Dr Kathryn Reilly

Dr Kathryn Reilly

Conjoint Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Behavioural Science, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Health Science (Nutrition & Dietetics), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • chronic disease prevention
  • nutrition guideline implementation
  • policy implementation

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 50
111712 Health Promotion 50
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (29 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Foley BC, Owen KB, Bellew W, Wolfenden L, Reilly K, Bauman AE, Reece LJ, 'Physical Activity Behaviors of Children Who Register for the Universal, State-Wide Active Kids Voucher: Who Did the Voucher Program Reach?', Int J Environ Res Public Health, 17 (2020)
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17165691
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden
2020 Nathan NK, Sutherland RL, Hope K, McCarthy NJ, Pettett M, Elton B, et al., 'Implementation of a school physical activity policy improves student physical activity levels: Outcomes of a cluster-randomized controlled trial', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 17 1009-1018 (2020)

© 2020 Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.. All rights reserved. Aim: To assess the impact of a multistrategy intervention designed to improve teachers' implementation of a school... [more]

© 2020 Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.. All rights reserved. Aim: To assess the impact of a multistrategy intervention designed to improve teachers' implementation of a school physical activity (PA) policy on student PA levels. Methods: A cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted in 12 elementary schools. Policy implementation required schools to deliver 150 minutes of organized PA for students each week via physical education, sport, or class-based activities such as energizers. Schools received implementation support designed using the theoretical domains framework to help them implement the current policy. Results: A total of 1,502 children in kindergarten to grade 6 participated. At follow-up compared with control, students attending intervention schools had, measured via accelerometer, significantly greater increases in school day counts per minute (97.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 64.5 to 130.4; P <.001) and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) (3.0; 95% CI, 2.2-3.8, P <.001) and a greater decrease in sedentary time (-2.1; 95% CI, -3.9 to -0.4, P =.02) per school day. Teachers in intervention schools delivered significantly more minutes (36.6 min) of PA to their students at follow-up (95% CI, 2.7-70.5, P =.04). Conclusions: Supporting teachers to implement a PA policy improves student PA. Additional strategies may be needed to support teachers to implement activities that result in larger gains in student MVPA.

DOI 10.1123/jpah.2019-0595
Co-authors John Wiggers, Alix Hall, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden
2020 Nathan N, Murawski B, Hope K, Young S, Sutherland R, Hodder R, et al., 'The efficacy of workplace interventions on improving the dietary, physical activity and sleep behaviours of school and childcare staff: A systematic review', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 1-24 (2020) [C1]

© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. There is a need for effective interventions that improve the health and wellbeing of school and childcare staff. This rev... [more]

© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. There is a need for effective interventions that improve the health and wellbeing of school and childcare staff. This review examined the efficacy of workplace interventions to improve the dietary, physical activity and/or sleep behaviours of school and childcare staff. A secondary aim of the review was to assess changes in staff physical/mental health, productivity, and students¿ health behaviours. Nine databases were searched for controlled trials including randomised and non-randomised controlled trials and quasi-experimental trials published in English up to October 2019. PRISMA guidelines informed screening and study selection procedures. Data were not suitable for quantitative pooling. Of 12,396 records screened, seven articles (based on six studies) were included. Most studies used multi-component interventions including educational resources, work-based wellness committees and planned group practice (e.g., walking groups). Multiple outcomes were assessed, findings were mixed and on average, there was moderate risk of bias. Between-group differences in dietary and physical activity behaviours (i.e., fruit/vegetable intake, leisure-time physical activity) favoured intervention groups, but were statistically non-significant for most outcomes. Some of the studies also showed differences favouring controls (i.e., nutrient intake, fatty food consumption). Additional robust studies testing the efficacy of workplace interventions to improve the health of educational staff are needed.

DOI 10.3390/ijerph17144998
Co-authors Beatrice Murawski, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Hodder, Flora Tzelepis
2020 Reilly KL, Kennedy S, Porter G, Estabrooks P, 'Comparing, Contrasting, and Integrating Dissemination and Implementation Outcomes Included in the RE-AIM and Implementation Outcomes Frameworks', Frontiers in Public Health, 8 1-9 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fpubh.2020.00430
Co-authors Sarah Kennedy
2019 Grady A, Wolfenden L, Rissel C, Green S, Reilly K, Yoong SL, 'Effectiveness of a dissemination strategy on the uptake of an online menu planning program: A controlled trial', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 30 20-25 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: Online systems offer opportunities to provide effective, ongoing support to childcare services to implement dietary... [more]

© 2018 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: Online systems offer opportunities to provide effective, ongoing support to childcare services to implement dietary guidelines. The study aimed to assess the effectiveness of a dissemination strategy on childcare service: (i) adoption; and (ii) use of an online menu planning program designed to increase compliance with dietary guidelines. Methods: A nonrandomised controlled trial was conducted with long day care services across Australia. All services received an email invitation to access an online evidence-based menu planning program. Services in the intervention also received training, telephone contact and provision of a portable computer tablet to encourage program adoption and use. Outcomes were assessed at the 6-month follow-up using analytics data recorded by the online program. Outcomes included the proportion of services having accessed the program (adoption) and the proportion of services with a current menu entered in the program (use as intended). Results: Twenty-seven interventions and 19 control services took part. At the 6-month follow-up, 100% vs 58% of services had adopted the online menu planning program (OR: 14.67, 95% CI: 2.43-infinity; P¿<¿0.01) and 41% vs 5% of services had a current menu entered in the program (OR: 9.99, 95% CI: 1.01-534.57; P¿<¿0.01) in the intervention and control arms respectively. Conclusions: This study highlights the need for strategies to support adoption and use of an online menu planning program in childcare services if the potential benefits of such a program are to be achieved. Future research should explore the effectiveness of differing strategies to increase adoption and use of online programs at scale. So what?: Strategies to support childcare service uptake and use of online programs are required in order for the potential public health benefits of such technologies to be realised.

DOI 10.1002/hpja.220
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Serene Yoong
2019 Nathan N, Janssen L, Sutherland R, Hodder RK, Evans CEL, Booth D, et al., 'The effectiveness of lunchbox interventions on improving the foods and beverages packed and consumed by children at centre-based care or school: a systematic review and meta-analysis', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 16 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-019-0798-1
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Serene Yoong
2019 Sutherland R, Brown A, Nathan N, Janssen L, Reynolds R, Walton A, et al., 'Protocol for an effectiveness- implementation hybrid trial to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an m-health intervention to decrease the consumption of discretionary foods packed in school lunchboxes: the 'SWAP IT' trial', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 19 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-019-7725-x
Co-authors John Wiggers, Andrew Searles, Christopher Oldmeadow, Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan
2019 Reynolds R, Sutherland R, Nathan N, Janssen L, Lecathelinais C, Reilly K, et al., 'Feasibility and principal acceptability of school-based mobile communication applications to disseminate healthy lunchbox messages to parents', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 30 108-113 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: This study aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of using an existing school-based mobile communication... [more]

© 2018 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: This study aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of using an existing school-based mobile communication application to deliver messages to parents on how to pack a healthy lunchbox. Methods: A telephone survey was conducted with 196 primary school principals within the Hunter New England region of New South Wales, Australia, in 2016. Results: Almost two thirds of primary schools (59%) currently use a school-based mobile communication application to communicate with parents. Most principals (91%) agreed school lunchboxes need improving, of which 80% agree it is a school's role to provide information and guidelines to parents. However, only 50% of principals reported currently providing such information. The provision of lunchbox messages to parents by a third party appeared an acceptable model of delivery by principals. Larger schools and schools in urban and lower socio-economic localities were more likely to have used a school-based mobile communication application. Conclusion: The majority of principals recognise student lunchboxes need improving. The use of school-based mobile communication applications appears to be feasible and acceptable by principals as a method of communicating lunchbox messages to parents. So what?: Use of school-based mobile communication applications may be an effective method for delivering health information at a population level. Future research should assess the potential efficacy of disseminating health interventions via this modality.

DOI 10.1002/hpja.57
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Luke Wolfenden
2019 Delaney T, Sutherland R, Wyse R, Wolfenden L, Lecathelinais C, Janssen L, et al., 'A cross-sectional study of the nutritional quality of student canteen purchases from New South Wales primary-school canteens', Public Health Nutrition, 22 3092-3100 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 The Authors. Objective: To assess the nutritional quality of student canteen purchases at recess and lunch, including: (i) the mean energy (kilojoules), saturated fat (gram... [more]

© 2019 The Authors. Objective: To assess the nutritional quality of student canteen purchases at recess and lunch, including: (i) the mean energy (kilojoules), saturated fat (grams), total sugar (grams) and Na (milligrams) and percentage of energy from saturated fat and total sugar; and (ii) the proportion and types of foods purchased that are healthier (green) and less healthy (amber/red) according to a state school canteen policy.Design: A cross-sectional study of student canteen food and beverage recess and lunch purchases.Setting: Twenty-six randomly selected government primary schools that were non-compliant with a state school canteen policy from a region of New South Wales, Australia, were approached to participate.Participants: Students (aged 5-12 years) of participating schools.Results: Eighteen schools (69 %) consented to participate. On average students' recess purchases contained 571·2 kJ energy, 1·6 g saturated fat, 11·6 g total sugar and 132·4 mg Na with 10·0 % of energy from saturated fat and 37·8 % of energy from total sugar. Students' lunch purchases contained 685·4 kJ energy, 1·8 g saturated fat, 12·7 g total sugar and 151·4 mg Na with 9·5 % of energy from saturated fat and 31·8 % of energy from total sugar. Less healthy items represented 72 and 76 % of all items purchased at recess and lunch, respectively, with 'savoury snacks' and 'sugar-sweetened ice blocks and slushies' being the most common recess and lunch purchases, respectively.Conclusions: There is considerable scope to improve the nutritional quality of student purchases from primary-school canteens, with a high percentage of energy from total sugar. Future research is required to identify effective strategies to enhance compliance with canteen policies and support the purchase of healthier foods from school canteens.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980019001903
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong
2019 Nathan N, Wiggers J, Bauman AE, Rissel C, Searles A, Reeves P, et al., 'A cluster randomised controlled trial of an intervention to increase the implementation of school physical activity policies and guidelines: study protocol for the physically active children in education (PACE) study', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 19 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-019-6492-z
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Andrew Searles, John Wiggers, Christopher Oldmeadow, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland
2019 Reilly K, Nathan N, Grady A, Wu JHY, Wiggers J, Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, 'Barriers to implementation of a healthy canteen policy: A survey using the theoretical domains framework', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 30 9-14 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: Improving implementation of school healthy canteen policies requires a comprehensive understanding of implementatio... [more]

© 2018 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: Improving implementation of school healthy canteen policies requires a comprehensive understanding of implementation barriers. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess a range of barriers, as reported by canteen managers, using a quantitative survey instrument developed based on a theoretical framework. Methods: A cross sectional survey of primary school canteen managers from the Hunter New England region of New South Wales was conducted of eligible schools in the study region identified as having an operational canteen. Survey items assessed canteen manager employment status, canteen characteristics and potential barriers to healthy canteen policy implementation, aligned to the 14 domains of the theoretical domains framework via a 5-point Likert scale ranging from 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree). The mean domain scores of canteen managers were calculated, less than four indicating the canteen manager considered the domain was a barrier. Canteen managers were also asked to provide the current canteen menu for audit by a dietitian. Results: Of the 184 participants, 20% (n¿=¿36) were assessed as having menus compliant with the state policy. The five most common domains identified as potential barriers to policy implementation were behavioural regulation (n¿=¿117, 65%), skills (n¿=¿105, 57%), beliefs about capabilities (n¿=¿100, 55%), reinforcement (n¿=¿95, 52%) and goals (n¿=¿95, 52%). Canteen managers who reported optimism as a barrier had significantly lower odds of having a menu compliant with the state policy (OR¿=¿0.39; 95% CI 0.16-0.95, P¿=¿0.038). Conclusions: This study provides further evidence of perceived and actual barriers that canteen managers face when attempting to implement a healthy canteen policy, and highlights the need to address differences in canteen characteristics when planning implementation support. So what?: For public health benefits of nutrition policies within schools to be realised, the barriers to implementation need to be identified and used to help guide implementation support strategies.

DOI 10.1002/hpja.218
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Alice Grady, Nicole Nathan
2019 Reilly K, Yoong SL, Sutherland R, Wiggers JH, Delaney T, Reynolds RC, et al., 'Secondary school implementation of a healthy eating policy', HEALTH PROMOTION JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, (2019)
DOI 10.1002/hpja.310
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2019 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Reilly K, Delaney T, Janssen LM, Reynolds R, et al., 'Two-year follow-up of a randomised controlled trial to assess the sustainability of a school intervention to improve the implementation of a school-based nutrition policy', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 30 26-33 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: School-based nutrition policies can have a positive effect on the school food environment. The primary aim of this ... [more]

© 2019 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: School-based nutrition policies can have a positive effect on the school food environment. The primary aim of this study was to assess the primary school adherence to a mandatory state-wide healthy canteen policy 12¿months after an effective multi-strategic implementation intervention concluded. Methods: Primary schools were randomised to (a) a 12-14¿months multi-strategic intervention or (b) no-intervention (control). The intervention aimed to improve implementation of a state-wide canteen policy by encouraging schools to remove unhealthy food and beverages (classified as ¿¿red¿¿ or ¿¿banned¿¿) from canteen menus and replace with healthy items (classified as ¿¿green¿¿). No implementation support was provided to either group by the research team between the 12 and 24¿months data collection period. Results: Seventy schools participated, of which 56 schools were assessed at 24-month follow-up. Intervention schools were less likely to have a menu which contained ¿¿red/banned¿¿ items at 24-month follow-up (RR¿=¿2.28; 95% CI: 1.18-4.40; P¿=¿0.01). Intervention schools, however, were not more likely than controls to have a menu which contained >50% ¿¿green¿¿ items at 24-month follow-up (RR¿=¿1.29; 95% CI: 0.98-1.70; P¿=¿0.10). Intervention schools were more likely to adhere to both policy components (no red/banned items and >50% green items on the menu) than control schools (RR¿=¿2.61; 95% CI: 1.29-5.29; P¿=¿0.006). Among intervention schools that were fully adherent to the policy following implementation support (12-month post baseline), all were also adherent at the 24-month follow-up. Conclusion: The intervention was effective in achieving long-term school adherence to a state-wide canteen policy at 24-month follow-up. So what?: The findings suggest that sustained improvements in implementation of school nutrition policies is possible following a period (12¿months) of comprehensive implementation support.

DOI 10.1002/hpja.238
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, Jenna Hollis, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong
2019 Wyse R, Delaney T, Gibbins P, Ball K, Campbell K, Yoong SL, et al., 'Cluster randomised controlled trial of an online intervention to improve healthy food purchases from primary school canteens: a study protocol of the 'click & crunch' trial', BMJ OPEN, 9 (2019)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-030538
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, John Attia, Rachel Sutherland, Serene Yoong, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rebecca Wyse
2019 Wolfenden L, Reilly K, Kingsland M, Grady A, Williams CM, Nathan N, et al., 'Identifying opportunities to develop the science of implementation for community-based non-communicable disease prevention: A review of implementation trials', Preventive Medicine, 118 279-285 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Implementation of interventions in community organisations such as schools, childcare centres, and sporting clubs are recommended to target a range of modifiable risks of n... [more]

© 2018 Implementation of interventions in community organisations such as schools, childcare centres, and sporting clubs are recommended to target a range of modifiable risks of non-communicable diseases. Poor implementation, however, is common and has contributed to the failure of non-communicable disease interventions globally. This study aimed to characterise experimental research regarding strategies to improve implementation of chronic disease prevention programs in community settings. The review used data collected in three comprehensive systematic reviews undertaken between August 2015 and July 2017. Randomised controlled trials, including cluster design, and non-randomised trials with a parallel control group were included. The data were extracted to describe trial characteristics, implementation strategies employed, implementation outcomes and study quality. Of the 40 implementation trials included in the study, unhealthy diet was the most common risk factor targeted (n = 20). The most commonly reported implementation strategies were educational meetings (n = 38, 95%), educational materials (n = 36, 90%) and educational outreach visits (n = 29, 73%). Few trials were conducted ¿at-scale¿ (n = 8, 20%) or reported adverse effects (n = 5, 13%). The reporting of implementation related outcomes; intervention adoption (n = 13, 33%); appropriateness (n = 11, 28%); acceptability (n = 8, 20%); feasibility (n = 8, 20%); cost (n = 3, 8%); and sustainability (n = 2, 5%); was limited. For the majority of trials, risk of bias was high for blinding of study personnel/participants and outcome assessors. Testing of strategies to improve implementation of non-communicable disease prevention strategies in community settings, delivered ¿at-scale¿, utilising implementation frameworks, including a comprehensive range of implementation outcomes should be priority areas for future research in implementation science.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.11.014
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers
2019 Yoong SL, Nathan N, Reilly K, Sutherland R, Straus S, Barnes C, et al., 'Adapting implementation strategies: a case study of how to support implementation of healthy canteen policies', Public Health, 177 19-25 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 The Royal Society for Public Health Objectives: Although evidence-based interventions (EBIs) and effective strategies to implement them exist, they cannot be used by policy... [more]

© 2019 The Royal Society for Public Health Objectives: Although evidence-based interventions (EBIs) and effective strategies to implement them exist, they cannot be used by policy makers and practitioners if they do not align with end users¿ needs. As such, adaptations to EBIs and implementation approaches are likely to occur to increase ¿fit¿ with end users¿ capacity. This article describes an approach undertaken by a population health service delivery unit in one Australian state to develop an adapted implementation strategy to support the implementation of the mandatory healthy canteen policy (EBI) to all schools located in the service delivery region. Study design: This is a case study of adapting an intervention to improve implementation of the healthy canteen policy. Methods and results: This is a six-step pragmatic, empirically driven approach. The steps include (i) adapt, where appropriate, the EBI to facilitate implementation; (ii) identify end users¿ capacity for implementation; (iii) identify opportunities to adapt the implementation interventions while preserving meaningful intervention impact; (iv) undertake program adaptation; (v) develop training and resources to support delivery of implementation strategies and; (vi) evaluate the adapted intervention. This article describes the application of these steps by the authors to develop an adapted support strategy consistent with end users¿ needs. Conclusions: This study provides some guidance on how to adapt implementation support approaches particularly when EBIs cannot be adapted. Future empirical research providing guidance on making practical adaptation decisions are needed.

DOI 10.1016/j.puhe.2019.07.003
Co-authors Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland
2018 Lee H, Hall A, Nathan N, Reilly KL, Seward K, Williams CM, et al., 'Mechanisms of implementing public health interventions: A pooled causal mediation analysis of randomised trials', Implementation Science, 13 1-11 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-018-0734-9
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Alix Hall, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan
2018 Reilly KL, Reeves P, Deeming S, Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Wiggers J, 'Economic analysis of three interventions of different intensity in improving school implementation of a government healthy canteen policy in Australia: Costs, incremental and relative cost effectiveness', BMC Public Health, 18 1-9 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5315-y
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan
2018 Tsai C, Svensen E, Flood VM, Probst Y, Reilly K, Corbett S, Wu JHY, 'Healthiness of Food and Beverages for Sale at Two Public Hospitals in New South Wales, Australia', NUTRIENTS, 10 (2018)
DOI 10.3390/nu10020216
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2018 Clinton-McHarg T, Janssen L, Delaney T, Reilly K, Regan T, Nathan N, et al., 'Availability of food and beverage items on school canteen menus and association with items purchased by children of primary-school age', Public Health Nutrition, 21 2907-2914 (2018) [C1]

© The Authors 2018Â. Objective To (i) describe the proportion of foods and beverages available on school canteen menus classified as having high (&apos;green&apos;), moderate (&ap... [more]

© The Authors 2018Â. Objective To (i) describe the proportion of foods and beverages available on school canteen menus classified as having high ('green'), moderate ('amber') or low ('red') nutritional value; (ii) describe the proportion of these items purchased by students; and (iii) examine the association between food and beverage availability on school canteen menus and food and beverage purchasing by students.Design A cross-sectional study was conducted as part of a larger randomised controlled trial (RCT).Setting A nested sample of fifty randomly selected government schools from the Hunter New England region of New South Wales, Australia, who had participated in an RCT of an intervention to improve the availability of healthy foods sold from school canteens, was approached to participate.Subjects School principals, canteen managers and students.Results The average proportion of green, amber and red items available on menus was 47·9, 47·4 and 4·7 %, respectively. The average proportion of green, amber and red items purchased by students was 30·1, 61·8 and 8·1 %, respectively. There was a significant positive relationship between the availability and purchasing of green (R 2=0·66), amber (R 2=0·57) and red menu items (R 2=0·61). In each case, a 1 % increase in the availability of items in these categories was associated with a 1·21, 1·35 and 1·67 % increase in purchasing of items of high, moderate and low nutritional value, respectively.Conclusions The findings provide support for school-based policies to improve the relative availability of healthy foods for sale in these settings.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980018001726
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Nicole Nathan, Rebecca Wyse
2018 Reilly KL, Nathan N, Wiggers J, Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, 'Scale up of a multi-strategic intervention to increase implementation of a school healthy canteen policy: Findings of an intervention trial', BMC Public Health, 18 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 The Author(s). Background: Implementation interventions delivered in schools to improve food provision have been found to improve student diet and reduce child obesity risk... [more]

© 2018 The Author(s). Background: Implementation interventions delivered in schools to improve food provision have been found to improve student diet and reduce child obesity risk. If the health benefits of food availability policies are to be realised, interventions that are effective need to be implemented at scale, across an entire population of schools. This study aims to assess the potential effectiveness of an intervention in increasing the implementation, at scale, of a healthy canteen policy by Australian primary schools. Methods: A non-controlled before and after study was conducted in primary schools located in the Hunter New England region of New South Wales, Australia. Schools received a multi-component intervention adapted from a previous efficacious and cost-effective randomised control trial. The primary trial outcome was the proportion of canteen menus compliant with the state healthy canteen policy, assessed via menu audit at baseline and follow-up by dietitians. Secondary outcomes included policy reach and adoption and maintenance policy implementation. Results: Of the 173 schools eligible for inclusion in the trial, 168 provided menus at baseline and 157 menus were collected at follow-up. At follow-up, multiple imputation analysis found 35% (55/157) of schools compared to 17% (29/168) at baseline (OR = 2.8 (1.6-4.7), p = < 0.001) had menus compliant with the state healthy canteen policy. As an assessment of the impact of the intervention on policy reach, canteen manager and principal knowledge of the policy increased from 64% (n = 76) and 38% (n = 44) respectively at baseline to 69% (n = 89) and 60% (n = 70) at follow-up (p = 0.393, p = 0.026). Adoption of the policy increased from 80% (n = 93) at baseline to 90% (n = 104) at follow-up (p = 0.005) for principals, and from 86% (n = 105) to 96% (n = 124) (p = 0.0001) for canteen managers. Multiple imputation analysis showed intervention effects were maintained six-months post intervention (33% of menus compliant OR = 2.6 (1.5-4.5), p = < 0.001 compared to baseline). Conclusions: This study found school canteen compliance with a healthy food policy increased in association with a multi-strategy intervention delivered at scale. The study provides evidence for public health policy makers and practitioners regarding strategies and modes of support required to support improvement in nutrition policy implementation across entire populations of schools.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5786-x
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2018 Reilly K, Nathan N, Wu JHY, Delaney T, Wyse R, Cobcroft M, et al., 'Assessing the potential impact of a front-of-pack nutritional rating system on food availability in school canteens: A randomised controlled trial', Appetite, 121 309-315 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 Background Front-of-pack graphical nutritional rating of products is becoming an important strategy in many countries to improve healthy food purchases by consumers. Eviden... [more]

© 2017 Background Front-of-pack graphical nutritional rating of products is becoming an important strategy in many countries to improve healthy food purchases by consumers. Evidence of the effectiveness of such on facilitating healthy food choices by school food service providers has not been reported. The primary aim of the study was to assess the impact of providing front-of-pack nutritional rating information on school canteen managers¿ likely food selections. Secondary outcomes were canteen manager awareness, attitudes and reported barriers to using the front-of-pack information. Methods A randomised controlled trial involving primary school canteen managers was conducted in a single region in New South Wales, Australia. Eligible participants were randomised to an intervention or control group and asked in a telephone interview which of 12 common food products sold in school canteens they would sell. Both groups received product name and brand information. The intervention group also received information regarding the nutritional rating of products. Results Canteen managers in the intervention group were significantly more likely than those in the control group to indicate they would sell three of the six ¿healthier¿ products (p = 0.036, 0.005, 0.009). There was no difference between groups in the likelihood of making available for sale any of the six ¿less healthy¿ products. The majority of canteen managers who had heard of a product nutritional rating system agreed that it was helpful in identifying ¿healthier¿ foods (88%, n = 31). Conclusions The inclusion of product nutritional rating information has the potential to improve the availability of some ¿healthier¿ items on canteen menus and contribute to improving child dietary intake. Further research is required to determine whether the use of product nutritional rating information actually makes a difference to canteen manager choices.

DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2017.11.103
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland
2017 Wyse R, Yoong SL, Dodds P, Campbell L, Delaney T, Nathan N, et al., 'Online canteens: Awareness, use, barriers to use, and the acceptability of potential online strategies to improve public health nutrition in primary schools', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 28 67-71 (2017) [C1]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2017. Issue addressed: This study of primary school principals assessed the awareness, use, barriers to use and acceptability of online c... [more]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2017. Issue addressed: This study of primary school principals assessed the awareness, use, barriers to use and acceptability of online canteens. Methods: A telephone survey of 123 primary school principals within the Hunter New England Region of New South Wales, Australia was conducted from September 2014 to November 2014. Results: Fifty-six percent of principals were aware of the existence of online canteens, with 8% having implemented such a system, and 38% likely to do so in the future. Medium/large schools were more likely to be aware of or to use online canteens, however there were no differences in awareness or use in relation to school rurality or socioeconomic advantage. Principals cited parent internet access as the most commonly identified perceived barrier to online canteen use, and the majority of principals (71-93%) agreed that it would be acceptable to implement a range of consumer behaviour strategies via an online canteen. Conclusions: Study findings suggest that despite relatively low levels of current use, online canteens have the potential to reach a large proportion of school communities in the future, across geographical and socioeconomic divides, and that the nutrition interventions which they have the capacity to deliver are considered acceptable to school principals. So what? Online canteens may represent an opportunity to deliver nutrition interventions to school communities. Future research should examine the feasibility and potential effectiveness of interventions delivered via this modality.

DOI 10.1071/HE15095
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong
2017 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Janssen LM, Wiggers J, Reilly K, Delaney T, et al., 'Multi-strategic intervention to enhance implementation of healthy canteen policy: a randomised controlled trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 12 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0537-9
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 34
Co-authors John Wiggers, Megan Freund, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse, Rachel Sutherland, Christopher Oldmeadow, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan
2016 Nathan N, Yoong SL, Sutherland R, Reilly K, Delaney T, Janssen L, et al., 'Effectiveness of a multicomponent intervention to enhance implementation of a healthy canteen policy in Australian primary schools: a randomised controlled trial', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 13 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0431-5
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan
2016 Yoong SL, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Reilly K, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'CAFE: a multicomponent audit and feedback intervention to improve implementation of healthy food policy in primary school canteens: a randomised controlled trial', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 13 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0453-z
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 15
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, Christopher Oldmeadow, Serene Yoong
2016 Reilly K, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Sutherland R, Wyse R, Yoong SL, 'Validity of four measures in assessing school canteen menu compliance with state-based healthy canteen policy', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 27 215-221 (2016) [C1]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2016. Issue addressed In order to assess the impact of healthy school canteen policies on food availability for students, valid methods o... [more]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2016. Issue addressed In order to assess the impact of healthy school canteen policies on food availability for students, valid methods of measuring compliance are needed that can be applied at scale. The aim of this study is to assess the validity and direct cost of four methods to assess policy compliance: 1) principal and 2) canteen manager self-report via a computer-assisted telephone interview; and 3) comprehensive and 4) quick menu audits by dietitians, compared with observations. Methods A cross-sectional study took place in the Hunter region of NSW, Australia, in a sample of 38 primary schools that had previously participated in a randomised controlled trial to improve healthy canteen policy compliance. Policy compliance was assessed using the four methods specified above. Percentage agreement, kappa, sensitivity and specificity compared with observations was calculated together with the direct time taken and costs of each method. Indirect costs (including set-up costs) for all measures have not been included. Results Agreement with observations was substantial for the quick menu audit (kappa=0.68), and moderate for the comprehensive menu audit (kappa=0.42). Principal and canteen manager self-report resulted in poor agreement and low specificity with the gold standard. The self-reported measures had the lowest cost, followed by the quick menu audit and lastly the comprehensive menu audit. Conclusion The quick menu audit represents a valid and potentially low-cost method of supporting policy implementation at scale. So what? This study demonstrates that a quick menu audit represents a valid measure of undertaking assessment of school canteen policy compliance at a population level.

DOI 10.1071/HE16053
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse
2015 Williams CM, Nathan N, Delaney T, Yoong SL, Wiggers J, Preece S, et al., 'CAFÉ: A multicomponent audit and feedback intervention to improve implementation of healthy food policy in primary school canteens: Protocol of a randomised controlled trial', BMJ Open, 5 (2015) [C1]

Introduction: A number of jurisdictions internationally have policies requiring schools to implement healthy canteens. However, many schools have not implemented such policies. On... [more]

Introduction: A number of jurisdictions internationally have policies requiring schools to implement healthy canteens. However, many schools have not implemented such policies. One reason for this isthat current support interventions cannot feasibly be delivered to large numbers of schools. A promising solution to support population-wide implementation of healthy canteen practices is audit and feedback. The effectiveness of this strategy has, however, not previously been assessed in school canteens. This study aims to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an audit and feedback intervention, delivered by telephone and email, in increasing the number of school canteens that have menus complying with a government healthy-canteen policy. Methods and analysis: Seventy-two schools, across the Hunter New England Local Health District in New South Wales Australia, will be randomised to receive the multicomponent audit and feedback implementation intervention or usual support. The intervention will consist of between two and four canteen menu audits over 12 months. Each menu audit will be followed by two modes of feedback: a written feedback report and a verbal feedback/support via telephone. Primary outcomes, assessed by dieticians blind to group status and as recommended by the Fresh Tastes @ School policy, are: (1) the proportion of schools with a canteen menu containing foods or beverages restricted for sale, and; (2) the proportion of schools that have a menu which contains more than 50% of foods classified as healthy canteen items. Secondary outcomes are: the proportion of menu items in each category ('red', 'amber' and 'green'), canteen profitability and cost-effectiveness. Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval has been obtained by from the Hunter New England Human Research Ethics Committee and the University of Newcastle Human Research Ethics Committee. The findings will be disseminated in usual forums, including peer-reviewed publication and conference presentations.

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006969
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Christopher M Williams
2014 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Williams CM, Delaney T, Reilly KL, Freund M, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to increase the implementation of a healthy canteen policy in Australian primary schools: study protocol.', Implement Sci, 9 147 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-014-0147-3
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Megan Freund, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden
Show 26 more journal articles

Review (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Mclaughlin M, Delaney T, Campbell E, Hodder R, Reilly K, Kingsland M, et al., 'Associations between digital health intervention engagement and physical activity and sedentary behaviour: a systematic review (2018)
DOI 10.13140/RG.2.2.12982.75840
Co-authors John Wiggers, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc, Luke Wolfenden

Conference (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Ooi JY, Yoong SL, Sutherland R, Wrigley J, Lecathelinais C, Reilly K, et al., 'Prevalence of current school-level nutrition policies and practices of secondary schools in NSW, Australia', HEALTH PROMOTION JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA (2020)
DOI 10.1002/hpja.357
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan
2018 Nathan N, Yoong SL, Reilly K, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Increasing Australian schools' implementation of a mandatory state-wide school healthy food policy: results of three randomised-controlled trials', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE (2018)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2017 Reilly K, Nathan N, Wiggers J, LinYoong S, Wolfenden L, 'Scale up of a Multistrategic Intervention to Increase Implementation of a Mandatory State-Based Healthy Canteen Policy', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan
2016 Finch M, Nathan N, Yoong S, Sutherland R, Seward K, Reilly K, et al., 'SUPPORTING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF STATE NUTRITION GUIDELINES AND POLICIES IN SCHOOLS AND CHILDCARE: APPLICATION OF THE THEORETICAL DOMAINS FRAMEWORK', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan
2016 Yoong S, Nathan N, Finch M, Sutherland R, Seward K, Reilly K, et al., 'IMPLEMENTING STATE NUTRITION GUIDELINES AND POLICIES IN SCHOOLS AND CENTRE BASED CHILDCARE: BARRIERS AND ENABLERS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2016 Nathan N, Yoong S, Reilly K, Delaney T, Janssen L, Sutherland R, et al., 'THEORY-INFORMED INTERVENTIONS TO INCREASE IMPLEMENTATION OF A MANDATORY HEALTHY FOOD POLICY IN SCHOOLS. APPLICATION OF THE THEORETICAL DOMAINS FRAMEWORK.', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Wyse R, Yoong SL, Dodds P, Campbell L, Delaney T, Nathan N, et al., 'THE POTENTIAL OF ONLINE CANTEENS TO DELIVER PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION INTERVENTIONS TO SCHOOL COMMUNITIES', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan
2016 Nathan N, Yoong S, Williams C, Reilly K, Delaney T, Sutherland R, et al., 'INCREASING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A STATE-WIDE HEALTHY CANTEEN POLICY: RESULTS OF THREE RANDOMISED-CONTROLLED TRIALS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, John Wiggers
Show 5 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $194,700

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20182 grants / $194,700

Addressing the health risk behaviours of the education workforce: A program to enhance the wellbeing of primary school teachers$124,700

Funding body: Teachers Health Foundation

Funding body Teachers Health Foundation
Project Team Doctor Nicole Nathan, Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Serene Yoong, Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Doctor Rebecca Hodder, Doctor Kathryn Reilly, Doctor Elaine Toomey
Scheme Research Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1800853
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Enhancing Teacher's Health$70,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Doctor Nicole Nathan, Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Serene Yoong, Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Doctor Rebecca Hodder, Doctor Kathryn Reilly, Doctor Elaine Toomey
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800924
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON Y
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Dr Kathryn Reilly

Positions

Conjoint Fellow
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Senior Research Assistant
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email kathryn.l.reilly@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 49246369

Office

Room HNE Population Health Booth Building
Building HNE Population Health Booth Building
Location HNE Population Health Wallsend Campus

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