Professor Francesco Paolucci

Professor Francesco Paolucci

Professor

Newcastle Business School

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Francesco Paolucci is Professor of Health Economics & Policy at the Faculty of Business & Law, University of Newcastle, Australia, and the School of Economics & Management, University of Bologna, Italy.

Before joining the University of Newcastle, he was Head of Health Policy at Sir Walter Murdoch of Public Policy and International Affairs, Murdoch University, Australia. Prof. Paolucci was formerly the Chief Advisor Health Reforms to Minister of Health in Chile in 2019 and is a current member of the Italian Technical Committee for Allocation of National Health Budget.

Prof. Paolucci has published over 60 academic peer-reviewed articles, book chapters and book reviews in a wide array of academic journals and presses, and in different languages. Among the others, he published a one single-authored book (“Health care financing and insurance options for design”. Publisher: Springer), leaded and coordinated the COVID-19 special issue for the peer-reviewed journal Health Policy and Technology and contributed with two chapters in a recent book describing the health insurance market and its financing (Risk Adjustment, Risk Sharing and Premium Regulation in Health Insurance Markets. Edited by Thomas McGuire and Richard C. van Kleef. Publisher: Elsevier).

Prof. Paolucci is an associate editor for the world’s leading journals in health policy and economics, is an active journal reviewer and has a strong record of international research collaboration. Prof. Paolucci has extensive international experience working as chief advisor to think-tanks, governments and industry. He is currently chief investigator on grants funded by the Australian Research Council, the National Health Medical Research Council, the European Commission (Horizon2020). Prof. Paolucci has been awarded industry grants from public and private agencies. He participates extensively in academic activities, conducts innovative research training activities, and provides teaching programs nationally and overseas. He supervises a number of doctoral and master students nationally and abroad.

Highlights include: over 15 years of engagement in health economics, policy and management in various countries (e.g. Austria, Australia, Chile, China, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Qatar, South Africa, Spain, UK, USA) through research, fieldwork and consulting experiences. He was awarded the 40 Under 40 Awards by Business News (2016) and an Outstanding Business Engagement award by Murdoch University (2017).


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Erasmus University - Rotterdam

Keywords

  • Health Care Systems
  • Health Economics
  • Health Insurance and Financing
  • Health Reform
  • Healthcare management
  • Public Policy

Languages

  • English (Fluent)
  • Italian (Mother)
  • Spanish (Fluent)
  • French (Fluent)
  • Dutch (Working)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
160508 Health Policy 30
140208 Health Economics 40
150204 Insurance Studies 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Professor University of Newcastle
Newcastle Business School
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
2/7/2007 - 30/12/2011 Fellow in Health Economics Australian National University
Australia
1/1/2014 -  Associate Professor University of Bologna
School of Economics and Management
Italy
30/4/2002 - 30/12/2007 Researcher and Co-Director of the MSc HEPL Erasmus University Rotterdam
Institute of Health Policy and Management
Netherlands
3/1/2011 - 30/12/2011 Associate Fellow Stanford University
United States
1/5/2014 - 1/12/2018 Head of Health Administration, Policy & Leadership programs Murdoch University
Sir Walter Murdoch School of Public Policy & International Affairs
Australia
1/5/2014 - 1/11/2018 Associate Professor in Health Policy and Economics Murdoch University
Sir Walter Murdoch School of Public Policy & International Affairs
Australia
1/1/2014 - 1/7/2014 Associate Professor of Health Policy The University of Western Australia
Australia
2/1/2012 - 1/5/2014 Reader in Health Policy and Economics Northumbria University
Department of Health Community and Education Studies
United Kingdom

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/8/2020 -  Member Australian Association of University Professors
Australia
1/1/2020 -  Member and creator of the Value in Health Economics and Policy group Value in Health Economics and Policy (VHEP)
Australia
2/1/2014 - 30/12/2015 Member of the International Collaborations Advisory Group Murdoch University
Sir Walter Murdoch School of Public Policy & International Affairs
Australia
10/1/2014 -  Associate Fellow Australasian College of Health Service Management
Australia
2/1/2007 -  Member Australian Health Economic Society
Australia
7/1/2002 -  Member International Health Economics Association
Australia
1/1/2003 -  Permanent Member and Country Coordinator for Australia Risk Adjustment Network
Netherlands
3/1/2018 - 30/12/2018 Member of the local organising committee for the Precision Public Health International The University of Western Australia
Australia
2/1/2014 - 30/12/2015 Member of the Cockburn Initiative Feasibility Group Murdoch University
Australia
2/1/2014 - 30/12/2015 Member of the Health Initiative Task Force Fiona Stanley Hospital | Murdoch University | South Metro Health District WA
Australia
2/1/2017 -  Associate Editor Health Policy and Technology Journal
Health Policy and Technology Journal
United States
1/4/2016 -  Associate Editor in Public Health Policy Frontiers
Public Health Policy
Switzerland
8/1/2007 -  Member Economic Society of Australia, NSW Chapter
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
18/1/2017 - 18/12/2017 Member of Italian National Health Technical Committee for the Allocation of Fund as Representative for Emilia-Romagna Region Servizio Sanitario Nazionale
Italy
2/1/2018 - 30/12/2018 Associate Dean of Research Murdoch University
Sir Walter Murdoch School of Public Policy & International Affairs
Australia
31/3/2020 - 31/7/2020 Consultant to Analyse NSW traffic data to assess the cost effectiveness of social distancing in COVID-19 times Hunter Research Foundation
1/7/2020 - 31/7/2020 Expert and Consultant for Charles River Associate Charles River Associates
Australia
1/3/2020 - 30/6/2020 Collaboration with MENZIS Center focusing on an analysis on the economic, finance and social impact of COVD-19 Menzies Foundation
1/5/2020 - 30/9/2020 Expert advisory Market Access Transformation
Australia
7/1/2013 - 31/12/2013 Head of Health Insurance and Financing Supreme Council of Health (SCH)
Qatar
1/3/2018 - 31/3/2019 Chief Advisor to the Ministry of Health on Health Insurance and Financing Reform Ministry of Health, Government of Chile
Chile

Awards

Award

Year Award
2017 Outstanding Business Engagement Research
Murdoch University
2016 40under40 Business News award in WA for entrepreneurial and business leadership
Business News
2013 Ones to watch
Mena Insurance Review
2009 ANU Vice-Chancellors grant for visiting international academic: Peter Zweifel
Australian National University
2008 Two ANU Vice-Chancellor's grants for visiting Eurropean and American universities and institutions, and for visiting international academic (John Armstrong, Chief Actuary VHI-Ireland)
Australian National University

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
GSBS6380 Health Economics and Finance
Newcastle Business School the University of Newcastle
Health economics is the application of economic principles to health and healthcare. Students apply core concepts of supply and demand theories to health and healthcare examples and learn about the importance of information (and information asymmetry) in health care markets; the critical role of insurance; hospital financing and delivery; and private/public mix in finance and provision of healthcare. In this course students are introduced to key conceptual frameworks of healthcare economics and decision making, and examine how Australian and international healthcare systems are designed and organised, including the critical components of long-term care and pharmaceutical markets.

Modality: Face to face and online
Course Coordinator and Lecturer 1/2/2020 - 30/12/2023
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Paolucci F, Health care financing and insurance. Options for design. (2011)
DOI 10.1007/978-3-642-10794-8_1
Citations Scopus - 4
2011 Paolucci F, Stoelwinder J, Risk-equalisation in health insurance markets: Models and international experience, Australian Centre for Health Research, Melbourne, 36 (2011)

Chapter (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Velasco C, Henriquez J, Paolucci F, Paolucci F, 'Health Plan Payment in Chile', Risk Adjustment, Risk Sharing and Premium Regulation in Health Insurance Markets, Elsevier, United Kingdom 235-261 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-811325-7.00008-7
2018 Paolucci F, Sequeira AR, Fouda A, Matthews A, Matthews A, 'Health Plan Payment in Australia', Risk Adjustment, Risk Sharing and Premium Regulation in Health Insurance Markets, Elsevier, United Kingdom 181-208 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-811325-7.00006-3
2016 García-Goñi M, McKiernan P, Paolucci F, 'Pathways towards health care systems with a chronic-care focus: Beyond the four walls', Boundaryless Hospital: Rethink and Redefine Health Care Management 59-80 (2016)

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016. Increasing health care expenditure is a matter of concern in many countries, particularly in relation to the underlying drivers of such e... [more]

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016. Increasing health care expenditure is a matter of concern in many countries, particularly in relation to the underlying drivers of such escalation that include aging, medical innovation, and changes in the burden of disease, such as the growing prevalence of chronic diseases. Most health care systems in developed countries have been designed to cure acute episodes, rather than to manage chronic conditions, and therefore they are not suitably or efficiently organized to respond to the changing needs and preferences of users. Hospitals provide much of that health provision and they are in need of adapting to the needs of the population. New models of chronic care provision have been developed to respond to the changing burden of disease, taking into account the role of hospitals. Further, there is considerable practical experience in several different countries showing their advantages but also the difficulties associated with their implementation. In this paper, we focus on the international experiences in terms of policy changes and pilot studies focused on testing the feasibility of moving toward chronic care models. In particular, we discuss a framework that identifies and analyzes key prerequisites to achieving high performing chronic care-based health care systems and apply it to various countries and link this proposal with the concept of the boundaryless hospital.

DOI 10.1007/978-3-662-49012-9_4
Citations Scopus - 1
2012 Paolucci F, McRae IS, McRae IS, 'Healthcare delivery for our ageing population: what does Australia need to do?', A Greater Australia: Population, policies and governance, CEDA, Melbourne 162-174 (2012)
2010 Paolucci F, Paolucci F, Henry E, Terry H, Jos A, 'The effectiveness of health informatics. In: Healthcare and the Effect of Technology. Medical Information Science Reference, Hershey, PA, USA, pp. 13-37. ISBN 978-1615207336', (2010)
Show 2 more chapters

Journal article (60 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Henríquez J, Almorox EG, Garcia-Goñi M, Paolucci F, 'The first months of the COVID-19 pandemic in Spain.', Health Policy Technol, (2020)
DOI 10.1016/j.hlpt.2020.08.013
2020 Higginson S, Milovanovic K, Gillespie J, Matthews A, Williams C, Wall L, et al., 'COVID-19: the need for an Australian Economic Pandemic Response Plan.', Health Policy Technol, (2020)
DOI 10.1016/j.hlpt.2020.08.017
Co-authors Christopher M Williams
2020 Benítez MA, Velasco C, Sequeira AR, Henríquez J, Menezes FM, Paolucci F, 'Responses to COVID-19 in five Latin American countries.', Health Policy Technol, 449 (2020)
DOI 10.1016/j.hlpt.2020.08.014
2020 Fouda A, Mahmoudi N, Moy N, Paolucci F, 'The COVID-19 pandemic in Greece, Iceland, New Zealand, and Singapore: Health Policies and Lessons Learned.', Health Policy Technol, (2020)
DOI 10.1016/j.hlpt.2020.08.015
2020 Matthews A, Paolucci F, Henriquez J, 'Private Health, COVID-19 and Agility in Healthcare', Actuaries Digital, (2020)
2020 Wall L, Hinwood M, Lang D, Smith A, Bunzli S, Clarke P, et al., 'Attitudes of patients and surgeons towards sham surgery trials: a protocol for a scoping review of attributes to inform a discrete choice experiment', BMJ OPEN, 10 (2020)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-035870
Co-authors Laura Wall, Danielle Lang, Madeleine Hinwood
2020 Chiara B, Marcello A, Mesfin G G, Giovanni C, Alessandro L, Adrian M, Francesco P, 'The COVID-19 pandemic in Italy: policy and technology impact on health and non-health outcomes', Health Policy and Technology, (2020)
DOI 10.1016/j.hlpt.2020.08.019
2019 Mortimer-Jones S, Morrison P, Munib A, Paolucci F, Neale S, Hellewell A, et al., 'Staff and client perspectives of the Open Borders programme for people with borderline personality disorder.', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 28 971-979 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/inm.12602
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2019 Henriquez J, Matthews A, Paolucci F, Stolz A, 'Private health and health care financing Learning from the world', The Institute of Actuaries of Australia - The Dialogue, (2019)
2019 Mentzakis E, García-Goñi M, Sequeira AR, Paolucci F, 'Equity and efficiency priorities within the Spanish health system: A discrete choice experiment eliciting stakeholders preferences', Health Policy and Technology, 8 30-41 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Background: The trade-off between efficiency and equity has been largely studied in the health economics literature and for countries with different types of health systems... [more]

© 2019 Background: The trade-off between efficiency and equity has been largely studied in the health economics literature and for countries with different types of health systems. Even if efficiency and equity are desired, it is not always feasible to attain both simultaneously. In Spain, the National Health System has historically been recognized for its universal access and free of charge provision, with good health outcomes. However, the recent increase in health expenditures together with the economic cycle has turned the orientation of health policy implementation towards efficiency, threatening universality and equity in the access to healthcare. Methods: A Discrete Choice Experiment was carried out to weigh priorities of policy-makers from different regions in Spain. A total of 69 valid questionnaires were collected and the preferences towards equity and/or efficiency criteria were evaluated. Composite League Tables (CLTs) were used to rank hypothetical health interventions based on their attributes. Results: The Spanish health policy-makers, managers and other stakeholder displayed a stronger preference for severity of disease, high individual benefits, a large number of beneficiaries and proven cost-effectiveness criteria in decision making. The priority interventions targeted severe mental disorders, i.e. major depressive disorders and suicides (or suicidal attempts), especially for young and middle age categories across the three regions under study. Conclusion: In times of economic crisis, health policy-makers, managers and other stakeholder value, in moderation, efficiency over equity. The impact of austerity measures on populations¿ socio-economic wellbeing seems correlated with the preference for mental health interventions.

DOI 10.1016/j.hlpt.2019.01.003
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2018 García-Go ni M, Fouda A, Calder RV, Paolucci F, 'A new funding model for a chronic-care focused healthcare system in Australia', Health Policy and Technology, 7 293-301 (2018)
Citations Scopus - 1
2018 Hasanova R, Mentzakis E, Paolucci F, Shmueli A, 'Beyond DRG: The effect of socio-economic indicators on inpatient resource allocation in Australia', Health Policy and Technology, 7 302-309 (2018)
2017 Fouda A, Fiorentini G, Paolucci F, 'Competitive Health Markets and Risk Equalisation in Australia: Lessons Learnt from Other Countries', Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, 15 745-754 (2017)

© 2017, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. The aims of this paper are to evaluate the risk equalisation (RE) arrangement in Australia¿s private health insurance agains... [more]

© 2017, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. The aims of this paper are to evaluate the risk equalisation (RE) arrangement in Australia¿s private health insurance against practices in other countries with similar arrangements and to propose ways of improving the system to advance economic efficiency and solidarity. Possible regulatory responses to insurance market failures are reviewed based on standard economic arguments. We describe various regulatory strategies used elsewhere to identify essential system features against which the Australian system is compared. Our results reveal that RE is preferred over alternative regulatory strategies such as premium rate restrictions, premium compensation and claims equalisation. Compared with some countries¿ practices, the calculated risk factors in Australia should be enhanced with further demographic, social and economic factors and indicators of long-term health issues. Other coveted features include prospective calculation and annual clearing of equalisation payments. Australia currently operates with a crude mechanism for RE in which the scheme incentivises insurers to select on risk rather than focusing on efficiency and equity-promoting actions. System changes should be introduced in a stepwise manner; thus, we propose an incremental reform.

DOI 10.1007/s40258-017-0330-1
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Paolucci F, Redekop K, Fouda A, Fiorentini G, 'Decision Making and Priority Setting: The Evolving Path Towards Universal Health Coverage', Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, 15 697-706 (2017)

© 2017, Springer International Publishing AG. Health technology assessment (HTA) is widely viewed as an essential component in good universal health coverage (UHC) decision-making... [more]

© 2017, Springer International Publishing AG. Health technology assessment (HTA) is widely viewed as an essential component in good universal health coverage (UHC) decision-making in any country. Various HTA tools and metrics have been developed and refined over the years, including systematic literature reviews (Cochrane), economic modelling, and cost-effectiveness ratios and acceptability curves. However, while the cost-effectiveness ratio is faithfully reported in most full economic evaluations, it is viewed by many as an insufficient basis for reimbursement decisions. Emotional debates about the reimbursement of cancer drugs, orphan drugs, and end-of-life treatments have revealed fundamental disagreements about what should and should not be considered in reimbursement decisions. Part of this disagreement seems related to the equity-efficiency tradeoff, which reflects fundamental differences in priorities. All in all, it is clear that countries aiming to improve UHC policies will have to go beyond the capacity building needed to utilize the available HTA toolbox. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) offers a more comprehensive tool for reimbursement decisions where different weights of different factors/attributes can give policymakers important insights to consider. Sooner or later, every country will have to develop their own way to carefully combine the results of those tools with their own priorities. In the end, all policymaking is based on a mix of facts and values.

DOI 10.1007/s40258-017-0349-3
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2017 Shmueli A, Golan O, Paolucci F, Mentzakis E, 'Efficiency and equity considerations in the preferences of health policy-makers in Israel', Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, 6 (2017)

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: There is a traditional tension in public policy between the maximization of welfare from given resources (efficiency) and considerations related ... [more]

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: There is a traditional tension in public policy between the maximization of welfare from given resources (efficiency) and considerations related to the distribution of welfare among the population and to social justice (equity). The aim of this paper is to measure the relative weights of the efficiency- and equity-enhancing criteria in the preferences of health policy-makers in Israel, and to compare the Israeli results with those of other countries. Methods: We used the criteria of efficiency and equity which were adopted in a previous international study, adapted to Israel. The equity criteria, as defined in the international study, are: severity of the disease, age (young vs. elderly), and the extent to which the poor are subsidized. Efficiency is represented by the criteria: the potential number of beneficiaries, the extent of the health benefits to the patient, and the results of economic assessments (cost per QALY gained). We contacted 147 policy-makers, 65 of whom completed the survey (a response rate of 44%). Using Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE) methodology by 1000Minds software, we estimated the relative weights of these seven criteria, and predicted the desirability of technologies characterized by profiles of the criteria. Results: The overall weight attached to the four efficiency criteria was 46% and that of the three equity criteria was 54%. The most important criteria were "financing of the technology is required so that the poor will be able to receive it" and the level of individual benefit. "The technology is intended to be used by the elderly" criterion appeared as the least important, taking the seventh place. Policy-makers who had experience as members of the Basket Committee appear to prefer efficiency criteria more than those who had never participated in the Basket Committee deliberations. While the efficiency consideration gained preference in most countries studied, Israel is unique in its balance between the weights attached to equity and efficiency considerations by health policy-makers. Discussion: The study explored the trade-off between efficiency and equity considerations in the preferences of health policy-makers in Israel. The way these declarative preferences have been expressed in actual policy decisions remains to be explored.

DOI 10.1186/s13584-017-0142-7
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
2017 Fouda A, Paolucci F, 'Path Dependence and Universal Health Coverage: The Case of Egypt.', Front Public Health, 5 325 (2017)
DOI 10.3389/fpubh.2017.00325
Citations Web of Science - 3
2016 Strazdins L, Welsh J, Korda R, Broom D, Paolucci F, 'Not all hours are equal: Could time be a social determinant of health?', Sociology of Health and Illness, 38 21-42 (2016)

© 2016 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness. Time can be thought of as a resource that people need for good health. Healthy behaviour, accessing health services,... [more]

© 2016 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness. Time can be thought of as a resource that people need for good health. Healthy behaviour, accessing health services, working, resting and caring all require time. Like other resources, time is socially shaped, but its relevance to health and health inequality is yet to be established. Drawing from sociology and political economy, we set out the theoretical basis for two measures of time relevant to contemporary, market-based societies. We measure amount of time spent on care and work (paid and unpaid) and the intensity of time, which refers to rushing, effort and speed. Using data from wave 9 (N = 9177) of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics of Australia Survey we found that time poverty (> 80 h per week on care and work) and often or always rushing are barriers to physical activity and rushing is associated with poorer self-rated and mental health. Exploring their social patterning, we find that time-poor people have higher incomes and more time control. In contrast, rushing is linked to being a woman, lone parenthood, disability, lack of control and work-family conflicts. We supply a methodology to support quantitative investigations of time, and our findings underline time's dimensionality, social distribution and potential to influence health.

DOI 10.1111/1467-9566.12300
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 23
2016 Mortimer-Jones S, Morrison P, Munib A, Paolucci F, Neale S, Bostwick A, Hungerford C, 'Recovery and Borderline Personality Disorder: A Description of the Innovative Open Borders Program', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 37 624-630 (2016)

© 2016, Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Although Recovery-oriented approaches to delivering mental health services are now promoted in health services across the gl... [more]

© 2016, Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Although Recovery-oriented approaches to delivering mental health services are now promoted in health services across the globe, there is an ongoing need to adapt these approaches to meet the unique needs of consumers with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder. The lived experience of borderline personality disorder includes emotional dysregulation, intense and unstable relationships, self-harming behaviours, fear of abandonment, and a limited capacity to cope with stress. These experiences present a range of challenges for those who deliver Recovery-oriented services and advocate the principles of empowerment and self-determination. This paper describes a novel crisis intervention program, ¿Open Borders,¿ which has been established to meet the unique needs of people with a borderline personality disorder diagnosis. Open Borders is a Recovery-oriented model that is run at a public, state-wide residential facility for mental health consumers in Western Australia, and offers alternative pathways to achieving mental health Recovery, including self-referral and short-term admission to a residential facility. The aims of the program are to break the cycle of hospital admission, reduce rates of self-harm, and support the complex Recovery journey of consumers with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder. Open Borders provides an exemplar for other health service organisations seeking to establish Recovery-oriented crisis intervention alternatives.

DOI 10.1080/01612840.2016.1191565
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2016 Radermacher R, Srivastava S, Walsham M, Sao C, Paolucci F, 'Enhancing the Inclusion of Vulnerable and High-Risk Groups in Demand-Side Health Financing Schemes in Cambodia: A Concept for a Risk-Adjusted Subsidy Approach', Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance: Issues and Practice, 41 244-258 (2016)

© 2016 The International Association for the Study of Insurance Economics. Efforts are currently under way in Cambodia to expand the population coverage of social health protectio... [more]

© 2016 The International Association for the Study of Insurance Economics. Efforts are currently under way in Cambodia to expand the population coverage of social health protection schemes (health equity funds and voluntary insurance). Aligning the benefit packages for members of such schemes poses particular challenges in relation to the insurance component, as the financing of direct benefits in the insurance relies largely on the collection of voluntary premiums. This paper develops the concept of a targeted "risk-adjusted subsidy" approach to address this issue. Data on the health-seeking behaviour of insured households from Kampong Thom district over the course of one year (2010) are used to illustrate the concept. To retain the currently applied community rating and set incentives for cost effectiveness in administrative costs, as well as to avoid cream skimming (focusing on "good risks"), a risk-adjustment mechanism is proposed that would provide ex ante subsidies to insurance schemes according to the expected additional cost of a person joining the scheme. Although the concept is developed using the example of Cambodia, it is equally applicable to all developing countries facing fragmented risk pools while aiming for universal health coverage.

DOI 10.1057/gpp.2016.5
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2016 Baji P, García-Goñi M, Gulácsi L, Mentzakis E, Paolucci F, 'Comparative analysis of decision maker preferences for equity/efficiency attributes in reimbursement decisions in three European countries', European Journal of Health Economics, 17 791-799 (2016)

© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Background: In addition to cost-effectiveness, national guidelines often include other factors in reimbursement decisions. However, weig... [more]

© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Background: In addition to cost-effectiveness, national guidelines often include other factors in reimbursement decisions. However, weights attached to these are rarely quantified, thus decisions can depend strongly on decision-maker preferences. Objective: To explore the preferences of policymakers and healthcare professionals involved in the decision-making process for different efficiency and equity attributes of interventions and to analyse cross-country differences. Method: Discrete choice experiments (DCEs) were carried out in Austria, Hungary, and Norway with policymakers and other professionals working in the health industry (N¿=¿153 respondents). Interventions were described in terms of different efficiency and equity attributes (severity of disease, target age of the population and willingness to subsidise others, potential number of beneficiaries, individual health benefit, and cost-effectiveness). Parameter estimates from the DCE were used to calculate the probability of choosing a healthcare intervention with different characteristics, and to rank different equity and efficiency attributes according to their importance. Results: In all three countries, cost-effectiveness, individual health benefit and severity of the disease were significant and equally important determinants of decisions. All countries show preferences for interventions targeting young and middle aged populations compared to those targeting populations over 60. However, decision-makers in Austria and Hungary show preferences more oriented to efficiency than equity, while those in Norway show equal preferences for equity and efficiency attributes. Conclusion: We find that factors other than cost-effectiveness seem to play an equally important role in decision-making. We also find evidence of cross-country differences in the weight of efficiency and equity attributes.

DOI 10.1007/s10198-015-0721-x
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2015 Paolucci F, Sowa PM, Garcia-Goni M, Ergas H, 'Mandatory aged care insurance: a case for Australia', AGEING & SOCIETY, 35 231-245 (2015)
DOI 10.1017/S0144686X13000767
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2015 Paolucci F, Mentzakis E, Defechereux T, Niessen LW, 'Equity and efficiency preferences of health policy makers in China - A stated preference analysis', Health Policy and Planning, 30 1059-1066 (2015)

© 2014 Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Background Macroeconomic growth in China enables significant pr... [more]

© 2014 Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Background Macroeconomic growth in China enables significant progress in health care and public health. It faces difficult choices regarding access, quality and affordability, while dealing with the increasing burden of chronic diseases. Policymakers are pressured to make complex decisions while implementing health strategies. This study shows how this process could be structured and reports the specific equity and efficiency preferences among Chinese policymakers. Methods In total, 78 regional, provincial and national level policymakers with considerable experience participated in a discrete choice experiment, weighting the relative importance of six policy attributes describing equity and efficiency. Results from a conditional logistic model are presented for the six criteria, measuring the associated weights. Observed and unobserved heterogeneities were incorporated and tested in the model. Findings are used to give an example of ranking health interventions in relation to the present disease burden in China. Results In general, respondents showed strong preference for efficiency criteria i.e. total beneficiaries and cost-effectiveness as the most important attributes in decision making over equity criteria. Hence, priority interventions would be those conditions that are most prevalent in the country and cost least per health gain. Conclusion Although efficiency criteria override equity ones, major health threats in China would be targeted. Multicriteria decision analysis makes explicit important trade-offs between efficiency and equity, leading to explicit, transparent and rational policy making.

DOI 10.1093/heapol/czu123
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2015 Bakx P, Chernichovsky D, Paolucci F, Schokkaert E, Trottmann M, Wasem J, Schut F, 'Demand-side strategies to deal with moral hazard in public insurance for long-term care', Journal of Health Services Research and Policy, 20 170-176 (2015)

© The Author(s) 2015. Moral hazard in public insurance for long-term care may be counteracted by strategies influencing supply or demand. Demand-side strategies may target the pat... [more]

© The Author(s) 2015. Moral hazard in public insurance for long-term care may be counteracted by strategies influencing supply or demand. Demand-side strategies may target the patient or the insurer. Various demand-side strategies and how they are implemented in four European countries (Germany, Belgium, Switzerland and the Netherlands) are described, highlighting the pros and cons of each strategy. Patient-oriented strategies to counteract moral hazard are used in all four countries but their impact on efficiency is unclear and crucially depends on their design. Strategies targeted at insurers are much less popular: Belgium and Switzerland have introduced elements of managed competition for some types of long-term care, as has the Netherlands in 2015. As only some elements of managed competition have been introduced, it is unclear whether it improves efficiency. Its effect will depend on the feasibility of setting appropriate financial incentives for insurers using risk equalization and the willingness of governments to provide insurers with instruments to manage long-term care.

DOI 10.1177/1355819615575080
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2015 García-Goñi M, Nuño-Solinís R, Orueta JF, Paolucci F, 'Is utilization of health services for HIV patients equal by socioeconomic status? Evidence from the Basque country', International Journal for Equity in Health, 14 (2015)

© 2015 García-Goñi et al. Introduction: Access to ART and health services is guaranteed under universal coverage to improve life expectancy and quality of life for HIV patients. H... [more]

© 2015 García-Goñi et al. Introduction: Access to ART and health services is guaranteed under universal coverage to improve life expectancy and quality of life for HIV patients. However, it remains unknown whether patients of different socioeconomic background equally use different types of health services. Methods: We use one-year (2010-2011) data on individual healthcare utilization and expenditures for the total population (N = 2262698) of the Basque Country. We observe the prevalence of HIV and use OLS regressions to estimate the impact on health utilization of demographic, socioeconomic characteristics, and health status in such patients. Results: HIV prevalence per 1000 individuals is greater the lower the socioeconomic status (0.784 for highest; 2.135 for lowest), for males (1.616) versus females (0.729), and for middle-age groups (26-45 and 46-65). Health expenditures are 11826¿ greater for HIV patients than for others, but with differences by socioeconomic group derived from a different mix of services utilization (total cost of 13058¿ for poorest, 14960¿ for richest). Controlling for health status and demographic variables, poor HIV patients consume more on pharmaceuticals; rich in specialists and hospital care. Therefore, there is inequity in health services utilization by socioeconomic groups. Conclusions: Equity in health provision for HIV patients represents a challenge even if access to treatment is guaranteed. Lack of information in poorer individuals might lead to under-provision while richer individuals might demand over-provision. We recommend establishing accurate clinical guidelines with the appropriate mix of health provision by validated need for all socioeconomic groups; promoting educational programs so that patients demand the appropriate mix of services, and stimulating integrated care for HIV patients with multiple chronic conditions.

DOI 10.1186/s12939-015-0215-6
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Mentzakis E, Paolucci F, Rubicko G, 'Priority Setting in the Austrian Healthcare System: Results from a Discrete Choice Experiment and Implications for Mental Health', JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH POLICY AND ECONOMICS, 17 61-73 (2014)
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2014 Orueta JF, Garcia-Alvarez A, Garcia-Goni M, Paolucci F, Nuno-Solinis R, 'Prevalence and Costs of Multimorbidity by Deprivation Levels in the Basque Country: A Population Based Study Using Health Administrative Databases', PLOS ONE, 9 (2014)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0089787
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 34
2014 García-Goñi M, Paolucci F, 'The Development of an Aged Care Insurance Market in Spain', Geneva Association Health and Ageing Newsletter, 30 (2014)
2013 Sowa PM, Stoelwinder JU, Paolucci F, 'Improving risk equalisation in health insurance markets: lessons from the Australian model', The Geneva Association Health and Ageing Newsletter, 29 (2013)
2013 Goñi-García M, Hernández-Quevedo C, Nuño-Solinís R, Paolucci F, 'Is Spain s NHS evolving to a high-performing chronic health system?', Eurohealth, 19 41-43 (2013)
2013 Tanios N, Wagner M, Tony M, Baltussen R, van Til J, Rindress D, et al., 'Which criteria are considered in healthcare decisions? Insights from an international survey of policy and clinical decision makers.', Int J Technol Assess Health Care, 29 456-465 (2013)
DOI 10.1017/S0266462313000573
Citations Web of Science - 49
2013 Sowa PM, Butler JRG, Connelly L, Paolucci F, 'Health-care accessibility in seven countries in eastern Europe: a multinomial logit study of individual unmet medical needs', LANCET, 381 135-135 (2013)
Citations Web of Science - 1
2012 Garcia-Goni M, Hernandez-Quevedo C, Nuno-Solinis R, Paolucci F, 'Pathways towards chronic care-focused healthcare systems: Evidence from Spain', HEALTH POLICY, 108 236-245 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.healthpol.2012.09.014
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 24
2012 Robson A, Paolucci F, 'Private Health Insurance Incentives in Australia: The Effects of Recent Changes to Price Carrots and Income Sticks', GENEVA PAPERS ON RISK AND INSURANCE-ISSUES AND PRACTICE, 37 725-744 (2012)
DOI 10.1057/gpp.2012.38
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2012 Mirelman A, Mentzakis E, Kinter E, Paolucci F, Fordham R, Ozawa S, et al., 'Decision-making criteria among national policymakers in five countries: A discrete choice experiment eliciting relative preferences for equity and efficiency', Value in Health, 15 534-539 (2012)

Background: Worldwide, there is a need for formalization of the priority setting processes in health. Recent research has used the term multicriteria decision analysis for methods... [more]

Background: Worldwide, there is a need for formalization of the priority setting processes in health. Recent research has used the term multicriteria decision analysis for methods that systematically include preferences for both equity and efficiency. The present study compares decision-makers' preferences at the country level for a set of equity and efficiency criteria according to a multicriteria decision analysis framework. Methods: Discrete choice experiments were conducted for Brazil, Cuba, Nepal, Norway, and Uganda. By using standardized methods, we elicited preferences for intervention attributes using a individual choice questionnaire. A multinomial logistic regression was applied to estimate the coefficients for all single-policy criteria, per country. Attributes were assigned to an equity group or to an efficiency group. After testing for scale variance, predicted probabilities for interventions with both types of attributes were compared across countries. Results: The Norway and Nepal groups showed considerable preferences for efficiency criteria over equity criteria with percent change in respective predicted sum probabilities of [10%, -84%] and [6%, -79%]. Brazil and Uganda also showed preference for the efficiency criteria though less convincingly ([-34%, -93%], [-18%, -63%], respectively). The Cuban group showed the strongest preferences with equity attributes dominating efficiency ([-52%, 213%]). Conclusions: Group preferences of policymakers show explicit but varying trade-offs of efficiency and equity in these diverse settings. This multicriteria decision analysis approach, using discrete choice experiments, indicates that systematic setting of health priorities is possible across a variety of countries. It may be a valuable tool to guide health reform initiatives. © 2012, International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR).

DOI 10.1016/j.jval.2012.04.001
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 34
2012 Defechereux T, Paolucci F, Mirelman A, Youngkong S, Botten G, Hagen TP, Niessen LW, 'Health care priority setting in Norway a multicriteria decision analysis', BMC Health Services Research, 12 (2012)

Background: Priority setting in population health is increasingly based on explicitly formulated values. The Patients Rights Act of the Norwegian tax-based health service guaranti... [more]

Background: Priority setting in population health is increasingly based on explicitly formulated values. The Patients Rights Act of the Norwegian tax-based health service guaranties all citizens health care in case of a severe illness, a proven health benefit, and proportionality between need and treatment. This study compares the values of the country's health policy makers with these three official principles. Methods. In total 34 policy makers participated in a discrete choice experiment, weighting the relative value of six policy criteria. We used multi-variate logistic regression with selection as dependent valuable to derive odds ratios for each criterion. Next, we constructed a composite league table - based on the sum score for the probability of selection - to rank potential interventions in five major disease areas. Results: The group considered cost effectiveness, large individual benefits and severity of disease as the most important criteria in decision making. Priority interventions are those related to cardiovascular diseases and respiratory diseases. Less attractive interventions rank those related to mental health. Conclusions: Norwegian policy makers' values are in agreement with principles formulated in national health laws. Multi-criteria decision approaches may provide a tool to support explicit allocation decisions. © 2012 Defechereux et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-12-39
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 37
2012 Paolucci F, Garcia-Goni M, Defechereux T, Mentzakis E, 'Evaluating preferences for equity and efficiency among national health policy makers in Spain', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 22 152-153 (2012)
2012 Garcia-Goni M, Paolucci F, Mcrea I, Livilenko L, 'The evolution towards chronic care-focused healthcare systems. An international perspective', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 22 246-246 (2012)
2012 García-Goñi M, Hernández-Quevedo C, Nuño-Solinís R, Paolucci F, Paolucci F, 'Verso sistemi sanitari orientati alle patologie croniche: il caso spagnolo. Politiche Sanitarie', Politiche Sanitarie, 13 160-171 (2012)
DOI 10.1706/1184.13101
2012 Paolucci F, James B, Wynand VDV, Wynand VDV, 'Mix pubblico e privato nel finanziamento dei servizi sanitari in Australia: opt-out con sussidi aggiustati per il profilo di rischio degli assicurati?', Politiche Sanitarie, 13 147-159 (2012)
DOI 10.1706/1184.13100
2011 McRae IS, Paolucci F, 'The global financial crisis and Australian general practice', Australian Health Review, 35 32-35 (2011)

Objective. To explore the potential effects of the global financial crisis (GFC) on the market for general practitioner (GP) services in Australia. Design. We estimate the impact ... [more]

Objective. To explore the potential effects of the global financial crisis (GFC) on the market for general practitioner (GP) services in Australia. Design. We estimate the impact of changes in unemployment rates on demand for GP services and the impact of lost asset values on GP retirement plans and work patterns. Combining these supply and demand effects, we estimate the potential effect of the GFC on the market for GP services under various scenarios. Results. If deferral of retirement increases GP availability by 2%, and historic trends to reduce GP working hours are halved, at the current level of ~5.2% unemployment average fees would decline by $0.23 per GP consultation and volumes of GP services would rise by 2.53% with almost no change in average GP gross earnings over what would otherwise have occurred. With 8.5% unemployment, as initially predicted by Treasury, GP fees would increase by $0.91 and GP income by nearly 3%. Conclusions. The GFC is likely to increase activity in the GP market and potentially to reduce fee levels relative to the pre-GFC trends. Net effects on average GP incomes are likely to be small at current unemployment levels. What is known about the topic? Although the broad directions of the impact of the global financial crisis on the demand for and supply of GP services have been the subject of public discussion, the overall impact on the GP market has not been formally assessed. What does this paper add? Drawing on existing supply and demand models, we estimate the likely effect of the global financial crisis on GP activity levels, GP earnings, and the fees to be faced by patients. What are the implications for practitioners? Practitioners on average are likely to work harder to recover losses in the investments they have made for their retirements. They may face lower fees than would have been the case due to the increasing supply of GPs as some defer retirement, but average incomes are likely to be minimally affected. © 2011 AHHA.

DOI 10.1071/AH09830
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2011 Strazdins L, Griffin AL, Broom DH, Banwell C, Korda R, Dixon J, et al., 'Time scarcity: Another health inequality?', Environment and Planning A, 43 545-559 (2011)

Considerable policy action has focused on the social patterning of health, especially the health risks associated with low income. More recent attention has turned to transport, f... [more]

Considerable policy action has focused on the social patterning of health, especially the health risks associated with low income. More recent attention has turned to transport, food systems, workplaces, and location, and the way their intersections with social position and income create health inequalities. Time is another dimension that structures what people do; yet the way in which time contours health has been neglected. This paper explores (a) how time might influence health, and (b) the way in which time scarcity complicates current understandings of health inequalities. Alongside other meanings, time can be thought of as a health resource. People need time to access health services, build close relationships, exercise, work, play, care, and consume-all activities that are fundamental to health. There is evidence that the experience of time pressure is directly related to poorer mental health. Lack of time is also the main reason people give for not taking exercise or eating healthy food. Thus, another impact of time scarcity may be its prevention of activities and behaviours critical for good health. We investigate whether time scarcity, like financial pressure, is socially patterned, and thus likely to generate health inequality. The experience of time scarcity appears to be linked to variations in time devoted to employment or caring-activities closely bound to gender, status, and life course. One reason that time scarcity is socially patterned is because of the way in which caring is valued, allocated, and negotiated in households and the market. Adding paid employment to caring workloads is now normative, transforming the allocation of time within families. But caring requires a close interlocking with others' needs, which are often urgent and unpredictable, creating conflict with the linear, scheduled, and commodified approach to time required in the workplace. We review the evidence for the possibility that these time pressures are indeed contributing to socially patterned health inequalities among people caring for others. We also explore the potential for time scarcity to compound other sources of health inequality through interplays with income and space (urban form, transportation networks and place of residence). People who are both time and income poor, such as lone mothers, may face compounding barriers to good health, and the urban geography of time-scarce families represents the embedding of time - money - space trade-offs linked to physical location. In Australia and the US, poorer families are more likely to live in mid to outer suburbs, necessitating longer commutes to work. These suburbs have inferior public transport access, and can lack goods and services essential to health such as shops selling fresh foods. We conclude with a tentative framework for considering time and health in the context of policy actions. For example, social policy efforts to increase workforce participation may be economically necessary, but could have time-related consequences that alter health. Similarly, if cities are to be made livable, health promoting, and more equitable, urban designers need to understand time and time - income - space trade-offs. Indeed, many social policies and planning and health interventions involve time dimensions which, if they remain unacknowledged, could further compound time pressures and time-related health inequality. © 2011 Pion Ltd and its Licensors.

DOI 10.1068/a4360
Citations Scopus - 58Web of Science - 53
2011 Ergas H, Paolucci F, 'Providing and financing aged care in Australia', Risk Management and Healthcare Policy, 4 67-80 (2011)

© 2011 Ergas and Paolucci, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd. This article focuses on the provision and financing of aged care in Australia. Demand for aged care will ... [more]

© 2011 Ergas and Paolucci, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd. This article focuses on the provision and financing of aged care in Australia. Demand for aged care will increase substantially as a result of population aging, with the number of Australians aged 85 and over projected to increase from 400,000 in 2010 to over 1.8 million in 2051. Meeting this demand will greatly strain the current system, and makes it important to exploit opportunities for increased efficiency. A move to greater beneficiary co-payments is also likely, though its extent may depend on whether aged care insurance and other forms of pre-payment can develop.

DOI 10.2147/RMHP.S16718
Citations Scopus - 4
2011 Paolucci F, Sowa PM, 'Incentives and Choice in Healthcare', ECONOMIC RECORD, 87 174-176 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1475-4932.2010.00715.x
2011 Robson A, Ergas H, Paolucci F, Paolucci F, 'The Analytics of the Australian Private Health Insurance Rebate and the Medicare Levy Surcharge', Agenda: a journal of policy analysis and reform, (2011)
2011 Paolucci F, Butler JRG, van de Ven WPMM, Ven WPMMVD, 'Removing Duplication in Public/Private Health Insurance in Australia: Opting Out With Risk-adjusted Subsidies?', Agenda: a journal of policy analysis and reform, 18 49-70 (2011)
2011 Paolucci F, Shmueli A, Shmueli A, 'The Introduction of Ex-ante Risk Equalisation in the Australian Private Health Insurance Market: A First Step', Agenda: a journal of policy analysis and reform, 18 71-92 (2011)
2010 Baltussen R, Youngkong S, Paolucci F, Niessen L, 'Multi-criteria decision analysis to prioritize health interventions: Capitalizing on first experiences', Health Policy, 96 262-264 (2010)

This paper capitalizes on a first set of experiences on the application of multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) in seven low- and middle-income settings. It thereby reacts to a... [more]

This paper capitalizes on a first set of experiences on the application of multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) in seven low- and middle-income settings. It thereby reacts to a recent paper by Peacock et al., highlighting the potential of MCDA to guide policy makers in highly specific decision-making contexts. We argue that MCDA also has a broader application in setting priorities in health, i.e. to indicate general perceptions on priorities without defining the allocation of resources in a precise fashion. This use of MCDA can have far-reaching and constructive influences on policy formulation. © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.healthpol.2010.01.009
Citations Scopus - 63Web of Science - 48
2010 Connelly LB, Paolucci F, Butler JRG, Collins P, 'Risk equalisation and voluntary health insurance markets: The case of Australia', Health Policy, 98 3-14 (2010)

In April 2007, Australia introduced a risk equalisation (RE) scheme (de facto a claims equalisation scheme), which replaced an extant reinsurance scheme that had operated since 19... [more]

In April 2007, Australia introduced a risk equalisation (RE) scheme (de facto a claims equalisation scheme), which replaced an extant reinsurance scheme that had operated since 1976. This scheme is one of a number of policy measures that the Australian Government has instituted to support the voluntary private health insurance (PHI) market which is subject to mandatory community rating and the attendant problem of selection. The latter has been a persistent concern in the Australian PHI market since the introduction of Australia's universal, compulsory national health insurance scheme Medicare. This paper presents a brief overview of Australia's health care financing arrangements and, in particular, focuses on the history, structure and functioning of the RE scheme. It provides an exposition of the operation of the scheme and empirical evidence of the scheme's effects in its first full year of operation, 2007-08. The paper makes three contributions: first, it provides the only detailed overview of the functioning of the Australian RE scheme published to date; second, it presents the first empirical measures of the scheme's operation at the level of the 38 individual PHI funds; and third, it describes the systematic differences in the scheme's operation with respect to large and small funds. Thus, this paper provides a number of insights into the operation and outcomes of the Australian RE scheme following its first year of operation. © 2010.

DOI 10.1016/j.healthpol.2010.06.002
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
2010 Armstrong J, Paolucci F, McLeod H, van de Ven WPMM, 'Risk equalisation in voluntary health insurance markets: A three country comparison', Health Policy, 98 39-49 (2010)

The paper summarises the conclusions for health policy from the experience of three countries who have introduced risk equalisation subsidies, in their voluntary health insurance ... [more]

The paper summarises the conclusions for health policy from the experience of three countries who have introduced risk equalisation subsidies, in their voluntary health insurance (VHI) markets. The countries chosen are Australia, Ireland and South Africa. All of these countries have developed VHI markets and have progressed towards introducing risk equalisation. The objective of such subsidies is primarily to make VHI affordable while encouraging efficiency in health care production.The paper presents a conceptual framework to understand and compare risk equalisation subsidies in VHI markets. The paper outlines how such subsidies are organised in each of the countries and identifies problems that arise in their implementation.We conclude that the objectives of risk equalisation, in VHI markets are no different to those in countries with mandatory insurance systems. We find that the introduction of risk equalisation subsidies is complex and that countries seeking to introduce risk equalisation in VHI markets must carefully consider how such subsidies advance their overall health policy goals. Furthermore, we conclude that such subsidies must be structured correctly as otherwise incentives exist for risk selection which may threaten affordability and efficiency.Our overall conclusion is that also in voluntary health insurance markets risk equalisation has a role in meeting the related public policy objectives of risk solidarity and affordability, and without it these objectives are severely undermined. © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.healthpol.2010.06.009
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
2010 Armstrong J, Paolucci F, van de Ven WPMM, 'Risk equalisation in voluntary health insurance markets', Health Policy, 98 1-2 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.healthpol.2010.06.007
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 4
2010 Armstrong J, Paolucci F, 'Risk equalisation in Ireland and Australia: A simulation analysis to compare outcomes', Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance: Issues and Practice, 35 521-538 (2010)

Risk equalisation has been implemented in a number of countries as a means of providing explicit risk-adjusted transfers between health insurance undertakings to improve efficienc... [more]

Risk equalisation has been implemented in a number of countries as a means of providing explicit risk-adjusted transfers between health insurance undertakings to improve efficiency within the health insurance market, and make health insurance affordable. Two such countries are Australia and Ireland. In this article, a simulation exercise is carried out to compare the effectiveness of the two countries risk equalisation schemes in meeting the policy objectives of encouraging insurers to be efficient and discouraging them from engaging in risk selection. The results of the analysis show that the Australian scheme is less effective than the Irish scheme in reducing the incentive for risk selection and in encouraging insurers to be efficient. The results provide evidence that direct standardisation mechanisms (as used in Ireland) can lead to superior outcomes as compared to indirect standardisation mechanisms (as used in Australia) in terms of promoting efficiency and deterring risk selection. © 2010 The International Association for the Study of Insurance Economics.

DOI 10.1057/gpp.2010.23
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2010 Ergas H, Paolucci F, 'Providing and financing aged care in Australia', GENEVA ASSOCIATION INFORMATION NEWSLETTER HEALTH AND AGEING, 23 (2010)
2010 Rebba V, Paolucci F, Paolucci F, 'Presente e futuro dei sistemi di long-term care: un confronto tra Italia, Germania, Paesi Bassi e Australia.', Politiche Sanitarie, 11 (2010)
2010 Paolucci F, Henry E, Henry E, 'L erogazione e il finanziamento dell assistenza agli anziani in Australia', Politiche Sanitarie, 11 12-24 (2010)
DOI 10.1706/521.6242
2009 Stoelwinder JU, Paolucci F, 'Sustaining medicare through consumer choice of health funds: Lessons from the Netherlands', Medical Journal of Australia, 191 30-32 (2009)

¿ The current escalation in costs of Australia's health care system does not appear to be sustainable. ¿ Sustainable financing requires direct engagement of consumers - inste... [more]

¿ The current escalation in costs of Australia's health care system does not appear to be sustainable. ¿ Sustainable financing requires direct engagement of consumers - instead of the current political process driven by special interest groups, targeted at gaining a larger share of the federal and state governments' budgets. ¿ Reforms in the Netherlands, directed at achieving universal insurance with consumer choice of health fund, provide valuable lessons for Australia on how to design sustainable financing.

DOI 10.5694/j.1326-5377.2009.tb02671.x
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2009 Paolucci F, Prinsze F, Stam PJA, van de Ven WPMM, 'The potential premium range of risk-rating in competitive markets for supplementary health insurance', International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, 9 243-258 (2009)

In this paper, we simulate several scenarios of the potential premium range for voluntary (supplementary) health insurance, covering benefits which might be excluded from mandator... [more]

In this paper, we simulate several scenarios of the potential premium range for voluntary (supplementary) health insurance, covering benefits which might be excluded from mandatory health insurance (MI). Our findings show that, by adding risk-factors, the minimum premium decreases and the maximum increases. The magnitude of the premium range is especially substantial for benefits such as medical devices and drugs. When removing benefits from MI policymakers should be aware of the implications for the potential reduction of affordability of voluntary health insurance coverage in a competitive market. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009.

DOI 10.1007/s10754-008-9049-8
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
2007 Paolucci F, Schut E, Beck K, Greß S, Van de Voorde C, Zmora I, 'Supplementary health insurance as a tool for risk-selection in mandatory basic health insurance markets', Health Economics, Policy and Law, 2 173-192 (2007)

As the share of supplementary health insurance (SI) in health care finance is likely to grow, SI may become an increasingly attractive tool for risk-selection in basic health insu... [more]

As the share of supplementary health insurance (SI) in health care finance is likely to grow, SI may become an increasingly attractive tool for risk-selection in basic health insurance (BI). In this paper, we develop a conceptual framework to assess the probability that insurers will use SI for favourable risk-selection in BI. We apply our framework to five countries in which risk-selection via SI is feasible: Belgium, Germany, Israel, the Netherlands, and Switzerland. For each country, we review the available evidence of SI being used as selection device. We find that the probability that SI is and will be used for risk-selection substantially varies across countries. Finally, we discuss several strategies for policy makers to reduce the chance that SI will be used for risk-selection in BI markets. © 2006 Cambridge University Press.

DOI 10.1017/S1744133107004124
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 25
2006 Paolucci F, Den Exter A, Van de Ven WPMM, 'Solidarity in competitive health insurance markets: analysing the relevant EC legal framework.', Health economics, policy, and law, 1 107-126 (2006)

In this article we perform an economic analysis of different regulatory frameworks that aim at guaranteeing solidarity in competitive health insurance markets. Thereafter, we anal... [more]

In this article we perform an economic analysis of different regulatory frameworks that aim at guaranteeing solidarity in competitive health insurance markets. Thereafter, we analyse the legal conformity of these intervention strategies with EC law. We find that risk compensation schemes are the first-best intervention strategy because they guarantee an 'acceptable level of solidarity' without hindering free trade and competition and without reducing efficiency. Second-best options are premium and excess-loss compensation schemes, which guarantee solidarity at the expense of some efficiency. Premium rate restrictions and open enrolment should be avoided because they reduce efficiency and are unnecessary, not proportional, and undesirable to the pursuit of the general good. These conclusions are relevant for EU countries that adopt premium rate restrictions and open enrolment in combination with a risk compensation scheme, such as Ireland and the Netherlands. In these countries policy makers should design the health insurance schemes in conformity with EC law, for example by replacing premium rate restrictions and open enrolment with premium and/or excess-loss compensation schemes.

DOI 10.1017/S1744133105000137
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
2005 Masseria C, Paolucci F, 'Equity in the delivery of inpatient care in Europe and Italy', Quaderni ACP, 12 3-7 (2005)

Income-related horizontal inequity in hospital admissions is estimated in twelve European countries. Pooled data of the EHCS for five years (1994-1998) are used to estimate and co... [more]

Income-related horizontal inequity in hospital admissions is estimated in twelve European countries. Pooled data of the EHCS for five years (1994-1998) are used to estimate and compare inequity indices. In most EU member states, after standardizing for need differences, the better off are more likely to be admitted to hospitals than the poor, and significantly so in Portugal, Greece, Austria, Italy, Ireland, Germany and France. Regional disparities in hospital supply also plays a role in the measured degree of inequity, in particular, in Italy and Spain. For the former we studied more deeply this phenomenon by using the Multiscopo ISTAT survey. The analysis confirms that people living in the North of Italy have a higher probability of being hospitalized than their counterparts and enjoy better quality of care. To make it worse, in the South people tend more intensively to move to other regions to receive hospital care.

Citations Scopus - 1
Mahmoudi N, Melia A, Lee D, Dalton C, Paolucci F, 'Cost-effectiveness Analysis of COVID-19 Case Isolation', SSRN Electronic Journal,
DOI 10.2139/ssrn.3603711
Show 57 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Paolucci F, 'Medicare Select': a pathway towards competitive social health insurance in Australia', Jerusalem (2012)

Other (44 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Paolucci F, Melia A, Lee D, Mahmoudi N, 'Is aggressive hotel isolation worth the cost to fight COVID-19? The answer depends on family size', (2020) [O1]
Co-authors Adrian Melia, Doowon Lee
2020 Paolucci F, 'Radio interview - Channel News Asia (CNA)', (2020) [O1]
2020 Higginson S, Paolucci F, 'Health induced economic crisis in Australia: One size doesn t fit all.', (2020) [O1]
2020 Paolucci F, 'Radio interview - ABCDrive', (2020) [O1]
2020 Henriquez J, Garcia Goñi M, Paolucci F, 'The COVID-19 catastrophe in Spain', (2020) [O1]
2020 Moy N, Paolucci F, 'While UK COVID-19 cases rose, Australia's slowed to a halt.', (2020) [O1]
2020 Antonini M, Berardi C, Paolucci F, 'Le Regioni in ordine sparso nella lotta al Covid', (2020) [O1]
2020 Paolucci F, 'Interview - ABC NewsRadio', (2020) [O1]
2020 Antonini M, Berardi C, Paolucci F, 'What Australia can learn from Italy s response to the COVID-19 disease', (2020) [O1]
2020 Berardi C, Antonini M, Paolucci F, 'How the coronavirus crippled Italy', (2020) [O1]
2020 Paolucci F, 'Radio interview - ABC NewsRadio', (2020) [O1]
2020 Paolucci F, 'Radio interview - CNA938', (2020) [O1]
2020 Antonini M, Berardi C, Paolucci F, 'Il pendolo del Covid-19, tra salute pubblica ed economia', (2020) [O1]
2020 Moy N, Paolucci F, 'Restructuring higher education funding in Australia during a pandemic', (2020) [O1]
2020 Paolucci F, Lee D, Wall L, Hinwood M, Antonini M, 'A $200 fine for not wearing a mask is fair, as long as free masks go to those in need', (2020) [O1]
Co-authors Doowon Lee, Madeleine Hinwood, Laura Wall
2020 Henriquez J, Gonzalo Almorox E, Garcia-Goni M, Paolucci F, 'First Months of the COVID-19 Pandemic in Spain', (2020)
DOI 10.2139/ssrn.3659377
2020 Benitez A, Velasco C, Paolucci F, 'Second wave of COVID-19: Lessons from Latin America', (2020) [O1]
2020 Milovanovic K, Higginson S, Paolucci F, 'Second wave lockdowns with risk-targeted policy responses', (2020) [O1]
2020 Fouda A, Mahmoudi N, Moy N, Paolucci F, 'Comparing the COVID-19 Pandemic in Greece, Iceland, New Zealand, and Singapore', : SSRN (2020)
DOI 10.2139/ssrn.3658463
2020 Paolucci F, 'Estrategias para enfrentar el COVID-19 y algunos aprendizajes. Los casos de Australia, Italia, Nueva Zelanda y Suecia', (2020) [O1]
2020 Paolucci F, 'What Have We Learned From this Crisis?', (2020) [O1]
2020 Mahmoudi N, Melia A, Lee D, Craig D, Paolucci F, 'Cost-effectiveness Analysis of COVID-19 Case Isolation', : SSRN (2020)
DOI 10.2139/ssrn.3603711
2020 Milovanovic K, Higginson S, Gillespie J, Wall L, Moy N, Hinwood M, et al., 'COVID-19: The Need for an Australian Economic Pandemic Response Plan', : SSRN (2020)
DOI 10.2139/ssrn.3663929
2020 Benitez A, Velasco C, Sequeira AR, Henriquez J, Menezes F, Paolucci F, 'Responses to COVID-19 in Five Countries of Latin America', : SSRN (2020)
DOI 10.2139/ssrn.3663292
2020 Moy N, Antonini M, Kyhlstedt M, Paolucci F, 'Categorising Policy & Technology Interventions for a Pandemic: A Comparative and Conceptual Framework', : SSRN (2020)
2019 Paolucci F, 'Isapres 5 puntos para avanzar', (2019) [O1]
2019 Paolucci F, Melia A, Henriquez J, 'Private health insurance premiums should be based on age and health status', (2019) [O1]
Co-authors Adrian Melia
2019 Paolucci F, 'Inflación de prima GES', (2019) [O1]
2019 Paolucci F, 'Making private insurance attractive again', (2019) [O1]
2016 Henríquez J, Velasco C, Mentzakis E, Paolucci F, 'Más equidad y eficiencia en Isapres: Evaluación y propuestas al mecanismo de compensación de riesgos.', : Centro de Estudios Publicos (2016)
2015 Paolucci F, García-Goni M, ni MG-G, 'The case for change towards universal and sustainable national health insurance and financing for Australia: enabling the transition to a chronic condition focussed health care system', (2015)
2015 Paolucci F, 'Allow Aussies to opt out of Medicare and rely on private insurance', (2015) [O1]
2015 Paolucci F, 'Radio Interview - ABC', (2015) [O1]
2015 Paolucci F, 'Policies: Paying the premium', (2015) [O1]
2015 Paolucci F, 'Radio interview - Dubai Eye 103.8', (2015) [O1]
2015 Paolucci F, 'Want real health reform? Integrate public and private health into one mandatory insurance system', (2015) [O1]
2015 Paolucci F, 'Assessing the roll-out of Dubai s Health Insurance Scheme', (2015) [O1]
2013 Paolucci F, 'Radio Interview - SBS', (2013) [O1]
2012 Paolucci F, 'Radio interview - SBS', (2012) [O1]
2011 García-Goñi M, Hernandez-Quevedo C, Paolucci F, Nuño-Solinís R, 'Roadmap towards chronic-based healthcare systems: the case of Spain', : London School of Economics (2011)
2011 Paolucci F, 'Radio Interview - SBS', (2011) [O1]
2011 Paolucci F, 'Radio interview - SBS', (2011) [O1]
2009 van Exel J, Brouwer W, Paolucci F, 'Grensoverschrijdende zorg: Redenen om te gaan of te blijven.', (2009)
2008 Paolucci F, 'The opportunity to opt-out of Medicare', (2008) [O1]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 29
Total funding $24,473,647

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20203 grants / $1,164,163

A practice change intervention to increase the routine provision of care addressing gestational weight gain: a stepped-wedge trial$734,163

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Melanie Kingsland, Professor Karen Campbell, Professor Craig Pennell, Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor Chris Rissel, Professor John Attia, Professor Maralyn Foureur, Professor Francesco Paolucci, Doctor Jenna Hollis
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2023
GNo G1900839
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON Y

Child Dental Benefit Policies and the Health of Australian Children $250,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding C1200 - Aust Competitive - ARC
Category 1200
UON N

A practice change intervention to increase the routine provision of care addressing gestational weight gain: a stepped-wedge trial$180,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Professor John Attia, Professor Karen Campbell, Professor Maralyn Foureur, Doctor Jenna Hollis, Doctor Melanie Kingsland, Professor Francesco Paolucci, Professor Craig Pennell, Professor Chris Rissel, Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Partnership Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G2000238
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON Y

20196 grants / $241,960

The PRETEND Trial: A mixed methods study evaluating PREferences, feasibility, and costs of performing sham surgery Trials involving major surgical procedures$155,596

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Francesco Paolucci, Dr Samantha Bunzli, Professor Peter Choong, Associate Professor Michelle Dowsey, Professor Philip Clarke
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1900193
Type Of Funding C2120 - Aust Commonwealth - Other
Category 2120
UON Y

University of Bologna and University of Newcastle$20,000

Funding body: Faculty of Business & Law, The University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Business & Law, The University of Newcastle
Scheme International Research Collaboration Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Aston University and University of Newcastle$20,000

Funding body: Faculty of Business & Law, The University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Business & Law, The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Doctor Adrian Melia, Doctor Heidi Wechtler

Scheme International Research Collaboration Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Gender Equality in the Medical Technology Industry$18,182

Funding body: Medical Technology Association of Australia

Funding body Medical Technology Association of Australia
Project Team Associate Professor Brendan Boyle, Associate Professor Caragh Brosnan, Prof MARK Flynn, Professor Rebecca Mitchell, Professor Francesco Paolucci
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1900933
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON Y

nib Hospital Rate Inflation Project$18,182

Funding body: nib Health Funds Limited

Funding body nib Health Funds Limited
Project Team Professor Francesco Paolucci, Doctor Adrian Melia, Doctor Heidi Wechtler
Scheme Matched Industry Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1901012
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON Y

Economic Development, Health and Nutrition for Sustainable Development $10,000

Funding body: Australia Africa Universities Network (AAUN)

Funding body Australia Africa Universities Network (AAUN)
Project Team Doctor Janet Dzator, Professor Francesco Paolucci, Doctor Adrian Melia, Doctor Heidi Wechtler, Prof. Yawe Bruno , Dr Allen Kabagenyi, Prof. Okurut Nathan, Prof Njoku Ama, James Gillespire, Dr Ekow Asmah, Dr Francis Andoh, Dr Michael Dzator
Scheme Partnership & Research Development Fund (PRDF)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1900649
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON Y

20181 grants / $9,000,000

ORTHOUNION$9,000,000

Funding body: European Commission, European Union

Funding body European Commission, European Union
Scheme Horizon 2020
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

20175 grants / $12,860,924

Repurposing of carbamazepine for treatment of skeletal dysplasia$9,245,924

Funding body: European Commission, European Union

Funding body European Commission, European Union
Scheme Horizon 2020
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Patients First: the Continuous Improvement in Care - Cancer (The CIC Cancer Project)$3,500,000

Funding body: Cancer Research Trust

Funding body Cancer Research Trust
Project Team

Saunders C; Bellgrad M; Bulsara C; Bulsara M; Codde J; Ives A; Johnson C; McKenzie A; Micallef J; Platt V; Preen D; Reid C; Slavov-Azamonova N; Zeps N; Yeates A

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Analysis of the economic and social impact of rare diseases on WA health system$50,000

Funding body: Western Australian Department of Health

Funding body Western Australian Department of Health
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON N

Evaluation of the potential impact of an ex-ante risk-equalisation model on the Australian PHI market$35,000

Funding body: Medibank Community Fund

Funding body Medibank Community Fund
Scheme Community Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON N

Ishars impact on community health and wellbeing$30,000

Funding body: ISHAR

Funding body ISHAR
Scheme Ishar Exploratory Study
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON N

20162 grants / $50,100

Evaluation of Hospital Performance and costing modelling$50,000

Funding body: Saint John of God Healthcare

Funding body Saint John of God Healthcare
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON N

Support the Development and implementation of the WA Health Networks Action Plan$100

Funding body: Western Australian Department of Health

Funding body Western Australian Department of Health
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON N

20154 grants / $444,500

SCRIPT$300,000

Funding body: Murdoch University

Funding body Murdoch University
Scheme Divisional Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Healthcare programs evaluation$113,000

Funding body: 360

Funding body 360
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON N

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus ayrey$16,500

Funding body: Medical Research Foundation

Funding body Medical Research Foundation
Scheme Medical Research Foundation
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON N

Evaluation of the open borders programme$15,000

Funding body: Murdoch University

Funding body Murdoch University
Scheme Divisional Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20142 grants / $107,000

Chronic care funding models by developing an economic conceptual framework and international case-studies on best practices in management of chronic conditions$100,000

Funding body: Victoria University

Funding body Victoria University
Scheme Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

School of Management Seed Grant Funding x2$7,000

Funding body: Murdoch University

Funding body Murdoch University
Scheme Divisional Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20131 grants / $30,000

Feasibility of risk-adjusted subsidies in Cambodia$30,000

Funding body: Micro Insurance Academy

Funding body Micro Insurance Academy
Scheme project grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding C3212 - International Not for profit
Category 3212
UON N

20121 grants / $30,000

Evaluation of the ex-post risk-equalisation mechanism$30,000

Funding body: Colombian Health Insurance Authority

Funding body Colombian Health Insurance Authority
Scheme project grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding C3232 - International Govt - Other
Category 3232
UON N

20111 grants / $40,000

The Design of Risk Adjustment in the Spanish Public Hospital Financing Scheme$40,000

Funding body: Universidad Complutense De Madrid

Funding body Universidad Complutense De Madrid
Scheme Visiting Scholar Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20102 grants / $405,000

Time Scarcity in Australian families: another inequity?$325,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Scheme Collaborative Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Risk equalization techniques: an international comparison$80,000

Funding body: Murdoch University

Funding body Murdoch University
Scheme Divisional Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20091 grants / $100,000

The future of private health insurance in Australia: an economic analysis of (1) ‘Business-As-Usual’ and (2) ‘Medicare Select’ scenarios$100,000

Funding body: Medibank Community Fund

Funding body Medibank Community Fund
Scheme Community Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed11
Current5

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 PhD Price Competition and Optimal Risk-Adjustment in Health Insurance Markets PhD (Economics), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2020 PhD Mental Health Disorders and the Use of E-Technologies: Value Based Approaches to Evaluate Implementation, Performance and Access PhD (Economics), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2020 PhD Mixed Methods Approached to Elicit and Evaluate Preferences, Feasibility, Costs and Outcomes of Performing Sham Surgery Trials Involving Major Surgical Procedures. PhD (Health Economics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2020 PhD Investigating Abnormal Financial Discounting Behaviour as a Way to Identify Potential Suicide Victims PhD (Economics), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2020 PhD A One Health Approach to Combat Wicked Problems within Global Food Systems PhD (Economics), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 Masters Comparative analysis of long-term care policies in the Netherlands and Chile Health Not Elswhere Classified, University of Bologna Principal Supervisor
2020 Masters On the implementation of a comprehensive HTA framework in Chile Health Not Elswhere Classified, University of Bologna Principal Supervisor
2020 Masters Macro and micro drivers of hospital inflation. Health Not Elswhere Classified, University of Bologna Principal Supervisor
2020 Masters Which preconditions must be fulfilled to achieve efficiency and affordability under Public-private mix based health systems? To what degree are they fulfilled?” - Case study of Australia Health Not Elswhere Classified, Management Center Innsbruck Principal Supervisor
2019 Masters Health Governance and Benefit Package Financing: Reform Proposal for the Chilean Economics, University of Bologna Principal Supervisor
2019 Masters The impact of voluntary deductibles in the Chilean health insurance market Economics, University of Bologna Principal Supervisor
2019 Masters Outpatient pharmaceutical insurance in the Chilean health insurance market Economics, University of Bologna Principal Supervisor
2019 Masters Risk rating in health insurance: A Tradeoff between efficiency and affordability or a means to reach both? Economics, University of Bologna Principal Supervisor
2019 Masters Cost-sharing in the private health insurance in Chile. Effects when premium rebates are either risk rated or community rated Economics, University of Bologna Principal Supervisor
2019 Masters The effects of risk equalization and risk sharing on private insurance risk rated premium Economics, University of Bologna Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Micro health insurance in Bangladesh: prospects and challenges
https://openresearch-repository.anu.edu.au/handle/1885/106397
Economics, Australian National University Co-Supervisor
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Research Projects

Patient and Surgeon preferences for sham surgery trials 2019 -

Publications

Wall L, Hinwood M, Lang D, Smith A, Bunzli S, Clarke P, et al., 'Attitudes of patients and surgeons towards sham surgery trials: a protocol for a scoping review of attributes to inform a discrete choice experiment', BMJ OPEN, 10 (2020)

Collaborators

Name Organisation
Professor Francesco Paolucci University of Newcastle
Doctor Madeleine Hinwood University of Newcastle
Ms Danielle Leigh Lang University of Newcastle

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News

Newcastle Business School VheP group supporting the global fight on the covid-19 crisis

April 29, 2020

The Newcastle Business School VheP group is supporting the global fight on the COVID-19 crisis.

Professor Francesco Paolucci

Position

Professor
Newcastle Business School
Newcastle Business School
Faculty of Business and Law

Contact Details

Email francesco.paolucci@newcastle.edu.au
Phone +61 (2) 4921 5039
Links Twitter
Research Networks

Office

Room New Space Newcastle X-747
Building New Space Newcastle
Location Newcastle

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