Professor Rhonda Wilson

Professor Rhonda Wilson

Professor

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Looking ahead to an exceptional student experience

Professor Rhonda Wilson is a Wiradjuri woman and Professor of Nursing in the Faculty of Health and Medicine. She is currently Australia’s only Aboriginal Professor of Mental Health Nursing. Hear from Professor Wilson as she reflects on her aspirations for improving mental health outcomes and education opportunities for Indigenous people.

Video: Looking ahead to an exceptional student experience

Looking ahead to an exceptional student experience

Hear from the Faculty of Health and Medicine’s Professor of Nursing, Professor Rhonda Wilson.

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Career Summary

Biography

Mental Health Nursing Scientist with a research focus on digital health

Prof Rhonda Wilson RN CMHN PhD is  Professor in Nursing at the University of Newcastle, Australia. She returned to Australia in 2019 (working as Associate Professor of Nursing at University of Canberra) after living and working in Denmark (University of Southern Denmark) where she was Associate Professor of E Mental Health and Head of Research for the Telepsychiatric Centre in a regional psychiatric hospital service area.

Rhonda has published extensively in international journals, book chapters and conference papers. She is a Registered Nurse in Australia, and a Credentialled Mental Health Nurse, currently serving on the Australian Nurses and Midwives Registered Nurse Course Accreditation Committee. She has previously worked as a clinical nurse, researcher and academic in Australia in various roles over the last 30 years; the past 12 years as a mental health educator for student nurses and other health professions, as well as supervising higher degree research students.

She is a member of the Editorial Board for the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing which is the highest impact mental health nursing journal in the world  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/14470349

In 2018 her co-edited text book was awarded best Tertiary (Wholly Australian) Teaching and Learning Resource – Blended Learning at the 2018 National Educational Publishing Awards. This is a prestigious educational publishing award that demonstrates our innovation in transforming learning materials and integrating traditional print and digital learning designs that interface with virtual learning platforms frequently used by Australian and New Zealand universities. Our blended learning model integrates work integrated learning and includes student, consumer and clinician narratives in such a way that the student can engage with the learning material from a range of perspectives. This textbook is the first nursing textbook that Cambridge University Press has published, and so achieving an award of this type in the second edition of the book is recognised as a significant achievement. Proctor, N., Hamer, H., McGarry, D., Wilson, R. L., & Froggatt, T. (Editors) (2014) Second Edition (2017) Third Edition in prep (2021). Mental Health: A person-centred approach. Melbourne: Cambridge University Press.

Through her work as a mental health clinician and as a researcher, Rhonda has specialised in the mental health care of hard to reach populations in regional and rural communities, and particularly with young people. Her main interests are in developing evidence-based precision digital therapeutics aimed at enhancing recovery.

The main theme for her research is developing and sustaining a Technology Enhanced Mental Health Lab. This involves a number of research projects working on various aspect of digital health research with a focus on technology that enhances person-centred recovery. There are several themes, but most are focused on clinical relevancy and ensuring a strong contribution to a future evidence base to support quality and safe development, trial and implementation of digital health interventions, together with enhancing the workforce development to incorporate digital technology to improve health and well-being, and recovery for people with health needs. She is interested to include research students (Masters research and PhD candidates) with topics that deal with information and self-help, quality and safety, early identification and early interventions, acute health matters through to complex and chronic conditions across the lifespan.

Rhonda is experienced with the use and supervision of a variety of research theories, paradigms and methods and software. A selected list follows: Qualitative and Mixed Methods; Case Study (Yin); Phenomenology; Social Ecology; Ethnography; Observational; Useability and Feasibility; Prototype development and testing; Time Series Analysis; Indigenous Research Methods (Storywork); Narrative; Survey; Ricoeurs Interpretative Methods; Digital methods and recruitment; Integrative and Scoping Review; Nvivo.

As an Aboriginal person herself, she is personally interested in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, and International Indigenous and First Nations peoples’ health and well-being. She is especially interested to encourage the scholarship and research of other Indigenous people. 

Rhonda is available to supervise higher degree research students,

More about her work can be found on these social media channels:

Researchgatehttps://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rhonda_Wilson3

Twitter: @RhondaWilsonMHN https://twitter.com/RhondaWilsonMHN

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/EMentalHealthNurse 

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/ResearchReady

Wordpresshttps://rhondawilsonmhn.com/

LinkedInhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/assocprofrhondawilson/

Soundcloudhttps://soundcloud.com/ementalhealthlab


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of New England

Keywords

  • digital health
  • e mental health
  • mental health
  • nursing
  • telepsychiatric

Languages

  • English (Mother)
  • Danish (Working)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111005 Mental Health Nursing 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Professor University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
28/10/2016 - 28/6/2019 Associate Professor in E Mental Health and Research Director University of Southern Denmark
Denmark
4/2/2019 - 8/4/2020 Associate Professor of Nursing University of Canberra
Department of Nursing
Australia
2/3/2020 -  Professor (Affiliate) SYNERGY Nursing & Midwifery Research Centre (University of Canberra & ACT Health)
Australia
1/1/2020 -  Professor of Nursing Massey University
New Zealand
1/3/2017 -  Adjunct Associate Professor The University of New England
Australia
1/1/2015 - 30/11/2015 Indigenous Academic Advisor The University of New England
Australia
1/1/2008 - 30/1/2017 Lecturer in Mental Health Nursing The University of New England
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Mental Health: A Person-centred approach, Cambridge University Press, UK (2017)
2017 Mental Health: A Person-centred approach, Cambridge University Press, UK (2017)
2016 Bloomfield J, Pegram A, Wilson R, Pearson A, Procter N, McGuiness B, et al., Clinical Nursing Skills An Australian Perspective, Cambridge University Press (2016)
2013 Mental Health: A person-centred approach, Cambridge University Press, Melbourne, Vic (2013)
Show 1 more book

Chapter (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Wilson R, Waqanaviti K, 'Navigating First Nations social and emotional well-being in mainstream mental health services', Yatdjuligin: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nursing and Midwifery Care., Cambridge University Press, Port Melbourne (2020)
2019 Hansen JP, Wilson R, 'Digital Clinical Decision Making in Nursing', Clinical Nursing, FADL Publishers, Copenhagen 255-271 (2019)
2017 Wilson R, 'Rural and regional mental health', Mental health, Cambridge University Press, Melbourne, Vic (2017)
2017 Wilson R, Bristow S, Wilson S, 'Elimination', Clinical Nursing Skills, Cambridge University Press, Melbourne, Vic (2017)
2017 Wilson R, 'E-Mental Health', Mental Health: A Person-centred approach, Cambridge University Press, Melbourne, Vic (2017)
2017 Wilson R, 'Promoting comfort', Clinical Nursing Skills, Cambridge University Press, Melbourne, Vic (2017)
2017 Wilson R, 'Mental health and substance use', Mental Health, Cambridge University Press, Melbourne, Vic (2017)
2017 Wilson R, Riley S, 'Mental health of children and young people', Mental Health, Cambridge University Press, Melbourne, Vic (2017)
2016 Wilson R, 'Overview of Australian healthcare', Clinical nursing skills: An Australian perspective, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 3-24 (2016)
Show 6 more chapters

Journal article (38 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Marcussen J, Thuen F, O'Connor M, Wilson RL, Hounsgaard L, 'Double bereavement, mental health consequences and support needs of children and young adults When a divorced parent dies', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 29 1238-1253 (2020) [C1]

© 2020 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Aims and objectives: To explore how children and young adults from divorced families experience double bereavement when they lose a divorced par... [more]

© 2020 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Aims and objectives: To explore how children and young adults from divorced families experience double bereavement when they lose a divorced parent with cancer and how the double bereavement influences their mental health consequences and need of support. Background: Children and young people who are confronted with the cancer and death of a parent is a highly stressful life event, which is associated with an increased risk of mental health problems, especially when children experience divorced parental cancer and death. Design: Participant observations and interviews with a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach and COREQ standards for reporting qualitative research. Methods: We conducted 340¿hr of participant observations within nine different support groups totalling 27 children and young adults from divorced families and included 28 interviews with participants and relatives. Analyses are based on Ricoeur's theory of interpretation: naïve reading, structural analysis, interpretation and discussion. Results: The experiences with double bereavement identified three main themes: 1. navigating through multiple transitions and disruptions within two family worlds; 2. consequences for mental health including stress overload and disruptions to well-being; and 3. need for accessible support derived from close relationships and professionals within and in-between family worlds. Conclusion: Children and young adult's double bereavement includes multiple transitions and disruptions often related to stress overload and mental health problems. Support from close relationships and professionals is experienced as helpful in the prevention and mitigation of mental health problems. Relevance to clinical practice: There is a need for targeted accessible support availability to children, young adults and their families when a divorced parent is dying of cancer in clinical practice. Our findings suggest that specific health policies for health professionals should be developed to target improved support for these families.

DOI 10.1111/jocn.15181
2020 Fisker Christensen L, Wilson R, Hansen JP, Thuroe Nielsen C, Alkier Gildberg F, 'A qualitative study of patients and providers experiences with the use of videoconferences by older adults with depression', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, (2020)
2020 Wilson RL, Carryer J, Dewing J, Rosado S, Gildberg F, Hutton A, et al., 'The state of the nursing profession in the International Year of the Nurse and Midwife 2020 during COVID-19: A Nursing Standpoint', Nursing Philosophy, 21 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/nup.12314
Co-authors Alison Hutton, Amanda Johnson10
2020 Cronin C, Hungerford C, Wilson RL, 'Using Digital Health Technologies to Manage the Psychosocial Symptoms of Menopause in the Workplace: A Narrative Literature Review.', Issues Ment Health Nurs, 1-8 (2020)
DOI 10.1080/01612840.2020.1827101
2020 Geia L, Baird K, Bail K, Barclay L, Bennett J, Best O, et al., 'A unified call to action from Australian nursing and midwifery leaders: ensuring that Black lives matter.', Contemp Nurse, 1-12 (2020)
DOI 10.1080/10376178.2020.1809107
Co-authors Michael Hazelton, Amanda Johnson10, Tracy Levett-Jones, Maralyn Foureur, Brett Mitchell, Alison Hutton
2019 Marcussen J, Hounsgaard L, O'Connor M, Moller S, Wilson R, Thuen F, 'Parental death in young adults with divorced compared to non-divorced parents: The effect on prolonged grief and mental health', DEATH STUDIES, (2019)
DOI 10.1080/07481187.2019.1648337
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2019 Marcussen J, Hounsgaard L, Bruun P, Laursen MG, Thuen F, Wilson R, 'The Divorced Family-Focused Care Model: A Nursing Model to Enhance Child and Family Mental Health and Well-Being of Doubly Bereaved Children Following Parental Divorce and Subsequent Parental Cancer and Death', JOURNAL OF FAMILY NURSING, 25 419-446 (2019)
DOI 10.1177/1074840719863918
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2019 Neilsen AS, Wilson RL, 'Combining e-mental health intervention development with human computer interaction (HCI) design to enhance technology-facilitated recovery for people with depression and/or anxiety conditions: An integrative literature review', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 28 22-39 (2019)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12527
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
2019 Tingleff EB, Hounsgaard L, Bradley SK, Wilson RL, Gildberg FA, 'A Matter of Trust and Distrust: A Qualitative Investigation of Parents' Perceptions About the Use of Mechanical Restraint on Their Adult Children in a Forensic Psychiatric Setting', JOURNAL OF FORENSIC NURSING, 15 120-130 (2019)
DOI 10.1097/JFN.0000000000000237
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2019 Jensen AM, Pedersen BD, Wilson RL, Olsen RB, Hounsgaard L, 'Nurses' experiences of delivering acute orthopaedic care to patients with dementia', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OLDER PEOPLE NURSING, 14 (2019)
DOI 10.1111/opn.12271
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2019 Lichtenstein MB, Dervisevic A, Eg J, Wilson R, Wesselhoft R, 'A psychometric evaluation of the automatic thoughts questionnaire in Danish adolescents and emerging adults', NORDIC PSYCHOLOGY, 71 262-275 (2019)
DOI 10.1080/19012276.2019.1604252
Citations Scopus - 1
2019 Wilson R, 'Global challenges facing mental health nurses: The safe and proficient use of digital therapeutics to enhance mental health recovery', News Magazine, Australian College of Mental Health Nurses, (2019)
2019 Wilson R, 'Integrated care for double bereavementassociated with parental cancer and death indivorced families', International journal of mental health nursing, 28 49-49 (2019)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12646
2018 Wilson RL, 'The right way for nurses to prescribe, administer and critique digital therapies', CONTEMPORARY NURSE, 54 543-545 (2018)
DOI 10.1080/10376178.2018.1507679
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2018 Jensen AM, Pedersen BD, Olsen RB, Wilson RL, Hounsgaard L, ' If only they could understand me! Acute hospital care experiences of patients with Alzheimer s disease', Dementia, (2018)

© The Author(s) 2018. Patients with dementia as co-morbidity find hospital stays challenging, because the focus is primarily on the somatic cause for the admission, with less emph... [more]

© The Author(s) 2018. Patients with dementia as co-morbidity find hospital stays challenging, because the focus is primarily on the somatic cause for the admission, with less emphasis on the needs pertaining to dementia-related support and care. This results in poorer holistic outcomes, compared to patients without dementia, and an increased cost for the healthcare sector and, society as a whole. The quest is to make hospitals a dementia-friendly context, because this is likely to lead to better patient outcomes for people with dementia generally; however, further research is required to understand where gains may be made in this regard. This study conducted participant observation research strategies to follow patient journeys with Alzheimer¿s disease admitted to orthopaedic wards, to learn about their experiences as patients. Longitudinal data were gathered by following patients on both day and evening shifts within a specialist orthopaedic hospital ward, commencing at patient admission and concluding at time of discharge. The data were interpreted from a phenomenological-hermeneutic perspective, inspired by Ricoeur¿s interpretation theory. The study revealed a communication style among nurses who failed to take into account the comprehensive needs of patients with dementia, in terms of timely information exchange and clinical relevance. Patients expressed the desire to be more fully engaged in the care decision-making, together with indicating their appreciation of the work of the health professionals who cared for them. The data revealed that the process of getting to know the patient at the beginning of every shift left little room to alleviate patients¿ experienced distress, caused by being in hospital. This resulted in patients who were less involved in the caring situation, or, if a patient took the initiative to act, intentions ended up being misinterpreted as disruptive behaviour. The findings have relevance for staff and ward management who are interested to strive to enhance the patient journey as a dementia-friendly hospital.

DOI 10.1177/1471301218820483
Citations Scopus - 3
2017 Wilson RL, Usher K, 'Social media as a recruitment strategy: Using Twitter to explore young people's mental health', Nurse Researcher, 25 36-41 (2017)

© 2017 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Background The development of a recruitment strategy requires nurse researchers to consider the avenues available to them t... [more]

© 2017 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Background The development of a recruitment strategy requires nurse researchers to consider the avenues available to them to fully investigate a phenomenon. In many cases, this will mean that they invite members of the public to be participants in their research. Successfully advertising the research project to potential participants requires a targeted approach, so that the participants will contribute to a data set that is sufficiently representative and analysis will elicit answers to the research questions. Societal changes in communication patterns and in media consumption have led to a downturn in traditional forms of media, such as television, radio and printed newspapers, magazines and newsletters. Increasingly, the public is using social media instead of traditional media. This change has implications for the design of research and researchers will have to adapt their recruitment strategies to include social media, if they are to collect representative rich data that can be analysed and reliably inform the findings of research. Aim To discuss the importance of rigorous research designs and to provide an example of a study that demonstrates how mental health researchers, investigating help and support for young people's mental health, can adapt their traditional recruitment practices and applied this new knowledge to recruitment using social media. Discussion A carefully designed social media recruitment process was particularly useful in attracting informative participant respondents who were able to provide meaningful and rich data relevant when responding to particular research questions. Engineering the participant user experience, such as using a minimum number of keyboard clicks to enter the online survey, mitigated the risk of drop out or incomplete responses. Conclusion Recruitment to a research study requires a strategy that matches the dynamics of the communication media used by potential participants. Nurse researchers need to be adept in the use of social media applied to health research contexts to ensure that data sets obtain representative samples and to reveal trustworthy, reliable, dependable and valid evidence to support clinical research and practice. Implications for practice The general popularity of social media has led to the public expectation that health information, and in some cases treatment, will be available online. Such a change in communication dynamics in recent times requires that nurse researchers develop new researcher skills and expertise in the proficient use of social media for the purpose of ethical recruitment of participants to health research projects.

DOI 10.7748/nr.2017.e1478
Citations Scopus - 3
2017 Wilson R, 'E Mental Health', News Magazine, Australian College of Mental Health Nurses, (2017)
2016 Alharbi J, Wilson R, Woods C, Usher K, 'The factors influencing burnout and job satisfaction among critical care nurses: a study of Saudi critical care nurses', JOURNAL OF NURSING MANAGEMENT, 24 708-717 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/jonm.12386
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 21
2016 Wilson RL, 'An Aboriginal perspective on 'Closing the Gap' from the rural front line', RURAL AND REMOTE HEALTH, 16 (2016)
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2016 Wilson R, Armstrong M, 'International networks: using conferences and site visits to improve care of young people', Mental Health Practice, 19 34-37 (2016)
DOI 10.7748/mhp.19.9.34.s22
2015 Wilson R, Hungerford C, 'Mental Health Education and Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) in Pre-registration Nursing Degrees: Follow the Leaders?', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 36 379-387 (2015)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2014.1002647
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
2015 Wilson RL, Usher K, 'Rural nurses: a convenient co-location strategy for the rural mental health care of young people', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 24 2638-2648 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/jocn.12882
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2015 Wilson RL, Wilson GG, Usher K, 'Rural Mental Health Ecology: A Framework for Engaging with Mental Health Social Capital in Rural Communities', ECOHEALTH, 12 412-420 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s10393-015-1037-0
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 9
2015 Ranse J, Hutton A, Wilson R, Usher K, 'Leadership Opportunities for Mental Health Nurses in the Field of Disaster Preparation, Response, and Recovery', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 36 391-394 (2015)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2015.1017062
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Alison Hutton
2015 Happell B, Wilson R, McNamara P, 'Undergraduate mental health nursing education in Australia: More than Mental Health First Aid', COLLEGIAN, 22 433-438 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2014.07.003
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Brenda Happell
2014 Wilson RL, 'Mental Health Recovery and Quilting: Evaluation of a Grass-Roots Project in a Small, Rural, Australian Christian Church', ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 35 292-298 (2014)
DOI 10.3109/01612840.2014.886089
Citations Scopus - 1
2014 Wilson R, Ranse J, Cashin A, McNamar P, 'Nurses and Twitter: The good, the bad, and the reluctant', COLLEGIAN, 21 111-119 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2013.09.003
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
2014 Ranse J, Hutton A, Jeeawody B, Wilson R, 'What Are the Research Needs for the Field of Disaster Nursing? An International Delphi Study', Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, (2014) [C1]

Background: Internationally there is an increasing amount of peer-reviewed literature pertaining to disaster nursing. The literature includes personal anecdotes, reflections, and ... [more]

Background: Internationally there is an increasing amount of peer-reviewed literature pertaining to disaster nursing. The literature includes personal anecdotes, reflections, and accounts of single case studies. Furthermore, issues such as the willingness of nurses to assist in disasters, the role of nurses in disasters, leadership, competencies, and educational preparedness for nurses have been the focus of the literature. Aim: The aim of this research was to determine the international research priorities for disaster nursing. Method: This research used a three-round Delphi technique. The first round used a face-to-face workshop to generate research statements with nursing members of the World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WADEM). The second and third rounds included the ranking of statements on a 5-point Likert scale with nursing members of WADEM and the World Society of Disaster Nursing (WSDN). Statements that achieved a mean of four or greater were considered a priority and progressed. Results: Participants were from multiple countries. Research statements were generated in the areas of: education, training, and curriculum; psychosocial; strategy, relationship, and networking; and clinical practice. Psychosocial aspects of disaster nursing ranked the highest, with five statements appearing in the top ten research areas, followed by statements relating to: education, training, and curriculum; clinical practice; and finally, strategy, relationship, and networking. Conclusions: Future disaster nursing research should focus on the area of psychosocial aspects of disaster nursing, in particular, both the psychosocial needs of a disaster-affected community and the psychosocial wellbeing of nurses who assist in disaster health activities. Copyright © World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine 2014.

DOI 10.1017/S1049023X14000946
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Alison Hutton
2014 Wilson R, Bastian D, 'Blog Power', Nursing Review, 34-35 (2014)
2014 Wilson R, Bastian D, 'Blog Power', Nursing Review, 34-35 (2014)
2014 Usher K, Woods C, Casella E, Glass N, Wilson R, Mayner L, et al., 'Australian health professions student use of social media', Collegian, 21 95-101 (2014) [C1]

Increased bandwidth, broadband network availability and improved functionality have enhanced the accessibility and attractiveness of social media. The use of the Internet by highe... [more]

Increased bandwidth, broadband network availability and improved functionality have enhanced the accessibility and attractiveness of social media. The use of the Internet by higher education students has markedly increased. Social media are already used widely across the health sector but little is currently known of the use of social media by health profession students in Australia. A cross-sectional study was undertaken to explore health profession students' use of social media and their media preferences for sourcing information. An electronic survey was made available to health profession students at ten participating universities across most Australian states and territories. Respondents were 637 first year students and 451 final year students. The results for first and final year health profession students indicate that online media is the preferred source of information with only 20% of students nominating traditional peer-reviewed journals as a preferred information source. In addition, the results indicate that Facebook® usage was high among all students while use of other types of social media such as Twitter® remains comparatively low.As health profession students engage regularly with social media, and this use is likely to grow rather than diminish, educational institutions are challenged to consider the use of social media as a validated platform for learning and teaching. © 2014 Australian College of Nursing Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2014.02.004
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 39
Co-authors Pauletta Irwin
2014 Paliadelis PS, Stupans I, Parker V, Piper D, Gillan P, Lea J, et al., 'The development and evaluation of online stories to enhance clinical learning experiences across health professions in rural Australia', Collegian, (2014) [C1]

Clinical placement learning experiences are integral to all health and medical curricula as a means of integrating theory into practice and preparing graduates to deliver safe, hi... [more]

Clinical placement learning experiences are integral to all health and medical curricula as a means of integrating theory into practice and preparing graduates to deliver safe, high-quality care to health consumers. A growing challenge for education providers is to access sufficient clinical placements with experienced supervisors who are skilled at maximising learning opportunities for students. This paper reports on the development and evaluation of an innovative online learning program aimed at enhancing student and clinical supervisors' preparedness for effective workplace-based learning. The evidence-based learning program used 'story-telling' as the learning framework. The stories, which were supported by a range of resources, aimed to engage the learners in understanding student and supervisor responsibilities, as well as the expectations and competencies needed to support effective learning in the clinical environment. Evaluation of this program by the learners and stakeholders clearly indicated that they felt authentically 'connected' with the characters in the stories and developed insights that suggested effective learning had occurred.

DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2014.08.003
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Nicky Hudson
2012 Wilson RL, Cruickshank M, Lea J, 'Experiences of families who help young rural men with emergent mental health problems in a rural community in New South Wales, Australia', CONTEMPORARY NURSE, 42 167-177 (2012)
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 11
2009 Wilson R, 'MODEL EVACUATION PLAN', JOURNAL OF PSYCHOSOCIAL NURSING AND MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES, 47 7-7 (2009)
DOI 10.3928/02793695-20090527-06
2009 Wilson R, 'Getting support: Establishing drug and alcohol services in small communities', Nursing Review, (2009)
2008 Boyd CP, Hayes L, Wilson RL, Bearsley-Smith C, 'Harnessing the social capital of rural communities for youth mental health: An asset-based community development framework', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, 16 189-193 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2008.00996.x
Citations Scopus - 47Web of Science - 42
2007 Wilson RL, 'Out back and out-of-whack: issues related to the experience of early psychosis in the New England region, New South Wales, Australia.', Rural and remote health, 7 715 (2007)

CONTEXT: The slow slide into a first episode of psychosis is often difficult to detect and is often described in retrospect as the point at which things were not quite right. A ru... [more]

CONTEXT: The slow slide into a first episode of psychosis is often difficult to detect and is often described in retrospect as the point at which things were not quite right. A rural setting can add an layer of complexity to detecting early psychosis, with local structural issues and other disadvantages potentially complicating both identification and early treatment. Fewer specialist workers are available in rural communities compared with urban communities, and drug and alcohol usage can mask the early signs of prodrome (early psychosis symptoms). Along with these more predictable contextual issues, family and drought conditions can impact significantly the mental health of vulnerability rural populations. The use of a vignette provides a window to the lived experience of early psychosis in rural communities. This article explores these issues in the context of northern New South Wales, Australia. ISSUES: Embedded rural health workers are uniquely positioned to work with local people. One way to address access issues and the lack of diversity among available healthcare practitioners is by recognising and nurturing generalist health workers in all disciplines in their specialist role as generalist. It is also important to recognise the natural processes of a rural community with regard to a sense of community, structures and networks, and to accommodate these when planning mental health services. LESSONS LEARNED: The development of generalist health workers to undertake supported early identification of psychosis in rural communities is a useful strategy. In practice, a key feature is the availability of a specialist project worker. In addition, it is important to continue to advocate for services to rural communities that aim at preventing psychiatric illness, as well as optimising continuity of care for rural residents.

Citations Scopus - 7
2003 Wilson R, 'A Generation X perspective of nursing employment options', Nursing Review, (2003)
Show 35 more journal articles

Conference (51 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Marcussen J, Thuen F, Hounsgaard L, Wilson R, 'Integrated care for double bereavement associated with parental cancer and death in divorced families', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING (2019)
2019 Wilson R, Marcussen J, Hounsgaard L, Thoude F, 'Parental cancer and death in divorced families Double bereavement and interventions targeted the related child´s and young adult´s mental health', Sheffield, UK (2019)
2019 Wilson R, 'Acute hospital care experiences of patients with Alzheimer s disease', The Hague, Netherlands (2019)
2019 Wilson R, 'The safe administration of digital therapeutics', Canberra, ACT (2019)
2019 Wilson R, 'Human Computer Interaction (HCI) implications and the safe use of digital therapies for people with depression and/or anxiety', Bodo, Norway (2019)
2019 Wilson R, 'The safe and precise use of digital therapeutics for people with mental health conditions', Warsaw, Poland (2019)
2018 Wilson R, Helweg-Jørgersen S, Mathiasen K, Holmberg T, Søgaard Nielsen A, 'E Mental Health: Digital interventions and monitoring capacitiy in the context of safe and effective human computer interactions', Boston, USA (2018)
2018 Wilson R, 'Bring your own (BYO) wearable or smartphone technology to mental health care', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING (2018)
2018 Wilson R, 'Bring your own (BYO) wearable or smartphone technology to mental health care', Cairns, Qld (2018)
2018 Wilson DR, Nielsen AS, 'Human computer interaction implications for e-mental health interventions among people with depression and/or anxiety', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING (2018)
2017 Shaw A, Paul D, Billingsley W, Kwan P, Wilson R, 'Gamification in E-mental health: Development of a digital intervention addressing severe mental illness and metabolic syndrome', Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Internet Technologies & Society: (ITS 2017), Sydney, NSW (2017)
2017 Wilson R, 'E Mental Health in Denmark', Middelfart, Denmark (2017)
2017 Wilson R, 'E Mental Health Research Seminar Ecological approaches to evidence-based e-mental health practice', University of Southern Denmark, Odense (2017)
2017 Wilson R, Faerch C, Helweg-Jorgensen S, Hensen JP, Hinze C, Holmberg T, et al., 'E mental health research and practice in Denmark', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING (2017)
2016 Wilson R, 'Indigenous experiences of mental health care and detention: A qualitative rural youth mental health research synthesis', EARLY INTERVENTION IN PSYCHIATRY (2016)
2016 Wilson R, Paul D, Kwan P, Billingsley W, Shaw A, 'MetaMood Phase Two: The software engineering of an Android app for a mental health e-health intervention using a novel gaming strategy', EARLY INTERVENTION IN PSYCHIATRY (2016)
2016 Barker L, Wilson R, Lovell J, 'Bringing the outside in and Walking the Talk: Reflecting on the process of conducting a workshop of sustainable learnings', Honolulu, Hawai i (2016)
2016 Wilson R, Kwan P, Paul D, Billingsley W, Shaw A, 'MetaMood Phase Two: The software engineering of an Android app for a mental health e-health intervention using a novel gaming strategy', Edinburgh, Scotland (2016)
2016 Wilson R, Kwan P, Paul D, Billingsley W, Shaw A, 'MetaMood Phase Two: The software engineering of an Android app for a mental health e-health intervention using a novel gaming strategy', Edinburgh, Scotland (2016)
2015 Wilson R, 'Nursing interventions for the care of young rural people with early mental health problems', London, England (2015)
2015 Wilson R, 'Accessing mental health care for young rural Aboriginal people', Darwin, Australia (2015)
2015 Hutton A, Ranse J, Wilson R, 'What are the research needs for the field of disaster nursing? An international Delphi study', Cape Town, South Africa (2015)
2015 Vaughan L, Wilson R, ' Pre help seeking: Non health service using parents perceptions of their adolescents' social and emotional wellbeing', Montreal, Canada (2015)
2015 Wilson R, Kwan P, Usher K, 'MetaMood: The development and clinical pilot trial of a mental health e-health intervention using an android smart device app', London, England (2015)
2014 Wilson R, Usher K, 'Mental health professional visitors in rural communities: What happens when they go back home?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING (2014)
2014 Wilson R, Usher K, 'A co-location model for nurses helping young rural people with emergent mental health problems', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING (2014)
2014 Wilson R, 'Nurses helping young rural people with emergent mental health problems', EARLY INTERVENTION IN PSYCHIATRY (2014)
2013 Happell B, Wilson R, McNamara P, 'Beyond bandaids: Defending the depth and detail of mental health in nursing education', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING (2013)
2013 Wilson R, ''I was about to explode': The experience of young rural people with emergent mental health problems', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING (2013)
2013 Wilson R, 'A conversation to build mental health rural recovery capital in a church setting: A story about a patchwork quilt, a young person and a mental health nurse (poster)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING (2013)
2013 Wilson R, 'Twitter: A contemporary nursing conversation tool (poster)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING (2013)
2013 Wilson R, Cruickshank M, Hercelinskyj G, 'Are the needs of young rural people with early mental health problems in rural Australia being met or ignored?', Lisbon, Portugal (2013)
2013 Lea J, Paliadelis P, Jarrott HM, Stupans I, Parker P, Fagan A, et al., 'Sharing stories to enhance work-integrated learning outcomes.', Newcastle, Australia (2013)
2013 Wilson R, Cruickshank M, Hercelinskyj G, 'The mental health needs of young rural people', Canberra, Australia (2013)
2013 Wilson R, Cruickshank M, Hercelinskyj G, 'Are the needs of young rural people with early mental health problems in rural Australia being met or ignored?', Melbourne, Australia (2013)
2011 Wilson R, Cruickshank M, Lea J, 'Experiences of families who help young rural men with emergent mental health problems in a rural community in New South Wales', Cape Town, South Africa (2011)
2011 Wilson R, Isaac WG, 'Nurse-led Policy to Practice - Integrating Physical and Mental Health Care to Reduce Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) Risk Amongst Mental Health Consumers', Cape Town, South Africa (2011)
2011 Wilson R, Isaac WG, 'Nurse-led Policy to Practice - Integrating Physical and Mental Health Care to Reduce Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) Risk Amongst Mental Health Consumers', Newcastle, Australia (2011)
2010 Sanderson H, Lea J, Wilson R, 'An evaluation of clinical education within a rural undergraduate nursing curriculum: Insights into the clinical facilitation model', Cambridge, England (2010)
2010 Sanderson H, Lea J, Wilson R, 'An Evaluation of Clinical Education within a Rural Undergraduate Nursing Curriculum', Orlando, FL (2010)
2010 Wilson R, 'Mental Health case-based simulation and virtual learning environments (VLE) in mental health pre-registration nursing', Hobart, Tasmania (2010)
2010 Wilson R, 'Mental health case-based simulation and virtual learning environments in mental health pre-registration nursing education [Poster]', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING (2010)
2009 Wilson R, 'Help-seeking through a narrative lens: The mothers' story of help seeking within rural families of young men with emergent mental health problems', Armidale, Australia (2009)
2009 Wilson R, Stewart C, 'Virtual clinical judgment development in an undergraduate nursing course utilizing Sakai wiki tools and purpose built tools', Boston, USA (2009)
2009 Wilson R, 'The problems of life: Families helping young rural men with emergent mental health problems', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING (2009)
2008 Wilson R, 'At the end of my string: The experience of parents', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING (2008)
2008 Wilson RL, 'He's changed: the experience of rural parents caring for a son with emergent psychosis', EARLY INTERVENTION IN PSYCHIATRY (2008)
2007 Wilson R, 'Outback and Out-Of-Whack: Nurses A Frontline Opportunity For The Early Identification of Early Psychosis in Rural Communities', Sydney, Australia (2007)
2007 Wilson R, Bartik W, 'Early psychosis national guidelines: Implications for practice', Armidale, Australia (2007)
2007 Wilson R, 'The length of duration of untreated psychosis adversely effects the long term prognosis and recovery period.Discovering the barriers to early identification of EP amongst young rural men will help to achieve a reduction in the length of untreated psychosis, thereby, improving prognoses for this group', Newcastle, Australia (2007)
2007 Wilson R, 'Barriers to early identification of early psychosis among young rural males', Tamworth, Australia (2007)
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Other (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Wilson R, 'Bush Remedies: You and your mental health 2014', (2014) [O1]

Report (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Wilson R, Little F, O'Brien A, Gray M, Finn A, 'Hunter & Central Coast ICTN. Scoping novel rural mental health clinical placements for undergraduate nursing and social work students in Northern NSW. Final Report: 20th November 2015', Australian Government. Department of Health, 32 (2015)
Co-authors Tony Obrien
2010 The Royal Australian & New Zealand College of Psychiatrists, Wilson R, 'Addressing the needs of siblings of children with chronic conditions. Report from the roundtable discussion 27 August 2010', The Royal Australian & New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (2010)
2008 Wilson R, 'Early psychosis project. Hunter New England Northern. Final report', Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service, Hunter New England Area Heath, NSW Health (2008)
2002 Wilson R, 'Goondiwindi Town and Waggamba Shire: Community demographics and needs for delivery of health and care services', Blue Care South West Region, Toowoomba (2002)
1999 Wilson R, 'Health patterns of the Aboriginal population with the Mildura demography a report commissioned by Sunraysia Community Health Services Inc', Sunraysia Community Health Services Inc (1999)
1998 Wilson R, 'Quality assurance audit. Sunraysia Private Nursing Home, Mildura, Victoria. A qualitative needs analysis', Aegis Care Group Pty Ltd (1998)
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Thesis / Dissertation (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Wilson R, Connecting mental health helping capital in rural communities to young people with emergent and early mental health problems, University of New England, Armidale (2014)
2009 Wilson R, Barriers to the early identification and intervention of early psychosis among young rural males, University of New England, Armidale (2009)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $28,333

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20201 grants / $28,333

Study to Assess the Value of an Integrated Workforce Approach to Mental Health Care in Rural and Remote Towns$28,333

Funding body: Mental Health Commission of New South Wales

Funding body Mental Health Commission of New South Wales
Project Team Professor Nicholas Goodwin, Professor Rhonda Wilson, Mr Lee Ridoutt, Dr Susan Nancarrow
Scheme Request for Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G2000880
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed6
Current5

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 PhD Drug use by young people at music festivals Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2020 PhD Mental health of rural men in New Zealand Mental Health Nursing, Massey University Co-Supervisor
2020 PhD Cultural Safety for Paediatric Patients and Families in the Emergency Department PhD (Nursing), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2019 Post-Doctoral Fellowship Patients experiences with access and use of electronic patient portals using the online portal Min Sundhedsplatform. Nursing, University of Southern Denmark Consultant Supervisor
2019 PhD What Motivates Recreational Drug Use in Adolescents? PhD (Nursing), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 PhD Caring for patients with dementia in the acute setting Health, University of Southern Denmark Co-Supervisor
2019 PhD E Mental Health program of research (personality disorder) Psychology, University of Southern Denmark Consultant Supervisor
2019 PhD Loss and Bereavement: A Mental Health perspective on children's and young adults' double bereavement of parental divorce and parental death Nursing, University of Southern Denmark Co-Supervisor
2019 PhD ENTER program of research (internet based cognitive behavioural therapy) Psychology, University of Southern Denmark Consultant Supervisor
2019 PhD Telepsychiatric program of research Mental Health Nursing, University of Southern Denmark Consultant Supervisor
2015 Masters Burnout and job satisfaction among Saudi critical care nurses in Hail Region, Saudi Arabia Nursing, The University of New England Co-Supervisor
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Professor Rhonda Wilson

Position

Professor
Central Coast Campus
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email rhonda.wilson@newcastle.edu.au
Links Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
Research Networks
Personal Blogs
Instagram

Office

Room BE156
Building Faculty of Health and Medicine Building
Location https://www.newcastle.edu.au/about-uon/our-environments/our-campuses-and-locations/central-coast/about

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