Dr Dawn Simpson

Dr Dawn Simpson

Lecturer

School of Health Sciences

Career Summary

Biography

Dawn is a lecturer in Physiotherapy with the University of Newcastle. She holds a BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy (University of Teesside, UK) and a PhD (Medical Sciences) (University of Tasmania). Dawn has worked in public health for over 20 years in the UK and Australia. Her clinical experience is predominantly in Rehabilitation and Aged Care (inpatient and community-based services) and she has managed large clinical teams of physiotherapy staff during her career. Dawn’s specific area of clinical interest is stroke rehabilitation, and her research focuses on improving recovery after stroke. She is interested in factors that influence sedentary behaviour and physical activity for stroke survivors, interventions that may improve post-stroke fatigue and health service models that could support improved rehabilitation and recovery outcomes after stroke.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Tasmania
  • Bachelor of Physiotherapy (Honours), University of Teeside

Keywords

  • Gerontology
  • Physical activity
  • Physiotherapy
  • Rehabilitation
  • Sedentary behaviour
  • Stroke

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
420106 Physiotherapy 50
420109 Rehabilitation 30
420199 Allied health and rehabilitation science not elsewhere classified 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/5/2012 - 30/11/2020 Team Leader Physiotherapist (Rehabilitation and Aged Care) Tasmanian Health Service South
Physiotherapy
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (11 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 De Jong AU, Smith M, Callisaya ML, Schmidt M, Simpson DB, 'Sedentary time and physical activity patterns of stroke survivors during the inpatient rehabilitation week', International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, 131-137 (2021) [C1]

Physical activity is recommended after stroke. However, the rehabilitation day is largely spent sedentary. Understanding patterns of physical activity across the rehabilitation we... [more]

Physical activity is recommended after stroke. However, the rehabilitation day is largely spent sedentary. Understanding patterns of physical activity across the rehabilitation week may help identify opportunities to improve participation. We aimed to examine: (1) differences between weekday and weekend sedentary time and physical activity, (2) the pattern of 24-h rehabilitation activity. Participants with stroke (n = 29) wore an activity monitor continuously during the final 7-days of inpatient rehabilitation. Linear mixed models (adjusted for waking hours) were performed with activity (sedentary, steps per day, walking time) as the dependent variable, and day type (weekday or weekend) as the independent variable. Patterns of upright time during the 24-h period were determined by averaging daily activity in 60-min intervals and generating a heat map of activity levels as a function of time. Participant mean age was 69 (SD 13) years (52% male) and mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 7.0 (SD, 5.5). There was no significant difference in sedentary time between weekdays and weekends. At the weekend, participants spent 8.4 min less time walking (95% CI, -12.1 to -4.6) taking 624 fewer steps/day (95% CI, -951 to -296) than during the week. Activity patterns showed greatest upright time in the morning during the week. Afternoon and evening activities were low on all days. Sedentary time did not change across the 7-day rehabilitation week, but less walking activity occurred on the weekend. There are opportunities for stroke survivors to increase physical activity during afternoons and evenings and on weekend mornings during rehabilitation.

DOI 10.1097/MRR.0000000000000461
2021 Simpson DB, Breslin M, Cumming T, de Zoete SA, Gall SL, Schmidt M, et al., 'Sedentary time and activity behaviors after stroke rehabilitation: Changes in the first 3 months home', Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 28 42-51 (2021) [C1]

Background: Sedentary time is prevalent following stroke, limiting functional improvement, and increasing cardiovascular risk. At discharge we examined: 1) change in sedentary tim... [more]

Background: Sedentary time is prevalent following stroke, limiting functional improvement, and increasing cardiovascular risk. At discharge we examined: 1) change in sedentary time and activity over the following 3 months¿ and 2) physical, psychological or cognitive factors predicting any change. A secondary aim examined cross-sectional associations between factors and activity at 3 months. Methods: People with stroke (n¿=¿34) were recruited from two rehabilitation units. An activity monitor (ActivPAL3) was worn for 7 days during the first week home and 3 months later. Factors examined included physical, psychological, and cognitive function. Linear mixed models (adjusted for waking hours) were used to examine changes in sedentary time, walking, and step count over time. Interaction terms between time and each factor were added to the model to determine if they modified change over time. Linear regression was performed to determine factors cross-sectionally associated with 3-month activity. Results: ActivPAL data were available at both time points for 28 (82%) participants (mean age 69 [SD 12] years). At 3 months, participants spent 39 fewer minutes sedentary (95%CI -70,-8 p =¿.01), 21¿minutes more walking (95%CI 2,22 p =¿.02) and completed 1112 additional steps/day (95%CI 268,1956 p =¿.01), compared to the first week home. No factors predicted change in activity. At 3 months, greater depression (ß 22¿mins (95%CI 8,36) p =¿.004) and slower gait speed (ß¿-¿43¿mins 95%CI -59,-27 p =¿0.001) were associated with more sedentary time and less walking activity, respectively. Conclusions: Sedentary time reduced and walking activity increased between discharge home and 3 months later. Interventions targeting mood and physical function may warrant testing to reduce sedentary behavior 3 months following discharge.

DOI 10.1080/10749357.2020.1783917
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Coralie English
2021 Hendrickx W, Riveros C, Askim T, Bussmann JBJ, Callisaya ML, Chastin SFM, et al., 'An Exploration of Sedentary Behavior Patterns in Community-Dwelling People With Stroke: A Cluster-Based Analysis.', J Neurol Phys Ther, 45 221-227 (2021)
DOI 10.1097/NPT.0000000000000357
Co-authors Carlos Riveros, Coralie English
2020 Simpson DB, Bird ML, English C, Gall SL, Breslin M, Smith S, et al., ' Connecting patients and therapists remotely using technology is feasible and facilitates exercise adherence after stroke ', Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 27 93-102 (2020) [C1]

Purpose: Repetitive task practice after stroke is important to improve function, yet adherence to exercise is low. The aim of this study was to determine whether using the interne... [more]

Purpose: Repetitive task practice after stroke is important to improve function, yet adherence to exercise is low. The aim of this study was to determine whether using the internet, a tablet application, and a chair sensor that connected to a therapist was feasible in monitoring adherence and progressing a functional exercise at home. Methods: Ten participants with stroke completed a 4-week sit-to-stand exercise using the technology at home (ACTRN12616000051448). A therapist remotely monitored exercise adherence, progressed goals, and provided feedback via the app. Measures of feasibility (design, recruitment/withdrawals, adherence, safety, participant satisfaction and estimates of effect on function) were collected. Results: Participants' mean age was 73.6 years [SD 9.9 years]. The system was feasible to deliver and monitor exercise remotely. All participants completed the study performing a mean 125% of prescribed sessions and 104% of prescribed repetitions. Participants rated the system usability (78%), enjoyment (70%) and system benefit (80%) as high. No adverse events were reported. The mean pre- and post-intervention difference in the total short performance physical battery score was 1.4 (95% CI 0.79, 2.00). Conclusions: It was feasible and safe to prescribe and monitor exercises using an app and sensor-based system. A definitive trial will determine whether such technology could facilitate greater exercise participation after stroke.

DOI 10.1080/10749357.2019.1690779
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Coralie English
2020 Simpson DB, Jose K, English C, Gall SL, Breslin M, Callisaya ML, '"Factors influencing sedentary time and physical activity early after stroke: a qualitative study"', DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION, (2020)
DOI 10.1080/09638288.2020.1867656
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Coralie English
2019 Lynch EA, Jones TM, Simpson DB, Fini NA, Kuys S, Borschmann K, et al., 'Activity Monitors for Increasing Physical Activity in Adult Stroke Survivors', STROKE, 50 E4-E5 (2019)
DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.118.023088
Co-authors Coralie English, Heidi Janssen
2019 Hendrickx W, Riveros C, Askim T, Bussmann JBJ, Callisaya ML, Chastin SFM, et al., 'Identifying factors associated with sedentary time after stroke. Secondary analysis of pooled data from nine primary studies.', Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 26 327-334 (2019) [C1]

Background: High levels of sedentary time increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, including recurrent stroke. Objective: This study aimed to identify factors associated with... [more]

Background: High levels of sedentary time increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, including recurrent stroke. Objective: This study aimed to identify factors associated with high sedentary time in community-dwelling people with stroke. Methods: For this data pooling study, authors of published and ongoing trials that collected sedentary time data, using the activPAL monitor, in community-dwelling people with stroke were invited to contribute their raw data. The data was reprocessed, algorithms were created to identify sleep-wake time and determine the percentage of waking hours spent sedentary. We explored demographic and stroke-related factors associated with total sedentary time and time in uninterrupted sedentary bouts using unique, both univariable and multivariable, regression analyses. Results: The 274 included participants were from Australia, Canada, and the United Kingdom, and spent, on average, 69% (SD 12.4) of their waking hours sedentary. Of the demographic and stroke-related factors, slower walking speeds were significantly and independently associated with a higher percentage of waking hours spent sedentary (p = 0.001) and uninterrupted sedentary bouts of >30 and >60 min (p = 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively). Regression models explained 11¿19% of the variance in total sedentary time and time in prolonged sedentary bouts. Conclusion: We found that variability in sedentary time of people with stroke was largely unaccounted for by demographic and stroke-related variables. Behavioral and environmental factors are likely to play an important role in sedentary behavior after stroke. Further work is required to develop and test effective interventions to address sedentary behavior after stroke.

DOI 10.1080/10749357.2019.1601419
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Carlos Riveros, Coralie English
2018 Simpson DB, Breslin M, Cumming T, de Zoete S, Gall SL, Schmidt M, English C, 'Go Home, Sit Less: The Impact of Home Versus Hospital Rehabilitation Environment on Activity Levels of Stroke Survivors', ARCHIVES OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION, 99 2216-2221 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2018.04.012
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Coralie English
2018 Lynch EA, Jones TM, Simpson DB, Fini NA, Kuys SS, Borschmann K, et al., 'Activity monitors for increasing physical activity in adult stroke survivors', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2018 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD012543.pub2
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Heidi Janssen, Coralie English
2017 Simpson D, Callisaya ML, English C, Thrift AG, Gall SL, 'Self-Reported Exercise Prevalence and Determinants in the Long Term After Stroke: The North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study', Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, 26 2855-2863 (2017) [C1]

Background Exercise has established benefits following stroke. We aimed to describe self-reported exercise 5 and 10 years after stroke, change in exercise over time, and to identi... [more]

Background Exercise has established benefits following stroke. We aimed to describe self-reported exercise 5 and 10 years after stroke, change in exercise over time, and to identify factors associated with long-term exercise. Methods Data on exercise (defined as 20 minutes' duration, causing sweating and increased heart rate) were obtained by questionnaire from a population-based stroke incidence study with 10-year follow-up. For change in exercise between 5 and 10 years (n = 276), we created 4 categories of exercise (no exercise, ceased exercising, commenced exercising, continued exercising). Multinomial regression determined associations between exercise categories and exercising before stroke, receiving exercise advice and functional ability and demographic factors. Results The prevalence of exercise at 5 years (n = 520) was 18.5% (n = 96) (mean age 74.7 [standard deviation {SD} 14] years, 50.6% male) and 24% (n = 78) at 10 years. In those with data at both 5 and 10 years (mean age 69 [standard deviation 14] years, 52.9% male), 15% (n = 42) continued exercising, 10% (n = 27) commenced exercising, 14% (n = 38) ceased exercising, and 61% (n = 169) reported no exercise. Continued exercise was associated with younger age (relative risk [RR].47 95% confidence interval [CI].25-0.89), greater Barthel score (RR 2.97 95% CI 1.00-8.86), independent walking (RR 2.32 95% CI 1.16-4.68), better quality of life (RR 10.9 95% CI 2.26-52.8), exercising before stroke (RR 16.0 95%CI 4.98-51.5), and receiving advice to exercise (RR 2.99 95% CI 1.73-5.16). Conclusions Few people exercise after stroke and fewer commence exercise long term. Innovative interventions to promote and maintain exercise are required after stroke.

DOI 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2017.07.008
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Coralie English
2017 Lynch EA, Borschmann K, Callisaya ML, Fini NA, Janssen H, Johnson L, et al., 'Activity monitors for increasing physical activity in adult stroke survivors', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2017 (2017)

This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To summarise the available evidence regarding the effectiveness of commercially available w... [more]

This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To summarise the available evidence regarding the effectiveness of commercially available wearable devices and smart phone applications for increasing physical activity levels for people with stroke.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD012543
Citations Scopus - 22
Co-authors Heidi Janssen, Coralie English
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Conference (18 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Simpson D, Denham A, Haracz K, Bird M-L, English C, Spratt N, et al., 'Essential elements of a community-based model of environmental enrichment to continue stroke recovery: Perceptions of carers of people living with stroke', Perth, Western Australia (Online) (2021)
Co-authors Kirsti Haracz
2021 Simpson D, Awuviry-Newton K, Denham A, Haracz K, Bird M-L, English C, et al., 'Exercising, Socialising and Thinking: Environmental Enrichment Model (ESTEEM) After Stroke: Preferences of people living with stroke for a model of environmental enrichment to continue peer-supported stroke recovery in the community', Perth, Western Australia (Online) (2021)
Co-authors Kirsti Haracz
2019 Simpson DB, Breslin M, Cumming T, English SLC, Gall M, Schmidt ML, Callisaya, 'Change in sitting and activity behaviours after stroke rehabilitation: the first 3-months at home', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2019)
Co-authors Coralie English
2019 de Jong A, Smith M, Callisaya M, Schmidt M, Simpson D, 'Sitting time and patterns of activity in post-stroke rehabilitation: week versus weekend activity', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2019)
2019 Simpson D, Breslin M, Cumming T, Gall S, Schmidt M, English C, Callisaya M, 'Change in sitting and activity time after stroke rehabilitation: The first 3-months at home', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2019)
Co-authors Coralie English
2019 Simpson D, Breslin M, Cumming T, Schmidt M, English C, Callisaya M, 'Change in sitting and activity time after stroke rehabilitation: the first 3-months at home', Hunter Valley, NSW, Australia (2019)
2019 Simpson D, De Jong A, Smith M, Callisaya M, Schmidt M, 'Sitting time and patterns of activity in post-stroke rehabilitation: week versus weekend activity', Hunter Valley, NSW, Australia (2019)
2019 Simpson D, Jose K, Breslin M, English C, Gall S, Callisaya M, 'Factors identified by people with stroke as contributing to sedentary behaviour during hospital rehabilitation', Adelaide, Australia (2019)
2018 Simpson D, Schmidt M, Bird M-L, Smith S, Callisaya M, 'Increasing intensity of practice after stroke using apps, internet and sensors to connect patients and therapists remotely: A feasibility study', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2018)
Citations Web of Science - 2
2018 Lynch E, Jones T, Simpson D, Fini N, Kuys S, Borschmann K, et al., 'Do physical activity monitors increase physical activity in adults with stroke? A cochrane systematic review', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2018)
Co-authors Heidi Janssen, Coralie English
2018 Simpson D, Schmidt M, Bird M-L, Smith S, Callisaya M, 'Increasing intensity of practice after stroke using apps internet and sensors to connect patients and therapists remotely: a feasibility study', Gothenburg, Sweden (2018)
2018 Simpson D, Breslin M, Cumming T, Gall S, English C, Callisaya M, 'The effect of home versus rehabilitation environment on activity levels of stroke survivors: Go home, sit less', Gothenburg, Sweden (2018)
2017 Hendrickx W, Riveros C, Askim T, Bussmann J, Callisaya ML, Chastin SFM, et al., 'Slow walking speed is associated with high sitting time in stroke survivors: a data pooling study', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2017)
Co-authors Carlos Riveros, Coralie English
2017 Simpson D, Breslin M, Cumming T, Gall S, Schmidt M, Callisaya M, 'Go home, sit less: the impact of rehabilitation environment on activity after stroke', Queenstown, New Zealand (2017)
2016 Simpson D, Callisaya M, Schmidt M, Smith S, Bird M-L, Teo W-P, et al., 'Assessment: What Does Technology Add to Practice?', JOURNAL OF AGING AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (2016)
2016 Simpson D, Callisaya M, Schmidt M, Smith S, 'Use of a Custom Made Sensor and Cushion Combination to Record Sit-to-Stand Performance and Remote Monitoring and Clinician Feedback Using Table Technology', JOURNAL OF AGING AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (2016)
2015 Simpson D, Callisaya M, English C, Thrift A, Gall S, 'Exercise after stroke: The North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Coralie English
2015 Simpson D, Callisaya M, English C, Thrift A, Gall S, 'Change in long term exercise participation post stroke: The North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS)', Barcelona, Spain (2015)
Show 15 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $5,000

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20211 grants / $5,000

Improving fatigue after stroke: the Nottingham Fatigue after Stroke, Australia study (NotFAST2-Aus). $5,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Margaret Galloway, Professor Coralie English, Doctor Dawn Simpson
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G2101067
Type Of Funding C3300 – Aust Philanthropy
Category 3300
UON Y
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Dr Dawn Simpson

Position

Lecturer
School of Health Sciences
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Contact Details

Email dawn.simpson@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4922 0822

Office

Room HC62
Building Hunter Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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