Professor Michael Nilsson

Professor Michael Nilsson

Director HMRI

Faculty of Health and Medicine

A leading role

The Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) has a strong tradition of cultivating young research talent, which its Director, Professor Michael Nilsson is keen to continue.

Professor Michael Nilsson in front of HMRI

Good role modelling and support is of immeasurable value to a young researcher, a concept not lost on HMRI Director Michael Nilsson. As a student, the esteemed Swedish neuroscientist, neurologist and rehabilitation medicine specialist came under the wing of Professor Christian Blomstrand, an innovative colleague in neurological research who was to become highly influential in Nilsson's career.

The pair still collaborate and share an interest in stroke and brain plasticity with a translational view, from the basic functions of astrocytes in the brain to pioneering studies in modern stroke rehabilitation.

"He was, and still is, a facilitator, a mentor and a fabulous person – his advice and guidance really helped shape my career," Nilsson reflects. "When I first started working in this area, astrocytes were thought to be very passive cells but he and other distinguished colleagues at the University of Gothenburg suspected that they were more involved in the inner processes of the brain and could see the potential for expansive and very interesting research.

"We pioneered parts of the early research in this field and contributed to the growing body of evidence demonstrating that astrocytes are essential for core brain functions. For example, they contribute to the control of the flow of information over the synapses and are integral in brain plasticity and regeneration."

Michael, is acutely aware of the important role the institute has played over its 14-year history in fostering emerging young medical researchers. He is impressed with the calibre of early and mid career researchers within the organisation, who in some cases are already leaders in their fields. Having a young family himself – he is a father of four children aged between three and 16 – he also is attuned to the many demands and responsibilities placed on young researchers.

"Life is not all about work and it is important that we acknowledge that, because we need different types of stimuli and also periods of rest and recovery. This will ultimately lead to a more productive researcher, and a better person overall. I am a firm believer of that," Michael maintains.

"HMRI has an important role to play in supporting young researchers in all aspects of their lives, not just for the benefit of their careers but for the benefit of the institute. We need to provide an environment in which they are happy to develop their careers so that in future we will have young people who can step up to take on leading roles in our research programs."

Previously Director of Research, Development and Education at northern Europe's largest teaching hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden, Nilsson brings to HMRI a wealth of research management experience and high standing in the international research community.He has forged strong relationships with researchers in Australia, including collaborations with HMRI's world-leading Stroke Research Group, since first venturing to the country in 1997 to undertake a visiting fellowship at Flinders University's Centre for Neuroscience.

"When I came to Newcastle for the first time I was impressed with the research community, the opportunities and the pioneering spirit that was evident," Michael recalls."The emphasis on translational research here also attracted me to the HMRI position.

"As a city with one university that has strong links to its teaching hospitals, Newcastle is ideally positioned to take a leading role internationally in patient-focused research. With the state-of-the-art facilities in our building, I envisage HMRI becoming a very desirable destination for world-class researchers."

Michael is maintaining a research role while steering HMRI. He is building a local team to work on brain recovery processes after stroke, of which his innovative Culture and Brain Health program will constitute a part. The project, based in Sweden, studies the effects of cultural and physical influences such as music, arts, architecture, nutrition and exercise, on brain recovery after stroke or trauma.

A 2009 study by Michael's team, using the records of more than one million young men from the Swedish conscription register, found a strong correlation between good cardiovascular fitness and higher intelligence. A subsequent study also showed an association between fitness in young adulthood and a reduced risk of depression later in life.

He and his colleagues are now working with the concept of enriched environments and how providing multimodal stimulation – a combination of physical exercises, social activity and cognitive challenges – can stimulate brain plasticity and functional recovery after stroke.

"We are studying the effects of physical and cultural stimulation in both healthy people and survivors of stroke and we strongly believe these factors can help sustain and develop the cognitive reserve of the brain," he outlines. "The research has potential implications for brain recovery in a range of situations, and for healthy ageing in general. I want to grow this program and have researchers from Sweden and other collaborating laboratories coming to HMRI and vice-versa.

"We will support parallel high-level international collaboration across all of the research programs of HMRI. Such collaborations are absolutely necessary for the development of our emerging research leaders."

Whilst increasing HMRI's global collaborations and profile are constant themes in Michael's strategy for the institute, he is similarly intent on building strong relationships at home. He speaks with equal enthusiasm about convening prestigious international symposia and instigating regular community seminars.

"HMRI is built on three pillars – the Hunter New England Local Health District, the University of Newcastle and the community – and the support of each is critical to its success," he states. "It is important that we keep people in the Hunter up to date with what we are doing, but also that we take our work to the world and let the international research community know what a wonderful, innovative environment we have here."

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Michael Nilsson in front of HMRI

A leading role

The Hunter Medical Research Institute has a strong tradition of cultivating young research talent, which its new Director, Professor Michael Nilsson is keen to continue.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Professor Michael Nilsson is the Director of the Hunter Medical Research Institute and Burges Professor of Medical Science at Newcastle University. He is a senior rehabilitation physician, neurologist and a translational neuroscientist bridging together knowledge in neurobiology, neural recovery and clinical rehabilitation after stroke. He is a Conjoint Professor of Neurorehabilitation and Translational Stroke Research, University of Gothenburg in Sweden and Honorary Professor of the Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne, Australia. Prior to his Directorship of the Hunter Medical Research Institute, Professor Nilsson was Director of Research and Development at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden.

During the course of his career, Professor Nilsson has implemented new models of care in neurorehabilitation and has led international accreditation projects for rehabilitation services in Sweden, which rendered him and his team recognition for outstanding service delivery in rehabilitation and translational neuroscience. As Director of Neurorehabilitation at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, Professor Nilsson was one of the youngest Directors of a clinical department in the hospital´s history. Under his directorship, the clinic was awarded top reviews for strong and visionary leadership in medical rehabilitation and translational neuroscience according to the international, US-based accreditation organisation “Commission on the Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities”. Professor Nilsson has received multiple prizes from patient organisations in rehabilitation and neurology, and quality prizes for rehabilitation service delivery. He has been awarded scholarships and prizes from Swedish Research Council, Brain Foundation, The Jubilee Foundation at Gothenburg University and the Swedish Society of Medicine.

Working at the forefront of translational and interdisciplinary research, Professor Nilsson has, through his entrepreneurial skills, developed projects and strong links with business partners. For example, he is the founder of NeuroOptima, a leading rehabilitation provider in Sweden and Spain.

Professor Nilsson’s research focuses on mechanisms underpinning brain plasticity, neuroprotection and neural repair with special emphasis on the functions of glial cells and stress-related mechanisms. He is also exploring the effects of enriched environment on stroke recovery in both animal models and clinical trials. Recently, he was the principal investigator of a pioneering interdisciplinary research program, The Culture and Brain Health Initiative, which included studies on the effects of multimodal interventions on cognition and motor skills in control subjects and stroke patients.

Professor Nilsson is currently chief investigator and co-lead on an NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in stroke rehabilitation and brain recovery. This centre involves internationally leading stroke researchers primarily from two major stroke research centres in Australia: the Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health in Melbourne; and the Hunter Medical Research Institute in Newcastle.

He has initiated multiple projects aimed at a deeper understanding of the outcome and impact of translational research internationally and in Australia. Recently, he was appointed as member of the Health Translation Advisory Committee, a new principal committee of the NHMRC.

Professor Nilsson has published > 150 scientific articles and over the course of his career received over $30 million in research funding. He has been an invited speaker to national and international meetings > 40 times since 2010. Recently, he was invited to be a member of the “Translation of scientific evidence into human trials” group, Stroke Recovery Roundtable in May 2016, Philadelphia, USA, to develop a set of research guidelines for stroke recovery.

Teaching Expertise

As Laboratory Director, and jointly with Associate Professor Rohan Walker from the Hunter Medical Research Institute’s Stroke Recovery Research Group, Professor Nilsson supervises nine PhD students. Internationally, he has supervised and mentored five postdoctoral researchers, seven PhD students and nine Master’s students.

Professor Nilsson has served as a teacher, tutor and lecturer since 1986. He obtained his initial teaching skills through lectures and discussion groups at the Department of Histology and Department of Anatomy and Cellular Biology, University of Gothenburg, 1986-1996. Mentorship from experienced teachers/researchers and invited lectures contributed to this knowledge. In his different roles, he has over the years continuously developed his teaching skills and also added on experience internationally. He was actively involved in clinical teaching and supervision in neurology, rehabilitation medicine and geriatrics in the medical program at the University of Gothenburg from 1995 – 2010.

Professor Nilsson has lectured postgraduate students since 1992, in areas such as: astrocyte biology, ion channels - structure and function, theoretical and clinical aspects of epilepsy, pharmacological treatment of epilepsy and stroke, brain plasticity and regeneration, modern stroke and brain injury rehabilitation, enriched environment and culture and health. He has been supervising doctoral students since 1994, either as main supervisor or co-supervisor.

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Gothenburg - Sweden

Keywords

  • Astrocytes
  • Brain Repair
  • Enriched Environment
  • Geriatrics
  • Histology
  • Microglia
  • Neurochemistry
  • Neurology
  • Neuroscience
  • Stroke Recovery
  • Stroke Rehabilitation

Languages

  • Swedish (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110321 Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl. Physiotherapy) 50
110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
12/12/2016 -  Adjunct Professor La Trobe University
Department of Community and Clinical Allied Health
Australia
11/10/2013 -  Honorary Professor The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health
Australia
1/11/2012 -  Conjoint Professor of Neurological Rehabilitation and Translational Stroke Research University of Gothenburg
Sweden
1/02/2012 -  Burges Professor of Medical Science Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
Australia
1/04/2010 - 1/04/2011 Director of Research, Development and Education (RD&E) Sahlgrenska University Hospital
Sweden
1/05/2009 - 1/03/2010 Director of Neurology, Neurosurgery, Clinical Neurophysiology and Neurorehabilitation Sahlgrenska University Hospital
Sweden
1/08/2006 - 1/04/2009 Chair of the Sector Council Region of West Sweden
Rehabilitation Medicine
Sweden
1/01/2004 - 1/08/2006 Director University of Gothenburg and Sahlgrenska University Hospital
Arvid Carlsson Institute
Sweden
1/12/2000 - 1/06/2004 Chair of the Sector Council Region of West Sweden
Rehabilitation Medicine
Sweden
1/10/1997 - 1/04/1998 Visiting Academic Flinders University
Centre for Neuroscience
Australia
1/05/1992 - 1/01/1993 Post-doctoral Scientist University of Gothenburg
The Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology
Sweden
1/01/1992 - 1/04/1992 Ph.D. student, full-time University of Gothenburg
Sweden
1/10/1984 - 1/12/1990 Ph.D. student, part-time in parallel with studies in Medicine University of Gothenburg
Sweden

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
5/12/2016 -  Australian Medical Practitioner Registration Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency
Specialist Registration in Rehabilitation Medicine
Australia
18/11/2016 -  Fellow Royal Australasian College of Physicians
Australasian Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine
1/08/2016 -  Committee Member Australian Brain Alliance (ABA)
Australia
1/06/2016 -  Committee Member Royal Australasian College of Physicians
Australasian Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine
11/08/2015 -  Committee Member NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Health Translation Advisory Committee
1/02/2012 -  Board Member Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
Australia
1/01/2011 -  Board Member Rest-Me Ltd
Sweden
1/01/2008 -  Board Member Aina Wallstrom's and Mary-Ann Sjoblom's Foundation for Medical Research
University of Gothenburg
Sweden
1/01/2007 -  Chair & Initiator Foundation for Peter Eriksson's Memorial Fund for Brain Research
Sweden
1/01/2006 -  Board Member NeuroOptima Ltd
Sweden
1/01/2002 -  Board Member Medicarta Ltd
Sweden

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/02/2012 -  Executive Director Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
Australia
1/02/2012 -  Staff Specialist Hunter New England Health
Rehabilitation Medicine
Australia
1/04/2011 - 1/01/2012 Research Strategist Sahlgrenska University Hospital
Central Administration
Sweden
1/10/2000 - 1/04/2009 Director and Senior Consultant Sahlgrenska University Hospital
Rehabilitation Medicine
Sweden
1/11/1994 - 1/09/2000 Combined Clinical Research / Residency Sahlgrenska University Hospital
Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine
Sweden
1/01/1993 - 1/10/1994 Internship to obtain license to practice in Medicine Mölndal Hospital, Gothenburg
Sweden

Awards

Recipient

Year Award
2009 Sahlgrenska University Hospital Quality Prize (awarded to the Rehabilitation Clinic)
Sahlgrenska University Hospital
2004 Swedish Parkinson Association Honorary Medal
Unknown
2003 NHR-price for significant achievements in Neurology and Rehabilitation
Unknown
2000 The Jubilee Foundation of University of Gothenburg
University of Gothenburg
1999 The Jubilee Foundation of University of Gothenburg
University of Gothenburg
1999 The Swedish Society of Medicine’s travel and foreign scholarship
Unknown
1997 Swedish Medical Research Council scholarship for international exchange
Unknown
1997 The Swedish Society of Medicine’s travel and foreign scholarship
Unknown
1997 Swedish Medical Research Council, Clinical Transitional Grant
Unknown
1997 The Swedish Brain Foundation postdoc scholarship
Unknown
1995 The Swedish Society of Medicine’s education scholarship
Unknown

Invitations

Keynote Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2014 Fit for the Future: The resilient Brain in the next decade

Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2016 Regional Innovation and Disruption: Health's contribution to regional innovation and economic growth
2016 Stress and Secondary Neurodegeneration in Stroke - Relevance for Neurorehabilitation
2016 The Medical Research Future Fund; doubling the federal funding of medical research in Australia
2015 Stroke rehabilitation practice and research - can you justify what your instincts tell you!
2015 Hunter Medical Research Institute Model for Effective Research Translation
2015 Enriched environment in stroke recovery
2014 International perspectives on Rehabilitation Research
2014 Stress and significant contributor to recovery after stroke: The good and the bad
2014 A history of effective research translation: the experience of HMRI
2014 Stroke Neuroscience and Stroke Recovery is all about Plasticity
2014 Brain Plasticity and Regeneration – from animal models to clinical rehabilitation
2013 Stroke recovery – the big picture
2013 Research directions in Australia
2013 What do we know about the neural substrates of recovery?
2013 Kontrollforlust for patienter och anhoiga efter stroke
2012 Translational Research in Stroke Rehabilitation
2012 Environmental enrichment in stroke rehabilitation – impact on cognition and Neural plasticity in the damaged brain: micro and macro perspective
2012 Modulation of brain plasticity as a basis for stroke rehabilitation
2012 Translational stroke research – Brain plasticity in stroke recovery and neurorehabiltiation
2012 Brain plasticity in stroke rehabilitation – An overview
2011 Astrocytes and reaction to cellular stress in the CNS
2011 Multimodal stimulation – How is the brain responding?
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Walker FR, Ong L, Nilsson M, 'Chronic Stress-induced Changes in Microglia in Determining Vulnerability to Mood Disorders', PRIMER OF PSYCHONEUROIMMUNOLOGY RESEARCH, PsychoNeuroImmunology Research Society, Los Angeles, CA 119-124 (2016) [B1]
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Rohan Walker
2012 Nilsson M, Pekny M, Pekna M, 'Chapter 3: Neural plasticity as a foundation for stroke rehabilitation', Stroke rehabilitation: Insights from Neuroscience and Imaging, Oxford University Press, New York, USA 24-34 (2012) [B1]
2012 Linden T, Carey L, Nilsson M, 'Chapter 8: Motivation, mood and the right environment', Stroke rehabilitation: Insights from Neuroscience and Imaging, Oxford University Press, New York, USA 105-115 (2012) [B1]
2006 Eriksson PS, Nilsson M, Wallin L, 'Neurogenesis in management: How to make co-workers gain and not drain their brains', Encyclopedia of Disability, Sage Publications (2006) [B1]
DOI 10.4135/9781412950510
1998 Jansson JO, Svensson J, Sjogren-Jansson E, Bengtsson BA, Kineman R, Frohman L, et al., 'Extra- and intra-hypothalamo-hypophyseal effects of GH secretagogues', Growth Hormone Secretagogues, Marcel Dekker (1998) [B1]
1997 Nilsson M, Hagberg GB, 'Astroglial potassium and calcium channels. Contribution to brain homeostasis and excitability control', On astrocytes in glutamate neurotransmission : New waves in neural information processing, Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg, Germany 69-91 (1997) [B1]
1997 Hansson E, Thorlin T, Linde M, Blomstrand F, Eriksson PS, Johansson U, et al., 'Astroglial pharmacology', Psychopharmacology. The fourth version of progress-version No 2, CD ROM, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (1997) [B1]
1993 Hansson E, Nilsson M, Eriksson PS, Ronnback L, 'Neuron-glia interactions: Receptor induced events in single astroglial cells and their implications for neuronal excitability and for neurotransmission', Trophic Regulation of the Basal Ganglia, Elsevier Science 345-363 (1993) [B1]
1986 Hansson E, Nilsson A, Eriksson P, Nilsson M, Sellstrom A, 'Heterogeneity among astrocytes evaluated by biochemical parameters', Dynamic Properties of Glial Cells II Cellular and Molecular Aspects, Pergamon Press Oxford, Oxford, USA 235-243 (1986) [B1]
Citations Scopus - 5
Show 6 more chapters

Journal article (157 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Jones KA, Maltby S, Plank MW, Kluge M, Nilsson M, Foster PS, Walker FR, 'Peripheral immune cells infiltrate into sites of secondary neurodegeneration after ischemic stroke.', Brain Behav Immun, 67 299-307 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.bbi.2017.09.006
Co-authors Rohan Walker, Steven Maltby, Paul Foster
2017 Bivard A, Lillicrap T, Krishnamurthy V, Holliday E, Attia J, Pagram H, et al., 'MIDAS (Modafinil in Debilitating Fatigue after Stroke): A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Cross-Over Trial', Stroke, 48 1293-1298 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 American Heart Association, Inc. Background and Purpose - This study aimed to assess the efficacy of modafinil, a wakefulness-promoting agent in alleviating post-stroke fa... [more]

© 2017 American Heart Association, Inc. Background and Purpose - This study aimed to assess the efficacy of modafinil, a wakefulness-promoting agent in alleviating post-stroke fatigue =3 months after stroke. We hypothesized that 200 mg of modafinil daily for 6 weeks would result in reduced symptoms of fatigue compared with placebo. Methods - This single-center phase 2 trial used a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design. The key inclusion criterion was a multidimensional fatigue inventory score of =60. Patients were randomized to either modafinil or placebo for 6 weeks of therapy, then after a 1 week washout period swapped treatment arms for a second 6 weeks of therapy. The primary outcome was the multidimensional fatigue inventory; secondary outcomes included the Montreal cognitive assessment, the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS), and the Stroke-Specific Quality of Life (SSQoL) scale. The multidimensional fatigue inventory is a self-administered questionnaire with a range of 0 to 100. Treatment efficacy was assessed using linear regression by estimating within-person, baseline-adjusted differences in mean outcomes after therapy. This trial was registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12615000350527). Results - A total of 232 stroke survivors were screened and 36 were randomized. Participants receiving modafinil reported a significant decrease in fatigue (multidimensional fatigue inventory, -7.38; 95% CI, -21.76 to -2.99; P < 0.001) and improved quality of life (SSQoL, 11.81; 95% CI, 2.31 to 21.31; P=0.0148) compared with placebo. Montreal cognitive assessment and DASS were not significantly improved with modafinil therapy during the study period (P > 0.05). Conclusions - Stroke survivors with nonresolving fatigue reported reduced fatigue and improved quality of life after taking 200 mg daily treatment with modafinil.

DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.116.016293
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Christopher Levi, Andrew Bivard, Mark Parsons, John Attia, Liz Holliday
2017 Ong LK, Walker FR, Nilsson M, 'Is Stroke a Neurodegenerative Condition? A Critical Review of Secondary Neurodegeneration and Amyloid-beta Accumulation after Stroke', AIMS MEDICAL SCIENCE, 4 1-16 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3934/medsci.2017.1.1
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Rohan Walker
2017 Bunketorp-Käll L, Lundgren-Nilsson Å, Samuelsson H, Pekny T, Blomvé K, Pekna M, et al., 'Long-Term Improvements after Multimodal Rehabilitation in Late Phase after Stroke', Stroke, 48 1916-1924 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 American Heart Association, Inc. Background and Purpose - Treatments that improve function in late phase after stroke are urgently needed. We assessed whether multimodal i... [more]

© 2017 American Heart Association, Inc. Background and Purpose - Treatments that improve function in late phase after stroke are urgently needed. We assessed whether multimodal interventions based on rhythm-and-music therapy or horse-riding therapy could lead to increased perceived recovery and functional improvement in a mixed population of individuals in late phase after stroke. Methods - Participants were assigned to rhythm-and-music therapy, horse-riding therapy, or control using concealed randomization, stratified with respect to sex and stroke laterality. Therapy was given twice a week for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was change in participants' perception of stroke recovery as assessed by the Stroke Impact Scale with an intention-to-treat analysis. Secondary objective outcome measures were changes in balance, gait, grip strength, and cognition. Blinded assessments were performed at baseline, postintervention, and at 3- and 6-month follow-up. Results - One hundred twenty-three participants were assigned to rhythm-and-music therapy (n=41), horse-riding therapy (n=41), or control (n=41). Post-intervention, the perception of stroke recovery (mean change from baseline on a scale ranging from 1 to 100) was higher among rhythm-and-music therapy (5.2 [95% confidence interval, 0.79-9.61]) and horse-riding therapy participants (9.8 [95% confidence interval, 6.00-13.66] ), compared with controls (-0.5 [-3.20 to 2.28]); P=0.001 (1-way ANOVA). The improvements were sustained in both intervention groups 6 months later, and corresponding gains were observed for the secondary outcomes. Conclusions - Multimodal interventions can improve long-term perception of recovery, as well as balance, gait, grip strength, and working memory in a mixed population of individuals in late phase after stroke. Clinical Trial Registration - URL: http//www.ClinicalTrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01372059.

DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.116.016433
Citations Web of Science - 1
2017 Ong LK, Nilsson M, Walker FR, 'Authors' response re: "Reconsidering the role of glial cells in chronic stress-induced dopa-minergic neurons loss within the substantia nigra? Friend of foe?" by Ong et al. Brain Behavior and Immunity, 2016', BRAIN BEHAVIOR AND IMMUNITY, 60 384-384 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.bbi.2016.11.029
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Rohan Walker
2017 Corbett D, Carmichael ST, Murphy TH, Jones TA, Schwab ME, Jolkkonen J, et al., 'Enhancing the alignment of the preclinical and clinical stroke recovery research pipeline: Consensus-based core recommendations from the Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation Roundtable translational working group', International Journal of Stroke, 12 462-471 (2017) [C1]

© 2017, © 2017 World Stroke Organization. Stroke recovery research involves distinct biological and clinical targets compared to the study of acute stroke. Guidelines are propos... [more]

© 2017, © 2017 World Stroke Organization. Stroke recovery research involves distinct biological and clinical targets compared to the study of acute stroke. Guidelines are proposed for the pre-clinical modeling of stroke recovery and for the alignment of pre-clinical studies to clinical trials in stroke recovery.

DOI 10.1177/1747493017711814
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
2017 Ong LK, Zhao Z, Kluge M, Walker FR, Nilsson M, 'Chronic stress exposure following photothrombotic stroke is associated with increased levels of amyloid beta accumulation and altered oligomerisation at sites of thalamic secondary neurodegeneration in mice', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 37 1338-1348 (2017) [C1]

© Author(s) 2016. Exposure to severe stress following stroke is recognised to complicate the recovery process. We have identified that stress can exacerbate the severity of post-... [more]

© Author(s) 2016. Exposure to severe stress following stroke is recognised to complicate the recovery process. We have identified that stress can exacerbate the severity of post-stroke secondary neurodegeneration in the thalamus. In this study, we investigated whether exposure to stress could influence the accumulation of the neurotoxic protein Amyloid-b. Using an experimental model of focal cortical ischemia in adult mice combined with exposure to chronic restraint stress, we examined changes within the contra-and ipsilateral thalamus at six weeks post-stroke using Western blotting and immunohistochemical approaches. Western blotting analysis indicated that stroke was associated with a significant enhancement of the 25 and 50 kDa oligomers within the ipsilateral hemisphere and the 20 kDa oligomer within the contralateral hemisphere. Stroked animals exposed to stress exhibited an additional increase in multiple forms of Amyloid-beta oligomers. Immunohistochemistry analysis confirmed that stroke was associated with a significant accumulation of Amyloid-beta within the thalami of both hemispheres, an effect that was exacerbated in stroke animals exposed to stress. Given that Amyloid-beta oligomers, most notably the 30-40 and 50 kDa oligomers, are recognised to correlate with accelerated cognitive decline, our results suggest that monitoring stress levels in patients recovering from stroke may merit consideration in the future.

DOI 10.1177/0271678X16654920
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rohan Walker, Linkooi Ong
2017 Krabbe D, Ellbin S, Nilsson M, Jonsdottir IH, Samuelsson H, 'Executive function and attention in patients with stress-related exhaustion: perceived fatigue and effect of distraction', Stress, 20 333-340 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor &amp; Francis Group. Cognitive impairment has frequently been shown in patients who seek medical care for stress-related mental hea... [more]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Cognitive impairment has frequently been shown in patients who seek medical care for stress-related mental health problems. This study aims to extend the current knowledge of cognitive impairments in these patients by focusing on perceived fatigue and effects of distraction during cognitive testing. Executive function and attention were tested in a group of patients with stress-related exhaustion (n = 25) and compared with healthy controls (n = 25). Perceived fatigue was measured before, during and after the test session, and some of the tests were administered with and without standardized auditory distraction. Executive function and complex attention performance were poorer among the patients compared to controls. Interestingly, their performance was not significantly affected by auditory distraction but, in contrast to the controls, they reported a clear-cut increase in mental tiredness, during and after the test session. Thus, patients with stress-related exhaustion manage to perform during distraction but this was achieved at a great cost. These findings are discussed in terms of a possible tendency to adopt a high-effort approach despite cognitive impairments and the likelihood that such an approach will require increased levels of effort, which can result in increased fatigue. We tentatively conclude that increased fatigue during cognitive tasks is a challenge for patients with stress-related exhaustion and plausibly of major importance when returning to work demanding high cognitive performance.

DOI 10.1080/10253890.2017.1336533
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2017 Corbett D, Carmichael ST, Murphy TH, Jones TA, Schwab ME, Jolkkonen J, et al., 'Enhancing the Alignment of the Preclinical and Clinical Stroke Recovery Research Pipeline: Consensus-Based Core Recommendations from the Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation Roundtable Translational Working Group *', Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 31 699-707 (2017) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2017. Stroke recovery research involves distinct biological and clinical targets compared to the study of acute stroke. Guidelines are proposed for the pre-clinic... [more]

© The Author(s) 2017. Stroke recovery research involves distinct biological and clinical targets compared to the study of acute stroke. Guidelines are proposed for the pre-clinical modeling of stroke recovery and for the alignment of pre-clinical studies to clinical trials in stroke recovery.

DOI 10.1177/1545968317724285
2017 Ong LK, Zhao Z, Kluge M, TeBay C, Zalewska K, Dickson PW, et al., 'Reconsidering the role of glial cells in chronic stress-induced dopaminergic neurons loss within the substantia nigra? Friend or foe?', Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 60 117-125 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. Exposure to psychological stress is known to seriously disrupt the operation of the substantia nigra (SN) and may in fact initiate the loss of dopaminergic n... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. Exposure to psychological stress is known to seriously disrupt the operation of the substantia nigra (SN) and may in fact initiate the loss of dopaminergic neurons within the SN. In this study, we aimed to investigate how chronic stress modified the SN in adult male mice. Using a paradigm of repeated restraint stress (an average of 20¿h per week for 6¿weeks), we examined changes within the SN using western blotting and immunohistochemistry. We demonstrated that chronic stress was associated with a clear loss of dopaminergic neurons within the SN. The loss of dopaminergic neurons was accompanied by higher levels of oxidative stress damage, indexed by levels of protein carbonylation and strong suppression of both microglial and astrocytic responses. In addition, we demonstrated for the first time, that chronic stress alone enhanced the aggregation of a-synuclein into the insoluble protein fraction. These results indicate that chronic stress triggered loss of dopaminergic neurons by increasing oxidative stress, suppressing glial neuroprotective functions and enhancing the aggregation of the neurotoxic protein, a-synuclein. Collectively, these results reinforce the negative effects of chronic stress on the viability of dopaminergic cells within the SN.

DOI 10.1016/j.bbi.2016.10.001
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Phil Dickson, Linkooi Ong, Rohan Walker, Sarah Johnson
2017 English C, Walker R, Pollack M, Mason G, Hourn M, Gerrand N, Nilsson M, 'SMART STROKES abstract supplement (vol 12, 2017)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE, 12 NP21-NP21 (2017)
DOI 10.1177/1747493017730182
Co-authors Coralie English
2017 Bhaskar S, Stanwell P, Bivard A, Spratt N, Walker R, Kitsos GH, et al., 'The influence of initial stroke severity on the likelihood of unfavourable clinical outcome and death at 90 days following acute ischemic stroke: A tertiary hospital stroke register study', Neurology India, 65 1252-1259 (2017)
DOI 10.4103/0028-3886.217947
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Christopher Levi, John Attia, Mark Parsons, Andrew Bivard, Peter Stanwell, Neil Spratt
2017 Valkenborghs SR, Visser MM, Dunn A, Erickson KI, Nilsson M, Callister R, van Vliet P, 'AExaCTT ¿ Aerobic Exercise and Consecutive Task-specific Training for the upper limb after stroke: Protocol for a randomised controlled pilot study', Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications, 7 179-185 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 The Authors Motor function may be enhanced if aerobic exercise is paired with motor training. One potential mechanism is that aerobic exercise increases levels of brain-de... [more]

© 2017 The Authors Motor function may be enhanced if aerobic exercise is paired with motor training. One potential mechanism is that aerobic exercise increases levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is important in neuroplasticity and involved in motor learning and motor memory consolidation. This study will examine the feasibility of a parallel-group assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial investigating whether task-specific training preceded by aerobic exercise improves upper limb function more than task-specific training alone, and determine the effect size of changes in primary outcome measures. People with upper limb motor dysfunction after stroke will be allocated to either task-specific training or aerobic exercise and consecutive task-specific training. Both groups will perform 60 hours of task-specific training over 10 weeks, comprised of 3 × 1 hour sessions per week with a therapist and 3 × 1 hours of home-based self-practice per week. The combined intervention group will also perform 30 minutes of aerobic exercise (70¿85%HR max ) immediately prior to the 1 hour of task-specific training with the therapist. Recruitment, adherence, retention, participant acceptability, and adverse events will be recorded. Clinical outcome measures will be performed pre-randomisation at baseline, at completion of the training program, and at 1 and 6 months follow-up. Primary clinical outcome measures will be the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) and the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT). If aerobic exercise prior to task-specific training is acceptable, and a future phase 3 randomised controlled trial seems feasible, it should be pursued to determine the efficacy of this combined intervention for people after stroke.

DOI 10.1016/j.conctc.2017.07.009
Co-authors Robin Callister, Sarah Valkenborghs Uon, Paulette Vanvliet
2017 Zhao Z, Ong LK, Johnson S, Nilsson M, Walker FR, 'Chronic stress induced disruption of the peri-infarct neurovascular unit following experimentally induced photothrombotic stroke.', Journal of cerebral blood flow and metabolism : official journal of the International Society of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 37 3709-3724 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0271678x17696100
Co-authors Rohan Walker, Linkooi Ong, Sarah Johnson
2017 Bhaskar S, Bivard A, Stanwell P, Parsons M, Attia JR, Nilsson M, Levi C, 'Baseline collateral status and infarct topography in post-ischaemic perilesional hyperperfusion: An arterial spin labelling study', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 37 1148-1162 (2017) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2016. Focal hyperperfusion after acute ischaemic stroke could be of prognostic value depending upon its spatial localisation and temporal dynamics. Factors associ... [more]

© The Author(s) 2016. Focal hyperperfusion after acute ischaemic stroke could be of prognostic value depending upon its spatial localisation and temporal dynamics. Factors associated with late stage (12-24 h) perilesional hyperperfusion, identified using arterial spin labelling, are poorly defined. A prospective cohort of acute ischaemic stroke patients presenting within 4.5 h of symptom onset were assessed with multi-modal computed tomography acutely and magnetic resonance imaging at 24 ± 8 h. Multivariate logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristics curves were used. One hundred and nineteen hemispheric acute ischaemic stroke patients (mean age = 71 ± 12 years) with 24 h arterial spin labelling imaging were included. Forty-Two (35.3%) patients showed perilesional hyperperfusion on arterial spin labelling at 24 h. Several factors were independently associated with perilesional hyperperfusion: good collaterals (71% versus 29%, P < 0.0001; OR = 5, 95% CI = [1.6, 15.7], P = 0.005), major reperfusion (81% versus 48%, P = < 0.0001; OR = 7.5, 95% CI = [1.6, 35.1], P = 0.01), penumbral salvage (76.2% versus 47%, P = 0.002; OR = 6.6, 95% CI = [1.8, 24.5] , P = 0.004), infarction in striatocapsular (OR = 9.5, 95% CI = [2.6, 34], P = 0.001) and in cortical superior division middle cerebral artery (OR = 4.7, 95% CI = [1.4, 15.7] , P = 0.012) territory. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.91. Our results demonstrate good arterial collaterals, major reperfusion, penumbral salvage, and infarct topographies involving cortical superior middle cerebral artery and striatocapsular are associated with perilesional hyperperfusion.

DOI 10.1177/0271678X16653133
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Christopher Levi, John Attia, Mark Parsons, Andrew Bivard, Peter Stanwell
2017 Zalewska K, Pietrogrande G, Ong LK, Abdolhoseini M, Kluge M, Johnson SJ, et al., 'Sustained administration of corticosterone at stress-like levels after stroke suppressed glial reactivity at sites of thalamic secondary neurodegeneration.', Brain Behav Immun, (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.bbi.2017.11.014
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Mahmoud Abdolhoseini Uon, Sarah Johnson, Rohan Walker
2017 Turley JA, Zalewska K, Nilsson M, Walker FR, Johnson SJ, 'An analysis of signal processing algorithm performance for cortical intrinsic optical signal imaging and strategies for algorithm selection', SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, 7 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-06864-y
Co-authors Sarah Johnson, Rohan Walker
2017 Zalewska K, Ong LK, Johnson SJ, Nilsson M, Walker FR, 'Oral administration of corticosterone at stress-like levels drives microglial but not vascular disturbances post-stroke', Neuroscience, 352 30-38 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 IBRO Exposure to chronic stress following stroke has been shown, both clinically and pre-clinically, to impact negatively on the recovery process. While this phenomenon is... [more]

© 2017 IBRO Exposure to chronic stress following stroke has been shown, both clinically and pre-clinically, to impact negatively on the recovery process. While this phenomenon is well established, the specific mechanisms involved have remained largely unexplored. One obvious signaling pathway through which chronic stress may impact on the recovery process is via corticosterone, and its effe cts on microglial activity and vascular remodeling. In the current study, we were interested in examining how orally delivered corticosterone at a stress-like concentration impacted on microglial activity and vascular remodeling after stroke. We identified that corticosterone administration for two weeks following stroke significantly increased tissue loss and decreased the weight of the spleen and thymus. We also identified that corticosterone administration significantly altered the expression of the key microglial complement receptor, CD11b after stroke. Corticosterone administration did not alter the expression of the vessel basement membrane protein, Collagen IV after stroke. Together, these results suggest that corticosterone is likely to represent only one of the major stress signals responsible for driving the negative impacts of chronic stress on recovery.

DOI 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2017.03.005
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Sarah Johnson, Rohan Walker
2017 Kluge MG, Kracht L, Abdolhoseini M, Ong LK, Johnson SJ, Nilsson M, Walker FR, 'Impaired microglia process dynamics post-stroke are specific to sites of secondary neurodegeneration', GLIA, 65 1885-1899 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Stroke induces tissue death both at the site of infarction and at secondary sites connected to the primary infarction. This latter process has been... [more]

© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Stroke induces tissue death both at the site of infarction and at secondary sites connected to the primary infarction. This latter process has been referred to as secondary neurodegeneration (SND). Using predominantly fixed tissue analyses, microglia have been implicated in regulating the initial response at both damage sites post-stroke. In this study, we used acute slice based multiphoton imaging, to investigate microglia dynamic process movement in mice 14 days after a photothrombotic stroke. We evaluated the baseline motility and process responses to locally induced laser damage in both the peri-infarct (PI) territory and the ipsilateral thalamus, a major site of post-stroke SND. Our findings show that microglia process extension toward laser damage within the thalamus is lost, yet remains robustly intact within the PI territory. However, microglia at both sites displayed an activated morphology and elevated levels of commonly used activation markers (CD68, CD11b), indicating that the standardly used fixed tissue metrics of microglial ¿activity¿ are not necessarily predictive of microglia function. Analysis of the purinergic P 2 Y 12 receptor, a key regulator of microglia process extension, revealed an increased somal localization on nonresponsive microglia in the thalamus. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify a non-responsive microglia phenotype specific to areas of SND post-stroke, which cannot be identified by the classical assessment of microglia activation but rather the localization of P 2 Y 12 to the soma.

DOI 10.1002/glia.23201
Co-authors Sarah Johnson, Rohan Walker, Linkooi Ong, Mahmoud Abdolhoseini Uon
2017 Deeming S, Searles A, Reeves P, Nilsson M, 'Measuring research impact in Australia's medical research institutes: a scoping literature review of the objectives for and an assessment of the capabilities of research impact assessment frameworks', HEALTH RESEARCH POLICY AND SYSTEMS, 15 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12961-017-0180-1
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2016 Bhaskar S, Bivard A, Stanwell P, Attia JR, Parsons M, Nilsson M, Levi C, 'Association of Cortical Vein Filling with Clot Location and Clinical Outcomes in Acute Ischaemic Stroke Patients', SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, 6 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/srep38525
Co-authors John Attia, Mark Parsons, Andrew Bivard, Christopher Levi, Peter Stanwell
2016 Bhaskar S, Bivard A, Parsons M, Nilsson M, Attia JR, Stanwell P, Levi C, 'Delay of late-venous phase cortical vein filling in acute ischemic stroke patients: Associations with collateral status', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 37 671-682 (2016) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2016. Evaluation of the venous system may be useful in stroke prognostication and patient selection for acute intervention strategies. We report a novel phenomeno... [more]

© The Author(s) 2016. Evaluation of the venous system may be useful in stroke prognostication and patient selection for acute intervention strategies. We report a novel phenomenon, delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling, observed on dynamic computed tomography angiography obtained using multidetector computed tomography scanner, in acute ischemic stroke patients. The aim of this study was to examine the frequency of delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling and assess its association to baseline collateral status. Dynamic computed tomography angiography images of acute ischemic stroke patients, being assessed for reperfusion therapy, were prospectively studied. Delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling was defined by late venous phase opacification of cortical veins despite contrast clearance from contralateral cortical veins on dynamic computed tomography angiography. Time to peak of maximum arterial enhancement was recorded. A total of 117 patients (mean age = 70.6 ± 13.3 years; males = 48%) with hemispheric ischemic stroke who underwent acute dynamic computed tomography angiography were included in the study. Overall, 56 (48%) demonstrated delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling. Poor collateralization (OR = 13.50; 95% CI = (4.2, 43); p = 0.0001) and longer time to peak of maximum arterial enhancement (OR = 3.2; 95% CI = (1.96, 5.3); p= 0.0001) were positively associated with delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling. Delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling was independently associated with poor baseline collateral status (75% vs. 15%, p = 0.0001; OR = 14.38; 95% CI = (4.33, 47.8); p = 0.0001). Delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling is frequently seen in patients with acute ischemic stroke and is associated with poor baseline collateralization.

DOI 10.1177/0271678X16637611
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Peter Stanwell, Andrew Bivard, John Attia, Mark Parsons, Christopher Levi
2016 Åberg MAI, Torén K, Nilsson M, Henriksson M, Kuhn HG, Nyberg J, et al., 'Nonpsychotic Mental Disorders in Teenage Males and Risk of Early Stroke: A Population-Based Study.', Stroke, 47 814-821 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.115.012504
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2016 Lillicrap T, Krishnamurthy V, Attia J, Nilsson M, Levi CR, Parsons MW, Bivard A, 'Modafinil In Debilitating fatigue After Stroke (MIDAS): study protocol for a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover trial', TRIALS, 17 (2016)
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Andrew Bivard, Mark Parsons, John Attia, Christopher Levi
2016 Searles A, Doran C, Attia J, Knight D, Wiggers J, Deeming S, et al., 'An approach to measuring and encouraging research translation and research impact', HEALTH RESEARCH POLICY AND SYSTEMS, 14 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12961-016-0131-2
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors John Attia, Darryl Knight, John Wiggers, Joerg Mattes
2016 Lubans D, Richards J, Hillman C, Faulkner G, Beauchamp M, Nilsson M, et al., 'Physical Activity for Cognitive and Mental Health in Youth: A Systematic Review of Mechanisms', PEDIATRICS, 138 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1542/peds.2016-1642
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Jordan Smith, David Lubans
2015 Bidarian-Moniri A, Nilsson M, Rasmusson L, Attia J, Ejnell H, 'The effect of the prone sleeping position on obstructive sleep apnoea', ACTA OTO-LARYNGOLOGICA, 135 79-84 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/00016489.2014.962183
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors John Attia
2015 Bidarian-Moniri A, Nilsson M, Attia J, Ejnell H, 'Mattress and pillow for prone positioning for treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea', Acta Oto-Laryngologica, 135 271-276 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Informa Healthcare. Conclusion: The new mattress and pillow for prone positioning (MPP) is efficient in reducing the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) and oxygen desaturation i... [more]

© 2015 Informa Healthcare. Conclusion: The new mattress and pillow for prone positioning (MPP) is efficient in reducing the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) and oxygen desaturation index (ODI) in most patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), with satisfactory compliance. Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the prone body and head sleep position on severity of disease in patients with OSA after 4 weeks of adaptation to a mattress and pillow facilitating prone positioning. Methods: Fourteen patients with mild to severe OSA, 11 men and 3 women with a mean AHI of 26 (min, 6; max, 53) and mean ODI of 21 (min, 6; max, 51) were evaluated. Two polysomnographic (PSG) studies were performed. The first PSG study was without any treatment and the second was after 4 weeks of adaptation to the MPP for prone positioning of the body and the head. Results: Mean AHI and ODI decreased from 26 and 21 to 8 and 7, respectively (p < 0.001) with treatment. The mean time spent in the supine position was reduced from 128 to 10 min (p = 0.02) and the prone time increased from 42 to 174 min (p = 0.02) with the MPP. The mean total sleep time was 390 min during the first PSG study night without treatment and 370 min during the second night with the MPP (p = 0.7). Ten patients (71%) reduced their AHI by at least 50% and reached a value < 10 during treatment. All patients managed to sleep on the MPP for > 4 h per night during the 4-week study.

DOI 10.3109/00016489.2014.968674
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors John Attia
2015 Kongsui R, Johnson SJ, Graham BA, Nilsson M, Walker FR, 'A combined cumulative threshold spectra and digital reconstruction analysis reveal structural alterations of microglia within the prefrontal cortex following low-dose LPS administration', Neuroscience, 310 629-640 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 IBRO. Sickness behaviors have become the focus of great interest in recent years as they represent a clear case of how peripheral disturbances in immune signaling can disr... [more]

© 2015 IBRO. Sickness behaviors have become the focus of great interest in recent years as they represent a clear case of how peripheral disturbances in immune signaling can disrupt quite complex behaviors. In the current study, we were interested in examining whether we could identify any significant morphological disturbances in microglia associated with these sickness-like behaviors in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. We chose lipopolysaccharide (LPS 100 µg/kg/i.p.), to induce sickness-like behaviors as it is the most well-validated approach to do so in rodents and humans. We were particularly interested in examining changes in microglia within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) as several recent neuroimaging studies have highlighted significant functional changes in this region following peripheral LPS administration. Paraformaldehyde-fixed tissue was collected from animals 24 h post LPS administration and labeled immunohistochemically with an antibody directed to bind to Iba-1, a protein known to be involved in the structural remodeling of microglia. To analyze changes, we have made use of two recently described image analysis procedures. The first is known as cumulative threshold spectra (CTS) analysis. The second involves the unsupervised digital reconstruction of microglia. We undertook these complementary analysis of microglial cells in the both the pre- and infralimbic divisions of the PFC. Our results indicated that microglial soma size was significantly enlarged, while cell processes had contracted slightly following LPS administration. To our knowledge this study is to first to definitely demonstrate substantial microglial disturbances within the PFC following LPS delivered at a dose that was sufficient to induce significant sickness-like behavior.

DOI 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2015.09.061
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Sarah Johnson, Brett Graham, Rohan Walker
2015 Patience MJ, Zouikr I, Jones K, Clarkson AN, Isgaard J, Johnson SJ, et al., 'Photothrombotic Stroke Induces Persistent Ipsilateral and Contralateral Astrogliosis in Key Cognitive Control Nuclei', NEUROCHEMICAL RESEARCH, 40 362-371 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11064-014-1487-8
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Sarah Johnson, Rohan Walker
2015 Jones KA, Zouikr I, Patience M, Clarkson AN, Isgaard J, Johnson SJ, et al., 'Chronic stress exacerbates neuronal loss associated with secondary neurodegeneration and suppresses microglial-like cells following focal motor cortex ischemia in the mouse', Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 48 57-67 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.bbi.2015.02.014
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Neil Spratt, Sarah Johnson, Rohan Walker
2015 Käll LB, Lindén T, Nilsson M, 'Käll, Lindén, and Nilsson Respond: The Impact of a Physical Activity Intervention Program on Academic Achievement', Journal of School Health, 85 279-280 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/josh.12249
2015 Clarkson AN, Parker K, Nilsson M, Walker FR, Gowing EK, 'Combined ampakine and BDNF treatments enhance poststroke functional recovery in aged mice via AKT-CREB signaling.', J Cereb Blood Flow Metab, 35 1272-1279 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/jcbfm.2015.33
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Rohan Walker
2015 Bunketorp Käll L, Malmgren H, Olsson E, Lindén T, Nilsson M, 'Effects of a Curricular Physical Activity Intervention on Children's School Performance, Wellness, and Brain Development', Journal of School Health, 85 704-713 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, American School Health Association. BACKGROUND: Physical activity and structural differences in the hippocampus have been linked to educational outcome. We investigated w... [more]

© 2015, American School Health Association. BACKGROUND: Physical activity and structural differences in the hippocampus have been linked to educational outcome. We investigated whether a curriculum-based physical activity intervention correlates positively with children's academic achievement, psychological well-being, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), fitness, and structural development of the brain. METHODS: The study had a quasi-experimental design and a control group. National test results were gathered from 545 students, 122 in the intervention school, and 423 in 3 control schools. HRQoL and socioemotional data were collected with child and proxy versions of KIDSCREEN and the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire. Overall, 79 students in grades 5 and 6 were recruited for an in-depth study, consisting of a submaximal oxygen consumption test and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. HRQoL and socioemotional data were collected from 349 students (65%), 182 (52%) in the intervention school, and 167 (48%) in one of the control schools. RESULTS: Girls attending the intervention school were more likely to pass national tests in Swedish (odds ratio 5.7) and Mathematics (odds ratio 3.2). The fourth to sixth graders in the intervention school reported lower levels of conduct problems (p < .05), and the girls were also less likely to report hyperactivity (p < .05). Girls reported higher levels of emotional problems (p < .05) than boys. Boys in the intervention group had significantly higher levels of estimated maximal oxygen uptake (p < .05) than controls. No difference in hippocampal structure was seen. CONCLUSIONS: Curriculum-based physical activity in school may improve the academic achievement and psychological health of children, particularly for girls.

DOI 10.1111/josh.12303
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2015 Aberg ND, Kuhn HG, Nyberg J, Waern M, Friberg P, Svensson J, et al., 'Influence of Cardiovascular Fitness and Muscle Strength in Early Adulthood on Long-Term Risk of Stroke in Swedish Men', STROKE, 46 1769-1776 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.115.009008
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2014 Malmevik J, Rogers ML, Nilsson M, Nakanishi Y, Rush RA, Sims NR, Muyderman H, 'Selective transfection of microglia in the brain using an antibody-based non-viral vector', Brain Research, 1586 12-22 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier B.V. There are currently few approaches to transiently manipulate the expression of specific proteins in microglia of the brain. An antibody directed against an e... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier B.V. There are currently few approaches to transiently manipulate the expression of specific proteins in microglia of the brain. An antibody directed against an extracellular epitope of scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) was found to be selectively taken up by these cells in the brain. Other antibodies tested were not internalised by microglia. A vector was produced by linking the SR-BI antibody to polyethyleneimine and binding a DNA plasmid encoding green fluorescent protein. Infusions of this vector into the hippocampus produced a widespread transfection of cells, more than 80% of which were immunoreactive for microglial/macrophage markers. Transfection was not detected in cells expressing markers for astrocytes or neurons. Reporter gene expression was most prominent near the infusion site but was seen in tissue up to 4 mm away. DNA bound to polyethyleneimine alone or to a vector containing a different antibody did not produce transfection in the brain. Single injections of the vector containing the SR-BI antibody into the brain also resulted in transfection of microglia, albeit with lower efficiency. Vector modifications to promote lysis of endosomes or entry of DNA into the nucleus did not increase efficiency. The findings clearly demonstrate the capacity of the SR-BI antibody to selectively target brain microglia. This approach offers considerable potential to deliver DNA and other molecules capable of modifying the function of these cells in vivo.

DOI 10.1016/j.brainres.2014.08.017
Citations Web of Science - 1
2014 Nyberg J, Aberg MAI, Schiöler L, Nilsson M, Wallin A, Torén K, Kuhn HG, 'Cardiovascular and cognitive fitness at age 18 and risk of early-onset dementia', Brain, 137 1514-1523 (2014) [C1]

Patients with early-onset dementia are a significantly under-recognized subgroup of patients with an increasing prevalence. Epidemiological studies are limited and studies of modi... [more]

Patients with early-onset dementia are a significantly under-recognized subgroup of patients with an increasing prevalence. Epidemiological studies are limited and studies of modifiable risk factors, such as physical fitness, are lacking. We aimed to investigate the associations between cardiovascular fitness individually and in combination with cognitive performance at age 18 and risk of early-onset dementia and mild cognitive impairment later in life. We performed a population-based cohort study of over 1.1 million Swedish, 18-year-old, male conscripts, who underwent conscription exams between 1968 and 2005. These males were then followed for up to 42 years. Objective data on cardiovascular fitness and cognitive performance were collected during conscription exams and were subsequently linked with hospital registries to calculate later risk of early-onset dementia and mild cognitive impairment using Cox proportional hazards models controlling for several confounders. The scores from the exams were divided into tertiles (low, medium, high) for the analyses. The mean follow-up time for the analyses was 25.7 years (standard deviation: 9.3) and the median was 27 years. In total, 30 195 315 person-years of follow-up were included in the study. In fully adjusted models, both low cardiovascular fitness and cognitive performance (compared to high) at age 18 were associated with increased risk for future early-onset dementia (cardiovascular fitness, n = 662 events: hazard ratio 2.49, 95%, confidence int erval 1.87-3.32; cognitive performance, n = 657 events: hazard ratio 4.11, 95%, confidence interval 3.19-5.29) and mild cognitive impairment (cardiovascular fitness, n = 213 events: hazard ratio 3.57, 95%, confidence interval 2.23-5.74; cognitive performance, n = 212 events: hazard ratio 3.23, 95%, confidence interval 2.12-4.95). Poor performance on both cardiovascular fitness and cognitive tests was associated with a > 7-fold (hazard ratio 7.34, 95%, confidence interval 5.08-10.58) and a > 8-fold (hazard ratio 8.44, 95%, confidence interval 4.64-15.37) increased risk of early-onset dementia and early-onset mild cognitive impairment, respectively. In conclusion, lower cardiovascular fitness and cognitive performance in early adulthood were associated with an increased risk of early-onset dementia and mild cognitive impairment later in life, and the greatest risks were observed for individuals with a combination of low cardiovascular fitness and low cognitive performance. © 2014 The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1093/brain/awu041
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 28
2014 Käll LB, Nilsson M, Lindén T, 'The impact of a physical activity intervention program on academic achievement in a swedish elementary school setting', Journal of School Health, 84 473-480 (2014) [C1]

BACKGROUND: Despite the emerging body of research on the potential of physical activity to improve learning and academic achievement, conclusive evidence regarding the effects of ... [more]

BACKGROUND: Despite the emerging body of research on the potential of physical activity to improve learning and academic achievement, conclusive evidence regarding the effects of physical activity on academic achievement is lacking. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of a physical activity intervention program on academic performance. METHODS: A controlled cross-sectional design was used to investigate the hypothesis that the intervention program would increase the proportion of students in grade 5 who achieved the national learning goals in Swedish, mathematics, and English compared with 3 reference schools. Academic results from the years prior to and during the intervention program were analyzed. Logistic regression analyses assessed the odds of achieving the national learning goals when the intervention program was integrated into the elementary curricula. RESULTS: Higher proportions of students in the intervention school achieved the national goals in all 3 subjects compared with the reference schools after initiation of the intervention program. The odds for achieving the national learning goals in the intervention school increased 2-fold (p < .05), whereas these odds either did not change or decreased in the reference schools. CONCLUSION: Promoting physical activity in school by means of a curriculum-based intervention program may improve children's educational outcome. © 2014, American School Health Association.

DOI 10.1111/josh.12179
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
2014 Sjöholm A, Skarin M, Churilov L, Nilsson M, Bernhardt J, Lindén T, 'Sedentary behaviour and physical activity of people with stroke in rehabilitation hospitals.', Stroke Res Treat, 2014 591897 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1155/2014/591897
Citations Scopus - 6
2014 Janssen H, Ada L, Bernhardt J, McElduff P, Pollack M, Nilsson M, Spratt N, 'Physical, cognitive and social activity levels of stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation within a mixed rehabilitation unit', Clinical Rehabilitation, 28 91-101 (2014) [C1]

Objective: To determine physical, cognitive and social activity levels of stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation, and whether these changed over time. Design: Observational stu... [more]

Objective: To determine physical, cognitive and social activity levels of stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation, and whether these changed over time. Design: Observational study using behavioural mapping techniques to record patient activity over 12 hours on one weekday and one weekend day at baseline (week 1) and again two weeks later (week 2). Setting: A 20-bed mixed rehabilitation unit. Subjects: Fourteen stroke patients. Interventions: None. Main measures: Percentage of day spent in any activity or physical, cognitive and social activities. Level of independence using the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and mood using the Patient Health Questionniare-9 (PHQ-9). Results: The stroke patients performed any activity for 49%, social activity for 32%, physical activity for 23% and cognitive activity for 4% of the day. Two weeks later, physical activity levels had increased by 4% (95% confidence interval (CI) 1 to 8), but levels of any activity or social and cognitive activities had not changed significantly. There was a significant: (i) positive correlation between change in physical activity and change in FIM score (r = 0.80), and (ii) negative correlation between change in social activity and change in PHQ-9 score (r = -0.72). The majority of activity was performed by the bedside (37%), and most physical (47%) and cognitive (54%) activities performed when alone. Patients undertook 5% (95% CI 2 to 9) less physical activity on the weekends compared with the weekdays. Conclusions: Levels of physical, cognitive and social activity of stroke patients were low and remained so even though level of independence and mood improved. These findings suggest the need to explore strategies to stimulate activity within rehabilitation environments. © The Author(s) 2013.

DOI 10.1177/0269215512466252
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Neil Spratt
2014 Ulfarsson T, Lundgren-Nilsson A, Blomstrand C, Nilsson M, 'A history of unemployment or sick leave influences long-term functioning and health-related quality-of-life after severe traumatic brain injury', BRAIN INJURY, 28 328-335 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/02699052.2013.865274
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2014 Walker FR, Jones KA, Patience MJ, Zhao Z, Nilsson M, 'Stress as necessary component of realistic recovery in animal models of experimental stroke', JOURNAL OF CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND METABOLISM, 34 208-214 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/jcbfm.2013.211
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Rohan Walker
2014 Bivard A, Krishnamurthy V, Stanwell P, Yassi N, Spratt NJ, Nilsson M, et al., 'Spectroscopy of reperfused tissue after stroke reveals heightened metabolism in patients with good clinical outcomes', JOURNAL OF CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND METABOLISM, 34 1944-1950 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/jcbfm.2014.166
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Peter Stanwell, Mark Parsons, Neil Spratt, Christopher Levi, Andrew Bivard
2014 Walker FR, Beynon SB, Jones KA, Zhao Z, Kongsui R, Cairns M, Nilsson M, 'Dynamic structural remodelling of microglia in health and disease: A review of the models, the signals and the mechanisms', BRAIN BEHAVIOR AND IMMUNITY, 37 1-14 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.bbi.2013.12.010
Citations Scopus - 53Web of Science - 49
Co-authors Rohan Walker, Murray Cairns
2014 Kongsui R, Beynon SB, Johnson SJ, Mayhew J, Kuter P, Nilsson M, Walker FR, 'Chronic stress induces prolonged suppression of the P2X7 receptor within multiple regions of the hippocampus: A cumulative threshold spectra analysis', Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 42 69-80 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.bbi.2014.05.017
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Sarah Johnson, Rohan Walker
2014 Janssen H, Ada L, Bernhardt J, McElduff P, Pollack M, Nilsson M, Spratt NJ, 'An enriched environment increases activity in stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation in a mixed rehabilitation unit: a pilot non-randomized controlled trial', DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION, 36 255-262 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/09638288.2013.788218
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Neil Spratt, Patrick Mcelduff
2014 Nilsson M, Johansson E, Liang S, Fagman H, 'Divergent roles of forkhead family transcription factor paralogs in medullary thyroid carcinoma', WIENER KLINISCHE WOCHENSCHRIFT, 126 S157-S158 (2014) [E3]
2014 Ulfarsson T, Lundgren-Nilsson A, Blomstrand C, Jakobsson K-E, Oden A, Nilsson M, Rosen T, 'Ten-year mortality after severe traumatic brain injury in western Sweden: A case control study', BRAIN INJURY, 28 1675-1681 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/02699052.2014.947625
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2014 von Otter M, Bergstrm P, Quattrone A, De Marco EV, Annesi G, Sderkvist P, et al., 'Genetic associations of Nrf2-encoding NFE2L2 variants with Parkinson s disease a multicenter study', BMC MEDICAL GENETICS, 15 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12881-014-0131-4
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 16
2014 Tjärnlund-Wolf A, Hultman K, Blomstrand F, Nilsson M, Medcalf RL, Jern C, 'Species-specific regulation of t-PA and PAI-1 gene expression in human and rat astrocytes', Gene Regulation and Systems Biology, 2014 113-118 (2014) [C1]

In recent years, the role and physiological regulation of the serine protease tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA and its inhibitors, including plasminogen activator inhibitor... [more]

In recent years, the role and physiological regulation of the serine protease tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA and its inhibitors, including plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1, in the brain have received much attention. However, as studies focusing these issues are difficult to perform in humans, a great majority of the studies conducted to date have utilized rodent in vivo and/or in vitro models. In view of the species-specific structural differences present in both the t-PA and the PAI-1 promoters, we have compared the response of these genes in astrocytes of rat and human origin. We reveal marked quantitative and qualitative species-specific differences in gene induction following treatment with various physiological and pathological stimuli. Thus, our findings are of importance for the interpretation of previous and future results related to t-PA and PAI-1 expression. © the authors, publisher and licensee Libertas Academica Limited.

DOI 10.4137/GRSB.S13387
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2013 Vickhoff B, Malmgren H, Åström R, Nyberg GF, Ekström SR, Engwall M, et al., 'Erratum: Music structure determines heart rate variability of singers', Frontiers in Psychology, 4 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00599
Citations Scopus - 30
2013 Khoff B, Malmgren H, Åström R, Nyberg G, Ekström S-R, Engwall M, et al., 'Music structure determines heart rate variability of singers', Frontiers in Psychology, 4 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00334
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 23
2013 Tynan RJ, Beynon SB, Hinwood M, Johnson SJ, Nilsson M, Woods JJ, Walker FR, 'Chronic stress-induced disruption of the astrocyte network is driven by structural atrophy and not loss of astrocytes', Acta Neuropathologica, 126 75-91 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00401-013-1102-0
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 40
Co-authors Rohan Walker, Madeleine Hinwood, Sarah Johnson
2013 Nyberg J, Åberg MAI, Torén K, Nilsson M, Ben-Menachem E, Georg Kuhn H, 'Cardiovascular fitness and later risk of epilepsy: A Swedish population-based cohort study', Neurology, 81 1051-1057 (2013) [C1]

Objective: To analyze the associations between cardiovascular fitness at age 18 years and future risk of epilepsy. Methods: Population-based cohort study of Swedish male conscript... [more]

Objective: To analyze the associations between cardiovascular fitness at age 18 years and future risk of epilepsy. Methods: Population-based cohort study of Swedish male conscripts (n = 1,173,079) born in 1950-1987, who were followed for up to 40 years. Data on cardiovascular fitness were collected during conscription exams and linked with hospital registers to calculate later risk of epilepsy using Cox proportional hazard models controlling for several confounders, including familial factors. Results: Epilepsy was recorded in 6,796 individuals during the follow-up time. In fully adjusted models, low and medium cardiovascular fitness (compared with high) at age 18 years was associated with increased risk of future epilepsy (hazard ratio 1.79, 95% confidence interval 1.57-2.03; and hazard ratio 1.36, 95% confidence interval 1.27-1.45, respectively). The associations changed only marginally after adjustment for familial influences and prior severe traumatic brain injury, cerebrovascular disease, or diabetes. Conclusions: Low cardiovascular fitness early in life is associated with an increased risk of epilepsy later in adulthood. These results agree with previous results from animal models. We propose that behaviors that increase cardiovascular fitness may act as positive disease-modifiers for the development of epilepsy. © 2013 American Academy of Neurology.

DOI 10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182a4a4c0
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2013 Kuhn HG, Åberg MAI, Waern M, Nyberg J, Nilsson M, Pedersen NL, et al., 'Authors' reply', British Journal of Psychiatry, 202 311 (2013)
DOI 10.1192/bjp.202.4.311
2013 Nilsson M, Hägglund M, Ekstrand J, Waldén M, 'Head and neck injuries in professional soccer', Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, 23 255-260 (2013)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the rate of and risk factors for head and neck injury in male soccer. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Professional soccer. PARTICIPANTS: Twent... [more]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the rate of and risk factors for head and neck injury in male soccer. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Professional soccer. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-six European teams between 2001/2002 and 2009/2010. ASSESSMENT OF RISK FACTORS: Simple and multiple risk factor analyses were evaluated using Cox regression for player-related variables and logistic regression for match-related variables. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Injury rate (number of time loss injuries per 1000 hours). RESULTS: A total of 136 head and neck injuries were recorded (2.2% of all injuries). The head and neck injury rate was 0.17 (0.06 concussions) per 1000 hours. There was a 20-fold higher rate of head and neck injury during match play compared with training (rate ratio [RR], 20.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] , 13.3-30.6) and a 78-fold higher rate of concussions (RR, 78.5; 95% CI, 24.4-252.5). Mean layoff for concussion was 10.5 days, but 27% of the concussed players returned to play within 5 days. Defender was the only significant player-related risk factor for head and neck injuries in the multiple analysis (RR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.0-3.1), whereas no significant variables were identified for concussions. CONCLUSIONS: Head and neck injuries were relatively uncommon in professional soccer. Defender was the playing position most at risk. More than one-quarter of the concussed players returned to play before what is recommended in the consensus statements by the major sports governing bodies. Copyright © 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

DOI 10.1097/JSM.0b013e31827ee6f8
Citations Scopus - 13
2013 Aberg ND, Olsson S, Aberg D, Jood K, Stanne TM, Nilsson M, et al., 'Genetic variation at the IGF1 locus shows association with post-stroke outcome and to circulating IGF1', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGY, 169 759-765 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1530/EJE-13-0486
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
2013 Ulfarsson T, Arnar Gudnason G, Rosén T, Blomstrand C, Stibrant Sunnerhagen K, Lundgren-Nilsson A, Nilsson M, 'Pituitary function and functional outcome in adults after severe traumatic brain injury: The long-term perspective', Journal of Neurotrauma, 30 271-280 (2013) [C1]

Post-traumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP) has been linked to disability and decreased quality of life. However, no studies have addressed the long-term consequences of PTHP in adults ... [more]

Post-traumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP) has been linked to disability and decreased quality of life. However, no studies have addressed the long-term consequences of PTHP in adults with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) only. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between pituitary function, quality of life, and functioning in 51 patients (16-65 years of age) with severe TBI who were admitted to Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg from 1999 to 2002. The patients were assessed once, 2-10 years after trauma. Data from the time of injury were collected retrospectively to adjust for injury severity. Outcome measures included hormonal testing, the Short Form-36 Health Survey, the Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended, and a self-report questionnaire specifically designed for this study and based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Of 51 patients, 14 (27.5%) presented with PTHP, and 11 (21.6%) had isolated growth hormone deficiency. Patients with PTHP were more often overweight at follow-up (p=0.01); the higher body mass index was partially explained by PTHP (R 2 change=0.07, p=0.001). Otherwise no significant correlation was found among PTHP, functioning, or patient-reported quality of life. This study - which is unique in the homogeneity of the patients, the long follow-up time, and the use of injury severity as an outcome predictor - did not confirm results from previous studies linking PTHP to a worse outcome. Therefore, screening for PTHP might be restricted to specific subgroups such as overweight patients, indicating growth hormone deficiency. © 2013, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

DOI 10.1089/neu.2012.2494
Citations Scopus - 14
2013 de Pablo Y, Nilsson M, Pekna M, Pekny M, 'Intermediate filaments are important for astrocyte response to oxidative stress induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion', HISTOCHEMISTRY AND CELL BIOLOGY, 140 81-91 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00418-013-1110-0
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 30
2013 Walker FR, Nilsson M, Jones K, 'Acute and Chronic Stress-Induced Disturbances of Microglial Plasticity, Phenotype and Function', Current Drug Targets, 14 1262-1276 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 65Web of Science - 59
Co-authors Rohan Walker
2013 Skarin M, Sjoholm A, Nilsson AL, Nilsson M, Bernhardt J, Linden T, 'A MAPPING STUDY ON PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN STROKE REHABILITATION: ESTABLISHING THE BASELINE', JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE, 45 997-1003 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.2340/16501977-1214
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
2013 Andersson D, Wilhelmsson U, Nilsson M, Kubista M, Stahlberg A, Pekna M, Pekny M, 'Plasticity Response in the Contralesional Hemisphere after Subtle Neurotrauma: Gene Expression Profiling after Partial Deafferentation of the Hippocampus', PLOS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0070699
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 12
2012 Aberg MA, Waern M, Pedersen NL, Berg Y, Aberg ND, Nilsson M, et al., 'Cardiovascular fitness in males at age 18 and risk of serious depression in adulthood: Swedish prospective population-based study', British Journal of Psychiatry, 201 352-359 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1192/bjp.bp.111.103416
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 34
2012 Nilsson M, Perkny M, Pekna M, 'Modulation of neural plasticity as a basis for stroke rehabilitation', Stroke, 43 2819-2828 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.112.654228
Citations Scopus - 66Web of Science - 58
2012 Nodin C, Blomstrand F, Nilsson M, 'Decreased oxidative stress during glycolytic inhibition enables maintenance of ATP production and astrocytic survival', Neurochemistry International: the journal for the publication of cellular and molecular aspects of neurochemistry, 61 291-301 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.neuint.2012.05.017
Citations Scopus - 6
2012 Correa F, Mallard C, Nilsson M, Sandberg M, 'Dual TNF-alpha-induced effects on NRF2-mediated antioxidant defence in astrocyte-rich cultures: Role of protein kinase activation', Neurochemical Research, 37 2842-2855 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11064-012-0878-y
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
2012 Bunketorp Kall L, Lundgren-Nilsson A, Blomstrand C, Pekna M, Pekny M, Nilsson M, 'The effects of a rhythm and music-based therapy program and therapeutic riding in late recovery phase following stroke: A study protocol for a three-armed randomized controlled trial', BMC Neurology, 12 141 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 5
2012 Janssen H, Ada L, Karayanidis F, Drysdale K, McElduff P, Pollack MR, et al., 'Translating the use of an enriched environment poststroke from bench to bedside: study design and protocol used to test the feasibility of environmental enrichment on stroke patients in rehabilitation', International Journal of Stroke, 7 521-526 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Karen Drysdale, Neil Spratt, Frini Karayanidis
2012 Van Vliet PM, Carey L, Nilsson M, 'Targeting stroke treatment to the individual', International Journal of Stroke, 7 480-481 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Paulette Vanvliet
2012 Porritt MJ, Andersson HC, Hou L, Nilsson A, Pekna M, Pekny M, Nilsson M, 'Photothrombosis-induced infarction of the mouse cerebral cortex is not affected by the Nrf2-activator sulforaphane', PLoS One, 7 e41090-e41090 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0041090
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 20
2012 Vickhoff B, Astrom R, Theorell T, Von Scheele B, Nilsson M, 'Musical piloerection', Music and Medicine, 4 82-89 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1943862112436562
Citations Scopus - 2
2011 Skarin M, Bernhardt J, Nilsson M, Sjoholm A, Linden T, 'Better wear out sheets than shoes. A survey of 202 stroke professionals´early mobilization practices and concerns', International Journal of Stroke, 6 10-15 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1747-4949.2010.00534.x
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
2011 Olsson S, Jood K, Melander O, Sjogren M, Norrving B, Nilsson M, et al., 'Lack of association between genetic variations in the KALRN region and ischemic stroke', Clinical Biochemistry, 44 1018-1020 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.clinbiochem.2011.05.025
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2011 Aberg D, Jood K, Blomstrand C, Jern C, Ladenvall C, Nilsson M, et al., 'Serum IGF-I levels correlate to improvement of functional outcome after ischemic stroke', Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 96 1055-1064 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1210/jc.2010-2802
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 28
2011 Bergstrom P, Andersson HC, Gao Y, Karlsson JO, Nodin C, Anderson MF, et al., 'Repeated transient sulforaphane stimulation in astrocytes leads to prolonged Nrf2-mediated gene expression and protection from superoxide-induced damage', Neuropharmacology, 60 343-353 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2010.09.023
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 30
2011 Osman A, Porritt M, Nilsson M, Kuhn G, 'Long-term stimulation of neural progenitor cell migration after cortical ischemia in mice', Stroke, 42 3559-3565 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.111.627802
Citations Scopus - 30
2011 Andersson HC, Anderson MF, Porritt MJ, Nodin C, Blomstrand F, Nilsson M, 'Trauma-induced reactive gliosis is reduced after treatment with octanol and carbenoxolone', Neurological Research, 33 614-624 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1179/1743132810Y.0000000020
Citations Scopus - 1
2011 Correa F, Ljunggren E, Mallard C, Nilsson M, Webber SG, Sandberg M, 'The Nrf2-inducalble antioxidant defence in astroglia can be both up- and down-regulated by activated microglia: involvemet of p38 MAPK', Glia, 59 785-799 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/glia.21151
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 21
2011 Correa F, Mallard C, Nilsson M, Sandberg M, 'Activated microglia decrease histone acetylation and Nrf-inducible anti-oxidant defence in astrocytes: Restoring effects of inhibitors of HDAC:s, p38 MAPK and GSK3', Neurobiology of Disease, 44 142-151 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.nbd.2011.06.016
Citations Scopus - 36
2010 Janssen H, Bernhardt J, Collier JM, Sena ES, McElduff P, Attia JR, et al., 'An enriched environment improves sensorimotor function post-ischemic stroke', Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 24 802-813 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1545968310372092
Citations Scopus - 53Web of Science - 48
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, John Attia, Neil Spratt
2010 Von Otter M, Landgren S, Nilsson S, Zetterberg M, Celojevic D, Bergstrom P, et al., 'Nrf2-encoding NFE2L2 haplotypes influence disease progression but not risk in Alzheimers disease and age-related cataract', Mechanisms of Ageing and Development, 131 105-110 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.mad.2009.12.007
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 31
2010 Jerndal M, Forsberg K, Sena ES, MacLeod MR, O'Collins VE, Linden T, et al., 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of erythropoietin in experimental stroke', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 30 961-968 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/jcbfm.2009.267
Citations Scopus - 59
2010 Larsson J, Esbjornsson E, Bjorkldahl A, Morberg I, Nilsson M, Sunnerhagen KS, 'Sick-leave after traumatic brain injury. The person or the diagnosis - what has greater impact?', Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 38 541-547 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1403494810371143
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2010 Hultman K, Blomstrand F, Nilsson M, Wilhelmsson U, Malmgren K, Penky M, et al., 'Expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and protease nexin-1 in human astrocytes: Response to injury-related factors', Journal of Neuroscience Research, 88 2441-2449 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jnr.22412
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 16
2010 Stridh MH, Correa F, Nodin C, Weber SG, Blomstrand F, Nilsson M, Sandberg M, 'Enhanced glutathione efflux from astrocytes in culture by low extracellular Ca2+ and curcumin', Neurochemical Research, 35 1231-1238 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11064-010-0179-2
Citations Scopus - 29
2010 Von Otter M, Landgren S, Nilsson S, Celojevic D, Bergstrom P, Hakansson A, et al., 'Association of Nrf2-encoding NFE2L2 haplotypes with Parkinsons disease', BMC Medical Genetics, 2 36-45 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2350-11-36
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 41
2009 Aberg MA, Pedersen NL, Thoren K, Svartengren M, Backstrand B, Johnsson T, et al., 'Cardiovascular fitness is associated with cognition in young adulthood', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of USA, 106 0906-911 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1073/pnas.0905307106
Citations Scopus - 127Web of Science - 109
2009 Zhu C, Qiu L, Wang X, Xu F, Nilsson M, Cooper-Kuhn C, et al., 'Age-dependent regenerative responses in the striatum and cortex after hypoxia-ischemia', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 29 342-354 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/jcbfm.2008.124
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 30
2009 Lee DR, Helps SC, Macardle PJ, Nilsson M, Sims NR, 'Alteration in membrane potential in mitochondria isolated from brain subregions during focal cerebral ischemia and early reperfusion: evaluation using flow cytometry', Neurochemical Research, 34 1857-1866 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11064-009-0001-1
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
2008 Thorsell A, Faijerson J, Blomstrand F, Nilsson M, Blennow K, Eriksson PS, Westman-Brinkmalm A, 'Proteome analysis of serum containing conditioned medium from primary astrocyte cultures', Genomics Proteomics and Bioinformatics, 1 128-142 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.4172/jpb.1000019
2008 Broberg M, Pope K, Lewis T, Olsson T, Nilsson M, Willoughby JO, 'Cell swelling precedes seizures induced by inhibition of astrocytic metabolism', Epilepsy Research, 80 132-141 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2008.03.012
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 18
2008 Li L, Lundkvist A, Andersson D, Wilhelmsson U, Nagai N, Pardo AC, et al., 'Protective role of reactive astrocytes in brain ischemia', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 28 468-481 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 269Web of Science - 247
2007 Broberg M, Pope KJ, Nilsson M, Wallance A, Wilson J, Willoughby JOW, 'Preseizure increased gamma electroencephalographic activity has no effect on extracellular potassium or calcium', Journal of Neuroscience Research, 85 906-918 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jnr.21162
Citations Scopus - 6
2007 Isqaard J, Aberg D, Nilsson M, 'Protective and regenerative effects of the GH/IGF-1 axis on the brain', Minerva Endocrinologica: a journal on endocrine system diseases, 32 103-113 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 40
2007 Zhu C, Xu F, Fukuda A, Korhonen L, Hagberg H, Lannering B, et al., 'X chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein reduces oxidative stress after cerebral irradiation or hypoxia-ischemia up-regulation of mitochondrial antioxidants', European Journal of Neuroscience, 26 3402-3410 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2007.05948.x
Citations Scopus - 25
2007 Zhu C, Wang X, Huang Z, Qiu L, Xu F, Vahsen N, et al., 'Apoptosis-inducing factor is a major contributor to neuronal loss induced by neonatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia', Cell Death and Differentiation, 14 775-784 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/sj.cdd.4402053
Citations Scopus - 143
2007 Zhu C, Wang X, Huang Z, Gao J, Modjtahedi N, Neagu MR, et al., 'Cyclophilin A participates in the nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor in neurons after cerebral hypoxia-ischemia', Journal of Experimental Medicine, 204 1741-1748 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1084/jem.20070193
Citations Scopus - 123
2007 Muyderman H, Wadley AL, Nilsson M, Sims NR, 'Mitochondrial glutathione protects against cell death induced by oxidative and nitrative stress in astrocytes', Journal of Neurochemistry, 102 1369-1382 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2007.04641.x
Citations Scopus - 34
2007 Nilsson M, Perkny M, 'Enriched environment and astrocytes in central nervous system regeneration', Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 39 345-352 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.2340/16501977-0084
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 20
2007 Qui L, Zhu C, Wang X, Xu F, Eriksson PS, Nilsson M, et al., 'Less neurogenesis and inflammation in the immature than in the juvenile brain after cerebral hypoxia-ischemia', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 27 785-794 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/sj.jcbfm.9600385
Citations Scopus - 45
2006 Thoren AE, Helps SC, Sims NR, Nilsson M, 'The metabolism of 14C-glucose by neurons and astrocytes in brain subregions following focal cerebral ischemia in rats', Journal of Neurochemistry, 97 968-978 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2006.03778.x
Citations Scopus - 21
2006 Olsson T, Broberg M, Pope KJ, Wallace A, Mackenzie L, Blomstrand F, et al., 'Cell swelling, seizures and spreading depression: An impedance study', Neuroscience, 140 505-515 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2006.02.034
Citations Scopus - 33
2006 Faijerson J, Tinsley RB, Aprico K, Nodin C, Nilsson M, Blomstrand F, Eriksson PS, 'Reactive astrogliosis induces astrocytic differentiation of adult neural stem/progenitor cells in vitro', Journal of Neuroscience Research, 84 1415-1424 (2006) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 32
2005 Thoren AE, Helps SC, Nilsson M, Sims NR, 'Astrocytic function assessed from 1-14-C -acetate metabolism after temporary focal ischemia in rats', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 25 440-450 (2005) [C1]
2005 Willoughby JO, Mackenzie L, Pope KJ, Broberg M, Nilsson M, 'Localized astroglial dysfunction disrupts high-frequency EEG rhythms', Journal of Neural Transmission, 112 205-213 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00702-004-0189-9
Citations Scopus - 7
2005 Nodin M, Nilsson M, Blomstrand F, 'Gap Junction blockage limits intercellular spreading of astrocytic apoptosis induced by metabolic depression', Journal of Neurochemistry, 94 1111-1123 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2005.03241.x
Citations Scopus - 33
2005 Kuhn HG, Cooper-Kuhn C, Eriksson P, Nilsson M, 'Signals regulating neurogenesis in the adult olfactory bulb', Chemical Senses, 30 i109-i110 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/chemse/bjh138
Citations Scopus - 5
2005 Perkny M, Nilsson M, 'Astrocyte activation and reactive gliosis', Glia, 50 427-434 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/glia.20207
Citations Scopus - 870Web of Science - 836
2005 Thoren AE, Helps SC, Nilsson M, Sims NR, 'Astrocytic function assessed from 1-14C-acetate metabolism affer temporary focal cerebral ischemia in rats', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 25 440-450 (2005)

Astrocytes play many roles essential for normal brain activity. The ability of these cells to recover after temporary focal cerebral ischemia is likely to be one important determi... [more]

Astrocytes play many roles essential for normal brain activity. The ability of these cells to recover after temporary focal cerebral ischemia is likely to be one important determinant of the extent of brain dysfunction and tissue damage. We have assessed astrocytic function based on the incorporation of radiolabel from 1- 14 C-acetate into glutamine at 1 hour of recirculation after middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2 or 3 hours in rats. There were marked differences in the response between subregions within the tissue subjected to ischemia, but the overall pattern of changes was similar after each ischemic period. The striatum, which forms part of the severely ischemic focal tissue during arterial occlusion, showed a large (44% to 68%) decrease in glutamine labeling compared with equivalent tissue from the contralateral hemisphere. In contrast, 14 C-glutamine content was not significantly altered in perifocal tissue in the cerebral cortex, which was subjected to more moderate ischemia. Cortical focal tissue also was not significantly affected, but the response was much more variable between rats. In these brain subregions, the extent of recovery of the 14 C-acetate metabolism after ischemia was not a good predictor of the likelihood of subsequent infarct development. Interestingly, a similar pattern of responses persisted when recirculation was extended to 4 hours. These results indicate that many astrocytes, particularly in the cortex, remain viable and capable of at least some complex oxidative metabolism during the first few hours of recirculation. © 2005 ISCBFM All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1038/sj.jcbfm.9600035
Citations Scopus - 24
2004 Sims NR, Nilsson M, Muyderman H, 'Mitochondrial glutathione: a modulator of brain cell death', Journal of Bioenergetics and Biomembranes, 36 329-333 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1023/B:JOBB.0000041763.63958.e7
Citations Scopus - 66
2004 Quinlan R, Nilsson M, 'Reloading the retina by modifying the glial matrix', Trends in Neurosciences, 27 241-242 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.tins.2004.02.009
Citations Scopus - 14
2004 Nilsson M, Anderson MF, Sims NR, 'Glutathione monoethylester prevents mitochondrial glutathione depletion during focal cerebral ischemia', Neurochemistry International: the journal for the publication of cellular and molecular aspects of neurochemistry, 44 153-159 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0197-0186(03)00133-5
Citations Scopus - 32
2004 Muyderman H, Nilsson M, Sims NR, 'Highly selective and prolonged depletion of mitochondrial glutathione in astrocytes markedly increases sensitivity to peroxynitrite', The Journal of Neuroscience, 24 8019-8028 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1103-04.2004
Citations Scopus - 71
2004 Anderson MF, Nilsson M, Eriksson PS, Sims NR, 'Glutathione monoethylester provides neuroprotection in a rodent model of stroke', Neuroscience Letters, 354 163-165 (2004) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 53
2004 Zaidan E, Nilsson M, Sims NR, 'Increased mitochondrial permeability in response to intrastriatal N-methyl-D-aspartate: detection based on accumulation of radiolabel from [3H]deoxyglucose', Neurochemical Research, 29 609-616 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1023/B:NERE.0000014831.65991.6a
Citations Scopus - 2
2003 Sjölund BH, Nilsson M, Grimby G, 'Foreword: Rehabilitation medicine and the new neurobiology', Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, Supplement, 4-5 (2003)
2003 Lee DR, Helps SC, Gibbins IL, Nilsson M, Sims NR, 'Losses in NG2 and NeuN immunoreactivity but not astrocytic markers during early reperfusion following severe focal cerebral ischemia', Brain Research, 989 221-230 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0006-8993(03)03373-0
Citations Scopus - 23
2003 Grimby G, Eriksson PS, Nilsson M, Sjolund BH, 'Ökad kunskap om den neurobiologiska bakgrunden till rehabilitering (Neurobiology provides a scientific foundation for rehabilitation).', Lakartidningen (Swedish Medical Journal), 100 2052-2055 (2003) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3
2003 Sjolund BH, Nilsson M, Grimby G, 'Rehabilitation medicine and the new neurobiology', Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 35 4-5 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/16501960310010061
2003 Anderson MF, Blomstrand F, Blomstrand C, Eriksson PS, Nilsson M, 'Astrocytes and stroke: networking for survival?', Neuroscience Research, 28 293-305 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1023/A:1022385402197
Citations Scopus - 118
2003 Willoughby JO, Mackenzie L, Broberg M, Thoren A, Medvedev A, Sims NR, Nilsson M, 'Fluorocitrate-mediated astroglial dysfunction causes seizures', Journal of Neuroscience Research, 74 160-166 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jnr.10743
Citations Scopus - 39
2002 Anderson MF, Aberg MA, Nilsson M, Eriksson PS, 'Insulin-like growth factor-I and neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain', Developmental Brain Research, 134 115-122 (2002) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0165-3806(02)00277-8
Citations Scopus - 226
2001 Nilsson M, Muyderman H, Angehagen M, Sandberg M, Bjorklund U, Olsson T, 'Alpha1-adrenergic modulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor-induced calcium oscillations and glutamate release in astrocytes', Journal of Biological Chemistry, 276 6504-6514 (2001) [C1]
DOI 10.1074/jbc.M103849200
Citations Scopus - 34
2001 Muyderman H, Sinclair J, Jardemark K, Hansson E, Nilsson M, 'Activation of B-adrenoceptors opens calcium-activated potassium channels in astroglial cells', Neurochemistry International: the journal for the publication of cellular and molecular aspects of neurochemistry, 38 269-276 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14
2000 Nilsson M, Thorlin T, Blomstrand F, Hansson E, 'The star-shaped cells: astrocytes involved in the pathogenesis and progress of neurological diseases', Swedish Medical Journal, 97 3604-3610 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3
2000 Hansson E, Muyderman H, Leonova J, Sinclair J, Blomstrand F, Thorlin T, et al., 'Astroglia and glutamate in physiology and pathology. Aspects on glutamate transport, glutamate-induced swelling and gap-junction communication', Neurochemistry International: the journal for the publication of cellular and molecular aspects of neurochemistry, 37 317-329 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 103
1999 Nilsson M, Perfilieva K, Johansson U, Orwar O, Eriksson PS, 'Enriched environment increases neurogenesis in the adult rat dentate gyrus and improves spatial memory', Journal of Neurobiology, 39 569-578 (1999) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/(SICI)1097-4695(19990615)39:4&lt;569::AID-NEU10&gt;3.0.CO;2-F
Citations Scopus - 600Web of Science - 542
1999 Zaidan E, Nilsson M, Sims NR, 'Cyclosporin A-sensitive changes in mitochondrial glutathione are an early response to intrastriatal NMDA or forebrain ischemia in rats', Journal of Neurochemistry, 73 2214-2217 (1999) [C1]
DOI 10.1046/j.1471-4159.1999.02214.x
Citations Scopus - 16
1998 Muyderman H, Nilsson M, Blomstrand F, Khatibi S, Olsson T, Hansson E, Ronnback L, 'Modulation of mechanically induced calcium waves in hippocampal astroglial cells. Inhibitory effects of alpha1-adrenergic stimulation', Brain Research, 793 127-135 (1998) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 22
1998 Thorlin T, Roginski R, Choudhury K, Nilsson M, Ronnback L, Hansson E, Eriksson P, 'Regulation of the glial glutamate transporter GLT-1 by glutamate and delta-opioid receptor stimulation', FEBS Letters, 425 453-459 (1998) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0014-5793(98)00288-9
Citations Scopus - 33
1998 Jansson J-O, Bengtsson B-A, Svensson J, Frohman LA, Nilsson O, Ahlman H, et al., 'Acromegaly and Cushings syndrome due to ectopic production of GHRH and ACTH by a thymic carcinoid tumour: in vitro responses to GHRH and GHRP-6', Clinical Endocrinology, 48 243-250 (1998) [C1]
DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2265.1998.00347.x
Citations Scopus - 47
1997 Jardemark K, Nilsson M, Muyderman H, Jacobsson I, 'Ca2+-ion permeability properties of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole- propionate (AMPA) receptors in isolated interneurons from the olfactory bulb', Journal of Neurophysiology, 77 702-708 (1997) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14
1997 Hagberg GB, Nilsson M, Blomstrand F, Tamir H, Hansson E, 'Stimulation of astroglial 5-HT2A receptors on astrocytes in primary culture opens voltage-independent Ca2+-channels', Neurochemistry International: the journal for the publication of cellular and molecular aspects of neurochemistry, 32 153-162 (1997) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 27
1997 Muyderman H, Hansson E, Nilsson M, 'Adrenoceptor-induced changes of intracellular K+ and Ca2+ in astrocytes and neurons in rat cortical primary cultures', Neuroscience Letters, 238 33-36 (1997) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0304-3940(97)00838-0
Citations Scopus - 9
1995 Puka M, Eriksson PS, Nilsson M, Sandberg M, Lehman A, 'Neurotoxicity of cysteine: interaction with glutamate', Brain Research, 705 65-70 (1995) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/0006-8993(95)01139-0
Citations Scopus - 86
1995 Eriksson PS, Nilsson M, Matejka G, 'Distribution and development of G alpha i-2 mRNA in the rat cerebral cortex investigated with in situ hybridization and RNAse protection assay.', Developmental Brain Research, 84 208-214 (1995) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/0165-3806(94)00174-X
Citations Scopus - 4
1994 Thorlin T, Eriksson PS, Nilsson M, Hansson E, Ronnback L, 'Opioid receptor stimulation modulate intracellular calcium in cultured neurons and astroglial cells', Regulatory Peptides, 53 S15-S16 (1994) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/0167-0115(94)90218-6
1993 Nilsson M, Eriksson PS, Rönnbäck L, Hansson E, 'GABA induces Ca2+ transients in astrocytes', Neuroscience, 54 605-614 (1993)

By using the Ca 2+ -sensitive indictor Fura-2/AM, the cytosolic Ca 2+ levels [Ca 2+ ] i were measured in type 1 astrocytes in rat cortical astroglial primary cultures, after sti... [more]

By using the Ca 2+ -sensitive indictor Fura-2/AM, the cytosolic Ca 2+ levels [Ca 2+ ] i were measured in type 1 astrocytes in rat cortical astroglial primary cultures, after stimulation with GABA, muscimol (GABA A agonist), or baclofen (GABA B agonist). We report the first evidence that stimulation of both GABA A and GABBA B receptors evokes Ca 2+ transients in type l astrocytes. Two types of Ca 2+ responses were seen: the single-phase curve, which was the most common, and the biphasic, which consisted of an initial rise that persisted at the maximal or submaximal level. Both types of Ca 2+ responses appeared with some latency. The responses were obtained in astrocytes grown for 12-16 days in culture and the response frequencies for all three agonists were 18% of the total number of examined cells. However, when the astrocytes were grown in a mixed astroglial/neuronal culture the response frequencies for all three agonists increased to 35% of the total number of examined cells. In some cells, the responses after GABA stimulation were blocked to baseline levels after exposure to bicuculline (GABA A antagonist). In other cells, bicuculline only slightly reduced the GABA-evoked responses, and the addition of phaclofen (GABA B antagonist) did not potentiate this partial inhibition. However, the muscimol-evoked rises in [Ca 2+ ] i were completely inhibited after exposure to bicuculline, while the responses after baclofen could only be partly blocked by phaclofen. GABA evoked rises in [Ca 2+ ] i which alternatively were inhibited (mostly) or persisted in Ca 2+ -free buffer. The rises in [Ca 2+ ] i persisted, but were reduced, in Ca 2+ -free buffer after stimulation with muscimol, but were inhibited after baclofen stimulation. The GABA uptake blockers guvacine, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo(4,5-c)pyridin-3-ol and nipecotic acid were also able to reduce the GABA-evoked rises in [Ca 2+ ] i However, the L-type Ca 2+ chennel antagonist nifedipine failed to influence on the GABA-evoked Ca 2+ transients. The results suggest that type 1 astrocytes in primary culture express GABA receptors which can elevate [Ca 2+ ] i directly or indirectly via Ca 2+ channels and/or via release from internai Ca 2+ stores. The results also suggest that GABA can have intracellular Ca 2+ -mobilizing sites since the GABA-evoked responses were reduced after incubation with GABA uptake blockers. © 1993.

DOI 10.1016/0306-4522(93)90232-5
Citations Scopus - 82
1993 Eriksson PS, Nilsson M, Wagberg M, Hansson E, Ronnback L, 'Kappa-opioid receptors on astrocytes stimulate L-type Ca2+ channels', Neuroscience, 54 401-407 (1993) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/0306-4522(93)90261-D
Citations Scopus - 50
1993 Nilsson M, Eriksson PS, Ronnback L, Hansson E, 'GABA induces cytosolic Ca2+ transients in astrocytes', Neuroscience, 54 605-614 (1993) [C1]
1992 Hansson E, Nilsson M, Eriksson P, Rönnbäck L, 'Astrocytes are of vital significance for the central nervous system', Lakartidningen, 89 3036-3042 (1992)

The tissue of the CNS (central nervous system) is composed of neurons and neuroglia. Whereas neurons develop an ability for the rapid transduction of specific signals, astrocytes ... [more]

The tissue of the CNS (central nervous system) is composed of neurons and neuroglia. Whereas neurons develop an ability for the rapid transduction of specific signals, astrocytes develop an ability to modulate the extracellular neuronal environment, and in mature CNS tissue manifest a capacity for active uptake of amino acids and ions. Astrocytes can control extracellular volume by regulation of their own volume, and are intimately involved in the neuronal exchange of trophic substances and metabolites. Astrocytic processes extend to blood vessel walls, the brain surface, the ventricular wall, neuronal cell bodies and synapses. Astrocytes are abundantly supplied with membrane receptors for various neurotransmitters, coupled to such second messenger systems as cyclic AMP (adenosine monophosphate) or the phosphatidylinositol cycle. Activation of the receptors results in changes in oxidative metabolism, cell morphology, cell volume, and immunocompetence: and recent findings have shown the occurrence of receptor-mediated changes in amino acid uptake. Thus, by modulating the extracellular environment, astrocytes can simultaneously modulate the sensitivity and/or excitability of large numbers of neurons. In the article are presented recent research findings suggesting astroglial cells to be targets for neurotransmitters, and probably to be actively involved in higher cognitive functions. Advances in our knowledge of astroglial cell characteristics might improve our understanding of behavioural disturbances and diseases of the CNS.

Citations Scopus - 2
1992 Hansson E, Nilsson M, Eriksson P, Ronnback L, 'Från hjärnceller i kultur till kroniskt toxiska encefalopatier (Astrocytes play vital roles in the central nervous system)', Lakartidningen (Swedish Medical Journal), 89 3036-3042 (1992) [C1]
1992 Eriksson PS, Nilsson M, Carlsson B, Isaksson OPG, Ronnback L, Hansson E, 'Chronic elevation of cAMP levels induces changes in the adenylate cyclase system, opiate receptor sensitivity and levels of Gs-mRNA in cultured neurons', Neuroscience Letters, 135 28-32 (1992) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/0304-3940(92)90128-T
Citations Scopus - 15
1992 Nilsson M, Ronnback L, Hansson E, 'Receptor coupled uptake of valproate in astroglial rat primary cultures', Neuroscience Letters, 136 83-86 (1992) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/0304-3940(92)90653-O
Citations Scopus - 6
1992 Nilsson M, Eriksson PS, Wagberg M, Ronnback L, Hansson E, 'Volume regulation of single astroglial cells in primary culture', Neuroscience Letters, 143 195-199 (1992) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/0304-3940(92)90264-8
Citations Scopus - 27
1992 Nilsson M, Hansson E, Ronnback L, 'Interactions between valproate, glutamate, aspartate and GABA with respect to uptake in astroglial primary cultures', Neurochemical Research, 17 327-332 (1992) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 28
1992 Nilsson M, Ronnback L, Hansson E, 'Agonist evoked Ca2+ transients in primary astroglial cultures - Modulatory effects of valproic acid', Glia, 5 201-209 (1992) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/glia.440050306
Citations Scopus - 24
1991 Nilsson M, Hansson E, Ronnback L, 'Heterogeneity among astroglial cells with respect to 5 HT-evoked cytosolic Ca2+ responses. A microspectrofluorimetric study on single cells in primary culture', Life Sciences, 49 1339-1350 (1991) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/0024-3205(91)90198-K
Citations Scopus - 22
1991 Nilsson M, Hansson E, Ronnback L, 'Adrenergic and 5-HT2 receptors on the same astroglial cell. A microspectrofluorimetric study on cytosolic Ca2+ responses in single cells in primary culture', Developmental Brain Research, 63 33-41 (1991) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/0165-3806(91)90064-P
Citations Scopus - 47
1990 Nilsson M, Hansson E, Ronnback L, 'Receptor and carrier regulated transport of Na+-valproate in primary astroglial cultures.', Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, 17 233-236 (1990) [C1]
1990 Nilsson M, Hansson E, Ronnback L, 'Transport of Na+-valproate and its effects on GABA uptake in astroglial primary culture', Neurochemical Research, 15 763-767 (1990) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/BF00968551
Citations Scopus - 14
1989 Persson L, Ronnback L, Ben Menachem E, Eriksson P, Nilsson M, 'Changes in CSF and brain soluble proteins following vigabatrin treatment in rats.', British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 27 73S-77S (1989)

1. Following the discovery of vacuoles in the white matter of the brain of small animals treated with vigabatrin (GVG) it was decided to investigate possible reasons for the occur... [more]

1. Following the discovery of vacuoles in the white matter of the brain of small animals treated with vigabatrin (GVG) it was decided to investigate possible reasons for the occurrence of these vacuoles and to explore the possibility of finding CSF markers which could be applicable for monitoring toxicity in humans. 2. An animal model was developed to study the changes of protein synthesis and to assay soluble brain proteins by isoelectric focusing and two-dimensional electrophoretic techniques. 3. Five groups of rats were treated either with 300 mg kg-1 day-1 GVG, 50 mg kg-1 GVG every other day, 300 mg kg-1 day-1 sodium valproate, 100 mg kg-1 day-1 sodium valproate or sham treated. 4. All animals were given the drug in a liquid full nutrient diet. The dietary intake of the different groups was adjusted to the group which showed the smallest dietary intake, to compensate for possible differences between groups due to nutritional factors. 5. The rats on 300 mg kg-1 day-1 GVG had a 30% reduction of body weight and a 6% reduction of their brain weight, compared with the lower GVG dose group, the two valproate groups and the sham treated group. 6. The synthesis of soluble proteins in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum was decreased in rats given GVG at 300 mg kg-1 day-1 and was increased in rats given valproate at 300 mg kg-1 day-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) 1989 The British Pharmacological Society

DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2125.1989.tb03465.x
Citations Scopus - 6
1989 Nilsson M, Hansson E, Ronback L, 'Uptake of sodium-valproate and effects on GABA transport in astroglial primary culture', Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, 16 244-247 (1989) [C1]
1989 Persson LI, Ronnback L, Ben-Menachem E, Eriksson PS, Nilsson M, 'Changes in CSF and brain soluble proteins following vigabatrin treatments in rats', British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 27 73S-77S (1989) [C1]
1989 Nilsson M, Lehmann A, Hansson E, 'Effects of 2-guanidinoethane sulfonate on glutamate uptake in primary astroglial cultures from the rat cerebral cortex', Clinical Neuropharmacology, 28 1415-1418 (1989) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/0028-3908(89)90019-1
Citations Scopus - 4
1986 Hansson E, Nilsson A, Eriksson P, Nilsson M, Sellstrom A, 'Heterogeneity among astrocytes evaluated by biochemical parameters', Advances in the Biosciences, 61 235-243 (1986) [C1]
1985 Hansson E, Eriksson P, Nilsson M, 'Amino acid and monoamine transport in primary astroglial cultures from defined brain regions', Neurochemical Research, 10 1335-1341 (1985) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/BF00964976
Citations Scopus - 57
Show 154 more journal articles

Conference (28 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Pietrogrande G, Mabotuwana N, Zhao Z, Abdolhoseini M, Johnson SJ, Nilsson M, Walker FR, 'Chronic stress induced disturbances in Laminin: A significant contributor to modulating microglial pro-inflammatory tone?', Brain, behavior, and immunity (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.bbi.2017.09.012
Co-authors Mahmoud Abdolhoseini Uon, Rohan Walker, Sarah Johnson
2017 Pietrogrande G, Mabotuwana N, Zhao Z, Mahmoud A, Johnson SJ, Zalewska K, et al., 'Chronic stress induced disturbances in Laminin: a significant contributor to modulating microglial pro-inflammatory tone?', GLIA, Edinburgh, SCOTLAND (2017)
Co-authors Sarah Johnson, Rohan Walker
2017 Mason G, English C, Walker R, Nilsson M, Pollack M, Hourn MM, Gerrand N, 'Addressing the recruitment barrier- The establishment of the Hunter Stroke Research Volunteer Register (HSRVR)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2017)
Co-authors Coralie English
2017 Galloway M, Marsden D, Callister R, Nilsson M, Erickson K, English C, 'Determining the minimum dose of exercise required to improve cardiorespiratory fitness in stroke survivors: Protocol for the ExDose trial', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2017)
Co-authors Coralie English, Robin Callister
2017 English C, Walker R, Pollack M, Mason G, Hourn M, Gerrand N, Nilsson M, 'Addressing the recruitment barrier: The establishment of the Hunter Stroke Research Volunteer Register (HSRVR)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2017)
Co-authors Coralie English
2017 Visser M, Goodin P, Lillicrap T, Krishnamurthy V, Attia J, Pagram H, et al., 'Modulation of resting-state networks in stroke survivors with severe post-stroke fatigue', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2017)
Co-authors Andrew Bivard, John Attia
2017 Gopaul U, Callister R, Carey L, Nilsson M, van Vliet P, 'Combined interventions for improving sensory-motor function of the upper limb (UL) post-stroke: a systematic review', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2017)
Co-authors Robin Callister, Paulette Vanvliet
2017 Gopaul U, Callister R, Carey L, Nilsson M, Sampson C, van Vliet P, 'Feasibility of Tactarray: A novel method for evaluating and retraining of sensorimotor control of finger forces post-stroke: a case report', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2017)
Co-authors Paulette Vanvliet, Robin Callister
2017 Valkenborghs S, Visser M, Nilsson M, Callister R, van Vliet P, 'A systematic review to identify all interventions combined with task-specific training to improve upper limb recovery following stroke', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2017)
Co-authors Robin Callister, Paulette Vanvliet
2017 Zalewska K, Ong LK, Pietrogrande G, Johnson SJ, Nilsson M, Walker FR, 'Oral corticosterone administration alone is sufficient to simulate the actions of chronic stress on glial cells but not on vasculature', GLIA, Edinburgh, SCOTLAND (2017)
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Rohan Walker
2016 Chapman MJ, Walker, Nilsson M, Ware S, Reilly, Tucker C, 'Architecture and Recovery', Salk Institute, San Diego (2016)
Co-authors Rohan Walker, Warren Reilly, Michael Chapman
2016 Janssen H, Kramer S, Spratt S, Ada L, Nilsson M, Pollack M, Bernhardt J, 'Systematic Review of Novel Activity Promoting Strategies to Incorporate into a Model of Environmental Enrichment for Use During Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation', CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES (2016)
2016 Gopaul U, Van Vliet P, Carey L, Hudson I, Nilsson M, 'Description of a novel "Combined Physical and SEnsOry training'' (COMPoSE) intervention to improve arm function after stroke, using TIDIER checklist', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2016)
Co-authors Irene Hudson, Paulette Vanvliet
2016 Valkenborghs S, Callister R, Nilsson M, Erickson K, Visser M, Dunn A, Van Vliet P, 'Aerobic exercise to increase efficacy of task-specific training for the upper limb after stroke: A pilot study', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2016)
Co-authors Paulette Vanvliet, Sarah Valkenborghs Uon, Robin Callister
2016 Valkenborghs S, Callister R, Nilsson M, Erickson K, Visser M, Dunn A, van Vliet P, 'Aerobic Exercise to Increase Efficacy of Task-Specific Training for the Upper Limb after Stroke: A Pilot Study Protocol', CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES (2016)
Co-authors Robin Callister, Sarah Valkenborghs Uon, Paulette Vanvliet
2015 Searles AM, Nilsson M, Bernhardt J, Cadilhac D, Doran C, Webb B, Deeming S, 'Applying a framework to access the impact from transnational health-research (FAIT)', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER, Sydney, NSW (2015) [E3]
2015 Doran C, Searles A, Nilsson M, Webb B, Deeming S, 'HMRI framework to assess the impact from transnational research (FAIT)', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER, Sydney, NSW (2015) [E3]
2015 Bhaskar S, Bivard A, Parsons M, Nilsson M, Attia J, Stanwell P, Levi C, 'Delay of late-venous phase cortical vein filling in acute ischemic stroke patients', Vienna, Austria (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Christopher Levi, John Attia, Mark Parsons, Peter Stanwell, Andrew Bivard
2015 Walker FR, Jones K, Zouikr I, Patience M, Clarkson A, Isgaard J, et al., 'Understanding "Stress X Microglial interactions" in stroke-induced secondary neurodegeneration: a major opportunity for the preser', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY, Cairns, AUSTRALIA (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Neil Spratt, Rohan Walker
2015 Walker FR, Zouikr I, Patience M, Clarkson A, Isgaard J, Johnson S, et al., 'Chronic stress exacerbates neuronal loss associated with secondary neurodegeneration and suppresses microglial-like cells following focal motor cortex ischemia in the mouse', GLIA, Bilbao, SPAIN (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Rohan Walker, Sarah Johnson, Neil Spratt
2015 Turley JA, Nilsson M, Walker FR, Johnson SJ, 'A comparison of signal processing techniques for Intrinsic Optical Signal imaging in mice', Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS (2015) [E1]

© 2015 IEEE. Intrinsic Optical Signal imaging is a technique which allows the visualisation and mapping of activity related changes within the brain with excellent spatial and te... [more]

© 2015 IEEE. Intrinsic Optical Signal imaging is a technique which allows the visualisation and mapping of activity related changes within the brain with excellent spatial and temporal resolution. We analysed a variety of signal and image processing techniques applied to real mouse imaging data. The results were compared in an attempt to overcome the unique issues faced when performing the technique on mice and improve the understanding of post processing options available.

DOI 10.1109/EMBC.2015.7319828
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rohan Walker, Sarah Johnson
2015 Smith H, Marquez J, Ada L, Spratt NJ, Nilsson M, Pollack M, et al., 'Quantifying physical, cognitive and social activity early after stroke: How enriched is the acute stroke environment?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Neil Spratt, Patrick Mcelduff, Jodie Marquez
2014 Deeming S, Nilsson M, Webb B, Searles A, Doran C, 'DEVELOPING THE HMRI FRAMEWORK FOR MEASURING RESEARCH IMPACT', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
2014 Bidarian-Moniri A, Nilsson M, Attia J, Ejnell H, 'Prone positioning for treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea', JOURNAL OF SLEEP RESEARCH, Tallinn, ESTONIA (2014) [E3]
Co-authors John Attia
2013 Tynan R, Beynon S, Nilsson M, Walker F, 'CHRONIC STRESS INDUCES PROFOUND STRUCTURAL REMODELLING OF ASTROCYTES WITHIN THEPREFRONTAL CORTEX: A CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ASTROCYTE MORPHOLOGYAND DENSITY', GLIA, Berlin, GERMANY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Rohan Walker
2012 Janssen H, Ada L, Bernhardt J, Karayanidis F, Drysdale K, McElduff P, et al., 'The use of an enriched environment post stroke: Translating from bench to bedside', Neurorehabilitation & Neural Repair: WCNR 2012 Oral Abstracts, Melbourne, VIC (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Karen Drysdale, Neil Spratt, Frini Karayanidis, Patrick Mcelduff
2012 Nilsson M, 'New approaches to stroke recovery', Journal of Molecular Neuroscience: Abstracts The 21st Annual Meeting of the Israel Society for Neuroscience & The First Binational Australian-Israeli Meeting in Neuroscience, Eilat, Israel (2012) [E3]
2012 Janssen H, Ada L, Bernhardt J, Karayanidis F, Drysdale K, McElduff P, et al., 'Exposure to an enriched environment increases post stroke activity and decreases time spent alone', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2012) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Neil Spratt, Frini Karayanidis
Show 25 more conferences

Creative Work (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
1991 Hansson E, Wagberg M, Eriksson P, Nilsson M, Ronnback L, Astrocytes - One key to brain function, Goteborgs, Sweden (1991) [J2]

Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
1992 Nilsson M, Astrocytes, neurotransmitters and valproate. A study with reference to uptake kinetics and receptor-evoked Ca-transients in astroglial primary culture, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden (1992) [T1]
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 24
Total funding $6,334,961

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20182 grants / $1,004,039

Microglial paralysis in post-stroke neurodegeneration: help or hinderance?$512,351

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Rohan Walker, Professor Neil Spratt, Professor Michael Nilsson
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1700229
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Stroke induced distrubances in glymphatic clearance: implications for brain repair?$491,688

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Rohan Walker, Professor Neil Spratt, Professor Michael Nilsson
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1700230
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20177 grants / $1,505,614

A scalable intervention for increasing vigorous physical activity among older adolescents: The 'Burn to Learn' cluster RCT$636,912

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Charles Hillman, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Michael Nilsson, A/Prof Chris Lonsdale, Doctor Narelle Eather, Doctor Jordan Smith
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1600064
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Subproject:HMRI MRSP Infrastructure (17) Brain and Mental Health - PRC for Stroke and Brain Injury$356,551

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Neil Spratt, Professor Mark Parsons, Professor Michael Nilsson, Associate Professor Rohan Walker, Associate Professor Sarah Johnson, Doctor Andrew Bivard, Doctor Andrew Gardner, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Doctor Coralie English, Associate Professor Frini Karayanidis, Aprof JANE Maguire
Scheme NSW MRSP Infrastructure Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo GS170009
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Burn 2 Learn - improving fitness and well-being in senior school students$127,740

Funding body: NSW Department of Education

Funding body NSW Department of Education
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Doctor Narelle Eather, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Jordan Smith, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Michael Nilsson, Doctor Liz Holliday, Professor Charles Hillman, A/Prof Chris Lonsdale
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1700721
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Using the Swedish National Population Medical Registry System to Explore Predictors of Post-Stroke Mood State and Cognitive Function$27,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Rohan Walker, Professor Michael Nilsson, Professor John Attia, Dr Leeanne Carey
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700296
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Elicitation interviews as a contemplative intervention: insights form stroke into body ownership and agency$21,032

Funding body: Mind and Life Europe

Funding body Mind and Life Europe
Project Team Doctor Bryan Paton, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Professor Michael Nilsson, Mr Gabriel Axel Montes, Andreas Roepstorff
Scheme Research Award
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700691
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

VR Rehab$4,545

Funding body: CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

Funding body CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Project Team Doctor Bryan Paton, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Professor Michael Nilsson, Mr Gabriel Axel Montes
Scheme ON Prime
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701035
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20163 grants / $345,797

HMRI MRSP Infrastructure (12-16) Brain and Mental Health Program – Stroke and Brain Injury$325,297

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Neil Spratt, Professor Mark Parsons, Associate Professor Rohan Walker, Doctor Coralie English, Professor Michael Nilsson, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Doctor Andrew Bivard, Aprof JANE Maguire, Conjoint Professor Parker Magin, Associate Professor Sarah Johnson, Professor John Attia
Scheme NSW MRSP Infrastructure Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600733
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Development and implementation of improved monitoring of psychological stress loads in patients recovering from stroke$20,000

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Michael Pollack, Professor Michael Nilsson, Associate Professor Rohan Walker, Doctor Lin Kooi Ong
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1600724
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

ComPoSE - Combined Physical and Sensory training to improve arm function after stroke $500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Paulette Van Vliet, Professor Michael Nilsson, Miss Urvashy Gopaul, Ms Huiqiao Tian
Scheme Linkage Pilot Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600920
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20156 grants / $2,789,544

Centre for Research Excellence in Stroke Rehabilitation and Brain Recovery$1,223,727

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Julie Bernhardt, Professor Michael Nilsson, Dr Leeanne Carey, Professor Paulette Van Vliet, Dr Dominique Cadilhac, Professor Christopher Bladin, Professor Sandy Middleton, Professor Geoff Donnan, Professor Mark Parsons, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi
Scheme Centres of Research Excellence (CRE) - Centres of Clinical Research Excellence
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1401448
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Centre for Research Excellence in Stroke Rehabilitation and Brain Recovery$1,223,727

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Julie Bernhardt, Professor Michael Nilsson, Dr Leeanne Carey, Professor Paulette Van Vliet, Dr Dominique Cadilhac, Professor Christopher Bladin, Professor Sandy Middleton, Professor Geoff Donnan, Professor Mark Parsons, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi
Scheme Centres of Research Excellence (CRE) - Centres of Clinical Research Excellence
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1401448
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Portable motor rehab device to improve arm movement after stroke$241,064

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Paulette Van Vliet, Doctor James Welsh, Professor Michael Nilsson, MELISSA Knight, Professor Irene Hudson, Mr Jeffrey Julian, Mr Luke Simmons
Scheme Development Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1400746
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Light Sheet Microscope Facility$55,026

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Michael Nilsson
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1501397
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Effects of aerobic exercise combined with task-specific training on neuroplasticity in (sub) chronic stroke$36,000

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding body National Stroke Foundation
Project Team Professor Paulette Van Vliet, Professor Michael Nilsson
Scheme Seed Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1500579
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Jennie Thomas Medical Research Travel Grant$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Paulette Van Vliet, Professor Michael Nilsson, Professor Robin Callister, Miss Sarah Valkenborghs
Scheme Jennie Thomas Medical Research Travel Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500652
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20145 grants / $579,967

Altering the Rehabililtation Environment to Improve Stroke Survivor Activity (AREISSA): A Phase II Trial.$264,241

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Professor Neil Spratt, Associate Professor Louise Ada, Professor Michael Nilsson, Professor Sandy Middleton, Associate Professor Julie Bernhardt, Professor Leonid Churilov, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Conjoint Associate Professor Michael Pollack, Associate Professor Steven Faux, Professor Lin Perry, Dr Annie McCluskey
Scheme NSW Cardiovascular Research Network Research Development Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1301044
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Investigating the neuroprotective effects of growth hormone$180,726

Funding body: University of Gothenburg

Funding body University of Gothenburg
Project Team Associate Professor Rohan Walker, Professor Michael Nilsson, Professor Jorgen Isgaard
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1301437
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON Y

The Nanostring nCounter System$75,000

Funding body: Ramaciotti Foundations

Funding body Ramaciotti Foundations
Project Team Professor Darryl Knight, Professor Phil Hansbro, Laureate Professor Paul Foster, Laureate Professor Rodney Scott, Conjoint Professor Peter Gibson, Professor Michael Nilsson
Scheme Major Equipment Award
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1300853
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

The Nanostring nCounter System$40,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Darryl Knight, Professor Phil Hansbro, Laureate Professor Paul Foster, Laureate Professor Rodney Scott, Conjoint Professor Peter Gibson, Professor Michael Nilsson
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301083
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

The Nanostring nCounter System$20,000

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust
Project Team Professor Darryl Knight, Professor Phil Hansbro, Laureate Professor Paul Foster, Laureate Professor Rodney Scott, Conjoint Professor Peter Gibson, Professor Michael Nilsson
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301084
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20131 grants / $110,000

Enriched Environment in Rehabilitation - A Phase II Trial$110,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Ms Heidi Janssen, Professor Neil Spratt, Professor Michael Nilsson
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1300569
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current10

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD1.8

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Post-Stroke Mood and Cognitive Impairments: a Tangle of Models and Mechanisms PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD The cognitive neuroscience of multisensory processing and agency in stroke survivors: from theory to rehabilitation PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Aerobic Exercise to Increase Efficacy of Task-Specific Training for the Upper Limb after Stroke: A Feasibility Study PhD (Human Physiology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Measuring Research Impact in Australia's Medical Research Institutes PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Post-stroke cognitive impairment: an exploration of the neuropathology and functional outcomes PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Investigating the minimum dose of exercise required to elicit a positive effect on fitness for stroke survivors. PhD (Physiotherapy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD ComPoSE - Combined Physical and SEnsOry training to improve arm function after stroke PhD (Physiotherapy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Examining the Role of Stress, Glia and Cognitive Function PhD (Anatomy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Development of an Intrinsic Optical Signal Imaging Pipeline to Investigate Cortical Re-organisation Following Experimental Stroke PhD (Anatomy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Environmental determinants of microglial motility PhD (Anatomy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Individual Patient Profiling Using Clinical and Neuroradiological Biomarkers in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Application of Advanced Multimodal Neuroimaging PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Environmental Determinants of Neurovascular Remodelling and Strategies to Enhance Recovery After Stroke PhD (Anatomy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Key Mechanisms Underlying Damage and Repair Processes in Sites of Secondary Neurodegeneration after Ischemic Stroke PhD (Anatomy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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News

horses

Horse riding and rhythm-and-music helping stroke recovery

June 16, 2017

Horseback riding and rhythm-and-music therapies may improve stroke survivors’ perception of recovery, gait, balance, grip strength and cognition years after their stroke, according to new research in the prestigious American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

Strokefinder

Hunter to test stroke detector

March 2, 2017

With an acute stroke occurring every 10 minutes in Australia, a revolutionary timesaving diagnostic device called the Stroke Finder helmet is being trialled by the Hunter Medical Research Institute for the first time.

Michael Nilsson

Stroke risk link to mental and physical fitness in teens

March 23, 2016

Using comprehensive health data from men aged 18, two international studies have highlighted a strong causal link between long-term stroke risk and both cardiovascular and mental fitness in early adulthood.

Hunter research leaders appointed to national research committees

September 22, 2015

Two medical research leaders from the University of Newcastle have been appointed to high-level advisory committees with the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC).

Cancer Boost

Major cancer boost

June 3, 2014

The Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA) has become the first regionally based organisation to receive full Translational Cancer Research Centre status and an accompanying $6.5-million funding injection from the Cancer Institute NSW.

Michael Nilsson

Exercise key to preventing early-onset dementia

March 12, 2014

A new international study has shown for the first time that teenagers with poor cardiovascular fitness and a lower IQ have a significantly increased risk of developing early-onset dementia and its precursors.

Professor Michael Nilsson

Position

Director HMRI
HMRI
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email michael.nilsson@newcastle.edu.au
Phone +61 2 4042 0570
Fax +61 2 4042 0001

Office

Building HMRI Building
Location Lot 1, Kookaburra Circuit, New Lambton Heights

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