Dr Anna Rayward

Dr Anna Rayward

Research Academic

School of Education

Career Summary

Biography

Having originally trained as a doctor, Anna undertook a PhD in Behavioural Sciences with a view to preventing the development of chronic diseases at the population level by improving lifestyle behaviours. She graduated in 2020, from the University of Newcastle, Australia.

Anna’s PhD research focused on understanding the bidirectional relationship between physical activity and sleep and harnessing it to improve the physical and mental health of Australian adults using a technology-based approach. Targeting physical inactivity and poor sleep health in adults is an important factor in preventing non-communicable diseases and as such both are critical public health areas.  

Anna's research now involves family-based interventions, specifically targeting fathersto help them adopt healthier lifestyle behaviours. She has joined a team of researchers at the University of Newcastle who are implementing the Daughters and Dads Active and Empowered program across NSW through collaboration with the NSW Office of Sport. The Daughters and Dads Active and Empowered program is a multi-award-winning program which empowers fathers as agents of change in their daughters’ lives, to improve their physical activity levels, sport skills and social-emotional well-being.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Behavioural Science, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Medicine, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Family healthy lifestyle interventions
  • Physical activity, sleep behaviours and health

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
420699 Public health not elsewhere classified 60
420603 Health promotion 30
390399 Education systems not elsewhere classified 10

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Academic University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia
Research Academic University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (21 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Duncan MJ, Rayward AT, Holliday EG, Brown WJ, Vandelanotte C, Murawski B, Plotnikoff RC, 'Effect of a physical activity and sleep m-health intervention on a composite activity-sleep behaviour score and mental health: a mediation analysis of two randomised controlled trials', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 18 (2021) [C1]

Background: To examine if a composite activity-sleep behaviour index (ASI) mediates the effects of a combined physical activity and sleep intervention on symptoms of depression, a... [more]

Background: To examine if a composite activity-sleep behaviour index (ASI) mediates the effects of a combined physical activity and sleep intervention on symptoms of depression, anxiety, or stress, quality of life (QOL), energy and fatigue in adults. Methods: This analysis used data pooled from two studies: Synergy and Refresh. Synergy: Physically inactive adults (18¿65 years) who reported poor sleep quality were recruited for a two-arm Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) (Physical Activity and Sleep Health (PAS; n = 80), or Wait-list Control (CON; n = 80) groups). Refresh: Physically inactive adults (40¿65 years) who reported poor sleep quality were recruited for a three-arm RCT (PAS (n = 110), Sleep Health-Only (SO; n = 110) or CON (n = 55) groups). The SO group was omitted from this study. The PAS groups received a pedometer, and accessed a smartphone/tablet ¿app¿ using behaviour change strategies (e.g., self-monitoring, goal setting, action planning), with additional email/SMS support. The ASI score comprised self-reported moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity, resistance training, sitting time, sleep duration, efficiency, quality and timing. Outcomes were assessed using DASS-21 (depression, anxiety, stress), SF-12 (QOL-physical, QOL-mental) and SF-36 (Energy & Fatigue). Assessments were conducted at baseline, 3 months (primary time-point), and 6 months. Mediation effects were examined using Structural Equation Modelling and the product of coefficients approach (AB), with significance set at 0.05. Results: At 3 months there were no direct intervention effects on mental health, QOL or energy and fatigue (all p > 0.05), and the intervention significantly improved the ASI (all p < 0.05). A more favourable ASI score was associated with improved symptoms of depression, anxiety, stress, QOL-mental and of energy and fatigue (all p < 0.05). The intervention effects on symptoms of depression ([AB; 95%CI] -0.31; - 0.60,-0.11), anxiety (- 0.11; - 0.27,-0.01), stress (- 0.37; - 0.65,-0.174), QOL-mental (0.53; 0.22, 1.01) and ratings of energy and fatigue (0.85; 0.33, 1.63) were mediated by ASI. At 6 months the magnitude of association was larger although the overall pattern of results remained similar. Conclusions: Improvements in the overall physical activity and sleep behaviours of adults partially mediated the intervention effects on mental health and quality of life outcomes. This highlights the potential benefit of improving the overall pattern of physical activity and sleep on these outcomes. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry: ACTRN12617000680369; ACTRN12617000376347. Universal Trial number: U1111¿1194-2680; U1111¿1186-6588. Human Research Ethics Committee Approval: H-2016-0267; H-2016¿0181.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-021-01112-z
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Mitch Duncan, Ron Plotnikoff, Beatrice Murawski
2021 Fenton S, Burrows TL, Collins CE, Holliday EG, Kolt GS, Murawski B, et al., 'Behavioural mediators of reduced energy intake in a physical activity, diet, and sleep behaviour weight loss intervention in adults.', Appetite, 165 105273 (2021)
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2021.105273
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Clare Collins, Beatrice Murawski, Tracy Burrows, Mitch Duncan
2021 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Barnes AT, Pollock ER, Kennedy S-L, Drew RJ, et al., 'Engaging Fathers to Improve Physical Activity and Nutrition in Themselves and in Their Preschool-Aged Children: The "Healthy Youngsters, Healthy Dads" Feasibility Trial', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY & HEALTH, 18 175-184 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2020-0506
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Alyce Barnes, Emma R Pollock, Myles Young
2021 Oftedal S, Rayward AT, Fenton S, Duncan MJ, 'Sleep, diet, activity, and incident poor self-rated health: A population-based cohort study.', Health Psychol, 40 252-262 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1037/hea0001066
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
2020 Murawski B, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Rayward AT, Brown WJ, Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, 'Examining mediators of intervention efficacy in a randomised controlled m-health trial to improve physical activity and sleep health in adults', Psychology and Health, 35 1346-1367 (2020) [C1]

Objectives: Examining mediators of intervention efficacy in an m-health intervention targeting physical activity and sleep in 160 Australian adults. Design: Nationwide randomised ... [more]

Objectives: Examining mediators of intervention efficacy in an m-health intervention targeting physical activity and sleep in 160 Australian adults. Design: Nationwide randomised controlled trial. Main outcome measures: Moderate- and vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA), assessed using the Active Australia Questionnaire; sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index); and sleep hygiene practices (Sleep Hygiene Index). Hypothesised psychosocial (e.g. self-efficacy) and behavioural (i.e. MVPA, sleep quality, sleep hygiene) mediators were tested on primary endpoint data at 3 months using bias-corrected bootstrapping (PROCESS 2 for SPSS). All outcomes and mediators were assessed using self-report. Results: At three months, the intervention had significantly improved sleep quality (d = 0.48, 95% CI: -2.26, -0.33, p = 0.009) and sleep hygiene (d = 0.40, 95% CI: -3.10, -0.19, p = 0.027). Differences in MVPA were not significant (d = 0.24, 95% CI: -35.53, 254.67, p = 0.139). Changes in MVPA were mediated by self-efficacy, perceived capability, environment, social support, intentions and planning, some of which showed inconsistent mediation (suppression). None of the hypothesised psychosocial factors mediated sleep outcomes. Changes in sleep hygiene mediated changes in sleep quality. Conclusions: Several psychosocial factors mediated changes in physical activity but not in sleep outcomes. Mediation effects of sleep hygiene on sleep quality highlight the importance of providing evidence-based strategies to improve sleep quality.

DOI 10.1080/08870446.2020.1756288
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Mitch Duncan, David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff, Beatrice Murawski
2020 Rayward AT, Murawski B, Duncan MJ, Holliday EG, Vandelanotte C, Brown WJ, Plotnikoff RC, 'Efficacy of an m-health physical activity and sleep intervention to improve sleep quality in middle-aged adults: The refresh study randomized controlled trial', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 54 470-483 (2020) [C1]

Background Poor sleep health is highly prevalent. Physical activity is known to improve sleep quality but not specifically targeted in sleep interventions. Purpose To compare the ... [more]

Background Poor sleep health is highly prevalent. Physical activity is known to improve sleep quality but not specifically targeted in sleep interventions. Purpose To compare the efficacy of a combined physical activity and sleep intervention with a sleep-only intervention and a wait-list control, for improving sleep quality in middle-aged adults without a diagnosed sleep disorder. Methods Three-arm randomized controlled trial (Physical Activity and Sleep Health (PAS), Sleep Health Only (SO), Wait-list Control (CON) groups; 3-month primary time-point, 6-month follow-up) of 275 (PAS = 110, SO = 110, CON = 55) inactive adults (40¿65 years) reporting poor sleep quality. The main intervention component was a smartphone/tablet ¿app¿ to aid goal setting and self-monitoring physical activity and/or sleep hygiene behaviors (including stress management), and a pedometer for PAS group. Primary outcome was Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) global score. Secondary outcomes included several self-reported physical activity measures and PSQI subcomponents. Group differences were examined stepwise, first between pooled intervention (PI = PAS + SO) and CON groups, then between PAS and SO groups. Results Compared with CON, PI groups significantly improved PSQI global and subcomponents scores at 3 and 6 months. There were no differences in sleep quality between PAS and SO groups. The PAS group reported significantly less daily sitting time at 3 months and was significantly more likely to report =2 days/week resistance training and meeting physical activity guidelines at 6 months than the SO group. Conclusions PIs had statistically significantly improved sleep quality among middle-aged adults with poor sleep quality without a diagnosed sleep disorder. The adjunctive physical activity intervention did not additionally improve sleep quality.

DOI 10.1093/abm/kaz064
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Beatrice Murawski, Ron Plotnikoff, Liz Holliday, Mitch Duncan
2020 Duncan MJ, Fenton S, Brown WJ, Collins CE, Glozier N, Kolt GS, et al., 'Efficacy of a Multi-component m-Health Weight-loss Intervention in Overweight and Obese Adults: A Randomised Controlled Trial.', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17176200
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Beatrice Murawski, Tracy Burrows, Mitch Duncan, Clare Collins, Liz Holliday
2020 Duncan MJ, Oftedal S, Rebar AL, Murawski B, Short CE, Rayward AT, Vandelanotte C, 'Patterns of physical activity, sitting time, and sleep in Australian adults: A latent class analysis', Sleep Health, 6 828-834 (2020) [C1]

Objective: To identify the patterns of activity, sitting and sleep that adults engage in, the demographic and biological correlates of activity-sleep patterns and the relationship... [more]

Objective: To identify the patterns of activity, sitting and sleep that adults engage in, the demographic and biological correlates of activity-sleep patterns and the relationship between identified patterns and self-rated health. Design and Setting: Online panel of randomly selected Australian adults (n = 2034) completing a cross-sectional survey in October-November 2013. Participants: Panel members who provided complete data on all variables were included (n = 1532). Measurements: Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, height, weight, self-rated health, duration of physical activity, frequency of resistance training, sitting time, sleep duration, sleep quality, and variability in bed and wake times. Activity-sleep patterns were determined using latent class analysis. Latent class regression was used to examine the relationships between identified patterns, demographic and biological characteristics, and self-rated health. Results: A 4-class model fit the data best, characterized by very active good sleepers, inactive good sleepers, inactive poor sleepers, moderately active good sleepers, representing 38.2%, 22.2%, 21.2%, and 18.4% of the sample, respectively. Relative to the very active good sleepers, the inactive poor sleepers, and inactive good sleepers were more likely to report being female, lower education, higher body mass index, and lower self-rated health, the moderately active good sleepers were more likely to be older, report lower education, higher body mass index and lower self-rated health. Associations between activity-sleep pattern and self-rated health were the largest in the inactive poor sleepers. Conclusions: The 4 activity-sleep patterns identified had distinct behavioral profiles, sociodemographic correlates, and relationships with self-rated health. Many adults could benefit from behavioral interventions targeting improvements in physical activity and sleep.

DOI 10.1016/j.sleh.2020.04.006
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Beatrice Murawski, Mitch Duncan
2019 Duncan M, Oftedal S, Rebar A, Murawski B, Short C, Rayward A, Vandelanotte C, 'Patterns of physical activity, sitting time and sleep in Australian adults: a latent class analysis', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 22 S56-S56 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2019.08.250
Co-authors Beatrice Murawski
2019 Rayward AT, Vandelanotte C, Corry K, Van Itallie A, Duncan MJ, 'Impact of a Social Media Campaign on Reach, Uptake, and Engagement with a Free Web- and App-Based Physical Activity Intervention: The 10,000 Steps Australia Program', International journal of environmental research and public health, 16 1-17 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph16245076
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
2019 Gordon S, Vandelanotte C, Rayward AT, Murawski B, Duncan MJ, 'Sociodemographic and behavioral correlates of insufficient sleep in Australian adults', SLEEP HEALTH, 5 12-17 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.sleh.2018.06.002
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Mitch Duncan, Beatrice Murawski
2019 Oftedal S, Burrows T, Fenton S, Murawski B, Rayward AB, Duncan MJ, 'Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of an m-Health Intervention Targeting Physical Activity, Diet, and Sleep Quality in Shift-Workers', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 16 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph16203810
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Mitch Duncan, Beatrice Murawski
2019 Murawski B, Plotnikoff RC, Rayward AT, Oldmeadow C, Vandelanotte C, Brown WJ, Duncan M, 'Efficacy of an m-health physical activity and sleep health intervention for adults: a randomized waitlist-controlled trial.', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 57 503-514 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2019.05.009
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Mitch Duncan, Christopher Oldmeadow, Beatrice Murawski
2018 Rayward A, Plotnikoff R, Vandelanotte C, Brown WJ, Holliday E, Duncan MJJ, 'A randomised controlled trial to test the efficacy of an m-health delivered physical activity and sleep intervention to improve sleep quality in middle-aged adults: The Refresh Study Protocol', Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications, 73 36-50 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2018.08.007
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Liz Holliday, Mitch Duncan, Beatrice Murawski
2018 Duncan MJ, Brown WJ, Burrows TL, Collins CE, Fenton S, Glozier N, et al., 'Examining the efficacy of a multicomponent m-Health physical activity, diet and sleep intervention for weight loss in overweight and obese adults: randomised controlled trial protocol', BMJ OPEN, 8 (2018)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-026179
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Mitch Duncan, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Tracy Burrows, Ron Plotnikoff, Beatrice Murawski, Michael Hensley, Liz Holliday
2018 Murawski B, Plotnikoff RC, Rayward AT, Vandelanotte C, Brown WJ, Duncan MJ, 'Randomised controlled trial using a theory-based m-health intervention to improve physical activity and sleep health in adults: the Synergy Study protocol', BMJ OPEN, 8 (2018)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-018997
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Mitch Duncan, Ron Plotnikoff, Beatrice Murawski
2018 Rayward AT, Burton NW, Brown WJ, Holliday EG, Plotnikoff RC, Duncan MJ, 'Associations between Changes in Activity and Sleep Quality and Duration over Two Years.', Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 50 2425-2432 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1249/mss.0000000000001715
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Ron Plotnikoff, Mitch Duncan
2017 Rayward AT, Duncan MJ, Brown WJ, Plotnikoff RC, Burton NW, 'A cross-sectional cluster analysis of the combined association of physical activity and sleep with sociodemographic and health characteristics in mid-aged and older adults', Maturitas, 102 56-61 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.maturitas.2017.05.013
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Mitch Duncan, Ron Plotnikoff
2016 Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, Trost SG, Rebar AL, Rogers N, Burton NW, et al., 'Balanced: a randomised trial examining the efficacy of two self-monitoring methods for an app-based multi-behaviour intervention to improve physical activity, sitting and sleep in adults', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 16 (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3256-x
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Beatrice Murawski, Mitch Duncan
Rayward AT, Vandelanotte C, Van Itallie A, Duncan MJ, 'Logging steps using the website, app, Fitbit or a combination influences engagement with the 10,000 Steps physical activity program: An observational study (Preprint)
DOI 10.2196/preprints.22151
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
Rayward AT, Vandelanotte C, Van Itallie A, Duncan MJ, 'Logging steps using the website, app, Fitbit or a combination is associates with engagement with the 10,000 Steps physical activity program: An observational study. (Preprint)', Journal of Medical Internet Research,
DOI 10.2196/22151
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $2,500

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20211 grants / $2,500

Research Output Scheme Funding$2,500

Funding body: College of Human and Social Futures, University of Newcastle

Funding body College of Human and Social Futures, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Anna Rayward

Scheme 2021 CHSF Research Output Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N
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Dr Anna Rayward

Position

Research Academic
School of Education
College of Human and Social Futures

Contact Details

Email anna.rayward@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 405 53239

Office

Room ATC308
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