,000

Funding body: Quality Bakers Australia Pty Limited

Funding body Quality Bakers Australia Pty Limited
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Megan Rollo, Associate Professor Tracy Burrows, Doctor Tamara Bucher, Doctor Kris Pezdirc, Doctor Rebecca Williams
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1601145
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20156 grants / $80,000

The HEY MAN pilot study: using eHeatlh to enhance your mental health, physical activity and nutrition in young men$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Megan Rollo, Professor Robin Callister, Doctor Geoffrey Skinner, Doctor Shamus Smith, Mr Lee Ashton
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401510
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Emlyn and Jennie Thomas Postgraduate Medical Research Scholarship$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Megan Rollo, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson, Mrs Lisa Vincze
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1500649
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Providing one-on-one virtual exercise care via video consultations: a feasibility study in pregnancy.$10,000

Funding body: Exercise and Sports Science Australia

Funding body Exercise and Sports Science Australia
Project Team Doctor Megan Rollo, Mrs Lisa Vincze, Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson
Scheme Tom Penrose Research and Community Service Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401192
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Nutrition’s role in chronic pain management$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Megan Rollo, Associate Professor Tracy Burrows, Dr Christopher Hayes, Ms Fiona Hodson
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501387
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

eHealth research project measuring the impact of web-based feedback on dietary intake in improving eating patterns and health$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Megan Rollo, Associate Professor Tracy Burrows, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501388
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Evaluation of a community-focused healthy lifestyle challenge$5,000

Funding body: Newcastle Herald

Funding body Newcastle Herald
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Megan Rollo
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500177
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20142 grants / $20,000

Using focus groups to understand young adult males motivators and barriers to participating in a Healthy Lifestyle Program$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson, Doctor Megan Rollo, Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301360
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Helping pregnant women achieve a healthy lifestyle and good outcomes for themselves and their baby in terms of health and well-being$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Megan Rollo, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson, Mrs Lisa Vincze
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401512
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20133 grants / $37,000

Dietitian Connect: The feasibility of providing online real-time consultations with a dietitian in combination with a web-based weight loss program$30,000

This project involved the development and testing of a prototype “virtual clinic” platform for the provision of online real-time consultations (web/video-conferencing) with a dietitian within a web-based weight loss platform.

Funding body: NSW Government

Funding body NSW Government
Project Team

Dr Megan Rollo, Dr Melinda Hutchesson, Professor Clare Collins

Scheme Techvoucher
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

Nutrition and Dietetics$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Megan Rollo
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1301074
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

mHealth Summit 2013, Washington DC USA, 6-11 December 2013$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Megan Rollo
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1301059
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current10

Total current UON EFTSL

Masters0.5
PhD3.27

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Using Machine Learning and Motion Tracking for the Detection of Eating Occasions in Dietary Assessment PhD (Information Technology), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Visualising Dietary Patterns: New Insights Into Eating Behaviours PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Efficacy of Varying Levels of Technology-Delivered Personalised Feedback on Dietary Patterns in Motivating Young Australian Adults to Improve Diet Quality and Eating Habits PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 Masters Evaluation of a Type 2 Diabetes Risk Reduction Program for Women with Recent Gestational Diabetes M Philosophy (Nutrition&Diet), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Cost-effectiveness Analysis of Prenatal Nutrition Interventions and Infant Health Outcomes PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Development of a Personality Based Intervention for Treatment of Addictive Eating Behaviours PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Impact of Experiential Nutrition Education Using 3D Food Models and Mobile Technology in Children Aged 10-13 PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Examining the impact of supportive tools including food labels and an augmented reality application on food and nutrition knowledge and portion size selection in pregnant women PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Nutrition's Role in the Management of Chronic Pain PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Weight Management During Pregnancy and Following Childbirth PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Optimising Dietary Intake and Nutrition Related Health Outcomes in Aboriginal Women and their Children PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Development and Evaluation of the HEYMAN (Harnessing Ehealth to enhance Young Men's Mental Health, Activity and Nutrition) Healthy Lifestyle Program for Young Adult Men Aged 18-25 Years PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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News

How are dietary intakes measured?

October 12, 2016

A team of UON researchers, led by Professor Clare Collins, is collaborating with national and international experts in order to improve the understanding of how dietary intake is measured and assessed amongst Australian researcher and health practitioners.

smartphone food

Smart snapshot of pregnancy diets

July 28, 2014

With little being known about the diets of expectant Indigenous mums, University of Newcastle nutrition researchers are using smartphone technology to gather first-hand insights and provide personalised feedback.

Young men exercising

Healthy lifestyle study targets young men

March 19, 2014

Young men are the target of a new University of Newcastle study aiming to tailor a healthy lifestyle program that meets their specific needs.

Diet Bytes

Diet Bytes and Baby Bumps

October 18, 2013

A University of Newcastle study will assess the use of smartphones as a new method for pregnant women to record their nutritional intake.

Dr Megan Rollo

Position

Post Doctoral Research Fellow
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Nutrition and Dietetics

Contact Details

Email megan.rollo@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5649

Office

Room ATC309
Building ATC Building
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