Ms Erin Clarke

Ms Erin Clarke

Research student

Career Summary

Biography

Erin is a PhD candidate from the School of Health Sciences. She completed her Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (Honours Class I) in 2016 and is an Accredited Practicing Dietitian. Her PhD is in Nutrition and Dietetics focusing on dietary assessment methods and weight loss. 
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Clarke ED, Rollo ME, Collins CE, Wood L, Callister R, Schumacher T, Haslam RL, 'Changes in vegetable and fruit intakes and effects on anthropometric outcomes in males and females', Nutrition and Dietetics, (2020)

© 2020 Dietitians Australia Aim: To investigate associations between changes in vegetable and fruit (V&F) intakes and anthropometric indices (weight, BMI, % body fat, waist ci... [more]

© 2020 Dietitians Australia Aim: To investigate associations between changes in vegetable and fruit (V&F) intakes and anthropometric indices (weight, BMI, % body fat, waist circumference), including differences by sex, during a dietary weight-loss intervention. Methods: Adults (18-45 years) with overweight/obesity (BMI 25-35 kg/m2) entered a 10-week pre-post study, receiving individualised consults with an Accredited Practising Dietitian targeting increased V&F intakes. Dietary intake was assessed using 24-hour recalls and food frequency questionnaires. Linear mixed models were used to examine how much of the changes in anthropometric indices were explained by changes in V&F intakes. Sex differences were assessed by Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Results: Of the 43 participants enrolled, 34 completed the study (53% female). Significant differences in energy intake and anthropometric indices were observed between males and females at baseline. After 10 weeks, females significantly reduced their weight (-2.9%, P <.01), BMI (-0.82 kg/m2, P <.01), waist circumference (-1.70 cm, P <.01), energy intake (-824 kJ/day, P =.01) and improved diet quality (-14.0% energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods, P <.01). Males significantly reduced weight (-2.5%, P =.04), BMI (-0.76 kg/m2, P =.03), waist circumference (-2.40 cm, P =.02), energy intake (-2875 kJ/day, P <.01), increased fruit intake (+0.89 serves/day, P =.02) and improved diet quality (-6% energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods, P <.01). Compared to the other sex, greater reductions were observed in energy intake in males and energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods in females. Linear mixed models identified that changes in V&F intakes did not explain the variation in anthropometric measures. Conclusion: Future interventions may benefit from trialling sex tailored messages to enhance effects on anthropometric changes.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12638
Co-authors Tracy Schumacher, Megan Rollo, Clare Collins, Lisa Wood, Robin Callister
2020 Clarke ED, Clarke ED, Rollo ME, Rollo ME, Pezdirc K, Collins CE, Collins CE, 'Urinary biomarkers of dietary intake: A review', Nutrition Reviews, 78 364-381 (2020) [C1]

© 2019 The Author(s). Dietary intakes are commonly assessed by established methods including food frequency questionnaires, food records, or recalls. These self-report methods hav... [more]

© 2019 The Author(s). Dietary intakes are commonly assessed by established methods including food frequency questionnaires, food records, or recalls. These self-report methods have limitations impacting validity and reliability. Dietary biomarkers provide objective verification of self-reported food intakes, and represent a rapidly evolving area. This review aims to summarize the urinary biomarkers of individual foods, food groups, dietary patterns, or nutritional supplements that have been evaluated to date. Six electronic databases were searched. Included studies involved healthy populations, were published from 2000, and compared measured dietary intake with urinary markers. The initial search identified 9985 studies; of these, 616 full texts were retrieved and 109 full texts were included. Of the included studies, 67 foods and food components were studied, and 347 unique urinary biomarkers were identified. The most reliable biomarkers identified were whole grains (alkylresorcinols), soy (isoflavones), and sugar (sucrose and fructose). While numerous novel urinary biomarkers have been identified, further validation studies are warranted to verify the accuracy of self-reported intakes and utility within practice.

DOI 10.1093/nutrit/nuz048
Co-authors Kristine Pezdirc, Megan Rollo, Clare Collins
2020 Clarke ED, Rollo ME, Collins CE, Wood L, Callister R, Philo M, et al., 'The Relationship between Dietary Polyphenol Intakes and Urinary Polyphenol Concentrations in Adults Prescribed a High Vegetable and Fruit Diet.', Nutrients, 12 (2020)
DOI 10.3390/nu12113431
Co-authors Clare Collins, Megan Rollo, Lisa Wood
2019 Brain K, Burrows TL, Rollo ME, Chai LK, Clarke ED, Hayes C, et al., 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of nutrition interventions for chronic noncancer pain', Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 32 198-225 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 The British Dietetic Association Ltd. Background: This systematic review aimed to evaluate the impact of nutrition interventions on participant reported pain severity and i... [more]

© 2018 The British Dietetic Association Ltd. Background: This systematic review aimed to evaluate the impact of nutrition interventions on participant reported pain severity and intensity in populations with chronic pain. Methods: Eight databases were systematically searched for studies that included adult populations with a chronic pain condition, a nutrition intervention and a measure of pain. Where possible, data were pooled using meta-analysis. Seventy-one studies were included, with 23 being eligible for meta-analysis. Results: Studies were categorised into four groups: (i) altered overall diet with 12 of 16 studies finding a significant reduction in participant reported pain; (ii) altered specific nutrients with two of five studies reporting a significant reduction in participant reported pain; (iii) supplement-based interventions with 11 of 46 studies showing a significant reduction in pain; and (iv) fasting therapy with one of four studies reporting a significant reduction in pain. The meta-analysis found that, overall, nutrition interventions had a significant effect on pain reduction with studies testing an altered overall diet or just one nutrient having the greatest effect. Conclusions: This review highlights the importance and effectiveness of nutrition interventions for people who experience chronic pain.

DOI 10.1111/jhn.12601
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Clare Collins, Megan Rollo, Tracy Burrows, Katherine Brain
2018 Hutchesson M, Callister R, Morgan P, Pranata I, Clarke E, Skinner G, et al., 'A Targeted and Tailored eHealth Weight Loss Program for Young Women: The Be Positive Be Healthe Randomized Controlled Trial', Healthcare, 6 1-19 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/healthcare6020039
Co-authors Megan Whatnall, Geoff Skinner, Robin Callister, Lee Ashton, Ilung Pranata, Christopher Oldmeadow, Philip Morgan, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
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Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Hutchesson M, Callister R, Morgan PJ, Pranata I, Skinner G, Collins CE, 'A targeted and tailored eHealth weight loss program for young women: The Be Positive Be Healthe pilot randomised controlled trial', http://www.alswh.org.au/scientificmeeting2016/program, Newcastle, Australia (2016)
Citations Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Ilung Pranata, Philip Morgan, Lee Ashton, Christopher Oldmeadow, Geoff Skinner, Robin Callister
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News

Free fruit and veg and fewer kilos on offer in weight-loss study

September 26, 2017

Participants in a new HMRI nutrition and physical activity study at the University of Newcastle will gain a week’s worth of fruit and vegetables for free, along

Ms Erin Clarke

Contact Details

Email erin.clarke@uon.edu.au
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