Dr Brenda Happell

Dr Brenda Happell

Professor

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Career Summary

Biography

Professor Brenda Happell is a registered nurse with specialist qualifications in mental health nursing. She has 28+ years’ experience in academia in Victoria, Queensland and the ACT. She has published more than 400 papers in the peer reviewed literature, three books and nine book chapters. Brenda has attracted approximately $14million in competitive research funding. She is an active researcher with a strong track record supervising higher degree students to successful and timely completion. 

Brenda was the inaugural Director of the Centre for Psychiatric Nursing at the University of Melbourne, former Director of the Institute for Health and Social Science Research at Central Queensland University and Professor of Nursing and Executive Director of SYNERGY, Nursing and Midwifery Research Centre at University of Canberra and ACT Health. She is a Fellow and Board Director of the Australian College of Mental Health Nurses, and former Editor of the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. Brenda was also an inaugural member of the Queensland Mental Health and Drug Advisory Council.   

Her research interests include: consumer participation in mental health services, and physical health of people experiencing mental illness. Brenda is the CIA of a NHMRC grant: Improving the cardiometabolic health of people with psychosis: The Physical Health Nurse Consultant service, a nurse-led initiative. The research will be undertaken in the ACT under the auspice of University of Newcastle. Brenda lives in Merrijig in country Victoria, near Mt Buller.

 


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, La Trobe University
  • Bachelor of Arts (Honours), La Trobe University
  • Master of Education, La Trobe University

Keywords

  • Attitudes of health professionals to mental illnes
  • Consumer Participation
  • Mental Health
  • Mental Health Nursing
  • Physical health and mental illness

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111005 Mental Health Nursing 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Professor University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2015 - 29/06/2018 Professor of Nursing and Executive Director SYNERGY Nursing & Midwifery Research Centre (University of Canberra & ACT Health)
Australia
1/02/2007 - 31/12/2014 Engaged Research Chair in Mental Health Nursing & Director Institute for Health and Social Science Central Queensland University
Australia
1/11/1999 - 31/12/2006 Associate Professor of Nursing and Director of the Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and Practice The University of Melbourne
Australia
2/02/1998 - 31/10/1999 Senior Lecturer and Associate Head of School (Postgraduate Nursing) The University of Melbourne
Australia
1/02/1991 - 31/01/1998 Senior Lecturer Deakin University
Australia
1/02/1990 - 31/01/1991 Lecturer Victoria College
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Happell B, 'Seclusion', A Companion to Criminal Justice, Mental Health & Risk (2014)

Journal article (466 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Bocking J, Ewart SB, Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Stanton R, Scholz B, '"Here if you need me": exploring peer support to enhance access to physical health care', JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH, 27 329-335 (2018)
DOI 10.1080/09638237.2017.1385741
2018 Happell B, Curtis J, Banfield M, Goss J, Niyonsenga T, Watkins A, et al., 'Improving the cardiometabolic health of people with psychosis: A protocol for a randomised controlled trial of the Physical Health Nurse Consultant service', CONTEMPORARY CLINICAL TRIALS, 73 75-80 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2018.09.001
2018 Scholz B, Bocking J, Platania-Phung C, Banfield M, Happell B, '"Not an afterthought": Power imbalances in systemic partnerships between health service providers and consumers in a hospital setting', HEALTH POLICY, 122 922-928 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.healthpol.2018.06.007
Citations Scopus - 2
2018 Happell B, Gordon S, Bocking J, Ellis P, Roper C, Liggins J, et al., 'How did I not see that? Perspectives of nonconsumer mental health researchers on the benefits of collaborative research with consumers', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 27 1230-1239 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12453
2018 Quinn C, Platania-Phung C, Bale C, Happell B, Hughes E, 'Understanding the current sexual health service provision for mental health consumers by nurses in mental health settings: Findings from a Survey in Australia and England', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 27 1522-1534 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12452
2018 Happell B, Gordon S, Bocking J, Ellis P, Roper C, Liggins J, et al., 'Turning the Tables: Power Relations between Consumer Researchers and other Mental Health Researchers', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 1-7 (2018)

© 2018 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC A crucial development resulting from consumer involvement in mental health services has been engagement as active participants in mental h... [more]

© 2018 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC A crucial development resulting from consumer involvement in mental health services has been engagement as active participants in mental health research, often conducted in collaboration with mental health researchers representing the health disciplines (referred to in this paper as ¿other¿ researchers). Despite progress in mental health consumer research, unequal power relations continue to pose a major barrier. Although power issues are discussed in the literature, there is little research from the perspective of other mental health researchers who have collaborated with consumers on research projects. This qualitative study explored other mental health researchers' perspectives on the role of power in collaborative research with consumers. Semi-structured interviews were completed with 11 other mental health researchers. Thematic analysis of the transcript version of interview recordings was conducted. The findings were grounded in ¿the table¿ as a literal and metaphorical site of power relations. The umbrella theme was prominence and presence (of consumers) at the table, followed by subthemes on barriers (tokenism, undermined potential) and surmounting them through reworking power (critical mass and openness to power dynamics). Overall it was found that while there continue to be significant power-related barriers to further building of robust collaborative research with consumers in mental health, there are several avenues that should be considered, much more assertively, to disrupt and transcend them.

DOI 10.1080/01612840.2018.1445328
Citations Scopus - 1
2018 Stanton R, Rosenbaum S, Lederman O, Happell B, 'Implementation in action: how Australian Exercise Physiologists approach exercise prescription for people with mental illness', Journal of Mental Health, 27 150-156 (2018)

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Background: Accredited Exercise Physiologists (AEPs) are trained to deliver exercise and physical activity inte... [more]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Background: Accredited Exercise Physiologists (AEPs) are trained to deliver exercise and physical activity interventions for people with chronic and complex health conditions including those with mental illness. However, their views on exercise for mental illness, their exercise prescription practices, and need for further training are unknown. Aims: To examine the way in which Australian AEPs prescribe exercise for people with mental illness. Methods: Eighty-one AEPs (33.3 ± 10.4 years) completed an online version of the Exercise in Mental Illness Questionnaire. Findings are reported using descriptive statistics. Results: AEPs report a high level of knowledge and confidence in prescribing exercise for people with mental illness. AEPs rate exercise to be at least of equal value to many established treatments for mental illness, and frequently prescribe exercise based on current best-practice principles. A need for additional training was identified. The response rate was low (2.4%) making generalisations from the findings difficult. Conclusions: Exercise prescription practices utilised by AEPs are consistent with current best-practice guidelines and there is frequent consultation with consumers to individualise exercise based on their preferences and available resources. Further training is deemed important.

DOI 10.1080/09638237.2017.1340627
Citations Scopus - 4
2018 Happell B, Gordon S, Bocking J, Ellis P, Roper C, Liggins J, et al., '¿Chipping away¿: non-consumer researcher perspectives on barriers to collaborating with consumers in mental health research', Journal of Mental Health, 1-7 (2018)

© 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group Background: Collaboration between researchers who have lived experience of mental illness and services (consumer... [more]

© 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group Background: Collaboration between researchers who have lived experience of mental illness and services (consumer researchers) and mental health researchers without (other mental health researchers) is an emergent development in research. Inclusion of consumer perspectives is crucial to ensuring the ethics, relevancy and validity of mental health research; yet widespread and embedded consumer collaboration of this nature is known to be impeded by attitudinal and organisational factors. Limited research describes consumer researchers¿ experiences of barriers. Other mental health researchers are key players in the co-production process yet there is also a paucity of research reporting their views on barriers to collaborating with consumers. Aims: To explore other researchers¿ views and experiences on partnering with consumer mental health researchers in Australia and New Zealand. Methods: Exploratory qualitative design. Eleven semi-structured interviews were conducted with mental health researchers. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. Results: Four themes concerning barriers to collaborating with consumers (hierarchies, status quo, not understanding, paternalism), and one theme on addressing the barriers (constantly chipping away) were identified. Conclusions: It is suggested that multifaceted strategies for advancing collaboration with consumers are most effective. It is imperative to attend to several barriers simultaneously to redress the inherent power disparity.

DOI 10.1080/09638237.2018.1466051
2018 Scholz B, Bocking J, Happell B, 'Improving exchange with consumers within mental health organizations: Recognizing mental ill health experience as a ¿sneaky, special degree¿', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 27 227-235 (2018)

© 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Stigmatizing views towards consumers may be held even by those working within mental health organizations. Contemporary ment... [more]

© 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Stigmatizing views towards consumers may be held even by those working within mental health organizations. Contemporary mental health policies require organizations to work collaboratively with consumers in producing and delivering services. Using social exchange theory, which emphasises mutual exchange to maximise benefits in partnership, the current study explores the perspectives of those working within organizations that have some level of consumer leadership. Interviews were conducted with 14 participants from a range of mental health organizations. Data were transcribed, and analyzed using thematic analytic and discursive psychological techniques. Findings suggest stigma is still prevalent even in organizations that have consumers in leadership positions, and consumers are often perceived as less able to work in mental health organizations than non-consumers. Several discourses challenged such a view ¿ showing how consumers bring value to mental health organizations through their expertise in the mental health system, and their ability to provide safety and support to other consumers. Through a social exchange theory lens, the authors call for organizations to challenge stigma and promote the value that consumers can bring to maximize mutual benefits.

DOI 10.1111/inm.12312
Citations Scopus - 8
2018 Happell B, Scholz B, 'Doing what we can, but knowing our place: Being an ally to promote consumer leadership in mental health', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 27 440-447 (2018)

© 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Consumer participation in all aspects of mental health services is clearly articulated as an expectation of contemporary men... [more]

© 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Consumer participation in all aspects of mental health services is clearly articulated as an expectation of contemporary mental health policy. Consumer leadership has been demonstrated to be beneficial to mental health services. Barriers to implementation have limited the realization of this goal. In this discursive paper, we argue that non-consumers who support consumer partnerships and leadership (known as ¿allies¿) have an important role to play in facilitating and supporting consumers in leadership roles. Allies currently have more potential to influence resource allocation, and might be viewed more credibly by their peers than consumer leaders themselves. We call for allies to ensure their role is one of support and facilitation (doing what they can), rather than directing the content or speaking on behalf of the consumer movement (knowing their place). In the present study, we address the importance of allies for the consumer movement. It proposes some ¿rules of engagement¿ to ensure that allies do not intentionally or otherwise encroach on consumer knowledge and expertise, so that they maintain the important position of supporting consumers and facilitating the valuing and use of consumer knowledge, expertise, and ultimately, leadership.

DOI 10.1111/inm.12404
Citations Scopus - 7
2018 Horgan A, Manning F, Bocking J, Happell B, Lahti M, Doody R, et al., '¿To be treated as a human¿: Using co-production to explore experts by experience involvement in mental health nursing education ¿ The COMMUNE project', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 27 1282-1291 (2018)

© 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Increasingly, experts as deemed by personal experience or mental health service use, are involved in the education of nurses... [more]

© 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Increasingly, experts as deemed by personal experience or mental health service use, are involved in the education of nurses; however, accompanying research is limited and focuses primarily on opinions of nurse educators and students. The aim of this study was to develop an understanding of the potential contribution to mental health nursing education by those with experience of mental health service use. The research was part of the international COMMUNE (Co-production of Mental Health Nursing Education) project, established to develop and evaluate co-produced mental health content for undergraduate nursing students. A qualitative descriptive design was adopted with data collected through focus group interviews in seven sites across Europe and Australia. Experts by experience (people with experience of distress, service use, and recovery) co-produced the project in partnership with nursing academics. Co-production enriched the process of data collection and facilitated the analysis of data from multiple perspectives. Two themes are presented in this paper. The first focuses on how experts by experience can enhance students¿ understanding of recovery by seeing the strengths inherent in the ¿human¿ behind the diagnostic label. The second highlights the importance of communication and self-reflection on personal values, where students can explore their own thoughts and feelings about mental distress alongside those with lived experience. Interacting with experts by experience in the classroom can assist in challenging stigmatizing attitudes prior to nursing placements. These findings can be used to inform international nursing curricula by increasing the focus on nursing skills valued by those who use the services.

DOI 10.1111/inm.12435
Citations Scopus - 2
2018 Scholz B, Happell B, 'Response to Commentary by von Peter to Happell, Brenda, & Scholz, Brett (2018). Doing what we can, but knowing our place: Being an ally to promote consumer leadership in mental health. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 27(1), 440¿447', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, (2018)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12556
2018 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Scholz B, Bocking J, Horgan A, Manning F, et al., 'Changing attitudes: The impact of Expert by Experience involvement in Mental Health Nursing Education: An international survey study', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, (2018)

© 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Reform to nursing education is essential to ensure future generations of nurses are strongly positioned to value, know, and ... [more]

© 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Reform to nursing education is essential to ensure future generations of nurses are strongly positioned to value, know, and deliver strength-based, recovery-oriented mental health practice. A promising pathway to effectively drive reform is the coproduction of curricula by nursing academics and people with lived experience of recovery from mental distress referred to as Experts by Experience. The Co-production in Mental Health Nursing Education (COMMUNE) project is an international collaboration for development and implementation of consumer coproduced curricula. This study evaluated the inclusion of Expert by Experience-led mental health nursing education on nursing students' attitudes to people labelled with mental illness, mental health nursing, and consumer participation. A repeated self-report measures design was implemented in Australia, Ireland, and Finland to ascertain level of generalizability of consumer involvement within undergraduate nursing programmes. Data were collected from nursing students (n¿=¿194) immediately before and after the education module, using three self-report instruments on attitudes (Mental Health Nurse Education Survey, Consumer Participation Questionnaire, and Opening Minds Scale). Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Eighty-nine per cent of the 27 points of change reflected more favourable and accepting attitudinal change. Of these, 41% were significant at Bonferroni adjusted alpha of 0.0025. There was a statistically significant increase in preparedness for practice in the mental health field in each of the three countries. The most pronounced change is related to the social and systemic inclusion of people with a diagnostic label and recovery-oriented care more broadly.

DOI 10.1111/inm.12551
2018 Happell B, Scholz B, 'Response to Commentary by Russo, Beresford, and O'Hagan¿To¿Happell, Brenda, & Scholz, Brett (2018). Doing what we can, but knowing our place: Being an ally to promote consumer leadership in mental health. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 27(1), 440¿447', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, (2018)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12545
2018 Stewart S, Scholz B, Gordon S, Happell B, '¿It depends what you mean by leadership¿: An analysis of stakeholder perspectives on consumer leadership', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, (2018)

© 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Contemporary mental health policies call for increased involvement of consumers in leadership across mental health service d... [more]

© 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Contemporary mental health policies call for increased involvement of consumers in leadership across mental health service design, delivery, and evaluation. However, consumer leadership is not currently well understood within academia or in mental health services themselves. This study investigates how consumer leadership is currently conceptualized by stakeholders at the service delivery level. To this end, semistructured interviews were conducted with 14 mental health organization members identifying as consumer leaders, colleagues supporting consumer leaders, or organization executives. Interview data were analysed using an inductive thematic analysis to develop a broad understanding of participants¿ perceptions of consumer leadership. Findings indicate constructions of consumer leadership within mental health organizations can be understood in¿relation to four themes: consumer leadership roles, requirements, purpose, and process. Inconsistencies across participants¿ perceptions of consumer leadership were identified as constituting barriers to its development, highlighting the need to better clarify the nature of consumer leadership.

DOI 10.1111/inm.12542
Citations Scopus - 1
2018 Scholz B, Bocking J, Banfield M, Platania-Phung C, Happell B, '"Coming from a different place": Partnerships between consumers and health services for system change', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 27 3622-3629 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/jocn.14520
2018 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Bocking J, Ewart SB, Scholz B, Stanton R, 'Consumers at the centre: interprofessional solutions for meeting mental health consumers¿ physical health needs', Journal of Interprofessional Care, (2018)

© 2018, © 2018 Taylor & Francis. Interprofessional care and consumer-oriented services are embodied in modern healthcare policy and practice. The views, needs, and values of... [more]

© 2018, © 2018 Taylor & Francis. Interprofessional care and consumer-oriented services are embodied in modern healthcare policy and practice. The views, needs, and values of consumers are essential to ensuring translation of policy to practice. This is particularly pertinent for people diagnosed with mental illness who experience a higher risk of physical health problems and premature death. A qualitative, exploratory research project was conducted, involving focus groups with members of a mental health consumer group in the Australian Capital Territory. Participants were asked about their experiences and opinions in relation to physical health and care and treatment provided. Focus group transcripts were thematically analysed. Three themes arose via analysis: (1) Meeting diverse physical healthcare needs, where mental health consumers connect with many types of healthcare providers, conventional and non-conventional, (2) centre of the interprofessional team for holistic care, where there is preference for a consumer-centred group effort in addressing health issues as the model of care, and (3) more gateways, less gatekeeping, where points of access were affected by cost, place and gatekeepers could be enabling. People with mental illness seek enhanced collaboration between a broader range of health professionals, with potential to contribute to their overall health and well-being.

DOI 10.1080/13561820.2018.1516201
2018 Happell B, Scholz B, Gordon S, Bocking J, Ellis P, Roper C, et al., '"I don't think we've quite got there yet": The experience of allyship for mental health consumer researchers.', Journal of psychiatric and mental health nursing, 25 453-462 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jpm.12476
2018 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Bocking J, Scholz B, Horgan A, Manning F, et al., 'Nursing students¿ attitudes towards people with diagnosed with mental illness and mental health nursing: an international project from Europe and Australia', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, (2018)

© 2018, © 2018 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. The stigma associated with a diagnosis of mental illness is well known yet has not reduced significantly in recent years. Health ... [more]

© 2018, © 2018 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. The stigma associated with a diagnosis of mental illness is well known yet has not reduced significantly in recent years. Health professionals, including nurses, have been found to share similar negative attitudes towards people with labelled with mental illness as the general public. The low uptake of mental health nursing as a career option reflects these stigmatised views and is generally regarded as one of the least popular areas of in which to establish a nursing career. The aim of the current project was to examine nursing students¿ attitudes towards the concept of mental illness and mental health nursing across four European countries (Ireland, Finland, Norway and the Netherlands), and Australia, using the Opening Minds Scale and the Mental Health Nurse Education survey. The surveys were distributed to students prior to the commencement of the mental health theory component. Attitudes towards mental health nursing were generally favourable. Differences in opinion were evident in attitudes towards mental illness as a construct; with students from Australia and Ireland tending to have more positive attitudes than students from Finland, Norway and the Netherlands. The future quality of mental health services is dependent on attracting sufficient nurses with the desire, knowledge and attitudes to work in mental health settings. Understanding attitudes towards mental illness and mental health nursing is essential to achieving this aim.

DOI 10.1080/01612840.2018.1489921
2017 Byrne L, Happell B, Reid-Searl K, 'Acknowledging Rural Disadvantage in Mental Health: Views of Peer Workers', Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 53 259-265 (2017)

© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc PURPOSE: The aim of this article was to present views and opinions of people employed to work from their personal experience of significant mental he... [more]

© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc PURPOSE: The aim of this article was to present views and opinions of people employed to work from their personal experience of significant mental health challenges (peer workers). The specific focus was on their capacity to contribute meaningfully to mental health service provision and in rural areas and associated barriers. DESIGN AND METHODS: Grounded Theory was the methodology utilized. In-depth interviews were conducted with peer workers throughout Australia. FINDINGS: Participants described significant barriers to the provision of quality mental health services in rural and regional locations. The two main areas identified were the following: transport and distance, and lack of mental health staff and services. CONCLUSIONS: The identified barriers place limitations on the capacity of peer workers to maximize effectiveness in rural settings. Peer workers could potentially play an important role in overcoming shortages of staff and services and improving mental health service delivery.

DOI 10.1111/ppc.12171
Citations Scopus - 2
2017 Scholz B, Bocking J, Happell B, 'Breaking through the Glass Ceiling: Consumers in Mental Health Organisations' Hierarchies', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 38 374-380 (2017)

© 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Contemporary mental health policies call for consumers to be engaged in all levels of mental health service planning, implementation, and... [more]

© 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Contemporary mental health policies call for consumers to be engaged in all levels of mental health service planning, implementation, and delivery. Critical approaches to traditional healthcare hierarchies can effectively challenge barriers to better engagement with consumers in mental health organisations. This qualitative exploratory study analyses how particular strategies for consumer leadership facilitate or hinder relationships between consumers and mental health services, and how these strategies influence hierarchical structures. Fourteen participants from a range of mental health organisations were interviewed. These interviews were analysed using thematic analytic and discursive psychological techniques. The findings highlight several benefits of having consumers within mental health organisational hierarchies, and elaborate on ways that employees within mental health services can support integration of consumers into existing hierarchies. Specific barriers to consumers in hierarchies are discussed, including a lack of clarity of structures and roles within hierarchies, and resistance to consumers reaching the highest levels of leadership within organisations. Alternative hierarchical models which privilege consumers' control over resources and power are also discussed. Mental health organisations are encouraged to integrate consumer leaders into their hierarchical structures to improve their organisational offerings, their reputation, and their service innovation.

DOI 10.1080/01612840.2017.1280106
Citations Scopus - 6
2017 Happell B, Wilson K, Platania-Phung C, Stanton R, 'Physical health and mental illness: listening to the voice of carers', Journal of Mental Health, 26 127-133 (2017)

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Background: Shortened life expectancy of people with mental illness is now widely known and the focus of resear... [more]

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Background: Shortened life expectancy of people with mental illness is now widely known and the focus of research and policy activity. To date, research has primarily reflected perspectives of health professionals with limited attention to the views and opinions of those most closely affected. The voice of carers is particularly minimal, despite policy stipulating carer participation is required for mental health services. Aim: To present views and opinions of carers regarding physical health of the people they care for. Methods: Qualitative exploratory. Two focus groups and one individual interview were conducted with 13 people identifying as carers of a person with mental illness. Research was conducted in the Australian Capital Territory. Data analysis was based on the thematic framework of Braun and Clarke. Results: Two main themes were interaction between physical and mental health; and, carers¿ own physical and mental health. Participants described the impact of mental illness and its treatments on physical health, including their own. Conclusions: Carers are acknowledged as crucial for the delivery of high quality mental health services. Therefore they have an important role to play in addressing the poor physical health of people with mental illness. Hearing their views and opinions is essential.

DOI 10.3109/09638237.2016.1167854
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2017 Stanton R, Gaskin CJ, Happell B, Platania-Phung C, 'The need for waist circumference as a criterion for metabolic syndrome in people with mental illness', COLLEGIAN, 24 387-390 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2016.08.005
2017 Ewart SB, Happell B, Bocking J, Platania-Phung C, Stanton R, Scholz B, 'Social and material aspects of life and their impact on the physical health of people diagnosed with mental illness', HEALTH EXPECTATIONS, 20 984-991 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/hex.12539
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2017 Scholz B, Gordon S, Happell B, 'Consumers in mental health service leadership: A systematic review', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 26 20-31 (2017)

© 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Contemporary mental health policies call for greater involvement of mental health service consumers in all aspects and at al... [more]

© 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Contemporary mental health policies call for greater involvement of mental health service consumers in all aspects and at all levels of service planning, delivery, and evaluation. The extent to which consumers are part of the decision-making function of mental health organizations varies. This systematic review synthesizes empirical and review studies published in peer-reviewed academic journals relating to consumers in leadership roles within mental health organizations. The Cochrane Library, Medline, and PsycINFO were searched for articles specifically analysing and discussing consumers¿ mental health service leadership. Each article was critically appraised against the inclusion criteria, with 36 articles included in the final review. The findings of the review highlight current understandings of organizational resources and structures in consumer-led organizations, determinants of leadership involvement, and how consumer leadership interacts with traditional mental health service provision. It appears that organizations might still be negotiating the balance between consumer leadership and traditional structures and systems. The majority of included studies represent research about consumer-run organizations, with consumer leadership in mainstream mental health organizations being less represented in the literature. Advocates of consumer leadership should focus more on emphasizing how such leadership itself can be a valuable resource for organizations and how this can be better articulated. This review highlights the current gaps in understandings of consumer leadership in mental health, including a need for more research exploring the benefits of consumer leadership for other consumers of services.

DOI 10.1111/inm.12266
Citations Scopus - 9
2017 Clancy L, Happell B, 'Being Accountable or Filling in Forms: Managers and Clinicians' Views About Communicating Risk', PERSPECTIVES IN PSYCHIATRIC CARE, 53 38-46 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/ppc.12135
2017 Scholz B, Bocking J, Happell B, 'How do consumer leaders co-create value in mental health organisations?', Australian Health Review, 41 505-510 (2017)

Objectives Contemporary mental health policies call for consumers to be involved in decision-making processes within mental health organisations. Some organisations have embraced ... [more]

Objectives Contemporary mental health policies call for consumers to be involved in decision-making processes within mental health organisations. Some organisations have embraced leadership roles for consumers, but research suggests consumers remain disempowered within mental health services. Drawing on a service-dominant logic, which emphasises the co-creation of value of services, the present study provides an overview of consumer leadership within mental health organisations in the Australian Capital Territory. Methods Mental health organisations subscribing to the local peak body mailing list were invited to complete a survey about consumer leadership. Survey data were summarised using descriptive statistics and interpreted through the lens of service-dominant logic. Results Ways in which organisations may create opportunities for consumers to co-create value within their mental health services included soliciting feedback, involving consumer leaders in service design, having consumer leaders involved in hiring decisions and employing consumer leaders as staff or on boards. Strategies that organisations used to develop consumer leaders included induction, workshops and training in a variety of organisational processes and skills. Conclusions The findings of the present study extend the application of a service-dominant logic framework to consumer leadership within mental health organisations through consideration of the diverse opportunities that organisations can provide for consumer co-creation of service offerings. What is known about the topic? Policy calls for consumer involvement in all levels of mental health service planning, implementation and delivery. The extent to which service organisations have included consumer leaders varies, but research suggests that this inclusion can be tokenistic or that organisations choose to work with consumers who are less likely to challenge the status quo. Service literature has explored the way consumers can co-create value of their own health care, but is yet to explore consumers' co-creation of value at a systemic level. What does the paper add? This paper outlines ways in which mental health organisations report involving consumers in leadership positions, including having consumers on boards, having consumers on recruitment panels and providing leadership training for consumers. These initiatives are considered in terms of the potential value co-created within mental health services by consumers in leadership, suggesting that consumer leaders are a resource to mental health organisations in terms of the value brought to service offerings. What are the implications for practitioners? Research suggests that medical professionals have been resistant to increased consumer leadership within mental health services. The findings of the present study emphasise the value that can be brought to service organisations by consumer leaders, suggesting that mental health practitioners may reconsider their approach and attitudes towards consumer leadership in the sector.

DOI 10.1071/AH16105
Citations Scopus - 4
2017 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, 'Review and analysis of the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program', Australian Health Review, (2017)

© AHHA. Objective: The aim of the present study was to review and synthesise research on the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP) to ascertain the benefits and limitation... [more]

© AHHA. Objective: The aim of the present study was to review and synthesise research on the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP) to ascertain the benefits and limitations of this initiative for people with mental illness, general practitioners, mental health nurses and the wider community. Methods: An electronic and manual search was made of the research literature for MHNIP in May 2017. Features of studies, including cohorts and findings, were tabulated and cross-study patterns in program processes and outcomes were closely compared. Results: Seventeen reports of primary research data have been released. Triangulation of data from different cohorts, regions and design show that the program has been successful on the primary objectives of increased access to primary mental health care, and has received positive feedback from all major stakeholders. Although the program has been broadly beneficial to consumer health, there are inequities in access for people with mental illness. Conclusions: The MHNIP greatly benefits the health of people with mental illness. Larger and more representative sampling of consumers is needed, as well as intensive case studies to provide a more comprehensive and effective understanding of the benefits and limitations of the program as it evolves with the establishment of primary health networks. What is known about the topic?: The MHNIP is designed to increase access to mental health care in primary care settings such as general practice clinics. Studies have reported favourable views about the program. However, research is limited and further investigation is required to demonstrate the strengths and limitations of the program. What does this paper add?: All studies reviewed reported that the MHNIP had positive implications for people with severe and persistent mental illness. Qualitative research has been most prevalent for mental health nurse views and research on Health of the Nation Outcome Scale scores for recipients of the program. There is more research on system dimensions than on person-centred care. Mental health consumers, carers and families have been neglected in the establishment, engagement and evaluation of the MHNIP. What are the implications for practitioners?: A more systematic, national-level research program into the MHNIP is required that is centred more on the experiences of people with mental illness.

DOI 10.1071/AH17017
2017 Happell B, Wilson K, Platania-Phung C, Stanton R, 'Filling the gaps and finding our way: family carers navigating the healthcare system to access physical health services for the people they care for', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 26 1917-1926 (2017)

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Aims and Objectives: To elicit the perspectives of carers of people with mental illness regarding access to, and experience with, physical healt... [more]

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Aims and Objectives: To elicit the perspectives of carers of people with mental illness regarding access to, and experience with, physical healthcare services for mental health consumers. Background: People diagnosed with mental illness have increased risks of physical illness and earlier death, problems able to be addressed through better physical health services. Carers of people with mental illness play a significant role in the mental healthcare system yet research examining their views is lacking. Design: Qualitative exploratory. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 mental health carers. They were asked to describe their views and experiences pertaining to the physical health and availability of physical health care for the people they care for. Data were analysed using the framework of Braun and Clarke. Results: Analysis of carer responses identified two important themes: responsiveness and access, and a shortage of care coordination. Carers felt alienated from physical healthcare providers and were compelled to fill gaps in available care through persistence in ensuring access to physical healthcare services. Conclusions: The findings identify carers as key stakeholders in the physical health care for the people they care for. Their involvement in accessing and coordinating care provides vital perspective on health service capacity, which requires further consideration in the practice and research domains. Relevance to clinical practice: Carers of people diagnosed with mental illness are crucial to the effective delivery of mental health services. Their perspectives must be central to their research agenda and contribute to the development of initiatives to improve clinical practice and promote improved physical health care.

DOI 10.1111/jocn.13505
Citations Scopus - 3
2017 Happell B, Bennetts W, Tohotoa J, Wynaden D, Platania-Phung C, 'Promoting recovery-oriented mental health nursing practice through consumer participation in mental health nursing education', Journal of Mental Health, 1-7 (2017)

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Background: Developing recovery-oriented services, and ensuring genuine consumer participation in all aspects o... [more]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Background: Developing recovery-oriented services, and ensuring genuine consumer participation in all aspects of services are central components of contemporary Australian mental health policy. However, attitudes of mental health professionals present a significant barrier. Given the positive impact of education on health professionals¿ attitudes, particularly when consumers are involved, further exploration of consumer involvement in education is required. Aims: To enhance understanding of the role consumers can play within mental health nursing education. Method: A qualitative exploratory project was undertaken involving individual interviews with mental health nurse academics and consumer educators. Results: Two main themes emerged from nurse participants: Recovery in action, consumer educators were able to demonstrate and describe their own recovery journey; and not representative, some participants believed consumer educators did not necessary reflect views and opinions of consumers more broadly. Two main themes for consumers were: the truth about recovery, consumer educators demonstrated recovery as an achievable goal; and not a real consumer, where health professionals to dismiss the consumer experience as unrepresentative and therefore not credible. Conclusions: Consumer participation can contribute positively to nurse education, however representativeness presents a major barrier, potentially enabling nurses to dismiss experiences of consumer academics and educators as exceptional rather than typical.

DOI 10.1080/09638237.2017.1294734
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Byrne L, Happell B, Reid-Searl K, 'Risky business: Lived experience mental health practice, nurses as potential allies', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 26 285-292 (2017)

© 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Mental health policy includes a clear expectation that consumers will participate in all aspects of the design and delivery ... [more]

© 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Mental health policy includes a clear expectation that consumers will participate in all aspects of the design and delivery of mental health services. This edict has led to employment roles for people with lived experience of significant mental health challenges and service use. Despite the proliferation of these roles, research into factors impacting their success or otherwise is limited. This paper presents findings from a grounded theory study investigating the experiences of Lived Experience Practitioners in the context of their employment. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 Lived Experience Practitioners. Risk was identified as a core category, and included sub-categories: vulnerability, ¿out and proud¿, fear to disclose, and self-care. Essentially participants described the unique vulnerabilities of their mental health challenges being known, and while there were many positives about disclosing there was also apprehension about personal information being so publically known. Self-care techniques were important mediators against these identified risks. The success of lived experience roles requires support and nurses can play an important role, given the size of the nursing workforce in mental health, the close relationships nurses enjoy with consumers and the contribution they have made to the development of lived experience roles within academia.

DOI 10.1111/inm.12245
Citations Scopus - 3
2016 Happell B, Gaskin CJ, Stanton R, 'Addressing the physical health of people with serious mental illness: A potential solution for an enduring problem', International Journal of Social Psychiatry, 62 201-202 (2016)

© SAGE Publications. People with serious mental illness face significant inequalities in physical health care. As a result, the risk of cardiometabolic disorders and premature mor... [more]

© SAGE Publications. People with serious mental illness face significant inequalities in physical health care. As a result, the risk of cardiometabolic disorders and premature mortality is far greater than that observed in the general population. Contributiung to this disparity, is the lack of routine physical health screening by mental health clinicians. One possible solution is the implimentation of a physical health nurse consultant, whose role is to monitor and coordinate the physical health care of people with serious mental illness. Current evidence supports the implimentation of such a role, and a failure to address the widening gaps in physical health care will only serve to increase the disparities faced by people with serious mental illness.

DOI 10.1177/0020764015621771
Citations Scopus - 5
2016 Stanton R, Reaburn P, Happell B, 'The effect of acute exercise on affect and arousal in inpatient mental health consumers', Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 204 658-664 (2016)

© 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. Acute exercise performed at a self-selected intensity improves affect and may improve long-term adherence. Similarly, in people with severe depr... [more]

© 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. Acute exercise performed at a self-selected intensity improves affect and may improve long-term adherence. Similarly, in people with severe depression, acute aerobic exercise performed at self-selected intensity improves affect and arousal. However, the relationship between changes in affect and arousal and perceived exercise intensity in people with mental illness has not been evaluated. Affect and arousal were assessed immediately prior to, and immediately following, a group exercise program performed at a self-selected intensity in 40 inpatient mental health consumers who received a diagnosis of anxiety or bipolar or depressive disorders. Exercise intensity was assessed immediately after exercise. Postexercise affect was significantly improved for people with bipolar and depressive disorders but not for people with anxiety disorders. For the group as a whole, results showed a significant curvilinear relationship between ratings of perceived exertion and postexercise affect. These data will inform the development and delivery of future exercise interventions for inpatient mental health consumers.

DOI 10.1097/NMD.0000000000000510
Citations Scopus - 2
2016 Happell B, Bennetts W, Platania-Phung C, Tohotoa J, 'Exploring the Scope of Consumer Participation in Mental Health Nursing Education: Perspectives From Nurses and Consumers', Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 52 169-177 (2016)

© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc Purpose: Exploration of the views and experiences of nurse academics and consumer academics and educators regarding the scope of consumer participati... [more]

© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc Purpose: Exploration of the views and experiences of nurse academics and consumer academics and educators regarding the scope of consumer participation in mental health nursing education. Design and Methods: A qualitative, exploratory inquiry into the description and views of mental health nurse academics and consumer educators about these roles. Findings: A significant variation in roles from guest speaker to substantive academic positions was evident, with most involvement brief and specifically teaching focused. Consumer participation in education was generally valued but noted to be limited in breadth and scope. Some concern was raised about the relevance of consumer academic roles, with a clear conceptualization of the consumer academic role necessary to facilitate their contribution to the education of health professionals. Practice Implications: Mental health consumer involvement in the education of nurses has been shown to impact positively on the attitudes of health professionals to people with mental illness. Advocacy for increased, meaningful input from consumers into nursing education is therefore necessary to improve practice.

DOI 10.1111/ppc.12113
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2016 Stanton R, Donohue T, Garnon M, Happell B, 'Participation in and Satisfaction With an Exercise Program for Inpatient Mental Health Consumers', Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 52 62-67 (2016)

© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Purpose: This study examines attendance at, and satisfaction with, a group exercise program in an inpatient mental health setting. Design and Method... [more]

© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Purpose: This study examines attendance at, and satisfaction with, a group exercise program in an inpatient mental health setting. Design and Method: Thirty-two inpatients completed discharge surveys to evaluate group activities. Data were analyzed for participation and satisfaction. Findings: More inpatients (n = 16, 50%) rated exercise as "excellent" compared with all other activities. Nonattendance rates were lowest for cognitive behavioral therapy (n = 2, 6.3%), highest for the relaxation group (n = 6, 18.8%), and 12.5% (n = 4) for the group exercise program. Practice Implications: Group exercise programs delivered by highly trained personnel are well attended and achieve high satisfaction ratings by inpatient mental health consumers.

DOI 10.1111/ppc.12108
Citations Scopus - 5
2016 Stanton R, Donohue T, Garnon M, Happell B, 'The relationship between exercise intensity and sleep quality in people hospitalised due to affective disorders: A pilot study', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 37 70-74 (2016)

© 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Individuals with mental illness experience poorer sleep quality compared to the general population. Exercise may improve sleep quality th... [more]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Individuals with mental illness experience poorer sleep quality compared to the general population. Exercise may improve sleep quality through a reduction in arousal, however the association between perceived exercise intensity and sleep quality for this population is largely unknown. Forty inpatient mental health consumers reported perceived exertion prior to, and immediately following, a morning session of combined aerobic and strengthening exercise. Self-reported sleep quality was reported immediately upon waking the day following the acute exercise session. Pearson's correlations examined the relationship between exercise intensity and sleep quality. A significant negative correlation was observed between post-exercise exertion and sleep quality (r = -0.32, p = 0.045). A reduction in arousal may explain the observed effects for people with anxiety disorders.

DOI 10.3109/01612840.2015.1114057
Citations Scopus - 2
2016 Happell B, Stanton R, Hodgetts D, Scott D, 'Quality of Life Outcomes in Community-based Mental Health Consumers: Comparisons with Population Norms and Changes over Time', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 37 146-152 (2016)

© 2016 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Quality of life is shown to be lower in people diagnosed with mental illness in comparison to the general population. The aim o... [more]

© 2016 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Quality of life is shown to be lower in people diagnosed with mental illness in comparison to the general population. The aim of this study is to examine the Quality of life in a subset of people accessing mental health services in a regional Queensland Centre. Thirty-seven people accessing mental health services completed the SF36 Health Survey on three occasions. Differences and relationships between Physical Composite Scores and Mental Composite Scores, comparisons with Australian population norms, and temporal change in Quality of Life were examined. Physical Composite Scores were significantly different to, but significantly correlated with, Mental Composite Scores on each occasion. Physical Composite Scores and Mental Composite Scores were significantly different to population norms, and did not vary significantly across time. The poor Quality of life of people with mental illness remains a significant challenge for the mental health workforce.

DOI 10.3109/01612840.2015.1119223
2016 Stanton R, Platania-Phung C, Gaskin CJ, Happell B, 'Screening for metabolic syndrome in mental health consumers using an electronic metabolic monitoring form', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 37 239-244 (2016)

© 2016 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Metabolic syndrome is more prevalent in people with serious mental illness, compared to the general population. The main purpos... [more]

© 2016 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Metabolic syndrome is more prevalent in people with serious mental illness, compared to the general population. The main purpose of this study was to determine the extent electronic metabolic monitoring forms were being completed in a regional mental health service and the extent to which diagnoses of metabolic syndrome could be made using the data available. A retrospective file audit of 721 electronic mental health consumer records was undertaken. Metabolic monitoring data were recorded for 261 (36%) consumers, of which 57 (21.8%) met the clinical criteria for metabolic syndrome, 61 (23.4%) did not meet clinical criteria, and diagnoses could not be made for 143 (54.8%) consumers due to missing data. The limited use of electronic health records may inhibit the detection of risk factors for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome.

DOI 10.3109/01612840.2015.1119221
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2016 Ennis G, Happell B, Reid-Searl K, 'Intentional Modelling: A Process for Clinical Leadership Development in Mental Health Nursing', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 37 353-359 (2016)

© 2016, Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Clinical leadership is becoming more relevant for nurses, as the positive impact that it can have on the quality of care and... [more]

© 2016, Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Clinical leadership is becoming more relevant for nurses, as the positive impact that it can have on the quality of care and outcomes for consumers is better understood and more clearly articulated in the literature. As clinical leadership continues to become more relevant, the need to gain an understanding of how clinical leaders in nursing develop will become increasingly important. While the attributes associated with effective clinical leadership are recognized in current literature there remains a paucity of research on how clinical leaders develop these attributes. This study utilized a grounded theory methodology to generate new insights into the experiences of peer identified clinical leaders in mental health nursing and the process of developing clinical leadership skills. Participants in this study were nurses working in a mental health setting who were identified as clinical leaders by their peers as opposed to identifying them by their role or organizational position. A process of intentional modeling emerged as the substantive theory identified in this study. Intentional modeling was described by participants in this study as a process that enabled them to purposefully identify models that assisted them in developing the characteristics of effective clinical leaders as well as allowing them to model these characteristics to others. Reflection on practice is an important contributor to intentional modelling. Intentional modelling could be developed as a framework for promoting knowledge and skill development in the area of clinical leadership.

DOI 10.3109/01612840.2016.1158336
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Happell B, Ewart SB, Platania-Phung C, Bocking J, Scholz B, Stanton R, 'What Physical Health Means to Me: Perspectives of People with Mental Illness', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 37 934-941 (2016)

© 2016, Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. There are significant inequalities in physical health and life expectancy between people with and without a mental illness. ... [more]

© 2016, Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. There are significant inequalities in physical health and life expectancy between people with and without a mental illness. Understanding perspectives of people with mental illness on personal meanings of physical health is essential to ensuring health services are aligned with consumer understandings, needs, and values. A qualitative exploratory study was undertaken involving focus groups with 31 consumers in The Australian Capital Territory, Australia. Participants were asked: ¿What does physical health mean to you?¿ Thematic analysis was applied to interview transcripts. Five themes are discussed, representing different emphases in the meaning of physical health: (1) physical and mental are interconnected, (2) absence of disease, (3) moving the body, (4) struggling for healthy diet, and (5) functioning and participation. Physical pain was a difficulty that arose across these themes. Mental health consumers see physical health as always connected with well-being. Nurses would benefit from been informed by consumer understandings of physical health. In addition, there should be more attention to quality of life measures of people with mental illness as these are more congruent with consumer perspectives on physical health than biomedical measures.

DOI 10.1080/01612840.2016.1226999
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2016 Happell B, 'Salami: By the slice or swallowed whole?', Applied Nursing Research, 30 29-31 (2016)

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Salami slicing, the practice of extracting multiple papers from the one data set, is generally considered unsound practice in publication. To date critique of... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Salami slicing, the practice of extracting multiple papers from the one data set, is generally considered unsound practice in publication. To date critique of this view in the literature is limited. The aim of this paper is to present alternative views to challenge the concept of salami slicing as inherently negative. More specifically the paper will discuss the potential consequences of producing thin and underdeveloped findings with insufficient scope for detailed discussion and articulation of the contribution to knowledge. Practical tips for dealing with multiple papers from one data set will provided.

DOI 10.1016/j.apnr.2015.08.011
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Byrne L, Happell B, Reid-Searl K, 'Lived experience practitioners and the medical model: world¿s colliding?', Journal of Mental Health, 25 217-223 (2016)

© 2015 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Background: Australian mental health policy requires that mental health services facilitate meaningful and genu... [more]

© 2015 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Background: Australian mental health policy requires that mental health services facilitate meaningful and genuine consumer participation in all aspects of mental health services. Roles for practitioners who work from their own experience of significant mental health challenges and mental health service use have been implemented in many services to promote participation and the development of more consumer focused services. Aims: To enhance understanding of perspectives of individuals working in lived experience roles to more closely understand their experiences and opinions about these roles. Method: A grounded theory study interviews were conducted with 13 lived experience practitioners. Results: The medical model was a core category arising from this work. Participants described the medical model as a prevailing culture within mental health services from their personal and professional experiences. This culture imposed a major limitation on the implementation, effectiveness and development of lived experience roles and themselves as individuals. It was also seen as a major limitation to the progress of Recovery orientated reform. Conclusions: The development of Recovery oriented services requires a strong lived experience practitioner workforce, with appropriate resourcing and support available. The current medical model approach requires critique to facilitate reform and avoid tokenism.

DOI 10.3109/09638237.2015.1101428
Citations Scopus - 6
2016 Happell B, Bennetts W, Tohotoa J, Platania-Phung C, Wynaden D, 'Nothing without vision! The views of consumers and mental health nurses about consumer involvement in mental health nursing education', COLLEGIAN, 23 241-248 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2015.04.004
Citations Scopus - 2
2016 Happell B, Wilson K, Platania-Phung C, Stanton R, 'Physical health nurse consultant role to improve physical health in mental health services: A carer's perspective', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 25 243-250 (2016)

© 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. The physical health of people diagnosed with a mental illness is significantly poorer in comparison with the general populat... [more]

© 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. The physical health of people diagnosed with a mental illness is significantly poorer in comparison with the general population. Awareness of this health disparity is increasing; however, strategies to address the problem are limited. Carers play an important role in the physical health care of people with mental illness, particularly in facilitating navigation of and advocating in the health care system. A specialist physical health nurse consultant position has been suggested as a way to address the physical health care disparity and limited research available suggests that positive outcomes are possible. In the present study, a qualitative exploratory research project was undertaken, involving in-depth interviews with people identifying as mental health carers. Two focus groups and one individual interview were conducted involving a total of 13 carers. The resulting data were analyzed thematically. Views and opinions about the proposed physical health nurse consultant (PHNC) position were sought during these interviews and are reported in this paper. Two main sub-themes were evident relating to characteristics of this role: reliability and consistency; and communication and support. Essentially carers expressed a need for support for themselves and consumers in addressing physical health concerns. Successful implementation of this position would require a consistent and reliable approach. Carers are significant stakeholders in the physical health of consumers of mental health services and their active involvement in identifying and tailoring services, including development of the physical health nurse consultant must be seen as a priority.

DOI 10.1111/inm.12208
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2016 Happell B, Bennetts W, 'Triumph and adversity: Exploring the complexities of consumer storytelling in mental health nursing education', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 25 546-553 (2016)

© 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Consumer participation in the education of health professionals is increasing, particularly in mental health nursing educati... [more]

© 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Consumer participation in the education of health professionals is increasing, particularly in mental health nursing education and storytelling remains the most frequent approach to consumer involvement. The use of story has tended to be accepted as a legitimate educational tool with limited critique or consideration of its potential consequences presented within the academic literature. A qualitative exploratory research study was undertaken with mental health nurse academics (n¿=¿34) and consumer educators and academics (n¿=¿12), to investigate the perceptions and experiences of mental health nurses and consumers regarding the involvement of consumers in mental health nursing education. Data were analysed thematically. Story was a major theme to emerge from consumer participants and received some attention from nurse academics. Consumers and nurses both referred to the power of story to convey the human experience of mental illness diagnosis and service use; and the vulnerability that can result from storytelling. Consumers also described: story as expectation; preparation and support; and the politics of story. All participants supported the value of storytelling in mental health nursing education. Consumers had considered the complexities in far greater detail. The ongoing value of story as an educational technique requires further research. Equally important is considering a broader range of educational roles for mental health consumers.

DOI 10.1111/inm.12244
Citations Scopus - 3
2016 Stanton R, Scott D, Happell B, 'Low knowledge of physical health behaviours is associated with poor diet and chronic illness in adults', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 22 226-232 (2016)

© La Trobe University 2016. Governments invest heavily in health promotion strategies to improve physical health behaviours. However, the dietary and physical activity practices o... [more]

© La Trobe University 2016. Governments invest heavily in health promotion strategies to improve physical health behaviours. However, the dietary and physical activity practices of many Australians fail to meet minimum levels for health, leading to the unacceptably high prevalence of chronic and complex illness. Health literacy is known to impact on health behaviour, and to be related to health knowledge; however, no studies have specifically examined knowledge of physical health behaviours in an Australian context. We assessed knowledge of physical health behaviours in 1244 adults in Queensland, Australia. Almost two-thirds of respondents had a 'Good' knowledge of physical health behaviour. People with 'Good' knowledge of physical health behaviours were more likely to be female, educated beyond secondary school, be employed and have an annual household income of >$52000 (P<0.05). People with 'Low' knowledge of physical health behaviours were significantly more likely to report insufficient intake of vegetables and have at least one chronic illness (P<0.05). Binary logistic regression shows low daily intake of vegetables to have the strongest association with low knowledge of physical health behaviours. Given the association between health knowledge and health literacy, assessment of the knowledge of physical health behaviours may provide considerable insight into the effectiveness of future health promotion interventions.

DOI 10.1071/PY14132
Citations Scopus - 2
2016 Happell B, Ewart SB, ''PLEASE BELIEVE ME, MY LIFE DEPENDS ON IT': PHYSICAL HEALTH CONCERNS OF PEOPLE DIAGNOSED WITH MENTAL ILLNESS', Australian nursing &amp; midwifery journal, 23 47 (2016)
2016 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Gaskin CJ, Stanton R, 'Use of an electronic metabolic monitoring form in a mental health service - A retrospective file audit', BMC Psychiatry, 16 (2016)

© 2016 Happell et al. Background: People with severe mental illness have poorer physical health, experience disparities in physical health care, and lead significantly shorter liv... [more]

© 2016 Happell et al. Background: People with severe mental illness have poorer physical health, experience disparities in physical health care, and lead significantly shorter lives, compared to the general population. Routine metabolic monitoring is proposed as a method of identifying risk factors for metabolic abnormalities. Efforts to date suggest routine metabolic monitoring is both incomplete and ad-hoc, however. This present study reports on the recent implementation of a routine metabolic monitoring form at a mental health service in regional Australia. Methods: A retrospective file audit was undertaken on 721 consumers with electronic health records at the mental health service. Descriptive statistics were used to report the frequency of use of the metabolic monitoring form and the range of metabolic parameters that had been recorded. Results: Consumers had an average age of 41.4 years (SD = 14.6), over half were male (58.4 %), and the most common psychiatric diagnosis was schizophrenia (42.3 %). The metabolic monitoring forms of 36 % of consumers contained data. Measurements were most commonly recorded for weight (87.4 % of forms), height (85.4 %), blood pressure (83.5 %), and body mass index (73.6 %). Data were less frequently recorded for lipids (cholesterol, 56.3 %; low density lipoprotein, 48.7 %; high density lipoprotein, 51.7 %; triglycerides, 55.2 %), liver function (alanine aminotransferase, 66.3 %; aspartate aminotransferase, 65.5 %; gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, 64.8 %), renal function (urea, 66.3 %; creatinine, 65.9 %), fasting blood glucose (60.2 %), and waist circumference (54.4 %). Conclusions: The metabolic monitoring forms in consumer electronic health records are not utilised in a manner that maximises their potential. The extent of the missing data suggests that the metabolic health of most consumers may not have been adequately monitored. Addressing the possible reasons for the low completion rate has the potential to improve the provision of physical health care for people with mental illness.

DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-0814-9
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
2016 Happell B, Ewart SB, Platania-Phung C, Bocking J, Griffiths K, Scholz B, Stanton R, 'Embedding a physical health nurse consultant within mental health services: Consumers' perspectives', International journal of mental health nursing, 25 377-384 (2016)

© 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. The life expectancy of people living with mental illness is significantly shorter than that of the rest of the population. D... [more]

© 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. The life expectancy of people living with mental illness is significantly shorter than that of the rest of the population. Despite the profound impact of physical health issues on both quality of life and life expectancy, the perspectives of mental health consumers have yet to be thoroughly explored. Furthermore, research has focused far more on describing barriers than on identifying solutions. This paper reports on findings from a qualitative exploratory research study, with the aim to examine the potential role of a specialist nurse with advanced physical health-care skills. Focus groups were conducted with 31 consumers. Data were analysed thematically. The concept of a role like this was supported; however, participants stressed: (i) the importance of integration between health professionals and various components of the health-care system; and (ii) the need for culture change for nurses to work from a less medically-dominated approach. Previous research literature suggests that a nursing position dedicated to physical health care and coordination might produce positive outcomes for mental health consumers. The findings from the current research project emphasize the need for consumers to be identified as key stakeholders in a solution-focused approach to improved physical health care for mental health consumers.

DOI 10.1111/inm.12185
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2016 Quinn C, Happell B, 'Supporting the Sexual Intimacy Needs of Patients in a Longer Stay Inpatient Forensic Setting', PERSPECTIVES IN PSYCHIATRIC CARE, 52 239-247 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/ppc.12123
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2016 Byrne L, Roper C, Happell B, Reid-Searl K, 'The stigma of identifying as having a lived experience runs before me: challenges for lived experience roles', Journal of Mental Health, 1-7 (2016)

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor &amp; Francis Group. Background: Lived experience practitioners can contribute to improved outcomes for people with mental illness, ... [more]

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Background: Lived experience practitioners can contribute to improved outcomes for people with mental illness, supplementing traditional mental health services and reducing health care costs. However, lived experience practitioners frequently face stigma and discrimination within their work roles. Aim: To understand the impact of stigma and discrimination on the effectiveness of lived experience roles from the perspective of lived experience practitioners. Method: In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 lived experience practitioners within a grounded theory study. Results: Issues of stigma and discrimination were identified as a core category of this study. Participants described stigma and discrimination so prevalent as to be considered a ¿normal¿ part of their working life. Professional isolation and attitudinal barriers from colleagues were seen to inhibit the effectiveness of lived experience roles. Conclusions: Lived experience practitioners can provide a vital contribution to stigma reduction broadly, however, the stigma and discrimination they face within work roles must be addressed to allow this contribution to be effective.

DOI 10.1080/09638237.2016.1244715
Citations Scopus - 4
2016 Happell B, Ewart SB, Platania-Phung C, Stanton R, 'Participative mental health consumer research for improving physical health care: An integrative review', International journal of mental health nursing, 25 399-408 (2016)

© 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. People with mental illness have a significantly lower life expectancy and higher rates of chronic physical illnesses than th... [more]

© 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. People with mental illness have a significantly lower life expectancy and higher rates of chronic physical illnesses than the general population. Health care system reform to improve access and quality is greatly needed to address this inequity. The inclusion of consumers of mental health services as co-investigators in research is likely to enhance service reform. In light of this, the current paper reviews mental health consumer focussed research conducted to date, addressing the neglect of physical health in mental health care and initiatives with the aim of improving physical health care. The international literature on physical healthcare in the context of mental health services was searched for articles, including mental health consumers in research roles, via Medline, CINAHL and Google Scholar, in October 2015. Four studies where mental health consumers participated as researchers were identified. Three studies involved qualitative research on barriers and facilitators to physical health care access, and a fourth study on developing technologies for more effective communication between GPs and patients. This review found that participatory mental health consumer research in physical health care reform has only become visible in the academic literature in 2015. Heightened consideration of mental health consumer participation in research is required by health care providers and researchers. Mental health nurses can provide leadership in increasing mental health consumer research on integrated care directed towards reducing the health gap between people with and without mental illness.

DOI 10.1111/inm.12226
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
2016 Happell B, Ewart SB, Bocking J, Platania-Phung C, Stanton R, ''That red flag on your file': misinterpreting physical symptoms as mental illness', Journal of clinical nursing, 25 2933-2942 (2016)

© 2016 John Wiley &amp; Sons Ltd. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To ascertain the views and experiences of mental health consumers regarding the availability and quality of care and treat... [more]

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To ascertain the views and experiences of mental health consumers regarding the availability and quality of care and treatment received for their physical health needs.BACKGROUND: People diagnosed with mental illness have higher occurrence of physical health problems. Responsive health care services are crucial for prevention and management of physical health problems, and for reducing disparities in health between people diagnosed with mental illness and those who are not. There is limited research giving voice to consumer perspectives on their experiences with health care providers.DESIGN: Exploratory qualitative.METHODS: Focus group interviews with mental health consumers accessed via a consumer network group in a region of Australia (n¿=¿31). All interview audio recordings were transcribed professionally. Interviews were thematically analysed.RESULTS: The main themes were: symptomising; failure to act and alertness to prejudice. The first two themes were consumer perceptions of the actions and behaviours of health professionals, and the third describes consumer responses to these behaviours and actions. Consumers described increased risks of illness and death because of undiagnosed physical illness despite their physical health advice-seeking as the reason for the health consultation.CONCLUSION: Health care providers' non-recognition of physical health problems presents a clear example of a significant and potentially life threatening health inequity. The service provider responses described by participants suggest that mental health consumers' physical health needs may not be taken seriously.RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Clinicians need to take seriously the physical health needs and concerns of people with mental illness. Nurses can play a crucial role in the prevention of diagnostic overshadowing as part of a broader direction of balancing biomedical perspectives with other approaches to health care.

DOI 10.1111/jocn.13355
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2016 Rebar AL, Boles C, Burton N, Duncan MJ, Short CE, Happell B, et al., 'Healthy mind, healthy body: A randomized trial testing the efficacy of a computer-tailored vs. interactive web-based intervention for increasing physical activity and reducing depressive symptoms', Mental Health and Physical Activity, 11 29-37 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Physical activity is an effective primary or adjunctive treatment to reduce depressive symptoms. Computer-tailored and interactive web-based physical activity ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Physical activity is an effective primary or adjunctive treatment to reduce depressive symptoms. Computer-tailored and interactive web-based physical activity interventions are potentially effective and accessible means for promoting physical activity, but little evidence exists regarding their efficacy in reducing depressive symptoms. We conducted a 2-arm randomised trial to compare the efficacy of these web-based interventions for increasing physical activity and reducing depressive symptoms. Participants (18 years or older and had no health condition limiting physical activity) were randomised to have access to a web-based physical activity intervention program with either computer-tailored advice (MyPAA) or interactive features (Walk 2.0). Only half of participants accessed the website at least once (MyPAA: allocated n¿=¿252, accessed program n¿=¿154, 61.1%; Walk 2.0: allocated n¿=¿262, accessed program n¿=¿120, 45.8%). Participants and the research team were blinded to group assignment. There were no significant between-group differences in change of self-reported physical activity or depressive symptoms. Physical activity significantly increased from baseline to one month (g¿=¿0.21) and three months (g¿=¿0.20), and depressive symptoms significantly decreased from baseline to one month (g¿=¿0.36) and three months (g¿=¿0.42). People who visited the website more and for longer had larger changes in physical activity and depressive symptoms than those who visited less. Web-based interventions with computer-tailoring and interactive features show promise as a method for increasing physical activity and reducing depressive symptoms, particularly for those who engage with the program. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613001215718.

DOI 10.1016/j.mhpa.2016.08.001
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
2015 Happell B, Gaskin CJ, Platania-Phung C, 'The Construct Validity of the Work-Related Flow Inventory in a Sample of Australian Workers', JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 149 42-62 (2015)
DOI 10.1080/00223980.2013.838539
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2015 Happell B, McAllister M, Gaskin CJ, 'Majors in Mental Health Nursing: Issues of Sustainability and Commitment', PERSPECTIVES IN PSYCHIATRIC CARE, 51 28-35 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/ppc.12063
2015 Byrne L, Happell B, Platania-Phung C, 'Attitudes of Nursing Students on Consumer Participation: The Effectiveness of the Mental Health Consumer Participation Questionnaire', PERSPECTIVES IN PSYCHIATRIC CARE, 51 45-51 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/ppc.12064
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2015 Stanton R, Franck C, Reaburn P, Happell B, 'A Pilot Study of the Views of General Practitioners Regarding Exercise for the Treatment of Depression', PERSPECTIVES IN PSYCHIATRIC CARE, 51 253-259 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/ppc.12088
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
2015 Happell B, Hodgetts D, Stanton R, Millar F, Phung CP, Scott D, 'Lessons Learned From the Trial of a Cardiometabolic Health Nurse', PERSPECTIVES IN PSYCHIATRIC CARE, 51 268-276 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/ppc.12091
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2015 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Scott D, Stanton R, 'Predictors of nurse support for the introduction of the cardiometabolic health nurse in the Australian mental health sector', Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 51 162-170 (2015)

PURPOSE: A cardiometabolic specialist nursing role could potentially improve physical health of people with serious mental illness. DESIGN AND METHODS: A national survey of Austra... [more]

PURPOSE: A cardiometabolic specialist nursing role could potentially improve physical health of people with serious mental illness. DESIGN AND METHODS: A national survey of Australian nurses working in mental health settings investigated predictors of support for the role. FINDINGS: Predictors included belief in physical healthcare neglect, interest in training; higher perceived value of improving physical health care. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: The findings suggest that nurses see the cardiometabolic health nurse role as a promising initiative for closing gaps in cardiometabolic health care and skilling other nurses in mental health.However, as the majority of variance in cardiometabolic health nurse support was unexplained, more research is urgently needed on factors that explain differences in cardiometabolic health nurse endorsement.

DOI 10.1111/ppc.12077
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2015 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Webster S, McKenna B, Millar F, Stanton R, et al., 'Applying the World Health Organization Mental Health Action Plan to evaluate policy on addressing co-occurrence of physical and mental illnesses in Australia', AUSTRALIAN HEALTH REVIEW, 39 370-378 (2015)
DOI 10.1071/AH14098
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2015 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Stanton R, Millar F, 'Exploring the Views of Nurses on the Cardiometabolic Health Nurse in Mental Health Services in Australia', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 36 135-144 (2015)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2014.901449
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2015 Quinn C, Cert PN, Happell B, 'Exploring Sexual Risks in a Forensic Mental Health Hospital: Perspectives from Patients and Nurses', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 36 669-677 (2015)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2015.1033042
2015 Byrne L, Happell B, Reid-Searl K, 'Recovery as a lived experience discipline: A grounded theory study', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 36 935-943 (2015)

© 2015 Taylor &amp; Francis Group, LLC. Recovery is government mandated and a core facet of mental health reform. However, Recovery implementation in this country (Australia) ha... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Recovery is government mandated and a core facet of mental health reform. However, Recovery implementation in this country (Australia) has been inhibited by a lack of education of, and understanding from, clinicians. A grounded theory study was undertaken to explore the potential and existing role of lived experience practitioners in assisting meaningful implementations of Recovery within the Australian mental health sector. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 people employed to work from a lived experience perspective. The findings suggest participants have experienced and observed significant barriers to the implementation of Recovery-focused practice while operating in lived experience roles. Three main issues emerged: (1) Recovery co-opted, (2) Recovery uptake, and (3) Recovery denial. For a genuine Recovery-focused mental health system to be developed, lived experience practitioners must be enabled to take their role as Recovery experts and leaders. Lived experience practitioners are the logical leaders of Recovery implementation due to their own internal experience and understandings of Recovery and the wider lived experience movement's development and championing of the concepts.

DOI 10.3109/01612840.2015.1076548
Citations Scopus - 6
2015 Happell B, Gaskin CJ, Byrne L, Welch A, Dip G, Gellion S, 'Clinical Placements in Mental Health: A Literature Review', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 36 44-51 (2015)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2014.915899
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 8
2015 Happell B, Wynaden D, Tohotoa J, Platania-Phung C, Byrne L, Martin G, Harris S, 'Mental health lived experience academics in tertiary education: The views of nurse academics', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 35 113-117 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2014.07.006
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 11
2015 Wynaden D, Tohotoa J, Omari OAL, Happell B, Heslop K, Barr L, Sourinathan V, 'Administering intramuscular injections: How does research translate into practice over time in the mental health setting?', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 35 620-624 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2014.12.008
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
2015 Happell B, McAllister M, 'The challenges of undergraduate mental health nursing education from the perspectives of heads of schools of nursing in Queensland, Australia', COLLEGIAN, 22 267-274 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2014.01.004
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2015 Happell B, Wilson R, McNamara P, 'Undergraduate mental health nursing education in Australia: More than Mental Health First Aid', COLLEGIAN, 22 433-438 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2014.07.003
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
2015 Stanton R, Reaburn P, Happell B, 'Barriers to exercise prescription and participation in people with mental illness: the perspectives of nurses working in mental health', JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC AND MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 22 440-448 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/jpm.12205
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2015 Happell B, Bennetts W, Harris S, Platania-Phung C, Tohotoa J, Byrne L, Wynaden D, 'Lived experience in teaching mental health nursing: Issues of fear and power', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 24 19-27 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12091
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 8
2015 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Byrne L, Wynaden D, Martin G, Harris S, 'Consumer participation in nurse education: A national survey of Australian universities', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 24 95-103 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12111
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2015 Stanton R, Happell B, Reaburn P, 'Investigating the exercise-prescription practices of nurses working in inpatient mental health settings', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 24 112-120 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12125
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
2015 Happell B, Galletly C, Castle D, Chris P-P, Stanton R, Scott D, et al., 'Scoping review of research in Australia on the co-occurrence of physical and serious mental illness and integrated care', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 24 421-438 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12142
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2015 Clancy L, Happell B, Moxham L, 'Perception of risk for older people living with a mental illness: Balancing uncertainty', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 24 577-586 (2015)

© 2015 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Risk is commonly defined as a negative threat which needs to be controlled and mitigated; as a concept, it takes high priori... [more]

© 2015 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Risk is commonly defined as a negative threat which needs to be controlled and mitigated; as a concept, it takes high priority in contemporary mental health services. Health-care organizations and clinicians are now required to use levels of risk as a benchmark for clinical decision-making. However, perceptions of risk change according to the lens through which it is viewed. A qualitative, exploratory research study was undertaken in an aged persons' mental health programme in Victoria, Australia, to explore the notion of risk from the multiple perspectives of service providers and consumers. Data were obtained through in-depth interviews, and analysis was based on the framework of Ritchie and Spencer. Balancing uncertainty emerged as a major theme, and comprised two subthemes: (i) complexity of risk from the perspective of providers of services; and (ii) complexity of safety from the perspectives of recipients of services. These differences emphasize a significant disjuncture between perceptions of risk and the potential for the individual needs and concerns of consumers to be subsumed under broader organizational issues. The uncertainty this tension highlights suggests the need to reconceptualize risk, incorporating the views and experiences of all stakeholders, particularly consumers and carers, to enhance recovery-oriented services and facilitate consumer participation within mental health services.

DOI 10.1111/inm.12175
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Scott D, Hanley C, 'Access to dental care and dental ill-health of people with serious mental illness: views of nurses working in mental health settings in Australia', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PRIMARY HEALTH, 21 32-37 (2015)
DOI 10.1071/PY13044
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
2015 Stanton R, Rosenbaum S, Kalucy M, Reaburn P, Happell B, 'A call to action: exercise as treatment for patients with mental illness', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PRIMARY HEALTH, 21 120-125 (2015)
DOI 10.1071/PY14054
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 8
2015 McAllister M, Wynaden D, Happell B, Flynn T, Walters V, Duggan R, et al., 'Staff experiences of providing support to students who are managing mental health challenges: A qualitative study from two australian universities', Advances in Mental Health, 12 192-201 (2015)

Copyright © eContent Management Pty Ltd The prevalence and consequences of mental health challenges amongst university students is now widely acknowledged and university staff pro... [more]

Copyright © eContent Management Pty Ltd The prevalence and consequences of mental health challenges amongst university students is now widely acknowledged and university staff provide an important but often hidden service to these students. While completing a university degree is important to the student¿s long-term outcomes there remains a paucity of literature on the support role provided to these students by staff. To contribute to knowledge in this area, a qualitative exploratory study was completed with academic and professional staff at two Australian universities in 2013. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with 26 participants to document their experiences and to identify the barriers and enablers to their support role to students. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and four themes emerged: (1) Factors that facilitate initiation of staff support; (2) barriers to providing support; (3) challenges facing staff; and (4) how universities support students with mental health challenges. Staff acknowledged the personal and organisational challenges they experienced but also highlighted the rewards they received associated with the role. The provision of training and the acknowledgement of the hidden role and workload by universities were important to ensuring positive outcomes for this group of students.

Citations Scopus - 3
2015 Happell B, Byrne L, 'Teaching from lived experience: a way to make mental health nursing more popular?', Australian nursing &amp; midwifery journal, 22 32-33 (2015)
2015 Ennis G, Happell B, Reid-Searl K, 'Clinical Leadership in Mental Health Nursing: The Importance of a Calm and Confident Approach', PERSPECTIVES IN PSYCHIATRIC CARE, 51 57-62 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/ppc.12070
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2015 Happell B, Stanton R, Hoey W, Scott D, 'Reduced Ambivalence to the Role of the Cardiometabolic Health Nurse Following a 6-Month Trial', PERSPECTIVES IN PSYCHIATRIC CARE, 51 80-85 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/ppc.12066
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
2015 Happell B, 'A better way to do this? Views of mental health nursing directors about preparation for mental health nursing practice', AUSTRALIAN HEALTH REVIEW, 39 211-216 (2015)
DOI 10.1071/AH14099
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2015 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, 'Cardiovascular Health Promotion and Consumers with Mental Illness in Australia', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 36 286-293 (2015)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2014.981770
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2015 Happell B, Byrne L, Platania-Phung C, 'The Recovery Knowledge Inventory for Measurement of Nursing Student Views on Recovery-oriented Mental Health Services', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 36 799-808 (2015)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2015.1049310
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2015 Quinn C, Happell B, 'Sex on show. Issues of privacy and dignity in a Forensic mental health hospital: Nurse and patient views', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 24 2268-2276 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/jocn.12860
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2015 Happell B, Bennetts W, Platania-Phung C, Tohotoa J, 'Consumer involvement in mental health education for health professionals: feasibility and support for the role', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 24 3584-3593 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/jocn.12957
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2015 Ennis G, Happell B, Reid-Searl K, 'Enabling professional development in mental health nursing: the role of clinical leadership', JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC AND MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 22 616-622 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/jpm.12221
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2015 Quinn C, Happell B, 'Consumer sexual relationships in a Forensic mental health hospital: Perceptions of nurses and consumers', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 24 121-129 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12112
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2015 Harris DM, Happell B, Manias E, 'Working with people who have killed: The experience and attitudes of forensic mental health clinicians working with forensic patients', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 24 130-138 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12113
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2015 Vandelanotte C, Short C, Rockloff M, Di Millia L, Ronan K, Happell B, Duncan MJ, 'How do Different Occupational Factors Influence Total, Occupational, and Leisure-Time Physical Activity?', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY & HEALTH, 12 200-207 (2015)
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2013-0098
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
2015 Harlow W, Happell B, Browne G, 'Accessibility of Opioid Replacement Therapy and how it's managed', Australian nursing &amp; midwifery journal, 22 43 (2015)
Co-authors Graeme Browne
2014 Happell B, Stanton R, Hoey W, Scott D, 'Cardiometabolic health nursing to improve health and primary care access in community mental health consumers: Protocol for a randomised controlled trial', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING STUDIES, 51 236-242 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2013.06.004
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2014 Gaskin CJ, Happell B, 'On exploratory factor analysis: A review of recent evidence, an assessment of current practice, and recommendations for future use', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING STUDIES, 51 511-521 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2013.10.005
Citations Scopus - 90Web of Science - 75
2014 Gaskin CJ, Happell B, 'Power, effects, confidence, and significance: An investigation of statistical practices in nursing research', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING STUDIES, 51 795-806 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2013.09.014
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 17
2014 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Scott D, Nankivell J, 'Communication With Colleagues: Frequency of Collaboration Regarding Physical Health of Consumers With Mental Illness', PERSPECTIVES IN PSYCHIATRIC CARE, 50 33-43 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/ppc.12021
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 5
2014 Happell B, Scott D, Hoey W, Stanton R, 'Self-Reported Health, Health Behaviors, Attitudes, and Beliefs of Regional Mental Health Consumers', PERSPECTIVES IN PSYCHIATRIC CARE, 50 193-200 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/ppc.12043
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
2014 Byrne L, Wilson M, Burke KJ, Gaskin CJ, Happell B, 'Mental health service delivery: a profile of mental health non-government organisations in south-east Queensland, Australia', AUSTRALIAN HEALTH REVIEW, 38 202-207 (2014)
DOI 10.1071/AH13208
2014 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Harris S, Bradshaw J, 'It's the Anxiety: Facilitators and Inhibitors to Nursing Students' Career Interests in Mental Health Nursing', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 35 50-57 (2014)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2013.837123
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
2014 Happell B, Stanton R, Hoey W, Scott D, 'Cardiometabolic Health Nursing to Improve Health and Primary Care Access in Community Mental Health Consumers: Baseline Physical Health Outcomes from a Randomised Controlled Trial', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 35 114-121 (2014)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2013.842619
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
2014 Happell B, McAllister M, 'The Views of Heads of Schools of Nursing about Mental Health Nursing Content in Undergraduate Programs', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 35 330-336 (2014)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2013.863413
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2014 Happell B, 'A Major Stream in Mental Health in Undergraduate Nursing Programmes: Identifying the Benefits and Acknowledging the Innovation', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 35 964-971 (2014)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2014.897779
Citations Scopus - 1
2014 Clancy L, Happell B, Moxham L, 'The Language of Risk: Common Understanding or Diverse Perspectives?', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 35 551-557 (2014)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2014.880139
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
2014 Byrne L, Platania-Phung C, Happell B, Harris S, Bradshaw J, 'Changing Nursing Student Attitudes to Consumer Participation in Mental Health Services: A Survey Study of Traditional and Lived Experience-led Education', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 35 704-712 (2014)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2014.888604
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 5
2014 Happell B, Stanton R, Platania-Phung C, McKenna B, Scott D, 'The Cardiometabolic Health Nurse: Physical Health Behaviour Outcomes from a Randomised Controlled Trial', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 35 768-775 (2014)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2014.896061
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2014 Happell B, McAllister M, 'Perspectives of Australian Nursing Directors Regarding Educational Preparation for Mental Health Nursing Practice', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 35 891-897 (2014)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2014.891679
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
2014 Happell B, McAllister M, Gaskin CJ, 'Opportunity lost? The major in mental health nursing in Australia', Nurse Education Today, 34 (2014)

Background: The ongoing difficulty in educating and sustaining an adequate nursing workforce in mental health settings has been identified throughout the world. Different strategi... [more]

Background: The ongoing difficulty in educating and sustaining an adequate nursing workforce in mental health settings has been identified throughout the world. Different strategies have been implemented internationally to deal with this situation. In Australia major streams in mental health nursing were introduced in some Australian universities to promote mental health nursing as a viable career choice for nursing students. Fourteen universities had implemented or planned to implement a major stream in mental health nursing. From a survey of these programs a lack of consistency in the structure and content of programs was evident. For most programs the intakes had been relatively small, although retention rates appeared promising. Objectives: To determine the extent majors in mental health nursing introduced in Australia have been sustained since their implementation. Design: Cross-sectional design. A survey instrument used in 2010 was readministered in 2013. Setting: Schools of Nursing in Australia where a major in mental health nursing had been implemented or planned. Participants: Subject and program coordinators. Methods: The survey was administered via email. Results: Of the 14 majors in mental health nursing originally proposed or implemented, only five were remaining, three had never commenced the program despite plans to do so and six programs once operating had now ceased. Numbers of students undertaking the program have tended to be small. Few modification changes in the structure and content in the majors since initial implementation were reported. Conclusions: The findings suggest that the major in mental health nursing has not been a successful or sustainable strategy, and therefore is unlikely to contribute positively to strengthening the mental health nursing workforce. The availability of sufficient graduate nurses with the interest and skills to pursue a career in mental health nursing is becoming urgent. The adequate resourcing of strategies to address this issue needs to be considered as a matter of priority. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2013.10.004
Citations Scopus - 2
2014 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Scott D, 'What Determines Whether Nurses Provide Physical Health Care to Consumers With Serious Mental Illness?', ARCHIVES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, 28 87-93 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.apnu.2013.11.001
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 6
2014 Happell B, Stanton R, Hoey W, Scott D, 'Development, Validation and Initial Outcomes of a Questionnaire to Investigate the Views of Nurses Working in a Mental Health Setting Regarding a Cardiometabolic Health Nursing Role', ARCHIVES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, 28 123-127 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.apnu.2013.12.003
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2014 Wynaden D, McAllister M, Tohotoa J, Al Omani O, Heslop K, Duggan R, et al., 'The Silence of Mental Health Issues Within University Environments: A Quantitative Study', ARCHIVES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, 28 339-344 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.apnu.2014.08.003
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
2014 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Scott D, 'Proposed nurse-led initiatives in improving physical health of people with serious mental illness: a survey of nurses in mental health', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 23 1018-1029 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/jocn.12371
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2014 Clancy L, Happell B, 'Tensions of difference: reconciling organisational imperatives for risk management with consumer-focused care from the perspectives of clinicians and managers', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 23 3177-3187 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/jocn.12564
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2014 McAllister M, Happell B, Flynn T, 'Learning essentials: What graduates of mental health nursing programmes need to know from an industry perspective', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 23 3449-3459 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/jocn.12594
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 9
2014 Happell B, Gaskin CJ, Reid-Searl K, Dwyer T, 'Physical and psychosocial wellbeing of nurses in a regional Queensland hospital', COLLEGIAN, 21 71-78 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2013.02.005
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2014 Happell B, Cleary M, 'Research career development: The importance of establishing a solid track record in nursing academia', COLLEGIAN, 21 233-238 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2013.04.005
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
2014 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Scott D, 'A systematic review of nurse physical healthcare for consumers utilizing mental health services', JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC AND MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 21 11-22 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/jpm.12041
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
2014 Happell B, 'Let the buyer beware! Loss of professional identity in mental health nursing', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 23 99-100 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12066
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2014 Happell B, 'The Yarra River flows through Melbourne: So what?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 23 1-2 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12056
2014 Happell B, Byrne L, McAllister M, Lampshire D, Roper C, Gaskin CJ, et al., 'Consumer involvement in the tertiary-level education of mental health professionals: A systematic review', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 23 3-16 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12021
Citations Scopus - 49Web of Science - 45
2014 Happell B, 'Academic freedom: Alive and well or victim of the conservative creep?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 23 285-286 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12086
2014 Happell B, 'Workplace well-being: Healing wounds or applying Band-Aids?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 23 381-382 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12103
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2014 Happell B, Byrne L, Platania-Phung C, Harris S, Bradshaw J, Davies J, 'Lived-experience participation in nurse education: Reducing stigma and enhancing popularity', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 23 427-434 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12077
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18
2014 Happell B, McAllister M, 'Implementing a major stream in mental health nursing: Barriers to effectiveness', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 23 435-441 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12075
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2014 McKenna B, Furness T, Wallace E, Happell B, Stanton R, Platania-Phung C, et al., 'The effectiveness of specialist roles in mental health metabolic monitoring: a retrospective cross-sectional comparison study', BMC PSYCHIATRY, 14 (2014)
DOI 10.1186/s12888-014-0234-7
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 15
2014 Stanton R, Happell B, 'A Systematic Review of the Aerobic Exercise Program Variables for People with Schizophrenia', CURRENT SPORTS MEDICINE REPORTS, 13 260-266 (2014)
DOI 10.1249/JSR.0000000000000069
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 17
2014 Scott D, Paterson JL, Happell B, 'Poor Sleep Quality in Australian Adults With Comorbid Psychological Distress and Physical Illness', BEHAVIORAL SLEEP MEDICINE, 12 331-341 (2014)
DOI 10.1080/15402002.2013.819469
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
2014 Stanton R, Happell B, Hayman M, Reaburn P, 'Exercise interventions for the treatment of affective disorders - research to practice', FRONTIERS IN PSYCHIATRY, 5 (2014)
DOI 10.3389/fpsyt.2014.00046
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 13
2014 Stanton R, Happell B, Reaburn P, 'The development of a questionnaire to investigate the views of health professionals regarding exercise for the treatment of mental illness', MENTAL HEALTH AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 7 177-182 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.mhpa.2014.06.001
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2014 Happell B, Stanton R, Hoey W, Scott D, 'Knowing is not doing: The relationship between health behaviour knowledge and actual health behaviours in people with serious mental illness', MENTAL HEALTH AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 7 198-204 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.mhpa.2014.03.001
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2014 Happell B, 'A specialist nurse role improves nurse the physical health behaviours of mental health consumers.', Australian nursing &amp; midwifery journal, 21 50 (2014)
2014 Happell B, Byrne L, Platania-Phung C, Harris S, Bradshaw J, 'CQUniversity leads innovation in mental health nursing.', Australian nursing &amp; midwifery journal, 21 51 (2014)
2014 Harlow W, Happell B, Browne G, 'Guided by Priority: How Clinicians Manage Access to Opioid Replacement Therapy', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 35 455-463 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2013.873102
Co-authors Graeme Browne
2014 Harlow W, Happell B, Browne G, Browne M, 'Can monitoring consumer requests for opioid-replacement therapy improve access to treatment?', Australian Health Review, 38 312-317 (2014) [C1]

Objective This study examined data recorded by one urban publicly funded opioid-replacement therapy clinic (from 2009 to 2011) to identify whether these data could be used to info... [more]

Objective This study examined data recorded by one urban publicly funded opioid-replacement therapy clinic (from 2009 to 2011) to identify whether these data could be used to inform the rostering of clinicians more effectively to improve access to treatment. Methods Data analysis incorporated descriptive and inferential methods. Results There were trends in the times of the year consumers seek opioid-replacement therapy, similarity and differences between gender requests for treatment and variation in consumer wait time on triage. Conclusions National reporting of opioid-replacement therapy triages would help gain a better understanding of the number of people in need of treatment. If opioid-replacement therapy providers monitored consumer triages, they could roster more effectively, have gender-specific clinicians available, acknowledge and inform consumers of wait time on triage and allow re-orientation of services to lower wait time. © 2014 AHHA.

DOI 10.1071/AH13212
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Graeme Browne
2014 Stanton R, Happell B, 'Exercise for mental illness: A systematic review of inpatient studies', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 23 232-242 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12045
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 22
2014 Happell B, 'Is it that time already?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 23 477-478 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12117
2014 Happell B, McAllister M, 'Back to the future? Views of heads of schools of nursing about undergraduate specialization in mental health nursing', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 23 545-552 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12082
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2014 Reid-Searl K, Levett-Jones T, Cooper S, Happell B, 'The implementation of Mask-Ed: Reflections of academic participants', Nurse Education in Practice, 14 485-490 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. This paper profiles the findings from a study that explored the perspectives and experiences of nurse educators who implemented a novel simulation approach te... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. This paper profiles the findings from a study that explored the perspectives and experiences of nurse educators who implemented a novel simulation approach termed Mask-Ed. The technique involves the educator wearing a silicone mask and or body parts and transforming into a character. The premise of this approach is that the masked educator has domain specific knowledge related to the simulation scenario and can transmit this to learners in a way that is engaging, realistic, spontaneous and humanistic.Nurse educators charged with the responsibility of implementing Mask-Ed in three universities were invited to participate in the study by attending an introductory workshop, implementing the technique and then journaling their experiences, insights and perspectives over a 12 month period. The journal entries were then thematically analysed. Key themes were categorised under the headings of Preparation, Implementation and Impact; Reflexivity and Responsiveness; Student Engagement and Ownership; and Teaching and Learning.Mask-Ed is a simulation approach which allows students to interact with the 'characters' in humanistic ways that promote person-centred care and therapeutic communication. This simulation approach holds previously untapped potential for a range of learning experiences, however, to be effective, adequate resourcing, training, preparation and practice is required.

DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2014.05.008
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones
2014 Harlow W, Happell B, Browne G, 'How clinicians manage access to opioid replacement therapy', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 23 451-459 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/inm.12076
Co-authors Graeme Browne
2013 Quinn C, Happell B, 'Talking About Sexuality With Consumers of Mental Health Services', PERSPECTIVES IN PSYCHIATRIC CARE, 49 13-20 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/j.1744-6163.2012.00334.x
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
2013 Happell B, Scott D, Nankivell J, Platania-Phung C, 'Nurses' Views on Training Needs to Increase Provision of Primary Care for Consumers With Serious Mental Illness', PERSPECTIVES IN PSYCHIATRIC CARE, 49 210-217 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/j.1744-6163.2012.00351.x
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
2013 Quinn C, Happell B, Welch A, 'The 5-As Framework for Including Sexual Concerns in Mental Health Nursing Practice', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 34 17-24 (2013)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2012.711433
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 11
2013 Cleary M, Horsfall J, Happell B, Hunt GE, 'Reflective Components in Undergraduate Mental Health Nursing Curricula: Some Issues for Consideration', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 34 69-74 (2013)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2012.722171
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2013 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Scott D, 'Are Nurses in Mental Health Services Providing Physical Health Care for People with Serious Mental Illness? An Australian Perspective', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 34 198-207 (2013)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2012.733907
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
2013 Byrne L, Happell B, Welch A, Moxham L, 'Reflecting on Holistic Nursing: The Contribution of an Academic With Lived Experience of Mental Health Service Use', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 34 265-272 (2013)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2012.745038
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
2013 Nankivell J, Platania-Phung C, Happell B, Scott D, 'Access to Physical Health Care for People with Serious Mental Illness: A Nursing Perspective and a Human Rights Perspective-Common Ground?', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 34 442-450 (2013)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2012.754974
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
2013 Stanton R, Reaburn P, Happell B, 'Is Cardiovascular or Resistance Exercise Better to Treat Patients With Depression? A Narrative Review', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 34 531-538 (2013)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2013.774077
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2013 McAllister M, Happell B, Bradshaw J, 'Authenticity, Creativity and a Love of the Job: Experiences of Grassroots Leaders of Mental Health Nursing in Queensland', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 34 658-664 (2013)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2013.766821
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2013 Ennis G, Happell B, Broadbent M, Reid-Searl K, 'The Importance of Communication for Clinical Leaders in Mental Health Nursing: The Perspective of Nurses Working in Mental Health', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 34 814-819 (2013)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2013.829539
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2013 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Scott D, 'Physical health care for people with mental illness: Training needs for nurses', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 33 396-401 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2013.01.015
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
2013 Happell B, Welch T, Moxham L, Byrne L, 'Keeping the Flame Alight: Understanding and Enhancing Interest in Mental Health Nursing as a Career', ARCHIVES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, 27 161-165 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.apnu.2013.04.002
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 11
2013 Scott D, Happell B, Strange S, Platania-Phung C, 'Investigating Self-Reported Health Behaviors in Australian Adults with Mental Illness', BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 39 60-65 (2013)
DOI 10.1080/08964289.2012.726289
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
2013 Happell B, Gaskin CJ, 'The attitudes of undergraduate nursing students towards mental health nursing: a systematic review', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 22 148-158 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/jocn.12022
Citations Scopus - 80Web of Science - 75
2013 Applegarth J, Dwyer T, Moxham L, Happell B, 'Identifying and acquiring the contextual skills and knowledge for nursing practice in assisted reproductive technology: a grounded theory study', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 22 1738-1747 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2012.04275.x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2013 Happell B, Scott D, Nankivell J, Platania-Phung C, 'Screening physical health? Yes! But...: nurses' views on physical health screening in mental health care', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 22 2286-2297 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2012.04325.x
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 21
2013 Cleary M, Horsfall J, Muthulakshmi P, Happell B, Hunt GE, 'Career development: graduate nurse views', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 22 2605-2613 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/jocn.12080
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 16
2013 Happell B, Dwyer T, Reid-Searl K, Burke KJ, Caperchione CM, Gaskin CJ, 'Nurses and stress: recognizing causes and seeking solutions', JOURNAL OF NURSING MANAGEMENT, 21 638-647 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/jonm.12037
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 34
2013 Cleary M, Happell B, Walter G, Hunt G, 'Obtaining higher research degree qualifications: Key strategies to consider', CONTEMPORARY NURSE, 44 196-203 (2013)
DOI 10.5172/conu.2013.44.2.196
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2013 Mackey S, Hatcher D, Happell B, Cleary M, 'Primary health care as a philosophical and practical framework for nursing education: Rhetoric or reality?', CONTEMPORARY NURSE, 45 79-84 (2013)
DOI 10.5172/conu.2013.45.1.79
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2013 Cleary M, Happell B, Lau ST, Mackey S, 'Student feedback on teaching: Some issues for consideration for nurse educators', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING PRACTICE, 19 62-66 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/ijn.12018
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 8
2013 Reid-Searl K, Happell B, Burke KJ, Gaskin CJ, 'Nursing students and the supervision of medication administration', COLLEGIAN, 20 109-114 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2012.04.003
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2013 Happell B, Reid-Searl K, Dwyer T, Caperchione CM, Gaskin CJ, Burke KJ, 'How nurses cope with occupational stress outside their workplaces', COLLEGIAN, 20 195-199 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2012.08.003
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2013 Happell B, 'Thanks a million: Acknowledging important contributions to the journal', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 22 1-1 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12004
2013 Gaskin CJ, Happell B, 'Power of mental health nursing research: A statistical analysis of studies in the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 22 69-75 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2012.00845.x
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
2013 Happell B, 'Suicide: Higher than the road toll yet hidden in the shadows', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 22 193-194 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12022
2013 Byrne L, Happell B, Welch T, Moxham LJ, ''Things you can't learn from books': Teaching recovery from a lived experience perspective', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 22 195-204 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2012.00875.x
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 34
2013 Quinn C, Happell B, Welch A, 'Talking about sex as part of our role: Making and sustaining practice change', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 22 231-240 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2012.00865.x
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
2013 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Scott D, 'Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program: Facilitating physical health care for people with mental illness?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 22 399-408 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12006
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
2013 Happell B, Scott D, Platania-Phung C, 'Nurse views on the cardiometabolic health nurse as an approach to improving the physical health of people with serious mental illness in Australia', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 22 418-429 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2012.00892.x
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
2013 Scott D, Happell B, 'Utilization and Perceptions of Primary Health Care Services in Australian Adults with Mental Illness', POPULATION HEALTH MANAGEMENT, 16 208-213 (2013)
DOI 10.1089/pop.2012.0018
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2013 Stanton R, Happell B, 'Specialist nursing role to address poor physical health', Australian nursing &amp; midwifery journal, 21 (2013)

It is now well known that people diagnosed with mental illness have poorer health behaviours, lower levels of physical activity, multiple comorbid chronic health conditions and po... [more]

It is now well known that people diagnosed with mental illness have poorer health behaviours, lower levels of physical activity, multiple comorbid chronic health conditions and poorer health compared to the general population (Scott et al 2012).

2013 Byrne L, Happell B, 'Innovation in mental health nursing education', Australian nursing &amp; midwifery journal, 21 (2013)

CQUniversity&apos;s strength in mental health nursing has been enhanced by what is thought to be the first full time academic employed specifically to work from a lived experience... [more]

CQUniversity's strength in mental health nursing has been enhanced by what is thought to be the first full time academic employed specifically to work from a lived experience of significant mental health difficulties, mental health service use and recovery.

2013 Harlow W, Happell B, Browne GC, Choudry J, Pinchin D, 'Triage in Opioid Replacement Therapy: What's the wait?', Substance Use and Misuse, 48 137-146 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Graeme Browne
2013 Harlow W, Roman MW, Hapell B, Browne G, 'Accessibility versus Quality of Care plus retention: the formula for service delivery in Opioid Replacement Therapy', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 34 706-714 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2013.804896
Co-authors Graeme Browne
2013 Happell BM, Gaskin CJ, Hoey W, Nizette D, Veach K, 'The activities that nurses working in community mental health perform: a geographical comparison', AUSTRALIAN HEALTH REVIEW, 37 453-457 (2013)
DOI 10.1071/AH13045
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2013 Stanton R, Happell BM, 'An Exercise Prescription Primer for People with Depression', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 34 626-630 (2013)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2012.758207
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2013 Harlow W, Happell B, Browne G, 'John or Jane? Exploring How Clinical Judgment is Applied in Managing Access to Opioid Replacement Therapy', JOURNAL OF PSYCHOACTIVE DRUGS, 45 258-265 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02791072.2013.803648
Co-authors Graeme Browne
2013 Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, Short C, Rockloff M, Ronan K, Happell B, Di Milia L, 'Associations between occupational indicators and total, work-based and leisure-time sitting: A cross-sectional study', BMC Public Health, 13 (2013)
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 34
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
2012 Happell B, Hoey W, Gaskin CJ, 'The characteristics of consumers receiving case management in the community: A review of literature', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 33 145-148 (2012)

Mental health nurses increasingly provide care for consumers in the community who once would have received treatment in psychiatric inpatient units. The purpose of this review is ... [more]

Mental health nurses increasingly provide care for consumers in the community who once would have received treatment in psychiatric inpatient units. The purpose of this review is to determine the characteristics of these consumers. We searched electronic databases and obtained information on some of the characteristics of community mental health consumers. For some nurses, over half of their caseloads are consumers with schizophrenia. Up to about one-third of consumers may be involuntary, but this proportion varies considerably. Impairments of health and social functioning appear common among consumers of community mental health services. This study identifies the need for greater interrogation of national databases to enhance understanding of community caseloads. © 2012 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

DOI 10.3109/01612840.2011.627107
Citations Scopus - 2
2012 Happell B, Dares G, Russell A, Cokell S, Platania-Phung C, Gaskin CJ, 'The relationships between attitudes toward seclusion and levels of burnout, staff satisfaction, and therapeutic optimism in a district health service', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 33 329-336 (2012)

The main purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between attitudes toward seclusion and levels of burnout, staff satisfaction, and therapeutic optimism. Staff a... [more]

The main purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between attitudes toward seclusion and levels of burnout, staff satisfaction, and therapeutic optimism. Staff at one district health service inpatient unit (n = 54) completed surveys on their attitudes toward seclusion and levels of burnout, staff satisfaction, and therapeutic optimism. Several moderately large correlations were found between perceiving the patients as feeling punished by seclusion and intrinsic satisfaction (rs =-.45, p = .001), and between patients asking to go to the seclusion room and personal accomplishment (rs =-.39, p = .002). In general, however, most correlations were small or negligible in size. The influence of nurses on the practice of seclusion was clear, with 72 of participants indicating it was nurses who most often make decisions regarding seclusion. Some participants appear to have a broad interpretation of when seclusion should be used, raising doubts about whether it is being employed solely as a measure of last resort. Given their high level of involvement in seclusions, nurses need to be actively involved in organisation-wide initiatives to reduce the use of this practice. © 2012 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

DOI 10.3109/01612840.2011.644028
Citations Scopus - 12
2012 Happell B, Scott D, Platania-Phung C, 'Perceptions of barriers to physical health care for people with serious mental illness: A review of the international literature', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 33 752-761 (2012)

Premature death and poorer access to quality care for physical health concerns is common for people diagnosed with serious mental illness (SMI). However, there is lack of clarity ... [more]

Premature death and poorer access to quality care for physical health concerns is common for people diagnosed with serious mental illness (SMI). However, there is lack of clarity regarding the nature of barriers encountered at different points in the physical health care process, and the level of consistency of these barriers both among countries, and between consumers with SMI and health care staff. The current narrative review integrates views of consumers and health care staff on barriers to physical health care. It involved a search of CINAHL, Proquest, and Web of Science, for peer-reviewed papers published between 2005 and June 2012, for studies of perceptions of barriers to physical health care, published in English. Despite variations in health care systems among countries, there is agreement between consumers and health care staff that division between physical and mental health care and stigma of mental illness act as barriers to all phases of the physical health care process. This uniformity is grounds for international policy development (in general public health and within mental health nursing) for reforms that improve the physical health care, quality of life, and longevity of people with serious mental illness. © 2012 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

DOI 10.3109/01612840.2012.708099
Citations Scopus - 30
2012 Cleary M, Horsfall J, Baines J, Happell B, 'Mental health behaviours among undergraduate nursing students: Issues for consideration', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 32 951-955 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2011.11.016
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
2012 Happell B, Scott D, Platania-Phung C, 'Provision of Preventive Services for Cancer and Infectious Diseases Among Individuals with Serious Mental Illness', ARCHIVES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, 26 192-201 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.apnu.2011.09.002
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
2012 Mackey S, Jackson D, Walter G, Happell B, Cleary M, 'Editorial: 'Face' and its cultural dimensions: some considerations for nurse educators', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 21 1797-1798 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2012.04245.x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2012 Reid-Searl K, Happell B, 'Supervising nursing students administering medication: a perspective from registered nurses', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 21 1998-2005 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2011.03976.x
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
2012 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, 'Mental health placements in a general health setting: no substitute for the real thing!', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 21 2026-2033 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2011.04016.x
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
2012 Happell B, Cleary M, 'Promoting health and preventing illness: Promoting mental health in community nursing practice', CONTEMPORARY NURSE, 41 88-89 (2012)
DOI 10.1080/10376178.2012.11002604
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2012 Happell B, Scott D, Platania-Phung C, Nankivell J, 'Rural physical health care services for people with serious mental illness: A nursing perspective', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, 20 248-253 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2012.01303.x
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2012 Scott D, Platania-Phung C, Happell B, 'Quality of Care for Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Amongst Individuals with Serious Mental Illness and Those Using Antipsychotic Medications', JOURNAL FOR HEALTHCARE QUALITY, 34 15-21 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1945-1474.2011.00155.x
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 17
2012 Happell B, Scott D, Platania-Phung C, Nankivell J, 'Physical health of people with mental illness: time for action.', Australian nursing journal (July 1993), 20 39 (2012)
Citations Scopus - 1
2012 Scott D, Burke K, Williams S, Happell B, Canoy D, Ronan K, 'Increased prevalence of chronic physical health disorders in Australians with diagnosed mental illness', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 36 483-486 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2012.00916.x
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 20
2012 Happell B, 'Writing and publishing clinical articles: A practical guide', Emergency Nurse, 20 33-38 (2012)

The sharing of knowledge among nurses and clinicians can strengthen the healthcare professions. In this context, many clinicians underestimate the relevance and importance of what... [more]

The sharing of knowledge among nurses and clinicians can strengthen the healthcare professions. In this context, many clinicians underestimate the relevance and importance of what they can contribute, and find the idea of writing for publication daunting. This article presents a practical approach to writing clinical articles for publication in professional journals such as Emergency Nurse. It covers the characteristics of clinical articles, their structure, choosing a journal and how the editorial process should be understood.

DOI 10.7748/en2012.04.20.1.33.c9042
Citations Scopus - 4
2012 Cleary M, Horsfall J, Happell B, 'Promoting mental health nursing: Employing undergraduate nursing students as assistants in mental health', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 21 69-74 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2011.00760.x
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2012 Happell B, 'Treat the brain; communicate with the mind', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 21 95-95 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2012.00819.x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2012 Happell B, Hoey W, Gaskin CJ, 'Community mental health nurses, caseloads, and practices: A literature review', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 21 131-137 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2011.00777.x
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 22
2012 Quinn C, Happell B, 'Getting BETTER: Breaking the ice and warming to the inclusion of sexuality in mental health nursing care', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 21 154-162 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2011.00783.x
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2012 Happell B, Scott D, Platania-Phung C, Nankivell J, 'Should we or shouldn't we? Mental health nurses' views on physical health care of mental health consumers', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 21 202-210 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2011.00799.x
Citations Scopus - 57Web of Science - 58
2012 Happell B, Davies C, Scott D, 'Health behaviour interventions to improve physical health in individuals diagnosed with a mental illness: A systematic review', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 21 236-247 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2012.00816.x
Citations Scopus - 61Web of Science - 56
2012 Byrne L, Happell B, 'Psychiatrists teaching mental health nursing: What's the problem?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 21 299-300 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2012.00849.x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2012 Happell B, 'Dichotomies and differences: Challenges for mental health nursing', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 21 399-399 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2012.00874.x
2012 Happell B, 'A practical guide to writing clinical articles for publication', Nursing Older People, 24 30-34 (2012)

The sharing of nursing knowledge between clinicians can strengthen the profession. Clinicians often underestimate the relevance and importance of what they may contribute and feel... [more]

The sharing of nursing knowledge between clinicians can strengthen the profession. Clinicians often underestimate the relevance and importance of what they may contribute and feel daunted by the idea of writing for publication. This article presents a practical approach to writing clinical articles for publication in professional journals such as Nursing Older People. It considers: what is a clinical article; the structure of a clinical article (Why? Where? How? What? What now?); choosing the journal; and understanding the editorial process.

DOI 10.7748/nop2012.04.24.3.30.c9018
Citations Scopus - 4
2012 Happell B, Scott D, Platania-Phung C, Nankivell J, 'Nurses' views on physical activity for people with serious mental illness', Mental Health and Physical Activity, 5 4-12 (2012)

Objectives: People with serious mental illness experience heightened physical ill-health. Physical activity is an effective strategy for improving physical health in this group. T... [more]

Objectives: People with serious mental illness experience heightened physical ill-health. Physical activity is an effective strategy for improving physical health in this group. This paper explores nurse views on the place of physical activity in the physical health care of people with serious mental illness who are receiving mental health care services. Methods: A qualitative exploratory study involving 38 nurses working in a regional and remote area of Queensland, Australia. Focus group interviews were audio recorded and transcribed and a thematic analysis was conducted. Results: Holism was identified as the main theme and physical activity was thought about as an aspect of holism at the level of the person and environment. For nurses, holism equated with supporting consumers in being more physical active and having healthier lifestyles. This was qualified by the sub-themes of fragmentation (that rendered physical activity difficult for consumers, and the nurses supporting them), and integration (where nurses and colleagues sought to address fragmentation in conjunction with consumers, but with transient success). Conclusion: As part of their holistic outlook, nurses recognise the importance of physical activity for consumers' overall health, and were involved in promoting physical activity through health education. When nurses tried to develop holism in mental health care (e.g. re-integrating services) sources of fragmentation were too significant and wide-ranging to overcome. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.mhpa.2012.02.005
Citations Scopus - 22
2012 Reid-Searl K, Happell B, Vieth L, Eaton A, 'High Fidelity Patient Silicone Simulation: A qualitative evaluation of nursing students' experiences', COLLEGIAN, 19 77-83 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2011.09.003
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 28
2012 Quinn C, Happell B, Browne GC, 'Opportunity lost? Psychiatric medications and problems with sexual function: A role for nurses in mental health', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 21 415-423 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2011.03908.x
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Graeme Browne
2012 Harlow W, Happell B, Browne G, 'The wait for opioid replacement therapy.', Australian nursing journal (July 1993), 20 38-39 (2012)
Co-authors Graeme Browne
2012 Hunt GE, Happell B, Chan SWC, Cleary M, 'Citation analysis of mental health nursing journals: How should we rank thee?', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 21 576-580 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2012.00815.x
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Sally Chan
2011 Happell B, Koehn S, 'Scratching beneath the surface: Influencing factors on nurses' attitudes toward the use of seclusion', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 32 449-456 (2011)

Reducing the use of seclusion is now widely identified as a quality issue for mental health services and reflects recognition of the detrimental impact of seclusion on consumers o... [more]

Reducing the use of seclusion is now widely identified as a quality issue for mental health services and reflects recognition of the detrimental impact of seclusion on consumers of services. Despite this, the research evidence suggests that nurses continue to support the use of seclusion in order to maintain a safe environment. The aim of this study was to consider how factors such as Therapeutic Optimism, Job Satisfaction, and Burnout might relate to nurses' attitudes toward seclusion. The Heyman Attitudes to Seclusion Survey, Elsom Therapeutic Optimism Scale, Maslach's Burnout Inventory, and Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaires were completed by 123 nurses employed in one of eight participating mental health services. Data analysis included Spearman's rho and independent-samples t-tests statistics. The findings suggested several significant relationships between attitudes toward seclusion and therapeutic optimism, job satisfaction, and burnout. Participants with higher optimism scores, high intrinsic motivation, low emotional exhaustion, and high personal accomplishment were more likely to respond negatively to the use of seclusion. This research enhances our understanding of attitudes toward seclusion and may assist in the development of interventions to influence more positive attitudes. © 2011 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

DOI 10.3109/01612840.2011.566981
Citations Scopus - 3
2011 Reid-Searl K, Dwyer T, Moxham L, Happell B, Sander T, 'Rediscovering the essence of nursing: Exploring the impact of in clinical experience in Thailand for undergraduate nursing students from Australia', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 31 892-897 (2011)
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2010.12.024
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 12
2011 Happell B, Koehn S, 'Seclusion as a necessary intervention: the relationship between burnout, job satisfaction and therapeutic optimism and justification for the use of seclusion', JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, 67 1222-1231 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2010.05570.x
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 15
2011 Happell B, Koehn S, 'Impacts of Seclusion and the Seclusion Room: Exploring the Perceptions of Mental Health Nurses in Australia', ARCHIVES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, 25 109-119 (2011)
DOI 10.1016/j.apnu.2010.07.005
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 14
2011 Happell B, Gaskin CJ, 'Exploring Patterns of Seclusion Use in Australian Mental Health Services', Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, 25 (2011)

Seclusion has remained a common practice in mental health services. In Australia, recent mental health policy has reflected a desire to reduce (and, if possible, eliminate) the us... [more]

Seclusion has remained a common practice in mental health services. In Australia, recent mental health policy has reflected a desire to reduce (and, if possible, eliminate) the use of seclusion. The collection and analysis of data on the use of seclusion have been identified as an important component of the success of reduction initiatives. A cross-sectional design was used in the collection of inpatient unit data on seclusions that occurred in 11 mental health services in Australia over a 6-month period. During this time, there were 4,337 episodes of care. One or more seclusions occurred in 6.8% of episodes of care, with consumers being secluded, on average, 2.32 times and with 44% of them having been secluded more than once. The average length of the seclusions was 2 hours 52 minutes, with 51.4% of seclusions being less than 2 hours. These rates were lower than those reported in previous research studies. The practice of seclusion occurred more commonly on the first 2 days following admission, on weekdays than weekends, and between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and midnight. An understanding of seclusion data can provide fundamental information from which strategies to reduce seclusion can be developed. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.apnu.2011.04.001
Citations Scopus - 10
2011 Happell B, 'No more "fake it"--it's time to fashion stake it!', Australian nursing journal (July 1993), 18 37 (2011)
2011 Ennis G, Happell B, Broadbent M, 'Rethinking leadership in mental health nursing.', Australian nursing journal (July 1993), 19 44 (2011)
2011 Reid-Searl K, Happell B, 'Factors influencing the supervision of nursing students administering medication: The registered nurse perspective', COLLEGIAN, 18 139-146 (2011)
DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2011.05.003
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2011 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Gray R, Hardy S, Lambert T, Mcallister M, Davies C, 'A role for mental health nursing in the physical health care of consumers with severe mental illness', JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC AND MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 18 706-711 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2850.2010.01666.x
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 36
2011 Happell B, 'Responding to reviewers' comments as part of writing for publication.', Nurse researcher, 18 23-27 (2011)

The aim of this paper is to provide a resource for authors to help them in getting their work published. The focus is on dealing with, and responding to, the comments of reviewers... [more]

The aim of this paper is to provide a resource for authors to help them in getting their work published. The focus is on dealing with, and responding to, the comments of reviewers. The importance to research of nurses writing for publication is widely acknowledged. However, a number of significant barriers to nurses actively engaging in this form of dissemination has been identified. Ways in which nurses can avoid the pitfalls that would make their manuscripts more likely to be rejected have been the subjects of published articles. Significantly less attention has been devoted to providing authors with methods to assist them in responding when their manuscripts are rejected or major revisions are requested. This article provides a brief overview of the process of editorial review. It offers a practical but structured approach to responding to reviewers' comments when undertaking major revisions and to preparing a rejected manuscript for resubmission to another journal. Authors frequently respond negatively to reviewers' comments and this may result in their being dissuaded from writing for publication. A structured approach to dealing with reviewers' comments may help nurses in making the requested revisions and increase their chances of publication. IMPLICATIONS FOR RESEARCH: The publication of research findings and other scholarly work are important for the professional advancement of nursing. Strategies to overcome the barriers to writing for publication are essential to achieving this goal. Helping authors to respond positively to reviewer critique and to make the necessary changes are important steps in this process.

DOI 10.7748/nr2011.07.18.4.23.c8632
Citations Scopus - 6
2011 Happell B, 'Undergraduate mental health nursing education: Time to shut up?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 20 231-231 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2011.00763.x
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2011 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Scott D, 'Placing physical activity in mental health care: A leadership role for mental health nurses', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 20 310-318 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2010.00732.x
Citations Scopus - 46Web of Science - 43
2011 Happell B, Cutcliffe JR, 'A broken promise? Exploring the lack of evidence for the benefits of comprehensive nursing education', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 20 328-336 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2011.00745.x
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 42
2011 Cleary M, Horsfall J, Hunt GE, Escott P, Happell B, 'Continuing challenges for the mental health consumer workforce: A role for mental health nurses?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 20 438-444 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2011.00757.x
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 32
2011 Quinn C, Happell B, Browne GC, 'Sexuality and consumers of mental health services: The impact of gender and boundary issues', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 32 170-176 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Graeme Browne
2011 Happell B, Moxham L, Platania-Phung C, 'The impact of mental health nursing education on undergraduate nursing students'- Attitudes to consumer participation', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 32 108-113 (2011)

Consumer participation in all aspects of mental health service delivery, including the education of mental health professionals, is now a policy expectation in Australia. Whether ... [more]

Consumer participation in all aspects of mental health service delivery, including the education of mental health professionals, is now a policy expectation in Australia. Whether education programs introducing nurses to mental health nursing lead to more favourable attitudes towards consumer participation is yet to be examined in pre-registration nursing programs in Australia. The current evaluation examined changes in scores for the Consumer Participation Survey for undergraduate nursing students (n = 68) in an Australian University. Data were analysed, using repeated measures t-test, to compare the pre- and post-test scores. There was a significant improvement in views on consumers participating as staff members. There were no statistically significant changes in attitudes towards consumer capacity and consumer involvement in care processes. Consumer participation in mental health care is now clearly articulated in Australian Government policy. For this to be successfully implemented a more comprehensive understanding of the ability of education to influence attitudes is required. © 2011 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

DOI 10.3109/01612840.2010.531519
Citations Scopus - 12
2011 Scott D, Happell B, 'The high prevalence of poor physical health and unhealthy lifestyle behaviours in individuals with severe mental illness', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 32 589-597 (2011)

Recent mental health care policy has addressed the need for health care professionals to consider the physical health of consumers. Mental health nurses are particularly well-plac... [more]

Recent mental health care policy has addressed the need for health care professionals to consider the physical health of consumers. Mental health nurses are particularly well-placed for this role. To provide mental health nurses with practical information, this narrative review summarises evidence from recent research on the physical health of individuals with Serious Mental Illness (SMI). In those with SMI, the international prevalence of obesity, the metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, symptoms of cardiovascular disease, and respiratory disease all exceed that of the general population by at least two times, and HIV prevalence may be increased by as much as eight times. This increased prevalence of chronic disease may be largely responsible for an increased risk of death of up to five times, resulting in as much as 30 years of potential life lost. Of particular concern, the recent evidence suggests that for physical health and increased mortality, the gap between individuals with SMI and the general population is worsening. Unhealthy lifestyle behaviours undoubtedly play a role in the development of poor physical health and chronic disease, and the present review indicates that low physical activity, poor diet, smoking, alcohol and substance abuse, and risky sexual behaviour are common in individuals with SMI. This narrative review demonstrates that the prevalence of poor physical health and health behaviours in people with SMI far exceed that observed in the general population, and reinforces the urgent need for mental health nurses to address physical health concerns in patients. © 2011 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

DOI 10.3109/01612840.2011.569846
Citations Scopus - 182
2011 Happell B, Palmer C, Tennent R, 'The Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program: desirable knowledge, skills and attitudes from the perspective of nurses', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 20 901-910 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2010.03510.x
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2011 Reid-Searl K, Eaton A, Vieth L, Happell B, 'The educator inside the patient: students' insights into the use of high fidelity silicone patient simulation', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 20 2752-2760 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2011.03795.x
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 19
2011 Happell B, Koehn S, 'Effect of aging on the perceptions of physical and mental health in an Australian population', NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES, 13 27-33 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1442-2018.2010.00571.x
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2011 Happell B, 'Mental health nursing: What it is or what it does?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 20 1-1 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2010.00727.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2011 Happell B, Moxham L, Clarke K-A, 'Implementation of a major in mental health nursing in Australian universities', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 20 237-246 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2010.00728.x
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 14
2011 Happell B, 'Making an impact: The International Journal of Mental Health Nursing with a bullet', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 20 307-307 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2011.00767.x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2011 Browne GC, Harlow W, Happell B, 'A wait on the nurses shoulders', Australian Nursing Journal, 19 48-48 (2011)
Co-authors Graeme Browne
2011 Harlow W, Happell B, Browne GC, 'Opioid Replacement Therapy: A wait unmanaged', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 20 418-427 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Graeme Browne
2011 Quinn C, Happell B, Browne GC, 'Talking or avoiding? Mental health nurses' views about discussing sexual health with consumers', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 20 21-28 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 41
Co-authors Graeme Browne
2010 Morris J, Koehn S, Happell B, Dwyer T, Moxham L, 'Implications of excess weight on mental wellbeing', AUSTRALIAN HEALTH REVIEW, 34 368-374 (2010)
DOI 10.1071/AH09708
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2010 Cleary M, Horsfall J, Happell B, 'Establishing clinical supervision in acute mental health inpatient units: Acknowledging the challenges', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 31 525-531 (2010)

After decades of discussion about clinical supervision and mental health nursing, the reality is that many acute mental health inpatient settings continue to struggle with the not... [more]

After decades of discussion about clinical supervision and mental health nursing, the reality is that many acute mental health inpatient settings continue to struggle with the notion of clinical supervision and the implementation process. In this article we delineate the key elements of clinical supervision, explore practical and dynamic difficulties associated with clinical supervision and question whether too much is being asked of this one process, especially in acute inpatient settings. For many mental health nurses, existing practices offer many of the purported benefits of clinical supervision. Ultimately, unless clinical supervision is better understood and implemented effectively, it is unlikely to meet expectations. Clinical supervision should ultimately be defined by the nurses participating in it. This article contributes to current discussions regarding the purpose of clinical supervision, the realities of its implementation, and in particular considers the role of clinical supervision relative to existing professional support opportunities. © 2010 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

DOI 10.3109/01612841003650546
Citations Scopus - 16
2010 Happell B, Palmer C, 'The mental health nurse incentive program: The benefits from a client perspective', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 31 646-653 (2010)

It is now acknowledged that a substantial proportion of the Australian population will experience a mental health condition at some time during their lives. Only a small proportio... [more]

It is now acknowledged that a substantial proportion of the Australian population will experience a mental health condition at some time during their lives. Only a small proportion will access care and treatment for these conditions, and those who do are more likely to access general medical practitioners than specialist mental health providers. The Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP) was introduced by the Commonwealth Government to enhance access to mental health care by engaging mental health nurses in collaboration with general practitioners and private psychiatrists. The aim of the current study was to explore the experiences and opinions of clients utilising these services. A qualitative exploratory approach involving in-depth semi-structured interviews was utilised to enhance understanding of the client perspective. Interviews were conducted with 14 clients. Data were analysed using NVivo to assist with the identification of major themes. The findings revealed the major themes to be: initial reactions; a comfortable setting; flexibility; holistic care; and affordable care. These findings suggest that clients perceive the MHNIP as a valuable intervention that met the mental health needs of clients to a greater extent than had previously been possible. © 2010 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

DOI 10.3109/01612840.2010.488784
Citations Scopus - 12
2010 Happell B, 'Moving in circles: A brief history of reports and inquiries relating to mental health content in undergraduate nursing curricula', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 30 643-648 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2009.12.018
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 26
2010 Welch T, Happell B, Edward K-L, 'Getting That Piece of Paper: Mental Health Nurses' Experience of Undertaking Doctoral Studies in Victoria, Australia', ARCHIVES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, 24 145-154 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.apnu.2009.04.005
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2010 Reid-Searl K, Moxham L, Walker S, Happell B, 'Supervising medication administration by undergraduate nursing students: influencing factors', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 19 775-784 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2009.03074.x
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
2010 Moxham L, Dwyer T, Happell B, Reid-Searl K, Kahl J, Morris J, Wheatland N, 'Recognising our role: improved confidence of general nurses providing care to young people with a mental illness in a rural paediatric unit', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 19 1434-1442 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2009.02993.x
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2010 Happell B, Koehn S, 'Attitudes to the use of seclusion: has contemporary mental health policy made a difference?', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 19 3208-3217 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2010.03286.x
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
2010 Happell B, 'Physical health and mental illness--taking action to bridge the gap.', Australian nursing journal (July 1993), 18 37 (2010)
2010 Reid-Searl K, Moxham L, Happell B, 'Enhancing patient safety: The importance of direct supervision for avoiding medication errors and near misses by undergraduate nursing students', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING PRACTICE, 16 225-232 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-172X.2010.01820.x
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 31
2010 Happell B, 'Facilitating consumer participation: An approach to finding the 'right' consumer', COLLEGIAN, 17 125-130 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2010.03.001
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2010 Happell B, 'Protecting the rights of individuals in collaborative research.', Nurse researcher, 17 34-43 (2010)

Collaborative research provides numerous benefits, such as the contribution of multiple perspectives and a more rounded approach to the research question. This paper considers and... [more]

Collaborative research provides numerous benefits, such as the contribution of multiple perspectives and a more rounded approach to the research question. This paper considers and discusses the rights of individuals involved in collaborative research and the protections necessary should the team change because of factors such as long term illness or conflict between team members. The concept of capacity is discussed as a way to determine the effect of changed individual circumstances on membership of a research team.

Citations Scopus - 2
2010 Cleary M, Horsfall J, Happell B, 'Developing practice in mental health settings', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 19 45-52 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2009.00632.x
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2010 Happell B, 'A time for reflection: Looking back and moving forward', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 19 73-74 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2010.00673.x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2010 Happell B, Koehn S, 'From numbers to understanding: The impact of demographic factors on seclusion rates', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 19 169-176 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2010.00670.x
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 18
2010 McAllister M, Happell B, Bradshaw J, 'Making us what we are: Noteworthy people and achievements in Queensland mental health nursing', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 19 250-256 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2010.00666.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2010 Happell B, Moxham L, Platania-Phung C, 'A psychometric analysis of the Mental Health Consumer Participation Questionnaire', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 19 377-384 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2010.00692.x
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
2010 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, Gruenert S, 'Rates of alcohol usage among Vietnamese Australian Communities: A literature review', JOURNAL OF SUBSTANCE USE, 15 246-256 (2010)
DOI 10.3109/14659890903013117
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2010 Happell B, Gaskin CJ, Gruenert S, Polimeni AM, 'The use of alcohol by Vietnamese living in Melbourne, Australia', Mental Health and Substance Use: Dual Diagnosis, 3 47-55 (2010)

Background: The size of the Vietnamese community residing in Melbourne, Australia has continued to grow steadily over the past decades; however, little is known about their level ... [more]

Background: The size of the Vietnamese community residing in Melbourne, Australia has continued to grow steadily over the past decades; however, little is known about their level of alcohol consumption. Aims: To collect data on alcohol consumption and consider the impact of demographic variables such as age and gender. Method: A questionnaire was administered to 1080 people recruited through Vietnamese organizations and the media. The survey questions were drawn from existing and validated instruments and demographic questions such as age and gender. Results: The findings suggest that Vietnamese Australians in Melbourne consume alcohol at a lower rate than the general population, but higher than the Vietnamese community in Sydney and Western Australia. Conclusions: Due to the limited research in this field, these findings make an important contribution to understanding the alcohol consumption patterns of Vietnamese Australians.

DOI 10.1080/17523280903523637
2010 Reid-Searl K, Moxham L, Walker S, Happell B, 'Nursing students administering medication: appreciating and seeking appropriate supervision', JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, 66 532-541 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2009.05214.x
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
2010 Reid-Searl K, Moxham L, Walker S, Happell B, '"Whatever It Takes": Nursing Students' Experiences of Administering Medication in the Clinical Setting', QUALITATIVE HEALTH RESEARCH, 20 952-965 (2010)
DOI 10.1177/1049732310364988
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2010 Happell B, 'Lead by vision, not by limitations: Recovery and the mental health nursing profession', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 19 1-2 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2009.00661.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2010 Happell B, Harrow A, 'Nurses' attitudes to the use of seclusion: A review of the literature', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 19 162-168 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2010.00669.x
Citations Scopus - 48Web of Science - 42
2010 Happell B, Palmer C, Tennent R, 'Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program: Contributing to positive client outcomes', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 19 331-339 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2010.00679.x
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
2010 Happell B, 'Student experiences of the undergraduate nursing degree RESPONSE', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 19 370-370 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2010.00712_2.x
2009 Elsom S, Happell B, Manias E, 'Informal Role Expansion in Australian Mental Health Nursing', PERSPECTIVES IN PSYCHIATRIC CARE, 45 45-53 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1744-6163.2009.00199.x
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 18
2009 Happell B, 'Turning the coin - Emphasizing the opportunities in mental health nursing', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 30 611-614 (2009)

It is widely acknowledged that mental health nursing has undergone considerable change in Australia during recent decades, including the mainstreaming of mental health services in... [more]

It is widely acknowledged that mental health nursing has undergone considerable change in Australia during recent decades, including the mainstreaming of mental health services into the general health care system. Recruitment problems and high levels of stress and burnout associated with the profession are seen to be indicative of a degree of demise in the status and desirability of this field of practice. However, new nursing roles have developed in response to these changes. The aim of this paper is to focus on three specific roles: mental health consultation-liaison nursing; mental health nurse practitioner; and the mental health nurse incentive program. These new roles present exciting and rewarding career opportunities for mental health nurses and may increase the attractiveness of mental health nursing for new graduates. © 2009 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1080/01612840903019732
Citations Scopus - 3
2009 Happell B, Roper C, 'Promoting genuine consumer participation in mental health education: A consumer academic role', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 29 575-579 (2009)
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2008.01.004
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 24
2009 Cleary M, Matheson S, Happell B, 'Evaluation of a transition to practice programme for mental health nursing', JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, 65 844-850 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2008.04943.x
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 38
2009 Gough K, Happell B, 'Undergraduate nursing students attitude to mental health nursing: a cluster analysis approach', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 18 3155-3164 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2008.02764.x
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 25
2009 Reid-Searl K, Dwyer T, Happell B, Moxham L, Kahl J, Morris J, Wheatland N, 'Caring for children with complex emotional and psychological disorders: experiences of nurses in a rural paediatric unit', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 18 3441-3449 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2008.02567.x
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 8
2009 Happell B, 'Clinical experience as the panacea! Acknowledging the importance of theory', CONTEMPORARY NURSE, 32 166-168 (2009)
DOI 10.1080/10376178.2009.11009874
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2009 Happell B, Moxham L, Reid-Searl K, Dwyer T, Kahl J, Morris J, Wheatland N, 'Promoting mental health care in a rural paediatric unit through participatory action research', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, 17 155-160 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2009.01061.x
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
2009 Happell B, Sundram S, Wortans J, Johnstone H, Ryan R, Lakshmana R, 'Assessing Nurse-Initiated Care in a Mental Health Crisis Assessment and Treatment Team in Australia', PSYCHIATRIC SERVICES, 60 1527-1531 (2009)
DOI 10.1176/ps.2009.60.11.1527
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2009 Happell B, Sundram S, Wortans J, Johnstone H, Ryan R, Lakshmana R, 'Assessing nurse-initiated care in a mental health crisis assessment and treatment team in Australia.', Psychiatric services (Washington, D.C.), 60 1527-1531 (2009)
DOI 10.1176/appi.ps.60.11.1527
2009 Happell B, 'Innovative approach to nursing education.', Australian nursing journal (July 1993), 17 39 (2009)
2009 Reid-Searl K, Moxham L, Walker S, Happell B, 'Internal conflict: Undergraduate nursing students' response to inadequate supervision during the administration of medication', COLLEGIAN, 16 71-77 (2009)
DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2008.11.002
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
2009 Happell B, 'Presenting with precision: preparing and delivering a polished conference presentation.', Nurse researcher, 16 45-56 (2009)

Conference presentations are recognised as a valuable means of disseminating knowledge. Brenda Happell offers a guide to delivering a conference presentation, including writing th... [more]

Conference presentations are recognised as a valuable means of disseminating knowledge. Brenda Happell offers a guide to delivering a conference presentation, including writing the paper preparing audio-visual materials and minimising the impact of nervousness. She also discusses strategies for obtaining feedback on presentation style.

Citations Scopus - 2
2009 Goodwin V, Happell B, 'Seeing both the forest and the trees: a process for tracking individual responses in focus group interviews.', Nurse researcher, 17 62-67 (2009)

Focus groups are a popular component of nursing research. While they have their advantages, a number of disadvantages are apparent, such as the difficulty involved in capturing in... [more]

Focus groups are a popular component of nursing research. While they have their advantages, a number of disadvantages are apparent, such as the difficulty involved in capturing individual responses. The use of a tracking sheet would allow the researcher to identify individual responses, and thus produce separate transcripts for each participant, which can be forwarded for verification or discussion. The advantage of this approach is that the researcher is able to obtain an account from individuals in addition to the group account.

DOI 10.7748/nr2009.10.17.1.62.c7341
Citations Scopus - 6
2009 Ryan R, Happell B, 'Learning from experience: Using action research to discover consumer needs in post-seclusion debriefing', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 18 100-107 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2008.00579.x
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 12
2009 Cutcliffe J, Happell B, 'Psychiatry, mental health nurses, and invisible power: Exploring a perturbed relationship within contemporary mental health care', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 18 116-125 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2008.00591.x
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 34
2009 Fisher JE, Happell B, 'Implications of evidence-based practice for mental health nursing', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 18 179-185 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2009.00607.x
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 21
2009 Happell B, Gough K, 'Preparing mental health nurses for the future workforce: An exploration of postgraduate education in Victoria, Australia', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 18 349-356 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2009.00626.x
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 18
2009 Happell B, 'Mental health, mental illness, or some of each? The need for care with the use of language', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 18 381-382 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2009.00650.x
Citations Web of Science - 1
2009 Dwyer T, Bradshaw J, Happell B, 'Comparison of mental health nurses' attitudes towards smoking and smoking behaviour', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 18 424-433 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2009.00628.x
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 14
2009 Cutcliffe J, 'The 'deep dynamics' of the discipline of mental health nursing.', International journal of mental health nursing, 18 81-82 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2009.00597.x
2009 Happell B, 'A model of preceptorship in nursing: Reflecting the complex functions of the role', Nursing Education Perspectives, 30 372-376 (2009)

Preceptorship has been consistently acknowledged in the literature as a strategy to maximize the benefits of clinical nursing education in terms of knowledge and skill acquisition... [more]

Preceptorship has been consistently acknowledged in the literature as a strategy to maximize the benefits of clinical nursing education in terms of knowledge and skill acquisition, confidence, and professional socialization. Further benefits have also been recognized for preceptors, and for the broader health care agency. Despite recognition of the importance of this role, there has been no clearly articulated model of preceptorship that reflects the broader factors impacting upon the relationship between registered nurse and nursing student This article presents a model of preceptorship that is directly based upon the preceptor-preceptee relationship and reflects the factors and influences that might impact, both positively and negatively, the strength and effectiveness of the relationship and subsequent learning outcomes.This model will provide a useful resource for the planning and implementation of a preceptorship program that maximizes clinical learning to the satisfaction of all stakeholders.

Citations Scopus - 34
2009 Elsom S, Happell B, Nurs CP, Manias E, Care CC, Stud MN, 'Australian Mental Health Nurses' Attitudes to Role Expansion', PERSPECTIVES IN PSYCHIATRIC CARE, 45 100-107 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1744-6163.2009.00210.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2009 Elsom S, Happell B, Manias E, 'Nurse practitioners and medical practice: Opposing forces or complementary contributions?', Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 45 9-16 (2009)

Purpose: The medical profession in Australia has expressed concern about the expansion of nursing practice into areas that are traditionally the domain of medicine. Particular app... [more]

Purpose: The medical profession in Australia has expressed concern about the expansion of nursing practice into areas that are traditionally the domain of medicine. Particular apprehension is raised in relation to the prescription of medications. This paper will consider and critique the argument that the standard of care provided by a nurse practitioner would be of lesser quality than that provided by a medical practitioner. Conclusions: Despite the medical profession's opposition for nurse practitioner roles, there is little evidence suggesting that the quality of services offered by a nurse practitioner would be inferior. Practice Implications: Available evidence suggests that care and treatment from nurse practitioners in primary health care is equal to that provided by medical practitioners. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

DOI 10.1111/j.1744-6163.2009.00195.x
Citations Scopus - 17
2009 Happell B, 'Influencing undergraduate nursing students' attitudes toward mental health nursing: Acknowledging the role of theory', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 30 39-46 (2009)

Most research designed to explore undergraduate nursing students&apos; attitudes towards mental health nursing tends to uphold clinical experience as the decisive factor, with muc... [more]

Most research designed to explore undergraduate nursing students' attitudes towards mental health nursing tends to uphold clinical experience as the decisive factor, with much less attention paid to the theoretical component. This paper presents the findings of a state-wide study conducted with undergraduate nursing students in Victoria, Australia. A pre- and post-test design was used to measure students' attitudes toward people with a mental illness and toward mental health nursing and their sense of preparedness for mental health practice. A questionnaire was administered at two time points; the first time point was following completion of the mental health nursing theoretical component, and the second was following the completion of clinical experience. An additional scale was added at the second time point to evaluate students' opinions about their clinical placement. The findings indicated significantly different attitudes and opinions depending on the university students attended. The amount of theory undertaken in the course accounts for some, but not all, of this variance. However, generally the students taking courses with a larger theoretical component tended to demonstrate higher scores (suggestive of more favourable attitudes) on all of the subscales, and that these differences were sustained following the completion of the clinical placement. These findings suggest that the amount of theory students receive in mental health nursing may be more influential than the relevant literature suggests.

DOI 10.1080/01612840802557113
Citations Scopus - 38
2009 Happell B, Gough KNH-W, 'Nursing Students' Attitudes to Mental Health Nursing: Psychometric Properties of a Self-report Scale', ARCHIVES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, 23 376-386 (2009)
DOI 10.1016/j.apnu.2008.10.005
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
2009 Happell B, 'Appreciating history: The Australian experience of direct-entry mental health nursing education in universities', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 18 35-41 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2008.00565.x
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 22
2009 Happell B, 'Finding voice: Promoting the right of free speech for mental health nurses', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 18 151-152 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2009.00608.x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2009 Cleary M, Horsfall J, Happell B, 'Transition to psychiatric/mental health nursing programs: Expectations and practical considerations', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 18 265-273 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2009.00606.x
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 20
2008 Happell B, 'Writing for publication: a practical guide.', Nursing standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain) : 1987), 22 35-40 (2008)

Nurses in clinical practice tend not to view writing for publication as part of their role, and often fail to recognise the value of written communication as a means of sharing va... [more]

Nurses in clinical practice tend not to view writing for publication as part of their role, and often fail to recognise the value of written communication as a means of sharing valuable knowledge and expertise with others. The tendency to view writing for publication as an arduous and daunting task, reserved only for those in academia, may deter the novice writer. This article aims to encourage nurses in clinical practice to consider writing for publication and actively contribute to professional development through the dissemination of nursing knowledge. The article also provides a practical guide for writing a research and quality improvement article.

DOI 10.7748/ns2008.03.22.28.35.c6435
Citations Scopus - 11
2008 Happell B, 'Meaningful information or a bureaucratic exercise? Exploring the value of routine outcome measurement in mental health', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 29 1098-1114 (2008)

Routine outcome measures have been introduced into mental health services throughout Australia, with the ultimate aim of developing standards for service delivery, and a means to ... [more]

Routine outcome measures have been introduced into mental health services throughout Australia, with the ultimate aim of developing standards for service delivery, and a means to determine the extent to which these standards are being realised in practice. Criticism that the existing measures are not reflecting the aspects of mental health care and treatment considered important by the consumers of those services is common and widespread. The aim of the current study was to explore the utility, effectiveness, and assumptions underlying routine outcome measures used by Victorian mental health services from the perspective of service users. Two focus group interviews were conducted with consumer members of a group known as Psych. Action and Training (a group of consumers and senior nurses with a commitment to consumer participation). The findings demonstrated criticism of the outcome measures routinely used in Victoria. The three main themes to emerge were: assumptions behind routine outcome measures; consumer concerns with routine outcome measures; and consumer perspective: purpose, process and principles. Copyright © Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

DOI 10.1080/01612840802319852
Citations Scopus - 6
2008 Happell B, 'Putting all the pieces together: Exploring workforce issues in mental health nursing', CONTEMPORARY NURSE, 29 43-52 (2008)
DOI 10.5172/conu.673.29.1.43
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 22
2008 Happell B, Robins A, Gough K, 'Developing more positive attitudes towards mental health nursing in undergraduate students: part 1 - does more theory help?', JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC AND MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 15 439-446 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2850.2007.01203.x
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 38
2008 Happell B, 'New Year! New Look! New Process!', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 17 1-1 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2007.00514.x
Citations Web of Science - 10
2008 Lynch L, Happell B, 'Implementing clinical supervision: Part 1: Laying the ground work', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 17 57-64 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2007.00511.x
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 16
2008 Lynch L, Happell B, 'Implementation of clinical supervision in action: Part 2: Implementation and beyond', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 17 65-72 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2007.00512.x
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 16
2008 Lynch L, Happell B, 'Implementation of clinical supervision in action: Part 3: The development of a model', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 17 73-82 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2007.00513.x
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
2008 Happell B, 'Debating or doing: Mutally exclusive or complimentary companions?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 17 151-152 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2008.00534.x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2008 Happell B, 'Contemporary mental health nursing: Crisis and opportunity?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 17 225-226 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2008.00537.x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2008 Happell B, 'The importance of clinical experience for mental health nursing - Part 1: Undergraduate nursing students' attitudes, preparedness and satisfaction', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 17 326-332 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2008.00555.x
Citations Scopus - 63Web of Science - 57
2008 Happell B, 'The importance of clinical experience for mental health nursing - Part 2: Relationships between undergraduate nursing students' attitudes, preparedness, and satisfaction', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 17 333-340 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2008.00556.x
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 30
2008 Goodwin V, Happell B, 'Psychiatric nurses' attitudes toward consumer and carer participation in care: Part 2-barriers to participation', Policy, Politics, and Nursing Practice, 9 249-256 (2008)

Australian government policy has effectively mandated consumer and carer participation. However, the limited relevant literature suggests there are significant barriers to impleme... [more]

Australian government policy has effectively mandated consumer and carer participation. However, the limited relevant literature suggests there are significant barriers to implementing participation in mental health services. Nurses have been identified as a professional group with an important role in creating the culture changes necessary for successful implementation, yet their views about consumer and carer participation have not been extensively explored. This article presents Part 2 of the findings of a qualitative study using focus group interviews with 30 nurses to explore opinions on the topic of consumer and carer participation. Data were analyzed using a content analysis approach, assisted by the software package NVivo. The themes explicated were systemic barriers and education, an essential ingredient. These findings emphasize the barriers and provide some sense of how educational techniques might assist with making some constructive inroads. © 2008 SAGE Publications.

DOI 10.1177/1527154408316064
Citations Scopus - 24
2008 Gaskin CJ, Elsom SJ, Happell B, 'Tailoring seclusion policies to the patient group - Reply', BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, 192 232-232 (2008)
DOI 10.1192/bjp.192.3.232a
2008 Happell B, 'The value of routine outcome measurement for consumers of mental health services: Master or servant?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHIATRY, 54 317-327 (2008)
DOI 10.1177/0020764008090285
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
2008 Elsom S, Happell B, Manias E, 'Expanded practice roles for community mental health nurses in Australia: Confidence, critical factors for preparedness, and perceived barriers', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 29 767-780 (2008)

As the momentum for nurse practitioner roles rapidly increases in Australia, little scholarly attention has been directed towards barriers to role expansion, the confidence necess... [more]

As the momentum for nurse practitioner roles rapidly increases in Australia, little scholarly attention has been directed towards barriers to role expansion, the confidence necessary to undertake expanded practice roles (other than prescription of medication), or the educational preparation required for expanded roles. This paper reports on community mental health nurses' views regarding confidence to undertake expanded roles, their opinions regarding the necessary preparation for such roles, and barriers to role expansion. An questionnaire was administered to 296 community mental health nurses employed in metropolitan and rural settings in Victoria, Australia. In regards to various domains of expanded practice, nurses were least confident about prescribing but more than half (54%) reported that they would either "definitely" or "probably" feel confident. Over 90% reported "probably" or "definitely" feeling confident to make recommendations for involuntary treatment. Eighty-four percent and 79% reported similar levels of confidence in relation to ordering diagnostic tests and referring patients to medical specialists, respectively. Most (95%) agreed that extra educational preparation was necessary in relation to undertaking expanded practice roles successfully. Factors considered most strongly as barriers to expanded nursing practice included the medical profession, followed by fear of litigation, and government departments and policies. Copyright © Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

DOI 10.1080/01612840802129269
Citations Scopus - 9
2008 Happell B, 'Clinical experience in mental health nursing: Determining satisfaction and the influential factors', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 28 849-855 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2008.01.003
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
2008 Reid-Searl K, Moxham L, Walker S, Happell B, 'Shifting supervision: implications for safe administration of medication by nursing students', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 17 2750-2767 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2008.02486.x
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 17
2008 Happell B, 'Barriers to implementing a nursing clinical development unit', CONTEMPORARY NURSE, 29 53-59 (2008)
DOI 10.5172/conu.673.29.1.53
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2008 Clancy L, Happell B, Moxham L, 'Assessing risk in aged care mental health.', Australian nursing journal (July 1993), 15 30-31 (2008)
Citations Scopus - 2
2008 Happell B, Robins A, Gough K, 'Developing more positive attitudes towards mental health nursing in undergraduate students: part 2-the impact of theory and clinical experience', JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC AND MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 15 527-536 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2850.2007.01233.x
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 35
2008 Happell B, 'From conference presentation to journal publication: a guide.', Nurse researcher, 15 40-48 (2008)

Large numbers of nurses present papers at professional and scholarly conferences. However, there are few avenues for the information to be disseminated more broadly Brenda Happell... [more]

Large numbers of nurses present papers at professional and scholarly conferences. However, there are few avenues for the information to be disseminated more broadly Brenda Happell provides a practical guide for nurses wanting to move from a conference presentation to a journal article.

Citations Scopus - 2
2008 Happell B, 'Conference presentations: a guide to writing the abstract.', Nurse researcher, 15 79-87 (2008)

Brenda Happell explains the role of the abstract in conference presentations and provides a practical guide to help nurses through the process of writing one. She also gives tips ... [more]

Brenda Happell explains the role of the abstract in conference presentations and provides a practical guide to help nurses through the process of writing one. She also gives tips on what to avoid.

Citations Scopus - 4
2008 Happell B, ''Ding dong the witch is dead!' the demise of the research quality framework', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 17 83-84 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2008.00524.x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2008 Happell B, 'Determining the effectiveness of mental health services from a consumer perspective: Part 1: Enhancing recovery', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 17 116-122 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2008.00519.x
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 32
2008 Happell B, 'Determining the effectiveness of mental health services from a consumer perspective: Part 2: Barriers to recovery and principles for evaluation', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 17 123-130 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2008.00520.x
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 24
2008 Sharrock J, Bryant J, McNamara P, Forster J, Happell B, 'Exploratory study of mental health consultation-liaison nursing in Australia: Part 1 demographics and role characteristics', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 17 180-188 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2008.00530.x
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 19
2008 McNamara P, Bryant J, Forster J, Sharrock J, Happell B, 'Exploratory study of mental health consultation-liaison nursing in Australia: Part 2 preparation, support and role satisfaction', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 17 189-196 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2008.00531.x
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 9
2008 Happell B, Edward K-L, Welch T, 'Doctoral graduates in mental health nursing in Victoria, Australia: The doctoral experience and contribution to scholarship', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 17 270-278 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2008.00543.x
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2008 Happell B, 'Untitled Reply', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 17 297-298 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2008.00549.x
2008 Happell B, 'Who cares for whom? Re-examining the nurse - patient relationship', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 17 381-382 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2008.00586.x
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2008 Happell B, 'Editorial: Embracing an international perspective (International Journal of Mental Health Nursing (2008) 17, 5, (299))', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 17 453 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2008.00583_3.x
2007 Gaskin CJ, Elsom SJ, Happell B, 'Interventions for reducing the use of seclusion in psychiatric facilities', BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, 191 298-303 (2007)
DOI 10.1192/bjp.bp.106.034538
Citations Scopus - 142Web of Science - 121
2007 Hayman-White K, Happell B, Charleston R, Ryan R, 'Transition to mental health nursing through specialist graduate nurse programs in mental health: A review of the literature', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 28 185-200 (2007)

Specialist graduate nurse programs (GNPs) in psychiatric/mental health nursing have been widely implemented across public healthcare services throughout Victoria, Australia. Broad... [more]

Specialist graduate nurse programs (GNPs) in psychiatric/mental health nursing have been widely implemented across public healthcare services throughout Victoria, Australia. Broadly, these programs aim to assist newly graduated nurses during the transition from nursing student to registered nurse. This paper presents a review of the literature relevant to GNPs; specifically focusing on graduate transition. An adequate orientation to clinical areas and ongoing support throughout the transition process were identified as significant determinants of new graduates" satisfaction with the initial post-qualification period. However, the literature suggests that the inadequacy of psychiatric/mental health nursing content in undergraduate nursing courses creates additional difficulties within this specialty area of practice. Moreover, the current literature review emphasises the need for further research to evaluate the effectiveness of GNPs for nursing in general and for psychiatric/mental health nursing in particular. Copyright © Informa Healthcare.

DOI 10.1080/01612840601096354
Citations Scopus - 24
2007 Elsom S, Happell B, Manias E, 'Exploring the expanded practice roles of community mental health nurses', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 28 413-429 (2007)

Significant changes to the delivery of mental health services have resulted in the expansion of the community mental health nursing role. This qualitative study was undertaken to ... [more]

Significant changes to the delivery of mental health services have resulted in the expansion of the community mental health nursing role. This qualitative study was undertaken to explore the extent to which community mental health nurses are currently engaged in expanded forms of practice. Focus groups were undertaken with community mental health nurses (n = 27) from metropolitan and rural Victoria, Australia. Thematic analysis identified the following major themes: reported practice, consumers as beneficiaries of expanded practice, risk of harm and litigation, and barriers to expanded practice. The findings emphasize the need for significant changes in current legislation if expanded practice for nurses is to become a reality.

DOI 10.1080/01612840600943739
Citations Scopus - 15
2007 Goodwin V, Happell B, 'Consumer and carer participation in mental health care: The carer's perspective: Part 2 - Barriers to effective and genuine participation', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 28 625-638 (2007)

Family members and significant others provide significant proportions of unpaid care for people experiencing a mental illness. Although the carer role is pivotal to contemporary m... [more]

Family members and significant others provide significant proportions of unpaid care for people experiencing a mental illness. Although the carer role is pivotal to contemporary mental health service delivery, the role of carers and the issues they face have received only scant attention in the literature. This paper presents the second part of the findings of an exploratory, qualitative inquiry, which sought greater understanding of carers' experiences of, and attitudes to opportunities for participation in care and treatment at an individual or systemic level, with particular emphasis on the role of psychiatric nurses in encouraging or discouraging participation. This paper explores the theme of systemic barriers to participation. These findings demonstrate the variable experiences of carers in their opportunities to participate and the important role nurses can assume in supporting carers' increased participation in the mental health care for their relative or significant other.

DOI 10.1080/01612840701354612
Citations Scopus - 22
2007 Goodwin V, Happell B, 'Consumer and carer participation in mental health care: The carer's perspective: Part 1 - The importance of respect and collaboration', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 28 607-623 (2007)

The role of family carers in the delivery of mental health services in Australia has become more than an advantage over not having this sort of participation. Increasingly the inv... [more]

The role of family carers in the delivery of mental health services in Australia has become more than an advantage over not having this sort of participation. Increasingly the involvement of non-paid carers (family members and significant others) has been recognised as central to the smooth delivery of care and treatment. Notwithstanding this acknowledgment, there is very little discussion of carer participation in mental health care delivery within the literature. The limited research in this area suggests that carers recognize very little opportunity for genuine participation, even less than is available to consumers. This paper presents part 1 of the findings of an exploratory, qualitative study seeking an in-depth understanding of the attitudes of carers from rural Victoria, Australia toward opportunities for participation with specific emphasis on the role of psychiatric nurses in encouraging or discouraging participation. The themes of respect and communication will be described in this paper. These findings demonstrate the variable experiences of carers in their opportunities to participate and the important role nurses can assume in supporting both carers and consumers through this process.

DOI 10.1080/01612840701354596
Citations Scopus - 24
2007 Elsom S, Happell B, Manias E, 'Expanded practice roles for community mental health nurses: What do consumers and carers have to say?', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 28 1065-1079 (2007)

Community-based mental health as the primary focus of treatment has influenced more autonomous roles for mental health nurses. A limited literature suggests that this has resulted... [more]

Community-based mental health as the primary focus of treatment has influenced more autonomous roles for mental health nurses. A limited literature suggests that this has resulted in the expansion of community mental health nursing into territory usually the exclusive domain of the medical profession. Consumers and carers are the two groups most affected by changes to service delivery; however, their views regarding the changing role of community mental health nurses have not been sought. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study involving indepth interviews with Australian consumers (n = 4) and carers (n = 6) designed to explore their views and opinions about the expanded practice roles of community mental health nurses. Four main themes were identified: accessibility and convenience; relationship with clinicians; beneficiaries of expanded nursing practice; and, are nurses up to it? The findings suggest expanded practice roles are perceived positively by consumers and carers and therefore worthy of further investigation.

DOI 10.1080/01612840701522069
2007 Happell B, Gough K, 'Employment through residency programs: A strategy to address the workforce crisis in psychiatric nursing', ARCHIVES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, 21 126-131 (2007)
DOI 10.1016/j.apnu.2007.01.002
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2007 Happell B, 'Appreciating the importance of history: a brief historical overview of mental health, mental health nursing and education in Australia.', The international journal of psychiatric nursing research, 12 1439-1445 (2007)

History is consistently acknowledged as crucial to the identity of a profession. In the case of mental health nursing this is perhaps more so, as published accounts of the history... [more]

History is consistently acknowledged as crucial to the identity of a profession. In the case of mental health nursing this is perhaps more so, as published accounts of the history of nursing rarely pays attention to the specialty of mental health. The aim of this paper is to provide a brief overview of the history of mental health nursing in Australia. It is concluded that an understanding of history is essential in understanding and interpreting contemporary mental health service delivery and seeking to overcome the professional distance between mental health and other branches of nursing.

Citations Scopus - 9
2007 Pridding A, Watkins D, Happell B, 'Mental health nursing roles and functions in acute inpatient units: caring for people with intellectual disability and mental health problems--a literature review.', The international journal of psychiatric nursing research, 12 1459-1471 (2007)

The purpose of this paper is to review current national and international perspectives on the role and function of mental health nursing in dual disability within acute mental hea... [more]

The purpose of this paper is to review current national and international perspectives on the role and function of mental health nursing in dual disability within acute mental health inpatient settings. A universally accepted definition of the role and function of psychiatric nursing has been elusive. The role and function may be presumed to have core attributes that differ according to local conditions. The articulation of the role and function will contribute to the body of knowledge of psychiatric nursing and to improving the understanding of the nurse-patient relationship for those caring for people with dual disability in acute mental health inpatient facilities. The two identified key roles and functions of mental health nursing practice for people with intellectually disabilities within acute inpatient mental health facilities in Victoria will be discussed.

Citations Scopus - 6
2007 Happell B, Gough K, 'Undergraduate nursing students' attitudes towards mental health nursing: Determining the influencing factors', CONTEMPORARY NURSE, 25 72-81 (2007)
DOI 10.5172/conu.2007.25.1-2.72
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 33
2007 Happell B, Roper C, 'Consumer participation in mental health research: articulating a model to guide practice', AUSTRALASIAN PSYCHIATRY, 15 237-241 (2007)
DOI 10.1080/10398560701320113
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 27
2007 Gough K, Happell B, 'We can't find the solution until we know the problem: Understanding the mental health nursing labour force', Australasian Psychiatry, 15 109-114 (2007)

Objective: Difficulties recruiting and retaining adequate numbers of mental health nurses have been extensively documented in the Australian literature. The continued increase in ... [more]

Objective: Difficulties recruiting and retaining adequate numbers of mental health nurses have been extensively documented in the Australian literature. The continued increase in the average age of practicing mental health nurses has intensified concerns that a workforce crisis is rapidly approaching. Despite the urgency of this situation, there has been no comprehensive, co-ordinated collection of labour force data. The aim of this paper is to synthesise and present labour force data gathered from various official sources to more clearly identify and articulate the nature and extent of the problem. Method: Relevant labour force data was obtained from reports produced by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and the Victorian Department of Human Services. Information was collated, synthesised and, in some cases, re-analysed to provide a clearer picture of the current national and Victorian mental health nursing labour force, as well as requirement and supply projections. Results: Findings are consistent with conclusions in the available literature but suggest that the magnitude of the problem is likely to be greater than previously anticipated. Conclusions: The systematic and coordinated collection of mental health nursing labour force data is crucial in order that appropriate interventions can be implemented and evaluated.

DOI 10.1080/10398560601148341
Citations Scopus - 12
2007 Roper C, Happell B, 'Reflection without shame - reflection without blame: towards a more collaborative understanding between mental health consumers and nurses', JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC AND MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 14 85-91 (2007)
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 19
2007 Happell B, 'Focus groups in nursing research: an appropriate method or the latest fad?', Nurse researcher, 14 18-24 (2007)

The use of focus groups as a method of nursing research has increased substantially over the past 20 years. In this paper, Brenda Happell describes a review of literature publishe... [more]

The use of focus groups as a method of nursing research has increased substantially over the past 20 years. In this paper, Brenda Happell describes a review of literature published from 1985 to 2004. Multiple uses are described for the focus-group approach, it may, for example, as a method in its own right and as a precursor to other methodological approaches. Advantages and disadvantages of focus groups as a research method are frequently considered. However, a rationale for the use of the method is frequently not provided, making it difficult to determine the extent to which the use of the method reflects the appropriateness, rather than the popularity of the approach. This paper suggests some circumstances in which focus groups should be used with caution, if at all.

DOI 10.7748/nr2007.01.14.2.18.c6018
Citations Scopus - 26
2007 Happell B, 'Conference presentations: developing nursing knowledge by disseminating research findings.', Nurse researcher, 15 70-77 (2007)

Conference presentations provide a potentially valuable means of encouraging more nurses to contribute to the development of nursing knowledge. This article by Brenda Happell, int... [more]

Conference presentations provide a potentially valuable means of encouraging more nurses to contribute to the development of nursing knowledge. This article by Brenda Happell, intended especially for novice presenters, aims to help nurses decide the most appropriate conference at which to present.

DOI 10.7748/nr2007.10.15.1.70.c6056
Citations Scopus - 2
2007 Happell B, 'Throwing the baby out with the bathwater? A lateral view of nursing research', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 16 71-72 (2007)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2007.00459.x
2007 Henderson S, Happell B, Martin T, 'Impact of theory and clinical placement on undergraduate students' mental health nursing knowledge, skills, and attitudes', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 16 116-125 (2007)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2007.00454.x
Citations Scopus - 63Web of Science - 61
2007 Happell B, 'The Journal goes from strength to strength', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 16 1-1 (2007)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2006.00448.x
2007 Hayman-White K, Happell B, 'Critique of Falloon and the Optimal Treatment Project', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 16 44-49 (2007)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2006.00443.x
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2007 Happell B, ''We are all consumers of mental health services': The hidden danger of promoting 'sameness'', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 16 145-146 (2007)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2007.00461.x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2007 Happell B, ''A rose by any other name ... ': The use of language in mental health nursing practice', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 16 223-223 (2007)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2007.00479.x
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2007 Happell B, 'Twice as much to be half as good: The undervaluing of mental health nursing leadership in academia', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 16 295-297 (2007)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2007.00489.x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2007 Happell B, 'Hitting the target! A no tears approach to writing an abstract for a conference presentation', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 16 447-452 (2007)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2007.00501.x
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2007 Henderson S, Happell B, Martin T, 'So what is so good about clinical experience? A mental health nursing perspective', Nurse Education in Practice, 7 164-172 (2007)

The available literature suggests that undergraduate nursing students generally do not have positive attitudes towards working in the mental health field but that clinical experie... [more]

The available literature suggests that undergraduate nursing students generally do not have positive attitudes towards working in the mental health field but that clinical experience is the most important factor influencing the development of a more favourable outlook. Despite this there is very little attention paid to the factors that contribute to a positive clinical experience. The aim of this paper is to examine the level of, and factors contributing to, undergraduate nursing students' satisfaction with clinical experience. A survey was administered to undergraduate nursing students (n = 146). The findings support the available literature in suggesting that the provision of support and the ability to become actively involved in patient care are the two most important factors affecting the perceived quality of clinical placements. However, this study contradicts the findings of earlier research in demonstrating a higher degree of satisfaction with clinical experience in inpatient settings. This reflected the view that there was less opportunity for patient care involvement within the community environment. Given the increased emphasis on community care, it is important that students are actively engaged in the care and treatment process in order that they have the opportunity to meet learning objectives in the mental health field. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2006.06.003
Citations Scopus - 37
2007 Goodwin V, Happell B, 'Psychiatric nurses enhancing consumer and caregiver participation in the State of Victoria: The impact of history and policy', Policy, Politics, and Nursing Practice, 8 55-63 (2007)

Australian mental health policy now clearly articulates that consumer and carer (informal caregiver) participation in all aspects of service delivery is an expectation. As the lar... [more]

Australian mental health policy now clearly articulates that consumer and carer (informal caregiver) participation in all aspects of service delivery is an expectation. As the largest professional group, nurses clearly play a key role in translating policy into practice. The aim of this article is to briefly overview the history of mental health service development in Victoria, with specific emphasis on the development of psychiatric nursing. Changing perspectives of consumers of mental health services and their informal carers is discussed. Policy development is described in the context of the development of mental health services. It is argued that an appreciation of the history of punishment and confinement is necessary for providing a climate conducive to consumer and carer participation. © 2007 Sage Publications.

DOI 10.1177/1527154406298389
Citations Scopus - 10
2007 Charleston R, Hayman-White K, Ryan R, Happell B, 'Understanding the importance of effective orientation: what does this mean in psychiatric graduate nurse programs?', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, 25 24-30 (2007)
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2007 Hayman-White K, Happell B, 'Psychiatric nursing and mental health funding: the double dilemma.', The international journal of psychiatric nursing research, 12 1488-1496 (2007)

The impact of mental illness on disease and disability burden is receiving more recognition than has previously been the case. It is now commonly understood that approximately 20%... [more]

The impact of mental illness on disease and disability burden is receiving more recognition than has previously been the case. It is now commonly understood that approximately 20% of the Australian population will experience a mental illness at some stage during their lives. Unfortunately this recognition is not reflected in the funding of mental health services, or in strategies to identify and rectify shortfalls in the nursing workforce. This paper provides an exploration of two areas. Firstly an overview of the current funding devoted to mental health and secondly an examination of workforce data with a view to recognising likely future trends for psychiatric nursing. The data demonstrates the existence of a double dilemma, firstly that the need for psychiatric nurses is likely to increase, and secondly that the looming workforce crisis may be more severe than has been anticipated.

Citations Scopus - 2
2007 Gough K, Happell B, 'We can't find the solution until we know the problem: understanding the mental health nursing labour force', AUSTRALASIAN PSYCHIATRY, 15 109-114 (2007)
DOI 10.1080/10398S60601148341
Citations Web of Science - 11
2007 Elsom S, Happell B, Manias E, Lambert T, 'Expanded practice roles for community mental health nurses: a qualitative exploration of psychiatrists" views', AUSTRALASIAN PSYCHIATRY, 15 324-328 (2007)
DOI 10.1080/10398560701344808
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
2007 Happell B, 'The older I get the more I worry: Attitudes of mental health nurses to working with older people', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 16 371-371 (2007)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2007.00491.x
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2007 Goodwin V, Happell B, 'Psychiatric nurses' attitudes toward consumer and carer participation in care: Part 1 - Exploring the issues', Policy, Politics, and Nursing Practice, 8 276-284 (2007)

Consumer and carer participation in mental health delivery is now enshrined in Australian Government policy. However, strategies assisting in implementing this vision have not bee... [more]

Consumer and carer participation in mental health delivery is now enshrined in Australian Government policy. However, strategies assisting in implementing this vision have not been explored. Nurses are crucial to the mental health workforce, both in numbers and by virtue of the therapeutic relationship. The willingness of nurses to encourage consumer and carer participation is therefore essential for implementation of this policy. This article presents part 1 of the findings of a qualitative study exploring nurses' opinions regarding consumer and carer participation. Data were analyzed using a content-analysis approach, assisted by the software package NVivo. The themes explicated were as follows: Consumer and carer participation-a help or a hindrance? Encouragement-an important role for nurses; and communication-a gift of nursing. These findings highlight the unique and important role nurses can play in encouraging participation and explore some of the issues involved if that role is to become a reality. © 2007 Sage Publications.

DOI 10.1177/1527154408315640
Citations Scopus - 20
2006 Miller G, Happell B, 'Talking about hope: The use of participant photography', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 27 1051-1065 (2006)

Hope as a concept is commonly described in everyday life and is generally regarded as an important component of health and fulfillment. The importance of hope in relation to peopl... [more]

Hope as a concept is commonly described in everyday life and is generally regarded as an important component of health and fulfillment. The importance of hope in relation to people who are marginalised due to illness or other social circumstances has been examined in the research literature. There is, however, a paucity of research addressing the importance of hope for people living with schizophrenia. The authors, in attempting to redress this paucity, identified that participants have difficulty articulating the concept of hope and its meaning to them as individuals. Participant photography was introduced as a research method during the course of the study. This paper presents an overview of the use of participant photography as a method to assist participants to describe their view of hope and its importance. A brief overview of findings are presented and compared with findings derived from traditional interview techniques. Participant photography proved beneficial in facilitating a discussion of hope at a very personal level. The potential ethical implications of this approach are discussed. Copyright © Informa Healthcare.

DOI 10.1080/01612840600943697
Citations Scopus - 24
2006 Sharrock J, Happell B, 'Competence in providing mental health care: A grounded theory analysis of nurses' experiences', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, 24 9-15 (2006)
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 28
2006 Charleston R, Happell B, 'Recognising and reconciling differences: Mental health nurses and nursing students' perceptions of the preceptorship relationship', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, 24 38-43 (2006)
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
2006 Happell B, 'Psychiatric/mental health nursing education in Victoria, Australia: Barriers to specialization', ARCHIVES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, 20 76-81 (2006)
DOI 10.1016/j.apnu.2005.08.011
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
2006 Happell B, 'The training and development workshops: promoting cultural change within mental health nursing.', The international journal of psychiatric nursing research., 11 1299-1309 (2006)

The inadequacy of training and professional development opportunities for mental health nurses is frequently discussed, yet surprisingly receives little attention in the literatur... [more]

The inadequacy of training and professional development opportunities for mental health nurses is frequently discussed, yet surprisingly receives little attention in the literature. The Enterprise Bargaining Agreement of 2000, introduced a number of senior nursing positions for mental health, designed to address this issue. In response to a need identified by the senior nurses, the Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and Practice implemented the Training and Professional Development Workshops. This paper presents an evaluation of the first two workshops conducted. The findings suggest that participants (n=32) were highly satisfied with the content and delivery of the workshops, and most importantly consider this will make a significant contribution to the implementation and ongoing development of their newly established roles.

Citations Scopus - 1
2006 Happell B, 'The Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and practice: promoting excellence in psychiatric nursing.', The international journal of psychiatric nursing research., 12 1402-1411 (2006)

The Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and Practice (CPNRP), is funded by the Department of Human Services Victoria, as an initiative to support psychiatric nurses throughout... [more]

The Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and Practice (CPNRP), is funded by the Department of Human Services Victoria, as an initiative to support psychiatric nurses throughout the State of Victoria. At the time of the CPNRPs inception in 1999, psychiatric nursing had been affected by widespread changes in the delivery of mental health services and nursing education in Victoria. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the development of the CPNRP and how this development reflected the significant issues of the time. The CPNRP introduced a number of programs and other initiatives in response to six primary issues: recruitment, retention, leadership, professional development, research: practice gap and communication.

Citations Scopus - 1
2006 Goodwin V, Happell B, 'In our own words: consumers' views on the reality of consumer participation in mental health care.', Contemporary nurse : a journal for the Australian nursing profession, 21 4-13 (2006)

The opportunity for consumers to participate in all stages of mental health service delivery, including the planning of their individual care, is now clearly enshrined in Australi... [more]

The opportunity for consumers to participate in all stages of mental health service delivery, including the planning of their individual care, is now clearly enshrined in Australian mental health policy. Published research which examines the extent to which this has been realised in practice is limited, and the paucity is even greater for research reflecting the views of the consumers themselves. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study. In-depth interviews were undertaken with consumers of mental health services from two rural areas in Victoria to explore their views and opinions regarding their ability for genuine participation in the planning and delivery of their mental health care, and in particular on the role of nurses in facilitating this process. Data were analysed with the assistance of NVivo, using a content analysis approach. The main themes identified were: respect, encouragement, collaboration and systemic barriers. The findings suggest that consumer participants identify a number of barriers which limit their ability to participate effectively. The implications for the role of the nurse in facilitating genuine consumer participation are discussed.

DOI 10.5172/conu.2006.21.1.4
Citations Scopus - 28
2006 Wortans J, Happell B, Johnstone H, 'The role of the nurse practitioner in psychiatric/mental health nursing: exploring consumer satisfaction', JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC AND MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 13 78-84 (2006)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2850.2006.00916.x
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 22
2006 Happell B, ''We used to call them student nurses': Considering the impact of third-level workers', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 15 1-2 (2006)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2006.00396.x
2006 Sharrock J, Grigg M, Happell B, Keeble-Devlin B, Jennings S, 'The mental health nurse: A valuable addition to the consultation-liaison team', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 15 35-43 (2006)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2006.00393.x
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 18
2006 Goodwin V, Happell B, 'Conflicting agendas between consumers and carers: The perspectives of carers and nurses', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 15 135-143 (2006)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2006.00413.x
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 30
2006 Happell B, 'Focus on inpatient units', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 15 223-223 (2006)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2006.00426.x
2006 Happell B, ''We used to call them student nurses': considering the impact of third-level workers.', International journal of mental health nursing, 15 1-2 (2006)
DOI 10.1080/09638230500518497
2006 Sgro S, Happell B, 'Politicize or Perish! The Importance of Policy for Australian Psychiatric¿Mental Health Nurses', Policy, Politics, &amp; Nursing Practice, 7 136-141 (2006)

As the largest professional group within the Australian mental health nursing workforce, psychiatric-mental health nurses are well positioned to influence mental health policy. Ho... [more]

As the largest professional group within the Australian mental health nursing workforce, psychiatric-mental health nurses are well positioned to influence mental health policy. However, the dominance of nursing by the medical profession has limited the extent to which this potential has been realized, with nurses remaining relatively unheard within the political arena. In recognition of this situation, the Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and Practice implemented a position for a policy analyst. Three primary aims were identified for this position: networking and relationship building, building profile, and providing a voice for psychiatric-mental health nursing. This article provides an overview of these three aims and the achievements to date. It is concluded that the policy analyst position has made a significant contribution to increasing the profile of psychiatric-mental health nursing and, therefore, to its capacity to influence policy. © 2006, Sage Publications. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1177/1527154406288274
Citations Scopus - 1
2006 Ryan R, Garlick R, Happell B, 'Exploring the role of the mental health nurse in community mental health care for the aged', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 27 91-105 (2006)

There is currently considerable discussion about the impact of the aging population on the demand for health care services, however there is considerably less attention paid to th... [more]

There is currently considerable discussion about the impact of the aging population on the demand for health care services, however there is considerably less attention paid to the impact of mental health issues on the needs of the aged population. Nurses comprise the largest professional group within the mental health workforce in Australia. The availability of a high quality mental health nursing workforce will therefore be crucial to meeting the health needs of aging clients in the future, accompanied by an increased pressure to increase the proportion of care delivered in the community. There is however, a paucity of literature on the role and contribution of community mental health nurses specialising in the aged care field. The aim of this paper is to present the findings of a project designed to examine the role of mental health nursing within aged persons' community mental health teams in Victoria, Australia, with particular emphasis on the biopsychosocial interventions used. Fifteen participants from three community mental health services in Victoria participated in a focus group interview to share their insights and experiences. Data analysis revealed two main themes, the role of the nurse, and the specific functions of the nurse. This data is presented as a beginning contribution to the paucity of literature currently available in this important area. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Inc.

DOI 10.1080/01612840500312902
Citations Scopus - 10
2006 Elsom S, Happell B, Manias E, 'The clinical nurse specialist and nurse practitioner roles: Room for both or take your pick?', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, 24 56-59 (2006)
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
2006 Happell B, 'Nursing clinical developments units--A strategy to promote the relationship between practice and academia.', The international journal of psychiatric nursing research., 11 1322-1330 (2006)

Bridging the theory-practice gap has historically been acknowledged as a priority for the nursing profession. Enhancing nurses&apos; attitudes regarding the relevance of theory to... [more]

Bridging the theory-practice gap has historically been acknowledged as a priority for the nursing profession. Enhancing nurses' attitudes regarding the relevance of theory to practice has been considered as crucial in order that the relationship between theory and practice becomes strong and complimentary. A review of the literature suggests that strategies such as joint clinical and academic positions have not had a significant impact in this respect. Nursing Clinical Development Units (NCDUs) were introduced in the United Kingdom as an initiative to promote the recognition and utilisation of research findings as an inherent component of nursing practice. However, there is limited literature addressing the impact of NCDUs on relationships between academia and the clinical field. The aim of this paper is to present the findings of a qualitative evaluation conducted with participants (n=14) of an NCDU program in Victoria, Australia. The findings suggest that this initiative can significantly enhance relationships with, and attitudes towards, academia.

Citations Scopus - 2
2006 Goodman D, Happell B, 'The efficacy of family intervention in adolescent mental health.', The international journal of psychiatric nursing research., 12 1364-1377 (2006)

The term &apos;family therapy&apos; is used to encompass a range of approaches that share a common view about the importance of family involvement in psychiatric disorders. This p... [more]

The term 'family therapy' is used to encompass a range of approaches that share a common view about the importance of family involvement in psychiatric disorders. This paper reviews the effectiveness of family interventions in adolescent mental health with a special emphasis on single session therapy. Research evidence shows that the family intervention in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, depression, attention deficit hyperactive disorder, anxiety and anorexia not only provides better outcomes, but also increases client satisfaction with services. Among the family therapy approaches, single session therapy (SST) seems to be a flexible and very effective model for adolescent mental disorders, which seem to offer an efficient means of providing rapid access to services whilst removing some of the difficulties associated with other forms of family therapy approaches. A new service development model is also discussed by drawing together a number of ideas encountered in practice settings.

Citations Scopus - 3
2006 Happell B, 'Challenges and controversy in mental health nursing', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 15 83-83 (2006)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2006.00418.x
2006 Happell B, 'Would the real mental health nurse please stand up? The relationship between identification and professional identity', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 15 155-156 (2006)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2006.00419.x
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2006 Happell B, Roper C, 'When equality is not really equal: Affirmative action and consumer participation', Journal of Public Mental Health, 5 6-11 (2006)

Consumer participation in mental health service planning and delivery is now authorised through Australian government policy. While strategies have been implemented to foster oppo... [more]

Consumer participation in mental health service planning and delivery is now authorised through Australian government policy. While strategies have been implemented to foster opportunities for participation, they have rarely been evaluated for their effectiveness. Furthermore, the inadequacy of these strategies to support policy implementation has been criticised in the literature and identified as a major obstacle to genuine and effective consumer participation in mental health care. This paper argues that there is an urgent need for affirmative action in order to overcome the current and historical discrimination that prevents consumers from active participation. © 2006, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

DOI 10.1108/17465729200600021
Citations Scopus - 7
2005 Fogarty M, Happell B, 'Exploring the benefits of an exercise program for people with schizophrenia: A qualitative study', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 26 341-351 (2005)

The relationship between regular exercise and physical health and well-being is extensively documented in the literature. However, considerably less attention is devoted to the im... [more]

The relationship between regular exercise and physical health and well-being is extensively documented in the literature. However, considerably less attention is devoted to the impact of exercise on health outcomes for people experiencing a mental illness. In response to the recognized paucity, a structured exercise program was developed and implemented for residents of a Community Care Unit in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Six residents participated in the program over a period of three months. This paper reports the findings of a qualitative study. A focus group interview was conducted with the resident participants (n = 6), the exercise physiologists who developed and implemented the program (n = 2), and nursing staff involved in implementing and supporting the program (n = 4). Analysis of the data collected revealed that four main themes had emerged: the individual nature of the program, physical improvement, group dynamics, and future plans. The findings of this study suggest that involvement in the program produced very positive outcomes, most notably in the physical fitness of residents. The individual nature of the program which enabled gradual participation, and the cohesive approach of the group as a whole were considered very important factors contributing to the overall success. Furthermore, the participants planned to continue with some form of physical activity in the future. The potential value of regular exercise for patients experiencing a mental illness has significant implications for nursing and requires further research exploration. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Inc.

DOI 10.1080/01612840590915711
Citations Scopus - 61
2005 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, 'Mental health issues within the general health care system: The challenge for nursing education in Australia', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 25 465-471 (2005)
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2005.04.005
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
2005 Happell B, Platania-Phung C, 'Mental health issues within the general health care system: Implications for the nursing profession', Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, 22 (2005)

Aim: The aim of this paper is to briefly describe the prevalence of mental illness within the general health care population and the implications for the nursing profession. Prima... [more]

Aim: The aim of this paper is to briefly describe the prevalence of mental illness within the general health care population and the implications for the nursing profession. Primary argument: The nursing profession espouses holism as its philosophy of care. This philosophy embraces the essential interaction between the biological, psychological and social aspects of each individual. The mainstreaming of mental health services within the general health care system has increased the level of contact nurses have with people experiencing mental health problems, yet the research evidence suggests they are not confident or competent in meeting the associated needs. Conclusion: There is an urgent need for education of the current and future nursing workforce if the challenges presented by mental health issues are to be addressed.

Citations Scopus - 19
2005 Charleston R, Happell B, 'Psychiatric nurses and undergraduate nursing students' perceptions of preceptorship in the mental health setting.', The international journal of psychiatric nursing research, 10 1166-1178 (2005)

The importance of clinical education for nursing is widely acknowledged and considerable effort has been invested into identifying the most effective models. Psychiatric nursing h... [more]

The importance of clinical education for nursing is widely acknowledged and considerable effort has been invested into identifying the most effective models. Psychiatric nursing has the additional imperative of increasing recruitment into the field. While clinical experience has been found to influence nursing students' attitudes towards psychiatric nursing and people experiencing a mental illness, little attention has been paid towards the factors that influence these outcomes. This study addresses the question, what is the experience of preceptorship for mental health nurses and undergraduate nursing students' in the mental health setting? An examination of the interactions within this model and the development of a substantive theory are facilitated by utilising the qualitative methodological approach, grounded theory. Findings indicate that psychiatric nurse preceptors seek to accomplish connectedness in the preceptorship relationship, through overcoming fear and other misconceptions. In addition, a number of factors emerged where commonality exists between the experiences of mental health nurse preceptors andthe nursing students. These included the need to manage the reconciling of difference between general acute health and mental health settings, the challenge for both groups to address student fear and preconceived ideas of mental illness and the need of preceptors to 'protect' the students.

Citations Scopus - 20
2005 Happell B, 'Clinical-academic partnerships research: converting the rhetoric into reality.', The international journal of psychiatric nursing research, 11 1218-1226 (2005)

An increasing recognition of the importance of research-based practice to the nursing profession has led to a number of strategies designed to increase the utilization and conduct... [more]

An increasing recognition of the importance of research-based practice to the nursing profession has led to a number of strategies designed to increase the utilization and conduct of nursing research. The transfer of nursing education from hospitals to universities occurred partly in response to the identified theory-practice gap. Subsequently, a significant investment in joint clinical-academic positions and clinical professorial positions has been made with the intention of bridging the gap between the tertiary sector and the clinical field. Anecdotal evidence suggests that neither strategy has achieved the desired degree of success. The available literature suggests that nurses do not tend to become involved in the conduct of research, nor do they readily utilise research findings in their practice. It is hypothesized in this paper that this reflects the strong cultural differences between the clinical and academic worlds in nursing. The aim of this paper is to discuss the impact of these cultural differences and describe specific principals that could contribute to significant cultural change and the bridging of the academic-clinician divide.

Citations Scopus - 8
2005 Happell B, 'Pink Floyd: Fond memory or contemporary role model?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 14 221-221 (2005)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-0979.2005.00386.x
2005 Happell B, 'Changes at the IJMHN', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 14 69 (2005)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-0979.2005.00360.x
2005 Charleston R, Happell B, 'Preceptorship in psychiatric nursing: An impact evaluation from an Australian perspective', Nurse Education in Practice, 5 129-135 (2005)

The importance of preceptorship in ensuring positive clinical experiences for undergraduates has been widely acknowledged in the literature. This is particularly the case for ment... [more]

The importance of preceptorship in ensuring positive clinical experiences for undergraduates has been widely acknowledged in the literature. This is particularly the case for mental health nursing due to the negative attitudes nursing students tend to hold towards this area of practice. The Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and Practice (CPNRP), introduced a subject: Preceptorship in Psychiatric Nursing, to facilitate the ability of clinicians to undertake the preceptorship role confidently and competently. This paper presents the findings from an evaluation of the impact of this subject on positive changes to practice in relation to preceptorship within the workplace setting. Participants from both the on-campus subject (n = 23) and a workshop conducted in rural Victoria (n = 5) took part in this qualitative study. The findings suggest that the subject has had a positive impact on the practice of preceptorship within the workplace. The impact at an organisational level was found to be higher amongst the rural participants. This is assumed to be a result of the fact that the rural participants were employed within the one service and used the workshop as an opportunity to address organisational issues. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2004.06.002
Citations Scopus - 5
2005 Happell B, Martin T, 'Changing the culture of mental health nursing: The contribution of nursing clinical development units', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 26 921-933 (2005)

The reluctance of nurses to utilise research findings in their practice has been extensively discussed in the literature. Nursing Clinical Development Units (NCDU) represent one a... [more]

The reluctance of nurses to utilise research findings in their practice has been extensively discussed in the literature. Nursing Clinical Development Units (NCDU) represent one approach to facilitating a greater interaction between research and nursing practice. This paper presents the results of an impact evaluation of an NCDU program operating in Victoria, Australia. In-depth interviews were conducted with participants in the NCDUprogram (n = 14). The findings suggest an increase in accessing and ultilising research by nurses since the introduction of the program, with an increased focus on evidence-based practice. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Inc.

DOI 10.1080/01612840500248213
Citations Scopus - 5
2005 Hayman-White K, Happell B, 'Nursing students' attitudes toward mental health nursina and consumers: Psychometric properties of a self-report scale', ARCHIVES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, 19 184-193 (2005)
DOI 10.1016/j.apnu.2005.05.004
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 37
2005 Happell B, 'Education for life: the evaluation of an innovative approach to facilitate ongoing learning for nurses.', The international journal of psychiatric nursing research, 10 1117-1128 (2005)

There is general consensus within the nursing profession that life-long learning is crucial for all nurses irrespective of their educational backgrounds. There currently is a pauc... [more]

There is general consensus within the nursing profession that life-long learning is crucial for all nurses irrespective of their educational backgrounds. There currently is a paucity of literature addressing both the problems experienced in accessing and utilising continuing education or innovative programs designed to overcome these problems, despite widespread acknowledgement of the problems encountered. In this paper the findings from the evaluation of the Clinician-Trainer Program, developed by the Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and Practice (CPNRP) are presented. This includes an evaluation of the course itself and of its impact on clinical practice. The findings suggest a high level of satisfaction with the course, but more importantly, it appears to be assisting trained clinicians to deliver professional development sessions within their workplace.

Citations Scopus - 6
2005 Happell B, 'Disseminating nursing knowledge--a guide to writing for publication.', The international journal of psychiatric nursing research, 10 1147-1155 (2005)

The dissemination of research findings and other forms of nursing knowledge is generally accepted as an element of accountability for professional practice. While an increase in n... [more]

The dissemination of research findings and other forms of nursing knowledge is generally accepted as an element of accountability for professional practice. While an increase in nursing research has been apparent in recent times, there seemingly remains a reluctance for nurses to publish the findings of their work. The identified barriers to writing for publication primarily focus on a lack of confidence in the ability to write in this arena, and uncertainty, apprehension and confusion regarding how exactly to go about writing and submitting a manuscript. The primary aim of this paper is to demystify the process of writing for publication by presenting a guide ranging from selecting the journal, to dealing with the reviewers' comments. Although the available literature includes a number of helpful hints, coverage of all of the relevant aspects in one article could not be located. It is intended that this paper will provide a valuable contribution by encouraging nurses to develop their research findings or other scholarly ideas into a manuscript to be submitted for publication.

Citations Scopus - 12
2005 Charleston R, Happell B, 'Coping with uncertainty within the preceptorship experience: The perceptions of nursing students', Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 12 303-309 (2005)

A substantial amount of time and resources are channelled into supporting clinical practicum in nursing education programmes. Attention is targeted at the most effective models to... [more]

A substantial amount of time and resources are channelled into supporting clinical practicum in nursing education programmes. Attention is targeted at the most effective models to achieve this aim. The provision of sound support models regardless of specific clinical setting is recognized as integral to student development and transition periods throughout nurses' careers. Within the mental health setting, this situation is compounded by the negative attitudes nursing students tend to hold towards people experiencing a mental illness. Preceptorship has been widely used both nationally and internationally for clinical practicum. Although this model seems to have been endorsed by virtue of its increasing use, additional examination is necessary to assess efficacy and effectiveness across clinical practicum, including those in mental health settings. In utilizing a grounded theory approach, this study addresses the question: what is the experience of preceptorship for undergraduate nursing students in the mental health setting? The major themes identified include: 'fear of the unknown', 'reconciling difference between general acute health and mental health settings' and 'supporting practice'. © 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2850.2005.00837.x
Citations Scopus - 29
2005 Charleston R, Happell B, 'Attempting to accomplish connectedness within the preceptorship experience: The perceptions of mental health nurses', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 14 54-61 (2005)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-0979.2005.00355.x
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
2005 Cleary M, Happell B, 'Promoting a sustainable mental health nursing workforce: An evaluation of a transition mental health nursing programme', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 14 109-116 (2005)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-0979.2005.00367.x
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 28
2005 Elsom S, Happell B, Manias E, 'Mental health nurse practitioner: Expanded or advanced?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 14 181-186 (2005)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-0979.2005.00379.x
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 19
2005 Happell B, 'Mental health nursing: Challenging stigma and discrimination towards people experiencing a mental illness', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 14 1 (2005)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-0979.2005.00339.x
Citations Scopus - 14
2005 Happell B, 'Controversy or bust . . . !', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 14 155 (2005)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-0979.2005.00373.x
2005 Cleary M, Happell B, 'Recruitment and retention initiatives: Nursing students' satisfaction with clinical experience in the mental health field', Nurse Education in Practice, 5 109-116 (2005)

The difficulty in attracting graduates of undergraduate nursing programs into mental health remains a challenge for the field. Positive clinical experience has been identified as ... [more]

The difficulty in attracting graduates of undergraduate nursing programs into mental health remains a challenge for the field. Positive clinical experience has been identified as a potential strategy in encouraging students to regard mental health nursing positively. This paper reports the findings of a survey administered to Undergraduate Nursing Students and Trainee Enrolled Nurses within the mental health area. The purpose of the survey was to measure satisfaction with clinical placements within an Area Mental Health Service. The information provided from the survey is directing the on-going development of clinical placements, clinical supports, education programs and recruitment and retention initiatives for nurses within the Central Sydney Area Mental Health Service. The findings indicate a generally high level of satisfaction with the clinical placement undertaken, however a number of strategies to improve satisfaction with placements were identified. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2004.06.001
Citations Scopus - 19
2004 Happell B, 'The centre for psychiatric nursing research and practice: An innovative approach to enhancing clinical nursing research in the psychiatric/mental health field', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 25 47-60 (2004)

The available nursing literature suggests that nurses engaged in clinical practice hold a somewhat ambivalent attitude towards nursing research. On the one hand, its value is ackn... [more]

The available nursing literature suggests that nurses engaged in clinical practice hold a somewhat ambivalent attitude towards nursing research. On the one hand, its value is acknowledged, but on the other, its relevance to clinical practice is questioned. This situation poses a significant barrier to the involvement of clinicians in research and the utilisation of findings in practice. This paper describes the implementation of a model to facilitate the development of a systematic research approach at the Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and Practice in Victoria, Australia. The development of strong relationships between the Centre and the clinical field was considered crucial in determining the success of this initiative. The introduction of a number of programs to foster the conduct and utilisation of clinical research are described, including: The Nursing Clinical Development Unit Program, the Clinical Research Fellowship Program, clinical research projects, the Collaborative Psychiatric Nursing Conference and strategies to encourage the dissemination of research information. In combination, these initiatives are expected to contribute to a systematic approach to engendering a research culture within psychiatric nursing in Victoria, Australia.

DOI 10.1080/01612840490249028-23
Citations Scopus - 6
2004 Pinikahana J, Happell B, 'Stress, burnout and job satisfaction in rural psychiatric nurses: A Victorian study', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 12 120-125 (2004)

Objective: To measure the level of stress, burnout and job, satisfaction in rural psychiatric nurses in Victoria, Australia. Method: This present study presents the findings of a ... [more]

Objective: To measure the level of stress, burnout and job, satisfaction in rural psychiatric nurses in Victoria, Australia. Method: This present study presents the findings of a research study undertaken with rural psychiatric nurses (n = 136) in two rural mental health services in Victoria. The study designed to measure their level of stress, burnout and job satisfaction using the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), the Nursing Stress Scale (NSS) and Job Satisfaction Scale (JSS). Results: The findings indicated that a low number rural psychiatric nurses suffered from 'high' level of burnout and the majority of nurses reported 'low level' of emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation scores. On the personal accomplishment subscale, only 11% recorded a 'high' score and 87% recorded 'low' score. On the Nursing Stress Scale, the 'workload' was the highest perceived stressor followed by 'inadequate preparation'. Conclusions: Paradoxically, the majority of rural psychiatric nurses stated that they were satisfied with their job, particularly with current situation at work, aspects of support and the level of involvement in decision making.

DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1854.2004.00572.x
Citations Scopus - 50
2004 Fogarty M, Happell B, Pinikahana J, 'The benefits of an exercise program for people with schizophrenia: A pilot study', PSYCHIATRIC REHABILITATION JOURNAL, 28 173-176 (2004)
DOI 10.2975/28.2004.173.176
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 23
2004 Happell B, Martin T, 'Exploring the impact of the implementation of a nursing clinical development unit program: What outcomes are evident?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 13 177-184 (2004)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-0979.2004.0330.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2004 Charleston R, Happell B, 'Evaluating the impact of a preceptorship course on mental health nursing practice', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 13 191-197 (2004)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-0979.2004.0332.x
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 17
2004 Lammers J, Happell B, 'Research involving mental health consumers and carers: a reference group approach', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 13 262-266 (2004)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-0979.2004.00343.x
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 19
2004 Happell B, 'Editorship of the IJMHN: Challenges and responsibilities', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 13 145 (2004)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-0979.2004.00325.x
2004 Happell B, 'Facilitating the professional development role of clinicians: Evaluating the impact of the clinician-trainer program', Nurse Education in Practice, 4 83-90 (2004)

The professionalisation of nursing has been accompanied by recognition of the need for ongoing professional development. Continuing education is considered as an important method ... [more]

The professionalisation of nursing has been accompanied by recognition of the need for ongoing professional development. Continuing education is considered as an important method in maintaining professional development. Despite this recognition there is a paucity of literature addressing either the problems experienced in accessing and utilising continuing education or innovative programs designed to overcome these problems. This paper describes the impact evaluation of the clinician-trainer program, developed by the Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and Practice (CPNRP). This program was developed with a view to equip experienced psychiatric/mental health clinicians with the skills to provide workplace professional development to nursing colleagues. The evaluation suggests that for most participants (n=21), the program has lead to an increase in the delivery of continuing education sessions. © 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/S1471-5953(03)00029-5
Citations Scopus - 5
2004 Lambert TJR, Chapman LH, 'Diabetes, psychotic disorders and antipsychotic therapy: a consensus statement', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 181 544-548 (2004)
Citations Scopus - 117Web of Science - 100
2004 Lammers J, Happell B, 'Mental health reforms and their impact on consumer and carer participation: A perspective from Victoria, Australia', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 25 261-276 (2004)

Victoria, Australia has experienced significant changes in the structure and delivery of mental health services over the past three decades. As a result of these changes, there is... [more]

Victoria, Australia has experienced significant changes in the structure and delivery of mental health services over the past three decades. As a result of these changes, there is now an expectation that consumers of services and their carers have increased opportunities to participate in the design and delivery of services. There currently exists a paucity of research that examines the degree to which this goal has been realized in practice. This article presents findings from a qualitative research study investigating the perceptions of consumers and carers regarding the degree to which the contemporary service system allows for their increased participation. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with consumers and carers. The findings suggest that consumers have identified an increased scope for their participation, although this varies considerably from service to service. Carers on the other hand described very little opportunity for participation at any level. The responses of carers suggest there may be some inherent difficulty in facilitating increased participation for both groups. Strategies to support carer participation are urgently required if the goals of state and national mental health policy in Australia are to be realized.

DOI 10.1080/01612840490274769
Citations Scopus - 40
2004 Hancox K, Lynch L, Happell B, Biondo S, 'An evaluation of an educational program for clinical supervision', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 13 198-203 (2004)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-0979.2004.0333.x
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 19
2004 Happell B, Manias E, Roper C, 'Wanting to be heard: mental health consumers' experiences of information about medication', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 13 242-248 (2004)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-0979.2004.00340.x
Citations Scopus - 72Web of Science - 61
2004 Happell B, 'Mental health nursing: A changing landscape', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 13 209 (2004)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-0979.2004.00335.x
2004 Carta B, Happell B, Pinikahana J, 'Influence of an educational program on mental health professionals' knowledge and perceptions of problematic alcohol and other drug use', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 10 43-50 (2004)

The issue of co-morbid substance abuse and mental illness is clearly identified in the literature. The adequacy of the knowledge and skills of mental health professionals to deal ... [more]

The issue of co-morbid substance abuse and mental illness is clearly identified in the literature. The adequacy of the knowledge and skills of mental health professionals to deal with the complex problems associated with this co-morbidity has received considerable attention. The effect of an educational program on mental health professionals' knowledge and perceptions of problematic alcohol and substance abuse was measured in a questionnaire survey in Victoria, Australia. The aim was to determine if an educational program could facilitate knowledge and attitudinal change among mental health professionals. In the pre-survey, a questionnaire on knowledge, skills, attitudes and practices was administered to 378 clinicians in Victoria (133 were returned, representing a 46% response rate). In the post-survey, 131 questionnaires were returned (response rate 35%). Significant changes in knowledge were reported following the educational program in the areas of overall knowledge of drug and alcohol, diagnosis of drug and alcohol abuse, and management of drug and alcohol abusers. While positive attitudes towards problematic drug and alcohol issues were expressed, specific educational programs to enhance their knowledge and skills in assessment and management of problematic drug and alcohol users are recommended.

DOI 10.1071/PY04025
2003 Pinikahana J, Happell B, Keks NA, 'Suicide and schizophrenia: A review of literature for the decade (1990-1999) and implications for mental health nursing', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 24 27-43 (2003)

This paper presents an overview of recent evidence on general and specific risk factors for suicide in patients with schizophrenia. The authors highlight the significant factors c... [more]

This paper presents an overview of recent evidence on general and specific risk factors for suicide in patients with schizophrenia. The authors highlight the significant factors contributing to the likelihood of suicide in patient s diagnosed with schizophrenia. This information will enhance the delivery of nursing care to these patients in all health care settings. A review of literature was conducted by two methods of investigation: Medline and CINAHL search and a manual search through articles from 1990 to 1999. The lifetime risk of committing suicide is estimated at about 9-13% of persons with schizophrenia, and it is 20 to 50 times higher than that in the general population. Young white males diagnosed with schizophrenia who are depressed, unmarried, unemployed, socially isolated, and functionally impaired and who lack external support are the most vulnerable in the early stages of schizophrenic illness. Findings can be instrumental in identifying and treating patients who are most vulnerable and in making psychiatric nurses aware of the scenarios and critical stages of the disease process when suicide is most likely to occur.

DOI 10.1080/01612840305305
Citations Scopus - 42
2003 Happell B, Pinikahana J, Roper C, 'Changing attitudes: The role of a consumer academic in the education of postgraduate psychiatric nursing students', ARCHIVES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, 17 67-76 (2003)
DOI 10.1053/apnu.2003.00008
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 39
2003 Happell B, Pinikahana J, Roper C, 'Changing attitudes: the role of a consumer academic in the education of postgraduate psychiatric nursing students.', Archives of psychiatric nursing, 17 67-76 (2003)
DOI 10.1016/s0883-9417(03)00002-5
2003 Summers M, Happell B, 'Patient satisfaction with psychiatric services provided by a Melbourne tertiary hospital emergency department', Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 10 351-357 (2003)

The mainstreaming of psychiatric services within the general healthcare system has created fundamental changes to the manner in which patients access acute psychiatric services. T... [more]

The mainstreaming of psychiatric services within the general healthcare system has created fundamental changes to the manner in which patients access acute psychiatric services. This change was intended to reduce the stigma associated with psychiatric diagnosis and therefore contribute to improved treatment outcomes for patients. The aim of this paper is to discuss the results of a study designed to ascertain the level of psychiatric patient satisfaction with the services received in the emergency department of a Melbourne metropolitan hospital. The results indicate a high level of satisfaction, particularly with the availability of staff with psychiatric qualifications and experience to provident treatment, support and care. The major areas of dissatisfaction identified by patients included: lengthy waiting times, lack of privacy in the triage area and negative attitudes of general staff. These findings support the argument from the literature for psychiatric consultancy services to be available in the emergency department, and further identifies the need for triage guidelines to be tailored to the needs of mental health patients and for emergency department triage staff to be appropriately educated to adequately triage these patients.

DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2850.2003.00600.x
Citations Scopus - 36
2003 Happell B, Roper C, 'The role of a mental health consumer in the education of postgraduate psychiatric nursing students: The students' evaluation', Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 10 343-350 (2003)

Recent Australian Government policy reflects the integral nature of active consumer participation to the planning and delivery of mental health services. The effectiveness of cons... [more]

Recent Australian Government policy reflects the integral nature of active consumer participation to the planning and delivery of mental health services. The effectiveness of consumer participation in improving mental health services has received some attention in the literature. Commonwealth Government funding enabled the development of a partnership between the Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and Practice and the Melbourne Consumer Consultants' Group. The successful application enabled the employment of a mental health consumer as an academic staff member of the Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and Practice. One important aspect of this role involved the mental health consumer teaching a consumer perspective to postgraduate psychiatric nursing students. The primary aim was to increase the students' awareness of and sensitivity to greater consumer participation within the mental health arena. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of the consumer academic role in teaching within the Postgraduate Diploma in Advanced Clinical Nursing (Psychiatric Nursing). An evaluation form was distributed to students (n = 21) on completion of the semester. The findings suggest the experience was considered beneficial to students and was impacting significantly on their current practice. This project supports the value of consumer participation in the education of mental health professionals.

DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2850.2003.00599.x
Citations Scopus - 65
2003 Lammers J, Happell B, 'Consumer participation in mental health services: Looking from a consumer perspective', Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 10 385-392 (2003)

Widespread changes to the structure and delivery of mental health services have effected considerable change in the role of the service user or consumer. The view of consumers of ... [more]

Widespread changes to the structure and delivery of mental health services have effected considerable change in the role of the service user or consumer. The view of consumers of mental health services as passive recipients of care and treatment is gradually undergoing a significant shift, in light of an increasing expectation that consumers be provided with opportunities to become actively involved in all aspects of their care. Consumer participation is now broadly reflected in government policy; however, to date there has been little exploration of the extent to which the policy is being realized in practice. To provide a greater understanding of these experiences and opinions, in-depth interviews were conducted with consumers of mental health services (n = 15). The interview transcripts were analysed through the identification and explication of major themes. The findings reinforce the need to view consumers as heterogenous and respond to individual needs and interests regarding consumer participation. Despite variations in experience there is a clear need to develop mechanisms to support consumer involvement and to influence the attitudes of health professions to become more valuing of a consumer perspective. Nurses are in an ideal position to lead this process.

DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2850.2003.00598.x
Citations Scopus - 80
2003 Pinikahana J, Manias E, Happell B, 'Transcultural nursing in Australian nursing curricula', Nursing and Health Sciences, 5 149-154 (2003)

As a result of the fact that Australia is a multicultural society with many people who come from non-English speaking backgrounds (NESB), the objective of the present study was to... [more]

As a result of the fact that Australia is a multicultural society with many people who come from non-English speaking backgrounds (NESB), the objective of the present study was to discuss the extent to which transcultural nursing education is incorporated into undergraduate nursing curricula. A survey was undertaken to determine the availability of nursing modules for undergraduate nursing students through Australian university websites on 'transcultural nursing' or related modules. Although the inclusion of these modules into nursing education provide an opportunity for nurses to perceive and respond to different patient behaviors in multicultural societies, it is not sufficient to understand the complexity of the health care needs of a multicultural society. The survey findings suggest that many universities have not included transcultural nursing modules in their nursing curricula. To address this problem, more transcultural nursing modules need to be introduced into nursing curricula and nursing academics need to refine their attitudes about the importance of cultural aspects of patient care within nursing education.

DOI 10.1046/j.1442-2018.2003.00146.x
Citations Scopus - 18
2003 Happell B, Summers M, Pinikahana J, 'Measuring the effectiveness of the national Mental Health Triage Scale in an emergency department', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 12 288-292 (2003)
DOI 10.1046/j.1447-0349.2003.t01-7-.x
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 18
2003 Happell B, Pinikahana J, Martin T, 'Stress and burnout in forensic psychiatric nursing', STRESS AND HEALTH, 19 63-68 (2003)
DOI 10.1002/smi.963
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 19
2003 Happell B, Johnston L, Hill C, 'Implementing research findings into mental health nursing practice: Exploring the clinical research fellowship approach', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 12 251-258 (2003)
DOI 10.1046/j.1447-0349.2003.t01-3-.x
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 33
2002 Miller G, Happell B, 'Recognizing the talent within: preparing clinicians for a role in professional development.', Journal of continuing education in nursing, 33 168-190 (2002)

BACKGROUND: Ongoing professional development is recognized as crucial to the psychiatric and mental health nursing profession; however, implementing effective professional develop... [more]

BACKGROUND: Ongoing professional development is recognized as crucial to the psychiatric and mental health nursing profession; however, implementing effective professional development programs has proved problematic. The Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and Practice in Victoria, Australia, developed a clinician-trainer course to overcome some of the identified problems. METHOD: An evaluation was conducted to measure participant satisfaction with the program. RESULTS: The initial evaluation suggests the course delivery and content were considered useful and relevant to participants, although areas for improvement were identified. CONCLUSION: The model developed is potentially effective but a longitudinal evaluation is required to determine the impact of the course on the implementation of professional development in the clinical domain.

Citations Scopus - 1
2002 Happell B, Sharrock J, 'Evaluating The Role of A Psychiatric Consultation-Liaison Nurse in The Australian General Hospital', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 23 43-60 (2002)

The importance of Psychiatric Consultation-Liaison Nursing (PCLN) in improving health outcomes for patients experiencing mental health problems has received some attention in the ... [more]

The importance of Psychiatric Consultation-Liaison Nursing (PCLN) in improving health outcomes for patients experiencing mental health problems has received some attention in the nursing literature. However, little effort has been made to evaluate the impact of this role. The study presented in this paper was conducted in order to assist in redressing this paucity. Focus groups were conducted with nurses (n = 17) employed at a large general hospital in Melbourne, Australia. The nurse participants were asked to discuss their views about utilizing the services of the specialist PCLN employed in this hospital. The responses of participants were overwhelmingly positive. The four main themes to emerge from the study were: helping staff, making contact, implementing strategies, and utilizing attributes. These findings are presented and discussed as a contribution to and extension of the existing literature.

DOI 10.1080/01612840252825473
Citations Scopus - 12
2002 Pinikahana J, Happell B, Taylor M, Keks NA, 'Exploring the complexity of compliance in schizophrenia', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 23 513-528 (2002)

A large body of literature indicates that people diagnosed with schizophrenia are highly likely to not comply with their prescribed treatment regime at some stage during the illne... [more]

A large body of literature indicates that people diagnosed with schizophrenia are highly likely to not comply with their prescribed treatment regime at some stage during the illness process. Factors that indicate the risk of noncompliance have been the subject of considerable research over a number of years. This paper presents an extensive review of the research literature on the subject of compliance in schizophrenia. A number of factors have constituted the focus of research into this area. These include: socio-demographic characteristics, including age, gender and socioeconomic economic status; illness factors including insight, psychiatric symptomatology, duration of illness, substance abuse, and adverse side-effects of medication; psychosocial factors such as health beliefs and social supports; and treatment factors including the nature of the therapeutic relationship between patients and health care professionals. While the results of relevant research do not provide a clear and conclusive picture of compliance, they provide important information to guide the pivotal role of the mental health nurse in facilitating patient compliance.

DOI 10.1080/01612840290052677
Citations Scopus - 36
2002 Happell B, 'The role of nursing education in the perpetuation of inequality', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 22 632-640 (2002)
DOI 10.1016/S0260-6917(02)00104-1
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 20
2002 Happell B, 'Nursing home employment for nursing students: valuable experience or a harsh deterrent?', JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, 39 529-536 (2002)
DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2648.2002.02321.x
Citations Scopus - 86Web of Science - 71
2002 Sharrock J, Happell B, 'THE ROLE OF A PSYCHIATRIC CONSULTATION LIAISON NURSE IN A GENERAL HOSPITAL: A CASE STUDY APPROACH', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, 20 39-47 (2002)
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2002 Happell B, Summers M, Pinikahana J, 'The triage of psychiatric patients in the hospital emergency department: A comparison between emergency department nurses and psychiatric nurse consultants', Accident and Emergency Nursing, 10 65-71 (2002)

The triage of patients in the hospital emergency department (ED) has developed as an efficient method to determine the level of urgency and provide appropriate care and treatment.... [more]

The triage of patients in the hospital emergency department (ED) has developed as an efficient method to determine the level of urgency and provide appropriate care and treatment. The triage process has been found to be less effective for patients presenting with mental health related problems. Triage guidelines specifically tailored for mental health needs have been introduced in the attempt to overcome existing problems, however, the effectiveness of these guidelines has not been extensively tested. This paper presents the findings of a study conducted in a large metropolitan hospital in Melbourne, Australia. All presentations to the ED for psychiatric problems (n = 137) were triaged using the mental health guidelines over a 3-month period. The same presentations were triaged by psychiatric nurse consultants employed in the ED and the results compared. The results indicate a high level of difference in the triage ranking by the two groups of nurses, with emergency nurses tending to classify presentations as more urgent than their psychiatric nurse colleagues. These findings suggest that mental health education for emergency nurses is necessary if the guidelines are to be used effectively and improve outcomes for patients presenting with psychiatric problems. © 2002 published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

DOI 10.1054/aaen.2001.0336
Citations Scopus - 37
2002 Summers M, Happell B, 'The quality of psychiatric services provided by an Australian tertiary hospital emergency department: A client perspective', Accident and Emergency Nursing, 10 205-213 (2002)

The mainstreaming of psychiatric services within the general health care system has created fundamental changes to the manner in which clients access acute psychiatric services. A... [more]

The mainstreaming of psychiatric services within the general health care system has created fundamental changes to the manner in which clients access acute psychiatric services. A review of the literature suggests that this process has been problematic. The current study involved the conduct of telephone interviews with psychiatric clients (n = 136) to ascertain their level of satisfaction with the services received in the emergency department of a Melbourne Metropolitan Hospital. The results were analysed using descriptive statistics. The study participants indicated a high level of satisfaction. Particular emphasis was placed upon the availability of staff with psychiatric qualifications and experience to provide treatment, support and care. Dissatisfaction was noted by some clients regarding lengthy waiting times, lack of privacy in the triage area and negative attitudes of emergency department staff. These findings support the value of psychiatric consultancy services in the emergency department, and further identify the need for triage guidelines to be tailored to the needs of mental health clients. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/S0965-2302(02)00158-3
Citations Scopus - 9
2002 Carta B, Happell B, Pinikahana J, 'Mental health professionals' knowledge and perceptions of problematic alcohol and substance use: A questionnaire survey', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 8 67-74 (2002)

The drug and alcohol related knowledge and perceptions of clinicians were examined in order for the Substance Use and Mental Illness Treatment Team to develop a relevant training ... [more]

The drug and alcohol related knowledge and perceptions of clinicians were examined in order for the Substance Use and Mental Illness Treatment Team to develop a relevant training curriculum for clinicians. A questionnaire on knowledge, skills, attitudes, and practices was distributed to 378 clinicians in Victoria. One hundred and seventy-three clinicians returned the questionnaire giving an overall response rate of 46%. The survey results showed that, although both a knowledge and skills gap exists in assessment and management of alcohol and drug problems, knowledge levels were of an adequate standard overall. Notable areas of weakness included basic knowledge of alcohol and drugs, such as the number of grams of alcohol in a standard drink and the number of alcohol free days per week recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council. While positive attitudes towards problematic drug and alcohol issues were expressed, specific educational programs to enhance skills in assessment and management of problematic drug and alcohol users are needed.

2002 Pinikahana J, Happell B, Carta B, 'Mental health professionals' attitudes to drugs and substance abuse', Nursing and Health Sciences, 4 57-62 (2002)

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the mental health professionals&apos; attitudes to drug and substance abuse in Victoria, Australia. The drug- and alcohol-relat... [more]

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the mental health professionals' attitudes to drug and substance abuse in Victoria, Australia. The drug- and alcohol-related attitudes of clinicians were examined in order to develop a relevant training curriculum for clinicians. A questionnaire on knowledge, skills, attitudes and practises was distributed to mental health clinicians (n = 378) in Victoria. One hundred and seventy-three clinicians returned the questionnaire, giving an overall response rate of 46%. The survey results show that the attitude of mental health professionals to drug and substance abuse is generally a positive one. The majority of respondents held positive views on treatment interventions and they are optimistic that drug and alcohol dependence are treatable illnesses. A positive and more optimistic attitude towards treatment interventions should enable health professionals, particularly nurses, to provide the necessary care for those in need of medical care.

DOI 10.1046/j.1442-2018.2002.00104.x
Citations Scopus - 34
2002 Happell B, Martin T, 'Changing the mental health nursing culture: the nursing clinical development unit approach.', International journal of mental health nursing, 11 54-60 (2002)

Developments in nursing as a profession have been accompanied by a perceived need to increase the relevance of research to nursing practice. The increased exposure to research in ... [more]

Developments in nursing as a profession have been accompanied by a perceived need to increase the relevance of research to nursing practice. The increased exposure to research in nursing curricula and the development of nursing academia has had little impact on either the conduct of clinical research or its utilization within the work place culture. Nursing Clinical Development Units (NCDU) were established with the view to overcoming some of these barriers through partnerships between academia and the clinical field. The aim of NCDU is to strive for improved patient outcomes. Education and research activities should be directed to achieve this patient-orientated outcome. The aim of this paper is to describe the NCDU program introduced by the Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and Practice (CPNRP) in Melbourne, Victoria. The way in which the program is designed to facilitate the relationship between CPNRP and the clinical field with the aim of contributing to improved patient outcomes will be emphasized. An evaluation of the program to date suggests that such links will be strengthened, and that this partnership will contribute to a greater involvement in clinically based research.

DOI 10.1046/j.1440-0979.2002.00226.x
Citations Scopus - 6
2002 Sharrock J, Happell B, 'The psychiatric consultation-liaison nurse: thriving in a general hospital setting.', International journal of mental health nursing, 11 24-33 (2002)

One outcome of mainstreaming of psychiatric services into the general health system is that nurses working in general hospitals now have increased contact with patients experienci... [more]

One outcome of mainstreaming of psychiatric services into the general health system is that nurses working in general hospitals now have increased contact with patients experiencing mental health problems. The literature suggests that general and comprehensive nurses do not believe they have the skills, confidence and knowledge to care adequately for patients in their care who have a mental health problems. The Psychiatric Consultation-Liaison Nurse (PCLN) can assist and educate general nurses in the care of patients with mental health problems who are receiving care in a medical/surgical setting. This study is based upon the findings of a Nurse Practitioner Pilot Study funded by the Department of Human Services (Victoria). In this paper the authors will present a brief overview of the role and model of practice of the PCLN, the means of referral, a profile of consultations and an overview of educational and policy development activity. The findings of the evaluation based on a combination of a Health Professional Satisfaction Survey and Focus Group Interviews will also be presented. The positive contribution of the PCLN to the confidence of nurses and how this might impact on patient outcomes will be highlighted. The value placed on the PCLN role by general hospital staff is evidence of psychiatric nursing not just surviving but thriving.

Citations Scopus - 20
2002 Pinikahana J, Happell B, Hope J, Keks NA, 'Quality of life in schizophrenia: a review of the literature from 1995 to 2000.', International journal of mental health nursing, 11 103-111 (2002)

The measurement of the quality of life of patients diagnosed with psychiatric disorders has become central to evaluating the effectiveness of treatments offered by Australian ment... [more]

The measurement of the quality of life of patients diagnosed with psychiatric disorders has become central to evaluating the effectiveness of treatments offered by Australian mental health services. The importance of quality of life as an indicator of the outcomes of interventions has been reflected by a large body of research seeking to measure the impact of variables such as gender, ethnicity and duration of illness on the measurable quality of life of an individual diagnosed with schizophrenia. This study aims to review and synthesize the recent literature in which quality of life has been measured by the use of at least one quality of life instrument. It is concludes that while the measurement of quality of life is valuable as a measure of outcomes, it should be treated as only one means of doing so.

DOI 10.1046/j.1440-0979.2002.00233.x
Citations Scopus - 87
2002 Cleary M, Jordan R, Happell B, 'Measuring outcomes in the workplace: the impact of an education program.', International journal of mental health nursing, 11 269-275 (2002)

There is an increasing pressure for mental health nurses to engage in research and quality improvement activities to demonstrate how nursing care contributes to improved patient o... [more]

There is an increasing pressure for mental health nurses to engage in research and quality improvement activities to demonstrate how nursing care contributes to improved patient outcomes. This paper describes the evaluation of an educational program, particularly its impact on participants' attitudes towards and confidence in the measurement of patient outcomes. Nurses from the Central Sydney Area Mental Health Service (n = 38) participated in one of two 1-day workshops. The participants were asked to complete three surveys. The first prior to the commencement of the workshop, the second on completion of the workshop and the third 3 months later. The findings suggest the workshops were beneficial to participants in many areas relevant to the measurement of outcomes. The recommendations made on the basis of this study are described.

DOI 10.1046/j.1440-0979.2002.00258.x
Citations Scopus - 4
2002 Happell B, Manias E, Pinikahana J, 'The role of the inpatient mental health nurse in facilitating patient adherence to medication regimes.', International journal of mental health nursing, 11 251-259 (2002)

Non-adherence to antipsychotic medication is associated with relapse of psychiatric symptoms and readmission to inpatient mental health services. The important role of the mental ... [more]

Non-adherence to antipsychotic medication is associated with relapse of psychiatric symptoms and readmission to inpatient mental health services. The important role of the mental health nurse in facilitating adherence has been acknowledged, however, there has been little exploration of how nurses themselves perceive this aspect of their role. A qualitative study was conducted to explore the perceptions of mental health nurses employed in inpatient settings regarding their role in facilitating medication adherence. Focus groups were conducted with 22 nurses from three inpatient settings in metropolitan Melbourne. The main themes to emerge from the data were: nurses' responsibilities in medication management; ways in which nurses are educated about antipsychotic medication; barriers to the provision of medication management, and barriers to effective patient adherence. Recommendations for more effective practice are discussed.

Citations Scopus - 35
2002 Happell B, Pinikahana J, Roper C, 'Attitudes of postgraduate nursing students towards consumer participation in mental health services and the role of the consumer academic.', International journal of mental health nursing, 11 240-250 (2002)

Consumer participation in health care is increasingly becoming an expectation of health services. While important progress has been made in the mental health area, the attitudes o... [more]

Consumer participation in health care is increasingly becoming an expectation of health services. While important progress has been made in the mental health area, the attitudes of mental health professionals towards consumers poses a severe limitation. Greater consumer involvement in the education of mental health professionals has been presented as a strategy to encourage the development of a greater acceptance of consumer involvement by health professionals. A consumer academic position has been introduced into the Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and Practice. An important aspect of this role concerns the education of postgraduate psychiatric/mental health nursing students, in order to provide a consumer perspective and encourage greater consumer participation. In order to determine the impact of this project a questionnaire was developed by the authors to measure attitudes to consumer participation and the role of the consumer academic. This paper presents the first stage of this study. The questionnaire was administered to students (n = 25) on the first day of the course. The findings suggest that most students favour a high level of consumer participation but that this is limited to specific areas of treatment planning and delivery. Furthermore, the students' demonstrate some level of ambivalence regarding the value and necessity of the consumer academic role.

Citations Scopus - 39
2002 Happell B, Roper C, 'Promoting consumer participation through the implementation of a consumer academic position', Nurse Education in Practice, 2 73-79 (2002)

Consumer participation in mental health care is increasingly becoming an expectation. A review of the literature suggests that the negative attitudes of mental health professional... [more]

Consumer participation in mental health care is increasingly becoming an expectation. A review of the literature suggests that the negative attitudes of mental health professionals towards people diagnosed with mental illness constitutes a significant barrier to the realization of this goal. The education of health professionals has been identified as a major strategy for reducing the negatively of such attitudes, and to promoting a more participatory relationship between consumer and provider. This paper describes the process of the development and implementation of an academic role for a consumer of mental health services in teaching psychiatric nursing students. A personal case study by the consumer academic is provided to illustrate the process of this collaborative venture. This paper contributes to the development of framework to guide the implementation of similar positions. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1054/nepr.2002.0068
Citations Scopus - 23
2002 Happell B, Carta B, Pinikahana J, 'Nurses' knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding substance use: A questionnaire survey', Nursing and Health Sciences, 4 193-200 (2002)

A questionnaire on nurses&apos; knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and practises regarding substance use was distributed to 302 nurses in Victoria. One hundred and thirty-four returned... [more]

A questionnaire on nurses' knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and practises regarding substance use was distributed to 302 nurses in Victoria. One hundred and thirty-four returned the questionnaire, giving an overall response rate of 44.3%. The survey results showed that although knowledge and skill gaps exist in assessment and management of alcohol and drug problems, overall knowledge levels were adequate. Although positive attitudes towards substance use were expressed, specific educational programs to enhance nurses' skills in assessment and management of substance-related disorders may be beneficial.

DOI 10.1046/j.1442-2018.2002.00126.x
Citations Scopus - 37
2002 Mullen A, Murray L, Happell B, 'Multiple family group interventions in first episode psychosis: Enhancing knowledge and understanding.', International journal of mental health nursing, 11 225-232 (2002)

Families play a major role in promoting recovery and preventing relapse following the first psychotic episode. This paper presents a multiple family group education programme for ... [more]

Families play a major role in promoting recovery and preventing relapse following the first psychotic episode. This paper presents a multiple family group education programme for the families of clients with first episode psychosis. The educational needs of the families are also discussed. The results of this evaluation show that the programme improved the families' perceptions of their overall knowledge and understanding of mental illness and its treatment. This evaluation demonstrates the efficacy of such groups and the key role of community mental health nurses in providing family interventions.

DOI 10.1046/j.1440-0979.2002.00253.x
Citations Scopus - 21
2001 Happell B, Brooker J, 'Who will look after my grandmother? Attitudes of student nurses toward the care of older adults.', Journal of gerontological nursing, 27 12-17 (2001)

A review of the literature illustrates the unpopularity of nursing in the elderly population related to other areas of nursing practice. The aim of this article is to present the ... [more]

A review of the literature illustrates the unpopularity of nursing in the elderly population related to other areas of nursing practice. The aim of this article is to present the findings of a research project conducted in Victoria, Australia, investigating the career preferences of undergraduate nursing students. The results indicate caring for older adults is considered the least popular area of practice for Year 1 nursing students. The reason given by students for their choices demonstrates a negative view of this type of work, largely based on inaccuracies and misconceptions. The implications of these findings for the future care of elderly individuals are discussed.

Citations Scopus - 68
2001 Wand T, Happell B, 'The mental health nurse: Contributing to improved outcomes for patients in the emergency department', Accident and Emergency Nursing, 9 166-176 (2001)

Fundamental changes to health-care policy in Australia have led to an increase in the extent to which emergency department staff come into contact with patients experiencing menta... [more]

Fundamental changes to health-care policy in Australia have led to an increase in the extent to which emergency department staff come into contact with patients experiencing mental health problems. This has been problematic for nurses, many of whom perceive themselves as lacking the skills and expertise to provide appropriate care and treatment to this client group. Psychiatric/mental health consultation-liaison nursing within the emergency department is becoming established as a means to overcome some of the problems identified. Despite this growth there is a paucity of literature evaluating the effectiveness of this position. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of the mental-health consultation-liaison nurse role in an inner city teaching hospital in Sydney Australia. The survey involved a three stage approach to data collection. The data collected at the commencement of the position included focus groups to ascertain the needs of emergency department nurses and a questionnaire designed to measure the skills, confidence and perceived knowledge of emergency department nursing and medical staff. An evaluation of the satisfaction of nurses and doctors was conducted towards the end of the three month pilot programme. The results confirmed the need for positions of this type and suggested a high level of satisfaction with the service provided. © 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

DOI 10.1054/aaen.2000.0248
Citations Scopus - 46
2001 Sharrock J, Happell B, 'The role of the psychiatric consultation-liaison nurse in the improved care of patients experiencing mental health problems receiving care within a general hospital environment', Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession, 11 260-270 (2001)

The Psychiatric Consultation-Liaison Nurse (PCLN) has an imporrtant role in supporting nurses and other health care professionals in caring for patients experiencing mental health... [more]

The Psychiatric Consultation-Liaison Nurse (PCLN) has an imporrtant role in supporting nurses and other health care professionals in caring for patients experiencing mental health problems in a non-psychiatric environment. The limited available research findings suggest the PCLN role to be effective in terms of staff satisfaction, and some suggestion of cost savings is apparent. This paper refers to a survey of the attitudes of health professionals (n-113) too the services provided by the PCLN in a large metropolitan hospital in Melbournre, Australia. The results indicate a high level of satisfaction with the services of the PCLN. Enhancement of the participants' professional role, the professional role of nursing and improving health outcomes was amongst the perceived benefits of the PCLN role. © eContent Management Pty Ltd.

DOI 10.5172/conu.11.2-3.260
Citations Scopus - 7
2001 Happell B, Taylor C, 'Negative attitudes towards clients with drug and alcohol related problems: finding the elusive solution.', The Australian and New Zealand journal of mental health nursing, 10 87-96 (2001)

The difficulties experienced by nurses in providing care to clients with drug and alcohol related problems within general hospital settings have been clearly identified in the lit... [more]

The difficulties experienced by nurses in providing care to clients with drug and alcohol related problems within general hospital settings have been clearly identified in the literature. Despite this, the problem continues with little or no evidence of improvement. This paper reports the results of a research project undertaken in a large private hospital in metropolitan Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The study sought to ascertain whether a difference in attitudes, confidence and perceived knowledge related to the care of clients with drug and alcohol problems would be evident between those nurses who used consultation and liaison services from a specialist drug and alcohol unit and those who did not. A questionnaire was administered to 200 nurses, with a 53% completion rate (n = 106). The results showed very little difference between the groups with the exception of the perceived knowledge category which indicated a statistically significant difference.

DOI 10.1046/j.1440-0979.2001.00198.x
Citations Scopus - 31
2001 Martin T, Happell B, 'Undergraduate nursing students' views of mental health nursing in the forensic environment', The Australian and New Zealand journal of mental health nursing, 10 116-125 (2001)

The literature clearly demonstrates that mental health nursing tends to be viewed negatively by undergraduate nursing students. While positive clinical experiences have been found... [more]

The literature clearly demonstrates that mental health nursing tends to be viewed negatively by undergraduate nursing students. While positive clinical experiences have been found to encourage more favourable attitudes towards mental health nursing, suitable placements are becoming scarce. An evaluation of clinical placements at the Victorian Institute of Forensic Mental Health (VIFMH) was undertaken to determine whether appropriate learning opportunities were offered, and identify the impact of the placement on students' attitudes to mental health nursing. The results suggest that VIFMH provides valuable learning experiences to increase students' understanding of mental health nursing and is effective in producing more positive attitudes towards this area of practice.

DOI 10.1046/j.1440-0979.2001.00201.x
Citations Scopus - 15
2001 Sharrock J, Happell B, 'An overview of the role and functions of a psychiatric consultation liaison nurse: An Australian perspective', Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 8 411-417 (2001)

The role of the psychiatric consultation liaison nurse (PCLN) has increased substantially in popularity over the last few years. Despite the growth of this position, a paucity of ... [more]

The role of the psychiatric consultation liaison nurse (PCLN) has increased substantially in popularity over the last few years. Despite the growth of this position, a paucity of literature regarding the role, functions and effectiveness of psychiatric consultation liaison nursing continues to exist. The current study was undertaken as part of the Victorian Nurse Practitioner Project. A significant aspect of this study concerned collection of data on the activities of the PCLN. This approach enabled an extensive and detailed profile of the PCLN to be formulated. The findings indicate that the PCLN provided a service to nursing, medicine and allied health in relation to patients experiencing mental health problems in the general hospital setting. Patients referred to the PCLN presented varied clinical features in terms of medical, surgical and mental health disorders. The PCLN performed a range of interventions. The results of this study make a significant contribution to address the current paucity of literature.

DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2850.2001.00415.x
Citations Scopus - 14
2001 Happell B, 'Comprehensive nursing education in Victoria: Rhetoric or reality?', Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 8 507-516 (2001)

Significant and widespread changes to the education of the psychiatric nursing workforce in Victoria, Australia are resulting in serious problems in the recruitment of new nursing... [more]

Significant and widespread changes to the education of the psychiatric nursing workforce in Victoria, Australia are resulting in serious problems in the recruitment of new nursing staff. In reviewing the available literature, it is evident that undergraduate nursing students do not commence their educational program with a strong interest in pursuing a career in psychiatric nursing. In light of this knowledge, the role of education in providing a comprehensive view of the nursing profession becomes paramount. Research investigating the impact of education on the attitudes of students to psychiatric nursing as a career option has produced mixed and often inconclusive results. A longitudinal study was undertaken in Victoria, Australia. Students of the majority of universities in which undergraduate nursing programs were operating participated in this study. The participants were asked to rank nine areas of nursing specialty in order of preference at the commencement and immediately prior to the completion of the nursing program. Despite a significant improvement in the popularity of psychiatric nursing as a career choice, this area was ranked at number 8 at both pre- and post-program test. The analysis of open-ended questions demonstrated a marked change in the overall attitudes towards the mentally ill and psychiatric nursing.

DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2850.2001.00418.x
Citations Scopus - 46
2000 Happell B, 'Student Interest in Perioperative Nursing Practice as a Career', AORN Journal, 71 600-605 (2000)

© 2000 AORN, Inc. Perioperative nursing is in crisis because of the difficulty recruiting sufficient numbers of graduate nurses and the threat of nonnursing employees performing t... [more]

© 2000 AORN, Inc. Perioperative nursing is in crisis because of the difficulty recruiting sufficient numbers of graduate nurses and the threat of nonnursing employees performing traditional nursing duties. The relative unpopularity of perioperative nursing as a career choice for graduate nurses is commonly attributed to little exposure to the specialty's theory and practice in undergraduate nursing education programs. This article discusses results of a longitudinal study's first phase to ascertain career preferences of undergraduate nursing students. Findings suggest that when students begin nursing programs, they consider perioperative nursing a favorable career option. Few studies regarding student nurses' attitudes toward perioperative nursing exist, making these results significant. AORN J 71 (March 2000) 600¿605.

DOI 10.1016/S0001-2092(06)61581-0
Citations Scopus - 7
2000 Happell B, Rushworth L, 'Can educational methods influence the popularity of psychiatric nursing?', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 20 318-326 (2000)
DOI 10.1054/nedt.1999.0432
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 24
2000 Sharrock J, Happell B, 'The role of the psychiatric consultation-liaison nurse in the general hospital.', The Australian journal of advanced nursing : a quarterly publication of the Royal Australian Nursing Federation, 18 34-39 (2000)

The mainstreaming of psychiatric services has increased the amount of contact nurses have with clients experiencing mental health problems within the general hospital environment.... [more]

The mainstreaming of psychiatric services has increased the amount of contact nurses have with clients experiencing mental health problems within the general hospital environment. A review of the literature suggests that general nurses find themselves lacking in the skills, confidence and knowledge to care adequately for these patients. The aim of this paper is to discuss the potential contribution of the psychiatric consultation-liaison nurse in addressing such problems in order to improve health outcomes for patients experiencing mental health problems. While a number of positions for Psychiatric Consultation-Liaison Nurses are being created throughout Australia, there is a paucity of literature relating to the development of this important role. This paper is intended to contribute to the advancement of a body of knowledge in this area.

Citations Scopus - 15
2000 Happell B, 'Psychiatric nursing education: can it make a difference?', The international journal of psychiatric nursing research, 6 657-669 (2000)

A review of the literature clearly indicates that psychiatric nursing is not a popular career choice for undergraduate nursing students. While it appears from the literature that ... [more]

A review of the literature clearly indicates that psychiatric nursing is not a popular career choice for undergraduate nursing students. While it appears from the literature that exposure to the theory and practice of psychiatric nursing can influence the attitudes of student nurses towards the mentally ill, no clear picture emerges from the research. Furthermore, the design of previous research does not address the relationship between improved attitudes towards the mentally ill and an increase in the popularity of psychiatric nursing. This paper discusses the results of a quasi-experimental study, which compared the attitudes of student nurses towards psychiatric nursing as a career option prior to and following completion of the psychiatric nursing component of the course. The post-test results suggest a strong and statistically significant increase in the popularity of psychiatric nursing. The possible impact of problem based learning in influencing these results is discussed.

Citations Scopus - 8
2000 Happell B, 'Can education make a difference to undergraduate nursing students' attitudes to psychiatric nursing?', Contemporary nurse : a journal for the Australian nursing profession, 9 40-50 (2000)

The introduction of undergraduate nursing education throughout Australia has had serious implications for the position of psychiatric nursing in attracting graduates into this fie... [more]

The introduction of undergraduate nursing education throughout Australia has had serious implications for the position of psychiatric nursing in attracting graduates into this field. There is some evidence from the results of limited research that a more positive view of psychiatric nursing can emerge as the result of education. However, such a relationship has not been found to be strong. This paper reports the findings of a quasi-experimental research study, which compared student nurses' attitudes towards psychiatric nursing as a career option both before and after completing the psychiatric nursing component of the course. The post-test results demonstrate a strong and statistically significant increase in the popularity of psychiatric nursing. Analysis of the open-ended responses suggests that exposure to the theory and practice of psychiatric nursing has dispelled many myths regarding this area of practice. The possible impact of problem-based learning on these results is discussed.

DOI 10.5172/conu.2000.9.1.40
Citations Scopus - 27
2000 Sharrock J, Happell B, 'The psychiatric consultation-liaison nurse: Towards articulating a model for practice', The Australian and New Zealand journal of mental health nursing, 9 19-28 (2000)

Psychiatric consultation-liaison nursing (PCLN) has experienced considerable growth in the past decade in Australia. In spite of this growth, a model for PCLN practice has not bee... [more]

Psychiatric consultation-liaison nursing (PCLN) has experienced considerable growth in the past decade in Australia. In spite of this growth, a model for PCLN practice has not been adequately developed and articulated. The aim of this paper is to begin the process of articulating a model for PCLN practice in order to redress the paucity of literature in this area. The paper includes a brief history of PCLN; articulation of the components of the PCLN role, namely consultation, liaison and culture brokering; the impact of PCLN on quality improvement; and the importance of research articulation for the development of the PCLN role.

DOI 10.1046/j.1440-0979.2000.00157.x
Citations Scopus - 16
2000 Rushworth L, Happell B, '¿Psychiatric nursing was great, but I want to be a ¿real¿ nurse¿: Is psychiatric nursing a realistic choice for nursing students?', The Australian and New Zealand journal of mental health nursing, 9 128-137 (2000)

The present paper reports the results of a quasi-experimental study that examined the relationship between exposure to the theory and practice of psychiatric nursing and the desir... [more]

The present paper reports the results of a quasi-experimental study that examined the relationship between exposure to the theory and practice of psychiatric nursing and the desirability of psychiatric nursing as a future career choice. A time series design was utilized to enable a comparison between pre- and post-test scores. A significant increase in the popularity of psychiatric nursing was evident in the experimental group in the post-test phase, while no significant change was detected in the control group. Despite this increase, a large number of students from the experimental group indicated their reluctance to undertake a career in psychiatric nursing without first consolidating their skills in the medical-surgical area. This situation reflects an image of nursing that is contrary to the caring philosophy it purports to embrace, but which appears to favour certain areas of nursing practice at the expense of others.

DOI 10.1046/j.1440-0979.2000.00174.x
Citations Scopus - 39
2000 Happell BM, '"Love is all you need"? Student nurses' interest in working with children.', Journal of the Society of Pediatric Nurses : JSPN, 5 167-173 (2000)

ISSUES AND PURPOSE: To investigate the impact of comprehensive nursing education on the future career interests of undergraduate nursing students, with particular emphasis on atti... [more]

ISSUES AND PURPOSE: To investigate the impact of comprehensive nursing education on the future career interests of undergraduate nursing students, with particular emphasis on attitudes toward working with children. DESIGN AND METHODS: Descriptive design with surveys of 793 undergraduates in university schools of nursing throughout Victoria, Australia. RESULTS: Working with children is the most popular of nine possible career choices. Student explanations reflected a love of, and desire to work with, children, suggesting a relatively naive and uninformed view. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: In view of the problems experienced in the recruitment and retention of adequate numbers of pediatric nurses, there is an urgent need to promote a more realistic view of this area of practice.

Citations Scopus - 3
1999 Happell B, Taylor C, '"We may be different, but we are still nurses": An exploratory study of drug and alcohol nurses in Australia', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 20 19-32 (1999)

The problems experienced by generalist nurses in providing care to patients who abuse alcohol and other drugs have been acknowledged in the literature. Despite the demonstrated su... [more]

The problems experienced by generalist nurses in providing care to patients who abuse alcohol and other drugs have been acknowledged in the literature. Despite the demonstrated success of educational programs in improving attitudes and enhancing the confidence of nurses in dealing with this clientele, the problem remains. Although large numbers of nurses specialize in the care of patients with drug- and alcohol-related problems, their specific skills have not been well researched. This article reports on a qualitative research project undertaken with 6 nurses currently practicing in a drug and alcohol unit in metropolitan Victoria, Australia. The findings suggest that these nurses are very skilled in their area of practice, and they can potentially provide information and support to nurses from other areas. This liaison role can help minimize the negative experiences frequently en countered by nonspecialist nurses caring for patients with drug- and alcohol-related problems.

DOI 10.1080/016128499248763
Citations Scopus - 6
1999 Harris DM, Happell B, 'Hospital-based psychiatric experience before community-based practice for nurses: Imperative or dispensable?', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 20 495-503 (1999)

This article describes an Australian research project that explored the relevance of hospital-based experience in preparing psychiatric nurses for community-based practice. A qual... [more]

This article describes an Australian research project that explored the relevance of hospital-based experience in preparing psychiatric nurses for community-based practice. A qualitative design was selected to obtain in-depth information in an area in which no formal research has been undertaken. In-depth interviews were conducted with 6 psychiatric nurses currently engaged in community-based practice. The interviews were audiotaped, and the transcribed data were analyzed for major themes. The results indicated that the participants did not believe their hospital experience had prepared them to function effectively in the community. In some respects hospital experience was perceived as having hindered their transition into the community environment. This exploratory- study indicates the need for further research and the exploration of alternative methods to prepare psychiatric nurses for community-based practice.

DOI 10.1080/016128499248466
Citations Scopus - 2
1999 Happell B, 'When I grow up I want to be a ...? Where undergraduate student nurses want to work after graduation', JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, 29 499-505 (1999)
DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2648.1999.00913.x
Citations Scopus - 80Web of Science - 67
1999 Happell B, 'Nurse education: Is it responding to the forces of supply and demand?', NURSING ECONOMICS, 17 252-256 (1999)
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
1999 Harris DM, Happell B, 'The skills required for conducting a community psychiatric nursing assessment: a qualitative study.', The Australian journal of advanced nursing : a quarterly publication of the Royal Australian Nursing Federation, 16 7-13 (1999)

The shift in focus from primarily institutionally based care, to community-based care, has highlighted the need for community psychiatric nurses with appropriate skills to care fo... [more]

The shift in focus from primarily institutionally based care, to community-based care, has highlighted the need for community psychiatric nurses with appropriate skills to care for clients experiencing mental illness within the community. This paper describes the results of a qualitative research project undertaken to examine the skills required by psychiatric nurses in conducting an assessment within the community. In depth interviews were conducted with a sample of six currently practising community psychiatric nurses, with differing levels of experience. The findings identified the main skills as: interpersonal skills; psychiatric nursing knowledge base; the ability to work with a variety of treatment modalities; and, literacy skills. The specific significance of these skills for the educational preparation of community psychiatric nurses is discussed.

Citations Scopus - 3
1999 Happell B, 'The image of critical care nursing: does it tell the whole story?', Australian Critical Care, 12 55-58 (1999)

The nursing profession is presently at a crucial stage of its development in terms of the popular image it projects. There has been a tendency for nurses to emphasise their techni... [more]

The nursing profession is presently at a crucial stage of its development in terms of the popular image it projects. There has been a tendency for nurses to emphasise their technical skills at the expense of the more psychosocial aspects of their role. Due to the highly technical nature of the working environment, critical care nurses are in particular danger of being viewed primarily in that technical light. This paper focuses on the image of critical care nursing held by undergraduate student nurses. The first stage of a longitudinal research project suggests critical care nursing to be a highly popular future career choice for students at the commencement of their course. Data analysis revealed that attraction to this area centred on the perceived emergency, life-saving and highly technical nature of the environment. There was very little emphasis on the more psychosocial aspects of the critical care nurse's role. The implications of this situation for the image of critical care nursing require serious consideration and intervention. © 1999 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/S1036-7314(99)70537-0
Citations Scopus - 2
1999 Happell B, Taylor C, 'Drug and alcohol education for nurses: Have we examined the whole problem?', Journal of Addictions Nursing, 11 180-185 (1999)

A review of the relevant literature clearly illustrates that providing care for patients with drug- and alcohol-related problems is frequently difficult for nurses. Negative attit... [more]

A review of the relevant literature clearly illustrates that providing care for patients with drug- and alcohol-related problems is frequently difficult for nurses. Negative attitudes towards these patients and a lack of adequate knowledge and skills to deliver appropriate care are frequently postulated as explanations for this situation. Research has emphasized both the deficiency of drug and alcohol education within nursing education at all levels, and the effectiveness of education in producing more positive attitudes, and greater confidence amongst nurses in dealing with these patients. Little research has investigated the impact of this educational deficit upon nurses who specialize in the care of patients with drug- and alcohol-related problems. This paper addresses the findings of a qualitative research project undertaken with nurses from a drug and alcohol unit in a general hospital. Three main issues emerged from this study: the educational content of drug and alcohol issues in preregistration nursing programs; individual experiences in the care of drug and alcohol patients; and the identified need for drug and alcohol education for nurses. The findings suggest that specialist drug and alcohol nurses are also impeded by inadequate educational opportunities. © 1999 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved.

DOI 10.3109/10884609909041545
Citations Scopus - 19
1999 Happell B, 'Who wants to be a psychiatric nurse? Novice student nurses' interest in psychiatric nursing', Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 6 479-484 (1999)

Available research findings suggest that nursing students do not regard psychiatric nursing as a desirable future career option. This paper addresses the results of a research pro... [more]

Available research findings suggest that nursing students do not regard psychiatric nursing as a desirable future career option. This paper addresses the results of a research project conducted by the author. This research addresses the relative popularity of psychiatric nursing in comparison to other nursing specialties, within Victoria, Australia. The research was conducted by use of a questionnaire in which commencing undergraduate nursing students were asked to rank nine areas of nursing specialty in order of preference and provide some explanation for their choices. The results indicate that psychiatric nursing emerges as the second least popular career choice for student nurses at this stage of their education.

DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2850.1999.00249.x
Citations Scopus - 44
1999 Happell B, Taylor C, 'In-service drug and alcohol education for generalist nurses: Are they interested?', Journal of Substance Use, 4 164-169 (1999)

A review of the literature reveals that generalist nurses tend to have negative attitudes towards providing care to patients with drug and alcohol problems. Pessimistic attitudes ... [more]

A review of the literature reveals that generalist nurses tend to have negative attitudes towards providing care to patients with drug and alcohol problems. Pessimistic attitudes are frequently attributed to inadequate education to enable the development of knowledge and skills required to deal confidently with these patients. Insufficient content in drug and alcohol issues has been found to be characteristic of undergraduate nursing curricula throughout England, America and Australia. In-service education is often presented as a viable alternative. This paper addresses the paucity of research in relation to in-service education on drug and alcohol related issues, for registered nurses. A research project was conducted involving general nurses (n = 106) employed in a private, acute, medical-surgical hospital, were surveyed to ascertain the amount of drug and alcohol in-service education they had received, whether they were interested in more, and the type of in-service education they would require. The results of this study clearly demonstrated that the registered nurses recognized their need for more education in this area.

Citations Scopus - 6
1999 Happell B, Taylor C, 'The educational and liaison roles of drug and alcohol nurses: A potential resource?', Journal of Substance Use, 4 45-50 (1999)

The difficulties encountered by nurses in caring for patients with drug and alcohol related problems have been consistently acknowledged in the literature. Negative attitudes towa... [more]

The difficulties encountered by nurses in caring for patients with drug and alcohol related problems have been consistently acknowledged in the literature. Negative attitudes towards these patients, and inadequate knowledge and skills to adequately care for them, are generally considered as the source of the problem. Despite this acknowledgement, drug and alcohol education continues to occupy a very small presence within nursing curricula. In-service education has been demonstrated to effect a more positive perspective towards patients with drug and alcohol problems, yet there is no evidence to suggest the situation is improving. This paper discusses the potential role of the drug and alcohol liaison nurse and addresses the paucity of literature referring to such a role. The results of a qualitative study by the authors revealed that specialized drug and alcohol nurses consider themselves suitably placed to fulfil this function. Although the process at this stage is small scale and informal, the findings suggest that drug and alcohol nurses are capable of fulfilling an educative and liaison role. In doing this they can facilitate the development of greater confidence and more positive attitudes amongst general nurses towards this aspect of nursing care.

DOI 10.3109/14659899909052895
Citations Scopus - 2
1998 Happell B, 'The implications of legislative change on the future of psychiatric nursing in Victoria', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, 32 229-234 (1998)
DOI 10.3109/00048679809062733
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 23
1998 Happell B, 'Student nurses' attitudes toward a career in community health', JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY HEALTH, 23 269-279 (1998)
DOI 10.1023/A:1018771421521
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
1998 Happell B, 'Problem-based learning: providing hope for psychiatric nursing?', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 18 362-367 (1998)
DOI 10.1016/0021-8634(92)80005-D
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 10
1998 Happell B, 'Psychiatric nursing: has it been forgotten in contemporary nursing education?', Nurse educator, 23 9-10 (1998)

Contemporary nursing education in Victoria, Australia aims to produce graduates with the capacity for employment in all areas of nursing at beginning practitioner level. Despite t... [more]

Contemporary nursing education in Victoria, Australia aims to produce graduates with the capacity for employment in all areas of nursing at beginning practitioner level. Despite this aim, psychiatric nursing occupies a relatively small proportion of undergraduate curricula. Research findings suggest that psychiatric nursing does not emerge as a popular career choice within comprehensive education. To prevent a crisis in nursing education, greater attention must be devoted to the theory and practice of psychiatric nursing, so that it can occupy a position of equal importance to other areas of nursing practice.

DOI 10.1097/00006223-199811000-00005
Citations Scopus - 5
1998 Happell B, 'University-based psychiatric nursing education: a promise for the future?', The Australian journal of advanced nursing : a quarterly publication of the Royal Australian Nursing Federation, 15 7-13 (1998)

University-based nursing education was introduced in Victoria, Australia, to redress the deficiencies attributed to the system of hospital-based training. The narrow and restricti... [more]

University-based nursing education was introduced in Victoria, Australia, to redress the deficiencies attributed to the system of hospital-based training. The narrow and restrictive focus, maintenance of the subservient position of nurses, the employee status of students, an inadequate relationship between theory and practice and failure to keep pace with changes in the role of the nurse were the main deficiencies identified. This paper refers to a qualitative research study which examines the differences between graduates of a university-based and hospital-based psychiatric nursing program during the year following graduation. The findings suggest that the tertiary-based course had the potential to significantly redress some inadequacies of the hospital-based course to produce different qualities within its graduates.

Citations Scopus - 5
1998 Rushworth L, Happell B, 'Psychiatric nursing education: Doing the impossible?', ARCHIVES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, 12 319-325 (1998)
DOI 10.1016/S0883-9417(98)80045-9
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 20
1997 Usher K, Happell B, 'Taking neuroleptic medications: a review.', The Australian and New Zealand journal of mental health nursing, 6 3-10 (1997)

Failure to take neuroleptic medications as prescribed often results in relapse and readmission to a psychiatric facility. It is the responsibility of the psychiatric/mental health... [more]

Failure to take neuroleptic medications as prescribed often results in relapse and readmission to a psychiatric facility. It is the responsibility of the psychiatric/mental health nurse to ensure that clients have sufficient knowledge and support to enable them to make informed decisions regarding their medication regimen. In addition, the nurse has an important role as client advocate with regard to this treatment option. However, the issues surrounding noncompliance represent a major challenge to psychiatric/mental health nurses. This paper explores these complex issues surrounding the taking of prescribed neuroleptic medication, in particular, the impact of personal factors, knowledge of neuroleptic medications, therapy factors and the helper relationship upon the medication taking behaviour of psychiatric clients is presented in relation to the literature and recent research findings. Finally, the implications of these factors towards the role of the mental health nurse is discussed.

Citations Scopus - 6
1997 Happell B, 'Psychiatric nursing in Victoria, Australia: A profession in crisis', Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 4 417-422 (1997)

The introduction of the Nurses Act in 1993 resulted in the cessation of separate undergraduate education as preparation for psychiatric nursing practice in Victoria, Australia. Th... [more]

The introduction of the Nurses Act in 1993 resulted in the cessation of separate undergraduate education as preparation for psychiatric nursing practice in Victoria, Australia. The focus of this paper is to present the nature and implications of the current legislation in light of the relative size of the psychiatric component within Victorian courses and the relevant literature and research findings regarding the position of psychiatric nursing within comprehensive courses. The potential crisis faced by the psychiatric nursing profession in securing a viable workforce for the future will be highlighted.

DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2850.1997.00039.x
Citations Scopus - 8
1996 Happell B, 'Focus group interviews as a tool for psychiatric nursing research.', The Australian and New Zealand journal of mental health nursing, 5 40-44 (1996)

This paper explores the potential of focus group interviews in psychiatric nursing research. The main advantage of focus groups lies in allowing a larger number of participants to... [more]

This paper explores the potential of focus group interviews in psychiatric nursing research. The main advantage of focus groups lies in allowing a larger number of participants to be included in the research, promoting greater discussion and idea generation than would be possible in individual interviews. However, as a research method the focus group is relatively unknown in psychiatric nursing and is therefore underutilized. The purpose of this article is to outline the potential advantages and disadvantages of focus groups as a research method. The process of focus group interviews is illustrated by the author's own experience with this method.

Citations Scopus - 21
1996 Happell B, 'Tertiary psychiatric nursing graduates: something different or more of the same?', The Australian and New Zealand journal of mental health nursing, 5 112-119 (1996)

Nursing education was transferred to the tertiary sector as the result of perceived inadequacies of the hospital-based system. The degree to which tertiary-based psychiatric nursi... [more]

Nursing education was transferred to the tertiary sector as the result of perceived inadequacies of the hospital-based system. The degree to which tertiary-based psychiatric nursing education has, in Victoria, redressed these deficiencies is considered. This paper focuses upon research conducted with registered psychiatric nurses to ascertain their perception of the difference between tertiary and hospital-based psychiatric nursing graduates. The graduates were interviewed during their third year of study and again at the end of their first post-graduate year. The data collected from these interviews were supported by interviews with educators from the tertiary and hospital-based courses. The interview data as a whole emphasized characteristic differences between hospital and tertiary graduates and underlined the potential advantages of the tertiary course.

Citations Scopus - 3
1996 Usher K, Happell B, 'Neuroleptic medication: the literature and implications for mental health nursing.', The Australian and New Zealand journal of mental health nursing, 5 191-198 (1996)

The past twenty years have been a period of consolidation in the pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia followed more recently by a period where a number of new, atypical neuroleptics h... [more]

The past twenty years have been a period of consolidation in the pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia followed more recently by a period where a number of new, atypical neuroleptics have enhanced the treatment options available to people with schizophrenia. In this article the contemporary research into neuroleptic medications, the mainstay of treatment for schizophrenia, is reviewed and critiqued. In particular, the article addresses important issues such as drug efficacy and action, the therapeutic effects of neuroleptics, side effects, including the recent research related to these side effects and, finally, the implications for mental health nurses. The issues raised here have sufficient relevance for mental health nurses for items to be considered in all undergraduate nursing and postgraduate mental health nursing courses.

Citations Scopus - 4
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 16
Total funding $9,013,047

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $706,419

Improving the cardiometabolic health of people with psychosis: The Physical Health Nurse Consultant service$706,419

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Brenda Happell, Dr Jackie Curtis, Dr Michelle Banfield, Dr John Goss, Associate Professor Theophile Niyonsenga, Dr Robert Stanton
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1801015
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20171 grants / $84,000

Review of the Alignment and Transition Arrangements between Adolescent and Adult Mental Health Services in Queensland (in collaboration with Health Outcomes International)$84,000

Funding body: Queensland Health

Funding body Queensland Health
Project Team

Happell, B., Scholz, B., Platania-Phung, C. & Bocking, J.

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20161 grants / $19,640

Consumer participation in health services: Barriers and enablers$19,640

Funding body: University of Canberra

Funding body University of Canberra
Project Team

Happell, B., Banfield, M., Bocking, J., Scholz, B., & Platania-Phung, C.

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20153 grants / $1,531,000

SYNERGY: Nursing and Midwifery Research Centre$1,225,000

Funding body: SYNERGY Nursing & Midwifery Research Centre (University of Canberra & ACT Health)

Funding body SYNERGY Nursing & Midwifery Research Centre (University of Canberra & ACT Health)
Project Team

Happell, B.

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Co-Produced Mental Health Nursing Education. Erasmus + Strategic Partnerships for Higher Education$300,000

Funding body: Erasmus+

Funding body Erasmus+
Project Team

Biering, P., Lahti, M, Happell, B., Bocking, J., Van der Vaart, K., Horgan, A., Granerud, A., MacGabhann, L.

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Physical health of people with mental illness: Carers’ perspectives$6,000

Funding body: ACT Health Mental Health Policy Unit and Carers ACT

Funding body ACT Health Mental Health Policy Unit and Carers ACT
Project Team

Happell, B.

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20141 grants / $322,000

Pathways to primary care: Improving the physical health outcomes of people with severe mental illness$322,000

Funding body: Western Australian Department of Health

Funding body Western Australian Department of Health
Project Team

Wynaden, D., Heslop, K., Laughame, J., Happell, B.

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20133 grants / $348,666

Establishment of a service agreement for the development and implementation of innovative solutions for clinical training placements$230,177

Funding body: Queensland Health

Funding body Queensland Health
Project Team

Welch, A., McAllister, M., Happell, B., Byrne, L., Moran, M., Chapman, M. & Connor, J.

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Mental health pilot project$73,500

Funding body: Queensland Health

Funding body Queensland Health
Project Team

Happell, B.

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Metabolic monitoring in mental illness$44,988

Funding body: Queensland Centre for Social Science Innovation

Funding body Queensland Centre for Social Science Innovation
Project Team

Happell, B. & Stanton, R.

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20123 grants / $398,322

Web-base physical activity interventions for people with mental health conditions$300,000

Funding body: CQ University

Funding body CQ University
Project Team

Happell, B., Vandelanotte, C. & Duncan, M.

Scheme Research Award Advancement Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

A Pilot Study of Cardiometabolic Health Nursing in a Community Mental Health Service.$73,000

Funding body: The Australian Centre For Health Services Innovation (AusHSI)

Funding body The Australian Centre For Health Services Innovation (AusHSI)
Project Team

Happell, B., Hoey, W. & Scott, D

Scheme AusHSI Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Investigating the physical health of consumers accessing community mental health care services$25,322

Funding body: Queensland Health

Funding body Queensland Health
Project Team

Happell, B. & Scott, D.

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20113 grants / $5,603,000

The Health Collaborative Research Network$5,530,000

Funding body: Commonwealth

Funding body Commonwealth
Project Team

Happell, B. & Kyd, J.

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Consumer and Health Professional Capacity Building Project$50,500

Funding body: Capricornia Division of General Practice

Funding body Capricornia Division of General Practice
Project Team

Happell, B. & Byrne, L.

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Service delivery models and consumer participations strategies in SEQ mental health NGOs$22,500

Funding body: Queensland Alliance

Funding body Queensland Alliance
Project Team

Happell, B., Byrne, L., Burke, K. & Choudhury, J.

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N
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Dr Brenda Happell

Position

Professor
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

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