Miss Courtney Barnes

Miss Courtney Barnes

Postdoctoral Researcher

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

I am a PhD candidate and public health researcher, investigating approaches to improve the implementation of evidence-based policies and practices within community-based settings (e.g. schools and childcare services). 

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • community settings
  • implementation
  • nutrition
  • public health

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
321005 Public health nutrition 30
420312 Implementation science and evaluation 40
420603 Health promotion 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Postdoctoral Researcher University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/5/2018 -  PhD Candidate College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, University of Newcastle
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/5/2018 -  Project Officer Hunter New England Population Health
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (23 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Wyse R, Jackson JK, Delaney T, Grady A, Stacey F, Wolfenden L, et al., 'The effectiveness of interventions delivered using digital food environments to encourage healthy food choices: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Nutrients, 13 (2021)

Digital food environments are now commonplace across many food service and retail set-tings, influencing how the population orders and accesses foods. As such, digital food enviro... [more]

Digital food environments are now commonplace across many food service and retail set-tings, influencing how the population orders and accesses foods. As such, digital food environments represent a novel platform to deliver strategies to improve public health nutrition. The purpose of this review was to explore the impact of dietary interventions embedded within online food ordering systems, on user selection and purchase of healthier foods and beverages. A systematic search of eight electronic databases and grey literature sources was conducted up to October 2020. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials and controlled trials, designed to encourage the selection and purchase of healthier products and/or discourage the selection and purchase of less-healthy products using strategies delivered via real-world online food ordering systems. A total of 9441 articles underwent title and abstract screening, 140 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility, and 11 articles were included in the review. Meta-analysis of seven studies indicated that interventions delivered via online food ordering systems are effective in reducing the energy content of online food purchases (standardized mean difference (SMD): -0.34, p = 0.01). Meta-analyses including three studies each suggest that these interventions may also be effective in reducing the fat (SMD: -0.83, p = 0.04), saturated fat (SMD: -0.7, p = 0.008) and sodium content (SMD: -0.43, p = 0.01) of online food purchases. Given the ongoing growth in the use of online food ordering systems, future research to determine how we can best utilize these systems to support public health nutrition is warranted.

DOI 10.3390/nu13072255
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Serene Yoong
2021 Yoong SL, Lum M, Jackson J, Wolfenden L, Barnes C, Jones J, et al., 'Healthy eating interventions delivered in early childhood education and care settings for improving the diet of children aged six years and below', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2021 (2021)

Objectives: This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (intervention). The objectives are as follows:. To assess the effectiveness of¿healthy eating interventions delivered in ECEC¿... [more]

Objectives: This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (intervention). The objectives are as follows:. To assess the effectiveness of¿healthy eating interventions delivered in ECEC¿settings for improving child dietary intake in children aged six years or under, relative to usual care or no intervention. Secondary objectives are to assess the impact of ECEC- based healthy eating interventions on physical (child weight), language/cognitive skills, social/emotional (mental health) and quality of life. The¿review will also report on cost¿of the intervention and adverse effects of ECEC-based healthy eating interventions, where this exists.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD013862
Co-authors Alice Grady, Sam Mccrabb, Serene Yoong, Alix Hall, Luke Wolfenden
2021 Yoong SL, Jones J, Pearson N, Swindle T, Barnes C, Delaney T, et al., 'An overview of research opportunities to increase the impact of nutrition intervention research in early childhood and education care settings according to the re-aim framework', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18 1-19 (2021) [C1]

Objective: To highlight opportunities for future nutrition intervention research within early childhood and education care (ECEC) settings, with a focus on generating evidence tha... [more]

Objective: To highlight opportunities for future nutrition intervention research within early childhood and education care (ECEC) settings, with a focus on generating evidence that has applicability to real-world policy and practice. Methods: An overview of opportunities to progress the field was developed by the authors using a collaborative writing approach and informed by recent research in the field. The group developed a list of recommendations aligned with the reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation and maintenance (RE-AIM) framework. Pairs of authors drafted individual sections of the manuscript, which were then reviewed by a separate pair. The first and senior author consolidated all sections of the manuscript and sought critical input on the draft iterations of the manuscript. Results: Interventions that employ digital platforms (reach) in ECEC settings, as well as research in the family day care setting (effectiveness) were identified as areas of opportunities. Research understanding the determinants of and effective strategies for dissemination (adoption), the implementation of nutrition programs, in addition to de-implementation (implementation) of inappropriate nutrition practices, is warranted. For maintenance, there is a need to better understand sustainability and the sustainment of interventions, in addition to under-taking policy-relevant research. Conclusions: The ECEC setting is prime for innovative and practi-cal nutrition intervention research.

DOI 10.3390/ijerph18052745
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Alice Grady
2021 Yoong SL, Jackson J, Barnes C, Pearson N, Swindle T, O'Reilly S, et al., 'Changing landscape of nutrition and dietetics research? A bibliographic analysis of top-tier published research in 1998 and 2018', Public Health Nutrition, 24 1318-1327 (2021) [C1]

Objective: The current study sought to describe and compare study type, research design and translation phase of published research in nutrition and dietetic journals in 1998 and ... [more]

Objective: The current study sought to describe and compare study type, research design and translation phase of published research in nutrition and dietetic journals in 1998 and 2018. Design: This was a repeat cross-sectional bibliographic analysis of Nutrition and Dietetics research. All eligible studies in the top eight Nutrition and Dietetics indexed journals in 1998 and 2018 were included. Two independent reviewers coded each study for research design (study type and study design) and translation phase (T0-T4) of the research using seminal texts in the field. Setting: Not relevant. Participants: Not relevant. Results: The number of publications (1998, n 1030; 2018, n 1016) has not changed over time, but the research type, design and translation phases have. The proportion of intervention studies in 1998 (43.8 %) was significantly higher than 2018 (19.4 %). In 2018, more reviews (46.9 % v. 15.6 % in 1998) and less randomised trials (14.3 % v. 37.8 % in 1998) were published. In regard to translation phase, there was a higher proportion of T2-T4 research in 2018 (18.3 % v. 3.8 % in 1998); however, the proportion of T3/T4 (dissemination, implementation and population-level research) research was still low (<3 %). Our sensitivity analysis with the four journals that remained in the top eight journal across the two time periods found no differences in the research type, design and translation phases across time. Conclusions: There was a reduction in intervention and T0 publications, alongside higher publication of clinical study designs over time; however, published T3/T4 research in Nutrition and Dietetics is low. A greater focus on publishing interventions and dissemination and implementation may be needed.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980021000136
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland
2021 Wolfenden L, Barnes C, Lane C, McCrabb S, Brown HM, Gerritsen S, et al., 'Consolidating evidence on the effectiveness of interventions promoting fruit and vegetable consumption: an umbrella review', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 18 (2021) [C1]

Background: The overarching objective was to examine the effectiveness of intervention strategies to promote fruit and vegetable consumption. To do this, systematic review evidenc... [more]

Background: The overarching objective was to examine the effectiveness of intervention strategies to promote fruit and vegetable consumption. To do this, systematic review evidence regarding the effects of intervention strategies was synthesized; organized, where appropriate, by the setting in which the strategies were implemented. Additionally, we sought to describe gaps in the review of evidence; that is, where evidence regarding the effectiveness of recommended policy actions had not been systematically synthesised. Methods: We undertook a systematic search of electronic databases and the grey literature to identify systematic reviews describing the effects of any intervention strategy targeting fruit and/or vegetable intake in children or adults of any age. Results: The effects of 32 intervention strategies were synthesised from the 19 included reviews. The strategies were mapped across all three broad domains of the NOURISHING framework (i.e. food environment, food system and behaviour change communication), but covered just 14 of the framework¿s 65 sub-policy areas. There was evidence supporting the effectiveness of 19 of the 32 intervention strategies. The findings of the umbrella review suggest that intervention strategies implemented within schools, childcare services, homes, workplaces and primary care can be effective, as can eHealth strategies, mass media campaigns, household food production strategies and fiscal interventions. Conclusions: A range of effective strategy options are available for policy makers and practitioners interested in improving fruit and/or vegetable intake. However, the effects of many strategies ¿ particularly those targeting agricultural production practices, the supply chain and the broader food system ¿ have not been reported in systematic reviews. Primary studies assessing the effects of these strategies, and the inclusion of such studies in systematic reviews, are needed to better inform national and international efforts to improve public health nutrition. Trial registration: The review protocol was deposited in a publicly available Open Science framework prior to execution of the search strategy. https://osf.io/unj7x/.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-020-01046-y
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Sam Mccrabb, Hannah Brown, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2021 Barnes C, Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Wedesweiler T, Kerr J, et al., 'The association between australian childcare centre healthy eating practices and children s healthy eating behaviours: A cross-sectional study within lunchbox centres', Nutrients, 13 (2021) [C1]

The association between healthy eating practices and child dietary intake in childcare centres where parents pack foods from home has received little attention. This study aimed t... [more]

The association between healthy eating practices and child dietary intake in childcare centres where parents pack foods from home has received little attention. This study aimed to: (1) Describe the nutritional content of foods and beverages consumed by children in care; and (2) Assess the association between centre healthy eating practices and child intake of fruit and vegetable servings, added sugar(grams), saturated fat(grams) and sodium(milligrams) in care. A cross-sectional study amongst 448 children attending 22 childcare centres in New South Wales, Australia, was conducted. Child dietary intake was measured via weighed lunchbox measurements, photographs and researcher observation, and centre healthy eating practices were assessed via researcher observation of centre nutrition environments. Children attending lunchbox centres consumed, on average 0.80 servings (standard deviation 0.69) of fruit and 0.27 servings (standard deviation 0.51) of vegetables in care. The availability of foods within children¿s lunchboxes was associated with intake of such foods (p < 0.01). Centre provision of intentional healthy eating learning experiences (estimate -0.56; p = 0.01) and the use of feeding practices that support children¿s healthy eating (estimate -2.02; p = 0.04) were significantly associated with reduced child intake of saturated fat. Interventions to improve child nutrition in centres should focus on a range of healthy eating practices, including the availability of foods packed within lunchboxes.

DOI 10.3390/nu13041139
Co-authors Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan
2021 Barnes C, McCrabb S, Stacey F, Nathan N, Yoong SL, Grady A, et al., 'Improving implementation of school-based healthy eating and physical activity policies, practices, and programs: a systematic review.', Transl Behav Med, 11 1365-1410 (2021)
DOI 10.1093/tbm/ibab037
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, Alice Grady, Serene Yoong, Sam Mccrabb, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Hodder
2021 Ooi JY, Wolfenden L, Sutherland R, Nathan N, Oldmeadow C, Mclaughlin M, et al., 'A Systematic Review of the Recent Consumption Levels of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages in Children and Adolescents From the World Health Organization Regions With High Dietary-Related Burden of Disease.', Asia Pac J Public Health, 10105395211014642 (2021)
DOI 10.1177/10105395211014642
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc, Alix Hall, Christopher Oldmeadow, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Rachel Sutherland
2021 Grady A, Barnes C, Lum M, Jones J, Yoong SL, 'Impact of Nudge Strategies on Nutrition Education Participation in Child Care: Randomized Controlled Trial', Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 53 151-156 (2021)

Objective: To assess the impact of incorporating nudge strategies in the design of a nutrition education workshop invitation on workshop registration among early childhood educati... [more]

Objective: To assess the impact of incorporating nudge strategies in the design of a nutrition education workshop invitation on workshop registration among early childhood education and care centers. Methods: A parallel-group randomized controlled trial was conducted with 88 centers. Centers received nudge strategies embedded within an enhanced invitation (intervention) or a generic invitation (control) to attend a nutrition education workshop. Center workshop registration and invitation recall and acceptability were compared between the 2 arms. Results: No statistically significant differences in workshop registration (25% vs 20%; P = 0.61), invitation recall (69% vs 62%; P = 0.58) or acceptability (mean: 8.38 vs 8.06; P = 0.50) were found between intervention and control centers, respectively. Conclusions and Implications: Low-intensity behavioral strategies embedded in the design of an invitation were insufficient to increase workshop registration significantly. Investigation and application of alternate evidence-based nudge strategies to encourage staff participation in nutrition education in early childhood education and care setting are recommended.

DOI 10.1016/j.jneb.2020.11.017
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Alice Grady
2021 Barnes C, Hall A, Nathan N, Sutherland R, McCarthy N, Pettet M, et al., 'Efficacy of a school-based physical activity and nutrition intervention on child weight status: Findings from a cluster randomized controlled trial', Preventive Medicine, 153 (2021)

Despite the benefits of factorial designs in quantifying the relative benefits of different school-based approaches to prevent unhealthy weight gain among students, few have been ... [more]

Despite the benefits of factorial designs in quantifying the relative benefits of different school-based approaches to prevent unhealthy weight gain among students, few have been undertaken. The aims of this 2 × 2 cluster randomized factorial trial was to evaluate the impact of a physical activity and nutrition intervention on child weight status and quality of life. Twelve primary schools in New South Wales, Australia randomly allocated to one of four groups: (i.) physical activity (150 min of planned in-school physical activity); (ii.) nutrition (a healthy school lunch-box); (iii.) combined physical activity and nutrition; or (iv.) control. Outcome data assessing child weight and quality of life were collected at baseline and 9-months post-baseline. Within Grades 4¿6 in participating schools, 742 students participated in anthropometric measurements, including child body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference, at baseline and follow-up. Findings indicated that students that received the nutrition intervention had higher odds of being classified in the BMI category of underweight/healthy weight (OR 1.64 95%CI 1.07, 2.50; p = 0.0220), while those who received the physical activity intervention reported a lower waist circumference (mean difference - 1.86 95%CI -3.55, -0.18; p = 0.030). There were no significant effects of the nutrition or physical activity intervention on child BMI scores or child quality of life, and no significant synergistic effects of the two interventions combined. Future research assessing the longer-term impact of both intervention strategies, alone and combined, is warranted to better understand their potential impact on child health. Trial registration: Australian Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN: ACTRN12616001228471.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2021.106822
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Alix Hall, Luke Wolfenden
2021 Delaney T, McLaughlin M, Hall A, Yoong SL, Brown A, O brien K, et al., 'Associations between digital health intervention engagement and dietary intake: A systematic review', Nutrients, 13 (2021)

There has been a proliferation of digital health interventions (DHIs) targeting dietary in-take. Despite their potential, the effectiveness of DHIs are thought to be dependent, in... [more]

There has been a proliferation of digital health interventions (DHIs) targeting dietary in-take. Despite their potential, the effectiveness of DHIs are thought to be dependent, in part, on user engagement. However, the relationship between engagement and the effectiveness of dietary DHIs is not well understood. The aim of this review is to describe the association between DHI engagement and dietary intake. A systematic search of four electronic databases and grey literature for records published before December 2019 was conducted. Studies were eligible if they examined a quantitative association between objective measures of engagement with a DHI (subjective experience or usage) and measures of dietary intake in adults (aged = 18 years). From 10,653 citations, seven studies were included. Five studies included usage measures of engagement and two examined subjective experiences. Narrative synthesis, using vote counting, found mixed evidence of an association with usage measures (5 of 12 associations indicated a positive relationship, 7 were in-conclusive) and no evidence regarding an association with subjective experience (both studies were inconclusive). The findings provide early evidence supporting an association between measures of usage and dietary intake; however, this was inconsistent. Further research examining the association between DHI engagement and dietary intake is warranted.

DOI 10.3390/nu13093281
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Alix Hall, Rachel Sutherland, Jenna Hollis, Luke Wolfenden, Julia Dray, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers
2020 Grady A, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Rissel C, Finch M, Flood V, et al., 'Effectiveness of a Web-Based Menu-Planning Intervention to Improve Childcare Service Compliance With Dietary Guidelines: Randomized Controlled Trial', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, 22 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/13401
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Serene Yoong
2020 Brown A, Barnes C, Byaruhanga J, McLaughlin M, Hodder RK, Booth D, et al., 'Effectiveness of technology-enabled knowledge translation strategies in improving the use of research in public health: Systematic review', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 22 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/17274
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc, Rebecca Hodder
2020 Yoong SL, Grady A, Wiggers JH, Stacey FG, Rissel C, Flood V, et al., 'Child-level evaluation of a web-based intervention to improve dietary guideline implementation in childcare centers: A cluster-randomized controlled trial', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 111 854-863 (2020) [C1]

Although it is recommended that childcare centers provide foods consistent with dietary guidelines, the impact of implementing sector-specific guidelines on child outcomes is larg... [more]

Although it is recommended that childcare centers provide foods consistent with dietary guidelines, the impact of implementing sector-specific guidelines on child outcomes is largely unknown. Objectives: This study aims to examine the impact of a web-based program and support to implement dietary guidelines in childcare centers on children's 1) diet; 2) BMI z scores; and 3) child health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Methods: This study was a cluster-randomized controlled trial utilizing a Type-3 Hybrid implementation-effectiveness design conducted between October 2016 and March 2018. This study reports on child outcomes. Fifty-four childcare centers in New South Wales, Australia were randomly assigned to the intervention (a web-based menu-planning tool and support) or control group (usual care). The intervention was designed to address barriers and enablers to dietary guideline implementation according to the Theoretical Domains Framework. A quota of 35 consenting childcare centers undertook child-level evaluation of dietary intake where 522 parents consented to completing =1 component of data collection for their child. Child consumption of core and discretionary (unhealthy) foods while in care was assessed via dietary observations by blinded research assistants, childcare diet quality was assessed via educator-completed questionnaires, BMI z scores were assessed via measured weight and height, and child HRQoL was assessed via parent report at baseline and 12-mo follow-up. Results: There was a significant increase in mean child consumption of fruit (0.39 servings; 95% CI: 0.12, 0.65 servings) and dairy foods (0.38 servings; 95% CI: 0.19, 0.57 servings) and a significant reduction in consumption of discretionary foods (-0.40 servings; 95% CI: -0.64, -0.16 servings) in care in the intervention group, relative to control at 12-mo follow-up. No significant differences were observed in diet quality, BMI z scores, or HRQoL. Conclusions: A web-based intervention to support planning of childcare menus consistent with dietary guidelines can improve child consumption of healthier foods in daycare. This trial was registered at www.anzctr.org.au as ACTRN12616000974404.

DOI 10.1093/ajcn/nqaa025
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Alice Grady, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Rachel Sutherland, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2020 Grady A, Barnes C, Wolfenden L, Lecathelinais C, Yoong SL, 'Barriers and Enablers to Adoption of Digital Health Interventions to Support the Implementation of Dietary Guidelines in Early Childhood Education and Care: Cross-Sectional Study', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, 22 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/22036
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Alice Grady, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2020 Barnes C, Grady A, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Pond N, McFayden T, et al., 'A pilot randomised controlled trial of a web-based implementation intervention to increase child intake of fruit and vegetables within childcare centres', Pilot and Feasibility Studies, 6 (2020)

Background: As dietary behaviours developed during early childhood are known to track into adulthood, interventions that aim to improve child nutrition at a population level are r... [more]

Background: As dietary behaviours developed during early childhood are known to track into adulthood, interventions that aim to improve child nutrition at a population level are recommended. Whilst early childhood education and care (ECEC) is a promising setting for interventions targeting children¿s nutrition behaviours, previous interventions have largely used high intensity, face-to-face approaches, limiting their reach, implementation and potential impact at a population level. Web-based modalities represent a promising means of supporting the delivery of childcare-based interventions whilst overcoming challenges of previous approaches; however, the feasibility of using such modalities to support implementation is largely unknown. As such, this study sought to collect feasibility and pilot data to inform the design of a web-based intervention together with health promotion officer support within childcare centres. Child dietary intake will also be assessed to provide an estimate of the impact of the implementation intervention. Methods: A superiority cluster randomised controlled trial with repeat cross-sectional data collection employing an effectiveness-implementation type-II hybrid design will be conducted with childcare centres within the Hunter New England region of New South Wales, Australia. Type-II hybrid designs provide the opportunity to assess intervention efficacy whilst piloting the feasibility of the implementation strategies. Centres allocated to the intervention group will receive access to a web-based program together with health promotion officer support to implement targeted healthy eating practices to improve child diet in care. A number of outcomes will be assessed to inform the feasibility to conduct a larger trial, including childcare centre and parent recruitment and consent rates for each component of data collection, uptake of the implementation strategies, acceptability of the intervention and implementation strategies, appropriateness of the implementation strategies and the contextual factors influencing implementation. Discussion: This study will provide high-quality evidence regarding the potential feasibility of a web-based intervention and the impact of healthy eating practices on child diet in care. Web-based modalities provide a promising approach for population-wide implementation support to childcare centres given their potential reach and consistency with existing infrastructure. Trial registration: Prospectively registered with Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ACTRN12619001158156).

DOI 10.1186/s40814-020-00707-w
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Nicole Nathan
2020 Jackson J, Wolfenden L, Grady A, Lum M, Leonard A, McCrabb S, et al., 'Early childhood education and care-based healthy eating interventions for improving child diet: a systematic review protocol', SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, 9 (2020)
DOI 10.1186/s13643-020-01440-4
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Sam Mccrabb, Alix Hall
2020 Wolfenden L, Barnes C, Jones J, Finch M, Wyse RJ, Kingsland M, et al., 'Strategies to improve the implementation of healthy eating, physical activity and obesity prevention policies, practices or programmes within childcare services', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2020 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD011779.pub3
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, Flora Tzelepis
2019 Hodder RK, O'Brien KM, Stacey FG, Tzelepis F, Wyse RJ, Bartlem KM, et al., 'Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2019 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub6
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, Rebecca Wyse, Flora Tzelepis, Rachel Sutherland, Luke Wolfenden, Kate Bartlem, Erica James
2019 Yoong SL, Nathan N, Reilly K, Sutherland R, Straus S, Barnes C, et al., 'Adapting implementation strategies: a case study of how to support implementation of healthy canteen policies', Public Health, 177 19-25 (2019) [C1]

Objectives: Although evidence-based interventions (EBIs) and effective strategies to implement them exist, they cannot be used by policy makers and practitioners if they do not al... [more]

Objectives: Although evidence-based interventions (EBIs) and effective strategies to implement them exist, they cannot be used by policy makers and practitioners if they do not align with end users¿ needs. As such, adaptations to EBIs and implementation approaches are likely to occur to increase ¿fit¿ with end users¿ capacity. This article describes an approach undertaken by a population health service delivery unit in one Australian state to develop an adapted implementation strategy to support the implementation of the mandatory healthy canteen policy (EBI) to all schools located in the service delivery region. Study design: This is a case study of adapting an intervention to improve implementation of the healthy canteen policy. Methods and results: This is a six-step pragmatic, empirically driven approach. The steps include (i) adapt, where appropriate, the EBI to facilitate implementation; (ii) identify end users¿ capacity for implementation; (iii) identify opportunities to adapt the implementation interventions while preserving meaningful intervention impact; (iv) undertake program adaptation; (v) develop training and resources to support delivery of implementation strategies and; (vi) evaluate the adapted intervention. This article describes the application of these steps by the authors to develop an adapted support strategy consistent with end users¿ needs. Conclusions: This study provides some guidance on how to adapt implementation support approaches particularly when EBIs cannot be adapted. Future empirical research providing guidance on making practical adaptation decisions are needed.

DOI 10.1016/j.puhe.2019.07.003
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Kathryn L Reilly, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland
Delaney T, Mclaughlin M, Hall A, Yoong SL, Brown A, O'Brien K, et al., 'Associations between digital health intervention engagement and dietary intake: A Systematic Review (Preprint)
DOI 10.2196/preprints.26698
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Alix Hall, Jenna Hollis, Luke Wolfenden, Julia Dray, Rachel Sutherland
Brown A, Barnes C, Byaruhanga J, McLaughlin M, Hodder RK, Booth D, et al., 'Effectiveness of Technology-Enabled Knowledge Translation Strategies in Improving the Use of Research in Public Health: Systematic Review (Preprint)
DOI 10.2196/preprints.17274
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc, Luke Wolfenden, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan
Grady A, Barnes C, Wolfenden L, Lecathelinais C, Yoong SL, 'Barriers and Enablers to Adoption of Digital Health Interventions to Support the Implementation of Dietary Guidelines in Early Childhood Education and Care: Cross-Sectional Study (Preprint)
DOI 10.2196/preprints.22036
Co-authors Alice Grady, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
Show 20 more journal articles

Review (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Delaney T, Mclaughlin M, Yoong SL, Wyse R, Sutherland R, Hollis J, et al., 'Associations between digital health intervention engagement and dietary intake: a systematic review (2018)
DOI 10.13140/RG.2.2.32035.71203
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
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Miss Courtney Barnes

Position

Postdoctoral Researcher
School of Medicine and Public Health
School of Medicine and Public Health
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Contact Details

Email courtney.barnes@newcastle.edu.au
Mobile 0419035765
Fax (02) 49216450

Office

Room 0051
Building Booth Building, Population Health
Location Wallsend

,
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