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Dr Kirrilly Pursey

Associate Lecturer

School of Health Sciences

Filling the Gaps: the Evidence of Food Addiction

The concept of food addiction has had a controversial history. Despite the documentation of the condition in many animal models, evidence for the condition in humans is still lacking.

“There’s quite a lot of overlap in the diagnosis of binge eating disorder and the current ‘diagnostic’ techniques we use for food addiction,” says food-addiction researcher and Accredited Practising Dietitian, Dr Kirrilly Pursey.

“But there are some people who seem to display a distinct addictive-like phenotype, and we want to find out more about this.”

Improving care, improving outcomes

With Kirrilly’s PhD research, she is working to optimise treatment outcomes for patients with these addictive-like behaviours. With an improved definition of what food addiction looks like, patients could be better ‘diagnosed’ and treated.

“That's where I would really like to see to progress in the food addiction field.”

One of the major gaps in the evidence base surrounding food addiction had been around the types of foods which provoke these addictive behaviours.

“We wanted to know whether specific foods could elicit the same sort of reactions as addictive substances like drugs and alcohol. So we looked for similar behaviours and at the activation of parts of the brain that drive the addictive process.”

Behaviours and attitudes towards food

Kirrilly worked alongside nutrition researcher, Dr Tracy Burrows, and MRI researcher, Associate Professor Peter Stanwell to examine changes in brain metabolism induced by ‘junk foods’ and ‘healthy foods’. Kirrilly worked with the same team throughout her Honours project, where she looked for changes that occur in brain chemistry following the consumption of energy drinks.

For her PhD project, Kirrilly also looked at attitudes and behaviours around food using the Yale Food Addiction scale and the Australian Eating Survey, developed by UON’s leading nutrition researcher, Professor Clare Collins.

“We conducted a survey to figure out what kind of foods are associated with these addictive behaviours and we found that it tended to be high sugar, high fat foods in particular.

“We also found that when we compared different studies, the people who had higher food addiction scores were those who were overweight or obese.”

Seeking out advice from across the globe

One of the major highlights of Kirrilly’s project was being awarded an HMRI Jennie Thomas Travel Scholarship. She flew all over North America visiting the researchers whose work she had been immersed in throughout her research.

Her trip included a visit to Assistant Professor Ashley Gearhardt, who developed the Yale Food Addiction Scale which had been so central to Kirrilly’s studies.

“She was so incredibly passionate about what she was doing."

“It was exciting and surreal to meet the researchers that you've read about.”

Meeting with these researchers also gave Kirrilly a new perspective on her work.

“They were all psychologists – when I went into this field as a dietitian, I thought it was going to be all about food and the chemicals in the food."

“Now I realise it’s completely multi-disciplinary. Once we can understand and define food addiction, treating it will be entirely multidisciplinary too.”

Combining research with clinical practise

Kirrilly maintains her clinical presence whilst working on her research projects.

“It's definitely beneficial being involved with both clinical and research practise, because what's the point in coming up with an answer to a research question if you can’t apply it to clinical situations?"

“I think when you work clinically you get a feel for what's going to work and what's not going to work, so it's a good way to know how these things are going to translate into practice. Sometimes when I talk to my patients they’ll say things like, ‘I'm addicted to lollies,’ or, ‘I'm craving chocolate,’ and the researcher side of my brain just goes, ‘I wish I could find out why you think these kinds of things!"

“But then at the same time it also makes you realise - I'm doing this research because hopefully it's going to help someone to have a more positive relationship with food.”

Kirrill Pursey

Filling the Gaps: the Evidence of Food Addiction

Dr Kirrilly Pursey is working to optimise treatment outcomes for patients who display addictive-like behaviours toward food.

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Career Summary

Biography

Dr Kirrilly Pursey is an early career researcher and currently holds a lecturing position within the School of Health Sciences at the University of Newcastle. Kirrilly was awarded her PhD in 2016 with her thesis exploring the neurobiological underpinnings of compulsive overeating. Her current research focuses on a range of disordered eating behaviours, particularly in children and adolescents. Kirrilly has experience in the development, implementation and evaluation of innovative models of care within the Local Health District as well as the delivery of workforce development and training to clinicians. She is an Accredited Practising Dietitian and has extensive dietetic experience across inpatient and community settings.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2015 Best Poster Presentation, Annual Scientific Meeting, Wellington, NZ
Nutrition Society of Australia
2014 Research Higher Degree Student Publication Award
University of Newcastle - School of Health Sciences
2013 Research Higher Degree Student Best Confirmation Award
University of Newcastle - School of Health Sciences
2012 Vice Chancellors Award for Outstanding Candidates
The University of Newcastle
2012 University Medal, Nutrition and Dietetics
University of Newcastle

Research Award

Year Award
2016 Greaves Family Early Career Researcher Grant
Hunter Medical Research Institute
2014 Jennie Thomas Travel Grant
Hunter Medical Research Institute

Scholarship

Year Award
2014 Neville Eric Sansom Diabetes Scholarship
The University of Newcastle
2013 Hunter Valley Research Foundation Robin McDonald Scholarship
Hunter Valley Research Foundation
2012 Australian Postgraduate Award
The University of Newcastle
2011 Deputy Vice Chancellor Honours Research Scholarship
The University of Newcastle
2010 Summer Vacation Scholarship
University of Newcastle - School of Health Sciences
2010 Rural Allied Health Undergraduate Scholarship
NSW Health
2007 David Beer Scholarship
The University of Newcastle

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
NUDI3220 Clinical Nutrition 1
University of Newcastle - School of Health Sciences
Tutor 1/2/2018 - 30/6/2018
HLSC1220 Food Science 1
The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Tutor 22/7/2013 - 4/11/2016
HLSC1220 Food Science 1
The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Lecturer 18/7/2016 - 2/12/2016
NUDI4290 Paediatric Nutrition and Diet
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Lecturer 3/2/2020 - 30/6/2020
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (18 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Pursey KM, Hay P, Bussey K, Trompeter N, Lonergan A, Pike KM, et al., 'Diabetes and disordered eating behaviours in a community-based sample of Australian adolescents.', J Eat Disord, 8 5 (2020)
DOI 10.1186/s40337-020-0282-y
2020 Pursey KM, Hart M, Jenkins L, McEvoy M, Smart CE, 'Screening and identification of disordered eating in people with type 1 diabetes: A systematic review.', J Diabetes Complications, 34 107522 (2020)
DOI 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2020.107522
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Carmel Smart, Mark Mcevoy
2019 Contreras-Rodriguez O, Burrows T, Pursey KM, Stanwell P, Parkes L, Soriano-Mas C, Verdejo-Garcia A, 'Food addiction linked to changes in ventral striatum functional connectivity between fasting and satiety', Appetite, 133 18-23 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Introduction: The concept of ¿food addiction¿ (FA) has gained popularity in view of clinical and neurobiological overlaps between excessive food intake and add... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Introduction: The concept of ¿food addiction¿ (FA) has gained popularity in view of clinical and neurobiological overlaps between excessive food intake and addictive disorders. However, no studies have examined the link between FA and striatocortical circuits involved in addictive disorders, or the influence of homeostatic status, which regulates the drive to eat, on these systems. This study aims to investigate changes in striatal functional connectivity between fasted and fed conditions among adults ranging in body mass index (BMI) and FA symptoms. Methods: Thirty adults were recruited from the general community and completed self-reported surveys including demographics, FA symptoms using the Yale Food Addiction Scale, as well as height and weight measures, used to determine BMI. Participants completed two 3-T MRI scans, one in a fasted state and one in a fed state. We conducted seed-based analyses to examine between-session (¿fasted > fed¿) change in resting-state functional connectivity of the ventral and dorsal striatum, and its association with FA scores (controlling for BMI). Results: Higher symptoms of FA correlated with greater changes in ventral caudate-hippocampus connectivity between fasted and fed conditions. FA symptoms did not correlate with connectivity in the dorsal caudate circuit. Post-hoc analyses revealed that participants with higher symptoms of FA had ventral caudate-hippocampus hyperconnectivity in the fasted scan only, as well as a significant reduction of this connectivity between the fasted and fed scans. Conclusions: Heightened connectivity in the ventral striatum during a fasted state, which has been linked to reward prediction signals, underpins symptoms of FA. In contrast, connectivity in the dorsal striatum or ¿habit¿ system is unrelated to homeostatic status and FA symptoms, and is thus less relevant for subclinical manifestations of FA.

DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2018.10.009
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Peter Stanwell, Tracy Burrows
2018 Li JTE, Pursey KM, Duncan MJ, Burrows T, 'Addictive Eating and Its Relation to Physical Activity and Sleep Behavior.', Nutrients, 10 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu10101428
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Mitch Duncan
2018 Nepal S, Kypri K, Pursey K, Attia J, Chikritzhs T, Miller P, 'Effectiveness of lockouts in reducing alcohol-related harm: Systematic review.', Drug and alcohol review, 37 527-536 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/dar.12699
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Attia, Kypros Kypri
2018 Burrows T, Kay-Lambkin F, Pursey K, Skinner J, Dayas C, 'Food addiction and associations with mental health symptoms: a systematic review with meta-analysis', Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 31 544-572 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 The British Dietetic Association Ltd. Background: The present study systematically reviewed the literature aiming to determine the relationships between food addiction, as ... [more]

© 2018 The British Dietetic Association Ltd. Background: The present study systematically reviewed the literature aiming to determine the relationships between food addiction, as measured by the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS), and mental health symptoms. Methods: Nine databases were searched using keywords. Studies were included if they reported: (i) YFAS diagnosis or symptom score and (ii) a mental health outcome, as well as the association between (i) and (ii). In total, 51 studies were included. Results: Through meta-analysis, the mean prevalence of food addiction diagnosis was 16.2%, with an average of 3.3 (range 2.85¿3.92) food addiction symptoms being reported. Subanalyses revealed that the mean number of food addiction symptoms in populations seeking treatment for weight loss was 3.01 (range 2.65¿3.37) and this was higher in groups with disordered eating (mean 5.2 3.6¿6.7). Significant positive correlations were found between food addiction and binge eating [mean r¿=¿0.602 (0.557¿0.643), P¿<¿0.05], depression, anxiety and food addiction [mean r¿=¿0.459 (0.358¿0.550), r¿=¿0.483 (0.228¿0.676), P¿<¿0.05, respectively]. Conclusions: A significant, positive relationship exists between food addiction and mental health symptoms, although the results of the present study highlight the complexity of this relationship.

DOI 10.1111/jhn.12532
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Christopher Dayas, Frances Kaylambkin
2017 Burrows T, Goldman S, Pursey K, Lim R, 'Is there an association between dietary intake and academic achievement: a systematic review', Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 30 117-140 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 The British Dietetic Association Ltd. Background: The majority of literature examining the effect of dietary behaviour on academic achievement has focused on breakfast cons... [more]

© 2016 The British Dietetic Association Ltd. Background: The majority of literature examining the effect of dietary behaviour on academic achievement has focused on breakfast consumption only. Here, we aim to systematically review the literature investigating the broader effects of dietary intake and behaviours on school-aged children's academic achievement. Methods: A search was undertaken across seven databases using keywords. For studies to be included, they needed to be conducted in: school-aged children (5¿18 years); assess and report: (i) a measure of academic performance; (ii) a measure of dietary intake/behaviour; and (iii) the association between dietary intake/behaviours and academic performance. Forty studies were included in the review. Results: The majority of studies were cross-sectional in design (n = 33) and studied children aged >10 years, with very few reports in younger age groups. More than 30 different dietary assessment tools were used, with only 40% of those using a validated/standardised assessment method. Half the studies collected outcomes of academic achievement objectively from a recognised educational authority, whereas 10 studies used self-reported measures. The dietary outcomes most commonly reported to have positive associations with academic achievement were: breakfast consumption (n = 12) and global diet quality/meal patterns (n = 7), whereas negative associations reported with junk/fast food (n = 9). Conclusions: This review highlights that moderate associations exist for dietary intakes characterised by regular breakfast consumption, lower intakes of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods and overall diet quality with respect to outcomes of academic achievement. Future studies should consider the use of validated dietary assessment methods and standardised reporting of academic achievement.

DOI 10.1111/jhn.12407
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Rebecca Lim
2017 Pursey KM, Davis C, Burrows TL, 'Nutritional Aspects of Food Addiction', Current Addiction Reports, 4 142-150 (2017)

© 2017, Springer International Publishing AG. Purpose of Review: Behavioural and neurobiological similarities have been identified between the consumption of certain foods and add... [more]

© 2017, Springer International Publishing AG. Purpose of Review: Behavioural and neurobiological similarities have been identified between the consumption of certain foods and addiction-related disorders. However, few studies have investigated what components of food may promote an addictive-like response in humans. This review evaluates recent research concerning the nutritional aspects of addictive-like eating. Recent Findings: Based on the current evidence base, highly processed, hyper-palatable foods with combinations of fat and sugar appear most likely to facilitate an addictive-like response. Total fat content and glycaemic index also appear to be important factors in the addictive potential of foods. Despite public interest and evidence from animal studies, few studies have reported an association between sugar and addictive-like eating. Summary: Due to the paucity of studies, it is difficult to conclusively identify a specific food or ingredient as capable of triggering an addictive-like response in humans. Future studies using validated dietary assessment tools are essential and may inform the development of novel strategies to treat maladaptive eating behaviours.

DOI 10.1007/s40429-017-0139-x
Citations Scopus - 12
Co-authors Tracy Burrows
2017 Rollo ME, Aguiar EJ, Pursey KM, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, et al., 'Impact on dietary intake of a self-directed, gender-tailored diabetes prevention program in men', World Journal of Diabetes, 8 414-421 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.4239/wjd.v8.i8.414
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Megan Rollo, Myles Young, Philip Morgan
2016 Pursey KM, Gearhardt AN, Burrows TL, 'The relationship between "food addiction" and visceral adiposity in young females', Physiology and Behavior, 157 9-12 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Objectives: There is increasing interest in the role of addictive-like eating in weight gain. No studies have investigated associations between addictive-like... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Objectives: There is increasing interest in the role of addictive-like eating in weight gain. No studies have investigated associations between addictive-like eating and specific patterns of fat deposition which are sensitive indicators of chronic disease risk. This exploratory study aimed to evaluate relationships between Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) assessed "food addiction" and visceral adiposity. Methods: Australian adults aged 18-35 years were recruited to an online survey including demographics and the YFAS. The YFAS is a 25-item tool designed to assess addictive-like eating behaviors and uses two scoring outputs, "diagnosis" and "symptom scores". Participants had their anthropometric measurements taken [height, weight and body composition (visceral fat, fat mass, percentage body fat)] using a standardized protocol. Results: Ninety-three female participants (age 24.3 ± 4.0years, BMI 24.3 ± 6.0 kg/m2) completed all measurements. Twenty-one participants (22.3%) met the predefined criteria for YFAS "diagnosis". YFAS "symptom scores" were moderately correlated with visceral fat area (r = 0.36, p < 0.001), and "symptom scores" predicted increases in visceral fat area [r2 = 0.17, ß = 1.17, p = 0.001]. Effect sizes were moderate for all variables. Conclusion: This study showed that YFAS assessed FA was associated with visceral fat deposition, a sensitive indicator of increased cardiometabolic risk. Future research is required to investigate whether FA predicts future weight gain.

DOI 10.1016/j.physbeh.2016.01.018
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Tracy Burrows
2016 Pursey KM, Collins CE, Stanwell P, Burrows TL, 'The stability of 'food addiction' as assessed by the Yale Food Addiction Scale in a non-clinical population over 18-months', Appetite, 96 533-538 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. The Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) is a widely used tool to assess the behavioural indicators of addictive-like eating. No studies, however, have used a lon... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. The Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) is a widely used tool to assess the behavioural indicators of addictive-like eating. No studies, however, have used a longitudinal design to determine whether these addictive-like eating behaviours are a stable or transient phenomenon in a community-based population. This study aimed to evaluate whether food addiction Diagnosis and Symptom scores as assessed by the YFAS remain stable over 18-months in a non-clinical population. Young adults aged 18-35 years were recruited from the community to a web-based survey in 2013. The survey included demographics, anthropometrics and the YFAS. Participants who volunteered to be recontacted for future research were invited to complete the same survey 18-months later. The YFAS scoring outputs Diagnosis and Symptom scores were tested for agreement and reliability between the two time points. Of the 303 participants who completed the original survey and agreed to be recontacted, 69 participants (22.8% of those recontacted, 94% female, 67% normal weight at baseline) completed the 18-month follow-up survey. At baseline, thirteen participants met the YFAS predefined criteria for Diagnosis, while eleven participants met these criteria at the 18-month follow-up. YFAS Diagnosis was found to have moderate agreement [K = .50, 95% CI (.23, .77)] between the two time points while Symptom scores had good agreement [K = .70, 95% CI (.54, .83)]. Intraclass correlation coefficients were interpreted as moderate over the 18-month period for both the Diagnosis [ICC = .71, 95% CI (.45, .88)] and Symptom scores [ICC = .72, 95% CI (.58, .82)]. YFAS assessed food addiction Diagnosis and Symptom scores were found to be relatively stable over 18-months in a non-clinical population of predominantly female, young adults. Future research is required to determine the impact of behavioural weight loss interventions on YFAS assessed addictive-like eating.

DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2015.10.015
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Clare Collins, Peter Stanwell, Tracy Burrows
2015 Pursey KM, Collins CE, Stanwell P, Burrows TL, 'Foods and dietary profiles associated with 'food addiction' in young adults', Addictive Behaviors Reports, 2 41-48 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.. BackgroundIt has been suggested that addictive behaviors related to consumption of specific foods could contribute to overeating an... [more]

© 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.. BackgroundIt has been suggested that addictive behaviors related to consumption of specific foods could contribute to overeating and obesity. Although energy-dense, hyper-palatable foods are hypothesized to be associated with addictive-like eating behaviors, few studies have assessed this in humans. ObjectiveTo evaluate in young adults whether intakes of specific foods are associated with 'food addiction', as assessed by the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS), and to describe the associated nutrient intake profiles. DesignAustralian adults aged 18-35. years were invited to complete an online cross-sectional survey including demographics, the YFAS and usual dietary intake. Participants were classified as food addicted (FAD) or non-addicted (NFA) according to the YFAS predefined scoring criteria. ResultsA total 462 participants (86% female, 73% normal weight) completed the survey, with 14.7% (n = 68) classified as FAD. The FAD group had a higher proportion of females (p =. 01) and higher body mass index (p< .001) compared to NFA. Higher YFAS symptom scores were associated with higher percentage energy intake (%E) from energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods including candy, take out and baked sweet products, as well as lower %E from nutrient-dense core foods including whole-grain products and breakfast cereals. These remained statistically significant when adjusted for age, sex and BMI category (p = .001). ConclusionsStatistically significant associations were identified between YFAS assessed food addiction and dietary intake, specifically intakes of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods. However, the effect sizes were small limiting clinical applications. Further examination of the relationship between addictive-like eating and intake of specific foods in a nationally representative sample is warranted.

DOI 10.1016/j.abrep.2015.05.007
Citations Scopus - 37
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows, Peter Stanwell
2015 Burrows TL, Pursey KM, Stanwell P, 'The Application of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Investigate the Effect of a Commercial Energy Drink', European Journal of Nutrition & Food Safety, 5 75-87 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.9734/EJNFS/2015/9229
Co-authors Peter Stanwell, Tracy Burrows
2014 Pursey K, Burrows TL, Stanwell P, Collins CE, 'How accurate is web-based self-reported height, weight, and body mass index in young adults?', J Med Internet Res, 16 e4 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.2909
Citations Scopus - 120Web of Science - 117
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Peter Stanwell
2014 Pursey KM, Stanwell P, Gearhardt AN, Collins CE, Burrows TL, 'The prevalence of food addiction as assessed by the yale food addiction scale: A systematic review', Nutrients, 6 4552-4590 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Obesity is a global issue and it has been suggested that an addiction to certain foods could be a factor contributing to ... [more]

© 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Obesity is a global issue and it has been suggested that an addiction to certain foods could be a factor contributing to overeating and subsequent obesity. Only one tool, the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) has been developed to specifically assess food addiction. This review aimed to determine the prevalence of food addiction diagnosis and symptom scores, as assessed by the YFAS. Published studies to July 2014 were included if they reported the YFAS diagnosis or symptom score and were published in the English language. Twenty-five studies were identified including a total of 196,211 predominantly female, overweight/obese participants (60%). Using meta-analysis, the weighted mean prevalence of YFAS food addiction diagnosis was 19.9%. Food addiction (FA) diagnosis was found to be higher in adults aged >35 years, females, and overweight/obese participants. Additionally, YFAS diagnosis and symptom score was higher in clinical samples compared to non-clinical counterparts. YFAS outcomes were related to a range of other eating behavior measures and anthropometrics. Further research is required to explore YFAS outcomes across a broader spectrum of ages, other types of eating disorders and in conjunction with weight loss interventions to confirm the efficacy of the tool to assess for the presence of FA.

DOI 10.3390/nu6104552
Citations Scopus - 169Web of Science - 149
Co-authors Clare Collins, Peter Stanwell, Tracy Burrows
2014 Pursey KM, Stanwell PT, Callister RJ, Brain K, Collins CE, Burrows TL, 'Neural responses to visual food cues according to weight status: a systematic review of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies', Frontiers in Nutrition, 1 1-11 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fnut.2014.00007
Citations Scopus - 99
Co-authors Clare Collins, Katherine Brain, Tracy Burrows, Robert Callister, Peter Stanwell
2013 Burrows TL, Pursey KM, Hutchesson MJ, Stanwell PT, 'What are the health implications associated with the consumption of energy drinks? A systematic review', Nutrition Reviews, 71 135-148 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Tracy Burrows, Peter Stanwell
Pursey KM, Contreras-Rodriguez O, Collins CE, Stanwell P, Burrows TL, 'Food Addiction Symptoms and Amygdala Response in Fasted and Fed States', Nutrients, 11 1285-1285 [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu11061285
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Peter Stanwell
Show 15 more journal articles

Conference (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Pursey K, Collins C, Stanwell P, Burrows T, 'Is food addiction a stable phenomenon?', Wellington, New Zealand (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Stanwell, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2013 Pursey K, Stanwell P, Collins CE, Burrows T, 'The use of fMRI in food addiction: A systematic review', Obesity Facts: The European Journal of Obesity, Liverpool, UK (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Peter Stanwell, Tracy Burrows
2013 Pursey K, Burrows T, Collins CE, Stanwell P, 'Does food addiction exist in the young Australian adult population?', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows, Peter Stanwell
2013 Pursey K, Burrows T, Collins CE, Stanwell P, 'How accurate is web-based self-reported height and weight in young Australian adults?', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Stanwell, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2013 Ramadan S, Burrows TL, Pursey KM, Stanwell PT, 'Brain MRS after consumption of commercially available energy drink', Proceedings of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Peter Stanwell, Saadallah Ramadan
2012 Burrows TL, Pursey KM, Hutchesson MJ, Stanwell PT, 'What are the health implications associated with the consumption of energy drinks? A systematic review', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Stanwell, Tracy Burrows, Melinda Hutchesson
Show 3 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 4
Total funding $40,500

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20173 grants / $30,500

Greaves Family Early Career Research Support Grant$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Kirrilly Pursey
Scheme Greaves Family Early Career Support Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1700715
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

HETI Workplace Learning Grant$4,000

Funding body: HETI (Health Education and Training Institute)

Funding body HETI (Health Education and Training Institute)
Scheme Workplace Learning Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Faculty of Health and Medicine ECR Pilot Grant$1,500

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine Pilot Grant University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine Pilot Grant University of Newcastle
Scheme UON Faculty of Health and Medicine Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20151 grants / $10,000

Jennie Thomas Medical Research Travel Grant - Food Addiction Study$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Kirrilly Pursey, Assistant Professor Ashley Gearhardt, Dr Nicole Avena, Professor Caroline Davis
Scheme Jennie Thomas Medical Research Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500426
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 PhD Investigating the Effectiveness of a Dietitian Intervention on Food Addiction PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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News

How are dietary intakes measured?

October 12, 2016

A team of UON researchers, led by Professor Clare Collins, is collaborating with national and international experts in order to improve the understanding of how

Survey to explore junk food 'addiction' in young adults

August 11, 2015

How does the brain react to certain food? Can we really be addicted?

Food addiction

October 14, 2013

Our researchers are hoping to determine whether ‘addiction’ to foods high in salt, fat and sugar is contributing to the obesity epidemic.

Dr Kirrilly Pursey

Position

Associate Lecturer
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email kirrilly.pursey@newcastle.edu.au

Office

Room Enter Building code/room CH123
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