Miss Lucy Kocanda

Miss Lucy Kocanda

Associate Lecturer

University Newcastle Department of Rural Health

Career Summary

Biography

Lucy is an Associate Lecturer in Nutrition and Dietetics at the University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health, in Tamworth NSW. This role involves working with undergraduate student dietitians, to support them in completing a range of clinical, community, food service and other placements. Lucy also works as an outreach dietitian, providing general inpatient and outpatient dietetics services in the smaller communities surrounding Tamworth. She is an Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD), and member of Dietitians Australia, including as a member of the Rehabilitation and Aged Care interest group leadership team.

Research Expertise

Lucy is a PhD candidate (Medicine) in the School of Medicine and Public Health, and Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition (PRC-PAN). Lucy's PhD research focuses on nutrition, behaviour change and cardiovascular disease prevention in rural communities. 


Qualifications

  • BACHELOR OF NUTRITION AND DIETETICS WITH HONOURS CLASS 1, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Knowledge Translation
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Rural Health

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
321099 Nutrition and dietetics not elsewhere classified 50
420321 Rural and remote health services 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Casual Web Learn Tutor Nursing & Midwifery University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
University Newcastle Department of Rural Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Onifade O, Kocanda L, Schumacher T, Rollo M, Rae K, Pringle KG, 'Effectiveness of interventions to optimise dietary intakes in the first 1000 d of life in Indigenous children: a systematic review.', Public Health Nutr, 1-14 (2021)
DOI 10.1017/S1368980021004328
Co-authors Kym Rae, Tracy Schumacher, Megan Rollo, Kirsty Pringle
2021 Hollis JL, Kocanda L, Seward K, Collins C, Tully B, Hunter M, et al., 'The impact of Healthy Conversation Skills training on health professionals' barriers to having behaviour change conversations: a pre-post survey using the Theoretical Domains Framework.', BMC Health Serv Res, 21 880 (2021)
DOI 10.1186/s12913-021-06893-4
Co-authors Tracy Schumacher, Maralyn Foureur, Jenna Hollis, Lesley Wicks, Clare Collins
2021 Brown LJ, Urquhart L, Squires K, Crowley E, Heaney S, Kocanda L, Schumacher T, 'Starting from scratch: Developing and sustaining a rural research team lessons from a nutrition and dietetics case study.', Aust J Rural Health, 29 729-741 (2021)
DOI 10.1111/ajr.12787
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Kelly Squires, Tracy Schumacher, Lisa Urquhart, Leanne Brown, Susan Heaney, Elesa Crowley
2021 Kocanda L, Schumacher TL, Kerr J, May J, Rollo ME, Neubeck L, Brown LJ, 'Current nutrition practice in cardiac rehabilitation programs', Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention, (2021)

Purpose: This study sought to determine current practice regarding nutrition care within cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs, including perceived barriers and facilitators to pro... [more]

Purpose: This study sought to determine current practice regarding nutrition care within cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs, including perceived barriers and facilitators to providing nutrition care in this setting. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in October and November 2019. Potential participants were program coordinators, identified through the Australian Cardiovascular Health and Rehabilitation Association program directory and invited to participate via e-mail. Results: Forty-nine respondents (response rate: 13%) are included in this analysis. Programs provided group (n = 42, 86%) and/or individual (n = 25, 51%) nutrition education, and most were supported by a dietitian (63%). However, the availability of dietitians and nutrition care provided at CR was variable. For example, individual education was consistently provided at 13 programs and usually by health professionals other than dietitians. Eight programs (16%) used a formal behavior change framework for nutrition care. Generally, respondents were positive about the role of nutrition; CR coordinators perceived nutrition as a valuable component of the program, and that they had good nutrition knowledge. An identified barrier was the financial resources available to support the provision of nutrition care. Conclusions: To ensure that patients receive the benefits of evidence-based nutrition care, program staff may require additional support, particularly regarding the use of evidence-based behavior change techniques. Key facilitators that may be leveraged to achieve this include the high value and priority that CR program coordinators place on nutrition care.

DOI 10.1097/HCR.0000000000000588
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Jennifer May, Leanne Brown, Tracy Schumacher
2021 Kocanda L, Brain K, Frawley J, Schumacher TL, May J, Rollo ME, Brown LJ, 'The Effectiveness of Randomized Controlled Trials to Improve Dietary Intake in the Context of Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Management in Rural Communities: A Systematic Review', Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 121 2046-2070.e1 (2021)

Background: Dietary intake is an important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, to our knowledge, there are no systematic reviews of nutrition interventions... [more]

Background: Dietary intake is an important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, to our knowledge, there are no systematic reviews of nutrition interventions in the context of cardiovascular disease prevention and management within rural communities. This is important to investigate, given the unique geographic, social, and contextual factors associated with rurality. Objective: Our primary objective was to systematically assess evidence on the effectiveness of randomized controlled trials to improve dietary intake in the context of cardiovascular disease prevention and management in rural communities. Methods: Nine electronic databases were searched from inception to June 2020, including MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, Embase, Emcare, PsycINFO, Scopus, Rural and Remote Health, CINAHL, and AMED. Randomized controlled trials that reported results of interventions with adult, rural populations and measured change in dietary intake compared to usual care, alternative intervention, or no intervention controls were included. Included randomized controlled trials were also assessed according to the TIDieR (Template for Intervention Description and Reporting) checklist and RE-AIM (reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, maintenance) framework. Results: Thirteen articles reporting results of randomized controlled trials were identified. Included articles reported a range of nutrition interventions and measured 18 dietary intake outcomes. Most studies (n = 10) demonstrated effectiveness in altering at least 1 dietary intake outcome, including fruit and/or vegetable (n = 9), fiber (n = 2), Dietary Risk Assessment score (n = 2), energy, dairy, carotene, vitamin C and sodium (all n = 1). However, there was wide variation in the reporting of intervention components (according to the TIDieR checklist) and impact (according to RE-AIM framework), resulting in difficulty interpreting the ┬┐real-world┬┐ implications of these results. Conclusions: Through this systematic review, we found limited evidence of improvement in dietary intakes due to nutrition interventions in the context of cardiovascular disease prevention and management in rural communities. Fruit and/or vegetable intakes were the most frequently reported dietary intake outcomes, and most likely to be improved across the included studies. Included studies were generally not well reported, which may hinder replication by clinicians and consolidation of the evidence base by other researchers. Given the substantial burden of cardiovascular disease experienced by those living in rural areas of developed countries, additional high-quality nutrition research that acknowledges the complexities of rural health is required.

DOI 10.1016/j.jand.2021.05.025
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Leanne Brown, Jennifer May, Katherine Brain, Tracy Schumacher
2021 Kocanda L, Fisher K, Brown LJ, May J, Rollo ME, Collins CE, et al., 'Informing telehealth service delivery for cardiovascular disease management: Exploring the perceptions of rural health professionals', Australian Health Review, 45 241-246 (2021)

Objective: To explore the perceptions of rural health professionals who use telehealth services for cardiovascular health care, including the potential role of telehealth in enhan... [more]

Objective: To explore the perceptions of rural health professionals who use telehealth services for cardiovascular health care, including the potential role of telehealth in enhancing services for this patient group. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten rural health professionals across a range of disciplines, including medicine, nursing and allied health. All study participants were based in the same rural region in New South Wales, Australia. Results: Participant responses emphasised the importance of including rural communities in ongoing dialogue to enhance telehealth services for cardiovascular care. Divergent expectations about the purpose of telehealth and unresolved technology issues were identified as factors to be addressed. Rural health professionals highlighted the importance of all stakeholders coming together to overcome barriers and enhance telehealth services in a collaborative manner. Conclusion: This study contributes to an evolving understanding of how health professionals based in regional Australia experience telehealth services. Future telehealth research should proceed in collaboration with rural communities, supported by policy that actively facilitates the meaningful inclusion of rural stakeholders in telehealth dialogue. What is known about the topic?: Telehealth is frequently discussed as a potential solution to overcome aspects of rural health, such as poor outcomes and limited access to services compared with metropolitan areas. In the context of telehealth and cardiovascular disease (CVD), research that focuses on rural communities is limited, particularly regarding the experiences of these communities with telehealth. What does this paper add?: This paper offers insight into how telehealth is experienced by rural health professionals. The paper highlights divergent expectations of telehealth's purpose and unresolved technological issues as barriers to telehealth service delivery. It suggests telehealth services may be enhanced by collaborative approaches that engage multiple stakeholder groups. What are the implications for practitioners?: The use and development of telehealth in rural communities requires a collaborative approach that considers the views of rural stakeholders in their specific contexts. To improve telehealth services for people living with CVD in rural communities, it is important that rural stakeholders have opportunities to engage with non-rural clinicians, telehealth developers and policy makers.

DOI 10.1071/AH19231
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Clare Collins, Tracy Schumacher, Andrew Boyle, Jennifer May, Leanne Brown, Karin Fisher
2018 Kocanda L, Brown L, Schumacher T, Rae K, Chojenta C, 'Breastfeeding duration and reasons for cessation in an Australian longitudinal cohort', Nutrition & Dietetics, 75 50-50 (2018)
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Catherine Chojenta, Kym Rae
Show 4 more journal articles

Conference (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Kocanda L, Brown L, Rollo M, Kerr J, Schumacher T, May J, 'Nutrition care at cardiac rehabilitation programs in Australia. Is it evidence based?', Nutrition care at cardiac rehabilitation programs in Australia. Is it evidence based?, Melbourne, Virtual Conference (2020)
DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12627
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Jennifer May, Tracy Schumacher, Megan Rollo
2020 Kocanda L, Schumacher T, Kerr J, May J, Rollo M, Brown L, 'Providing nutrition care at cardiac rehabilitation. A survey of current practice and attitudes in Australia', Virtual Conference (2020)
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Jennifer May, Tracy Schumacher, Megan Rollo
2019 Kocanda L, Kerr J, Brown L, May J, Schumacher T, Rollo M, Rutherford J, 'Nutrition education in cardiac rehabilitation: Time for change', Sydney, NSW (2019)
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Jennifer May, Leanne Brown, Tracy Schumacher
2018 Kocanda L, Brown L, May J, Rollo M, Collins C, Schumacher T, 'Can opportunistic CVD risk screening increase interest in own health for a rural population?', Tamworth, NSW (2018)
Co-authors Clare Collins, Leanne Brown, Megan Rollo, Jennifer May, Tracy Schumacher
2018 Brown LJ, Kocanda L, Schumacher T, Rae K, Chojenta CL, 'Breastfeeding duration and reasons for cessation in an Australia longitudinal cohort', Sydney (2018)
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Catherine Chojenta, Kym Rae
Show 2 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $4,293

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20211 grants / $4,293

The development and feasibility of ReJUICE your pain: Pilot dietary intervention in patients attending a tertiary pain service$4,293

Funding body: School of Health Sciences - University of Newcastle

Funding body School of Health Sciences - University of Newcastle
Project Team

Dr Katherine Brain, Lucy Kocanda, Dr Chris Hayes, Fiona Hodson

Scheme 2021 Research Support Grant Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2022 Honours Nutrition care needs of patients attending cardiac rehabilitation in the Hunter New England Health District Nutrition & Dietetics, College of Health, Medicine & Wellbeing - The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2021 Honours How dietetic practitioners and students are using social media in Australia Nutrition & Dietetics, College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Miss Lucy Kocanda

Positions

Associate Lecturer
University Newcastle Department of Rural Health
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Casual Web Learn Tutor Nursing & Midwifery
School of Nursing and Midwifery
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Contact Details

Email lucy.kocanda@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 02 6755 3571
Link Twitter

Office

Location Department of Rural Health, Tamworth

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