Dr Kate Davies

Dr Kate Davies

Lecturer

School of Humanities and Social Science

Fighting social inequities with research

Dr Kate Davies is a sociologist with a fierce commitment to social justice. Her work aims to break the cycle of social disadvantage and poorer life and health outcomes by empowering and respecting marginalised voices.

Kate Davies

When it comes to social justice, Dr Kate Davies describes herself as “unapologetically idealistic and passionate”.

Her research is helping to improve crucial human services such as housing, employment and child protection by ensuring that the people they serve have power over policy and program decisions. It then seeks to understand what difference this type of citizen involvement might make for people’s health and social outcomes.

“Those people whose lives are changed by the decisions made at policy and program levels must be involved in that decision-making process,” asserts Kate.

“Citizen involvement in human services is a human right and is ethical. But increasingly we are also seeing that where people are involved in the decisions that affect them, the outcomes are better for everyone.”

The true impact of hardship

Kate points to the evidence, which shows again and again, that people who experience complex hardship, such as poverty, violence or living with a disability, tend to have worse outcomes in areas such as health, crime, employment and education.

“The explanation for such unequal outcomes is that discrimination and prejudice is ingrained in the structure of our society. That won’t change unless we understand what is happening and develop evidence on what works to improve equality.”

Kate’s passion for equality permeates every area of her life. She is a respected tertiary educator and researcher, a foster carer, research partner and funder, and a board member for Community Disability Alliance Hunter and Nova for Women and Children. Kate’s research is also purposefully collaborative, inviting input from non-academic partners.

“Working in partnership with people who live the experiences we are studying is important; people aren’t just the subjects of research. However, collaboration takes time; slow relationship building is crucial to effective human services research.”

Kate acknowledges that time can be costly, and research funding difficult to secure. Nevertheless, she rarely lets a lack of funding stand in the way of much-needed progress. With Nova for Women and Children, Kate recently commissioned a piece of local research to be conducted by University of Newcastle researchers on assertive outreach for women. She is also working in collaboration with her law and social work colleagues to explore the importance of parent and family inclusion in child protection practice.

“The evidence tells us that children’s lives are better when they have meaningful connections with their families. I see this in my research work, and I experience it as a foster carer.”

Valuing lived experience

Kate’s research is built on extensive firsthand experience working alongside people during some of the most difficult times of their lives. Over the years, she has worked and volunteered in urban, rural and remote Australian communities and around the world in disaster management, public health and community development.

Kate’s community involvement has given her a deep appreciation for people’s lived experience expertise, which can lead to interventions such as peer support, peer mentoring, advocacy, and community leadership. While there is limited evidence to show whether shifting power to people with lived experience makes a difference to outcomes, Kate is determined to build this evidence base for the future.

“My work in peer support, in particular, has offered clear guidance to community organisations about what it takes to not only employ people with lived experience—for example, lived experience of mental illness—but to ensure that such employment changes organisations for the better.”

Kate has also used her research skills to evaluate and refine mental health and suicide prevention programs, predominantly in rural Australia, creating a cycle of quality improvement. Additionally, her skills as an evaluator and advisor have contributed to several international development programs, particularly within the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement.

Creating hope and change

Throughout her vibrant career, Kate has seen “shocking inequalities” but also incredible triumphs. Her work is paving the way to a better future for our communities, one where marginalised voices are respected, valued, and hold power within decisions, policies and programs.

“Once you open your eyes to inequality in the world, it’s impossible to look away.

“I have had the privilege of witnessing community leaders take power, children and young people stand up and advocate for their rights, people living with disability hold their societies to account, women defy oppression and violence, and individuals and families quietly go about their lives with strength and dignity.”

“Through my research and teaching, I hope to make a tiny contribution to the goal of social justice and making the world a more equal place.”

Fighting social inequities with research

Dr Kate Davies is a sociologist with a fierce commitment to social justice. Her work aims to break the cycle of social disadvantage and poorer life and health outcomes by empowering and respecting marginalised voices.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Kate Davies is a Human Services Lecturer with the School of Humanities and Social Science.

Kate has taught across of range of sociology, health and development courses.

Kate is a sociologist whose research seeks to better understand and address inequalities that shape people’s experiences of health and wellbeing.

Kate was previously a Postdoctoral Research Fellow with the Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine. She evaluated and examined a range of program and policy approaches to improve mental health outcomes for rural and remote communities. She led the evaluation of the Farm-Link rural suicide prevention program and contributed to evaluations and critiques of a range of integrated care models. Kate’s previous research has produced evidence-based models and strategies for enhancing the participation of people who experience mental health issues in policymaking and service delivery. She has evaluated organisational learning approaches to integrating peer workers into community-based mental health teams and examined ‘lived-experience’ as a valuable and crucial source of knowledge and expertise.

Kate works throughout the Asia-Pacific region in public health and disaster risk reduction roles and brings substantial policymaking and program management expertise to her academic work. 


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • community development
  • disability
  • evaluation
  • human services
  • international aid and development
  • mental health
  • peer support
  • service-user participation and lived experience
  • sociology of health

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
440405 Poverty, inclusivity and wellbeing 40
440712 Social policy 20
441012 Sociology of inequalities 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia
Casual Academic University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
31/3/2016 -  Research Associate Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health
Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/4/2012 - 20/12/2013 International Advisor Australian Red Cross
Tonga

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
SOCA2505 Sociology and Psychology of Mental Health for Occupational Therapy
School of Humanities and Social Science - Faculty of Education and Arts - The University of Newcastle
Lecturer, Tutor, Course Coordinator (2019) 1/2/2018 - 17/7/2019
GEOG1030 Global Poverty and Development
The University of Newcastle
Lecturer and tutor 1/3/2014 - 20/7/2016
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Gray MMA, Coates J, Davies K, 'Social development, the environment and the future of the planet', Future Directions in Social Development, Palgrave, London 141-164 (2017) [B1]
Co-authors Mel Gray
2014 Gray M, Agllias K, Davies K, 'Social justice feminism', The Routledge International Handbook of Social Justice 173-187 (2014)
DOI 10.4324/9781315857534
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Mel Gray, Kylie Agllias

Journal article (19 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Akter S, Davies K, Rich JL, Inder KJ, 'Community perspectives of barriers indigenous women face in accessing maternal health care services in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh', ETHNICITY & HEALTH, (2020)
DOI 10.1080/13557858.2020.1862766
Co-authors Kerry Inder, Shahinoor Akter Uon, Jane Rich
2020 Davies K, Read DMY, Booth A, Turner N, Gottschall K, Perkins D, 'Connecting with social and emotional well-being in rural Australia: An evaluation of We-Yarn , an Aboriginal gatekeeper suicide prevention workshop', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 28 579-587 (2020)

Objective: This evaluation considered the potential of We-Yarn, a suicide prevention gatekeeper training workshop, to contribute to Aboriginal suicide prevention in rural New Sout... [more]

Objective: This evaluation considered the potential of We-Yarn, a suicide prevention gatekeeper training workshop, to contribute to Aboriginal suicide prevention in rural New South Wales. Design: A mixed methods approach included surveys, in-depth interviews and workshop observations. Setting: Aboriginal suicide prevention training in rural New South Wales, Australia. Participants: Attendees at We-Yarn training. Intervention: We-Yarn provided culturally safe suicide prevention skills training for Aboriginal people and for those who work with Aboriginal communities and persons in rural New South Wales. Training workshops were delivered across multiple locations for 6 hours in one day. Workshops were facilitated by two facilitators with lived and professional experience; one Aboriginal and one non-Aboriginal facilitator. We-Yarn content was developed by staff from the Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health, and in consultation with Aboriginal Elders and representatives of Aboriginal Medical Services to ensure relevance and cultural appropriateness. Main outcome measures: Pre and post-workshop surveys captured capacity and participants¿ confidence in identifying and responding to a person at risk of suicide. Interviews explored participants' experiences of workshops, implementation of learning, and attitudes regarding social and emotional wellbeing and suicide. Observations detailed the workshop environment, participants' engagement, and participants' responses to facilitators and content. Results: We-Yarn was considered culturally appropriate. Participants responded to facilitators' lived experiences. Participants reported significant improvements in understanding the links between cultural strengths, social and emotional wellbeing and suicide prevention. However, health professionals with existing knowledge wanted a stronger focus on clinical training. Conclusion: We-Yarn promoted discussion of suicide prevention within a holistic health framework, building on participants' pre-existing knowledge about social and emotional wellbeing. Importantly, skilful facilitators with lived experience were vital to the success of the workshops. Consideration should be given to attracting people with low suicide prevention knowledge to the workshops, developing tailored workshops for health professionals and ensuring prolonged engagement with communities. Multifaceted and long term responses in addition to this type of training are important.

DOI 10.1111/ajr.12671
Co-authors David Perkins, Angela Booth
2020 Akter S, Davies K, Rich JL, Inder KJ, 'Barriers to accessing maternal health care services in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh: A qualitative descriptive study of Indigenous women's experiences.', PloS one, 15 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0237002
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Shahinoor Akter Uon, Jane Rich, Kerry Inder
2020 Akter S, Rich JL, Davies K, Inder KJ, 'Prevalence and factors associated with knowledge and access to delivery services at primary health care facilities amongst indigenous women in Khagrachhari district Bangladesh - A cross-sectional study', MIDWIFERY, 90 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2020.102798
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Shahinoor Akter Uon, Jane Rich, Kerry Inder
2020 Akter S, Rich JL, Davies K, Inder KJ, 'Prevalence and factors associated with antenatal care service access among Indigenous women in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh: A cross-sectional study', PLOS ONE, 15 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0244640
Co-authors Kerry Inder, Shahinoor Akter Uon, Jane Rich
2020 Cheesmond N, Davies K, Inder KJ, 'The role of the peer support worker in increasing rural mental health help-seeking', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 28 203-208 (2020) [C1]

Objective: Mental health peer support workers draw on lived experience to provide benefit to people experiencing mental distress. People living in rural areas are less likely than... [more]

Objective: Mental health peer support workers draw on lived experience to provide benefit to people experiencing mental distress. People living in rural areas are less likely than their urban counterparts to seek professional help for psychological distress. The aim of this study was to explore the perceived value of rural peer support workers as facilitators to rural mental health help-seeking. Design: Data were gathered through a cross-sectional survey distributed by a social media boosted post. Setting: A total of 349 ¿small¿ rural towns in New South Wales as defined by the Modified Monash Model classification system as MMM5. Participants: A total of 765 adult, rural residents completed the survey. Main outcome measure(s): Participants were asked to select, from a list of potential facilitators, those which they felt would make mental health help-seeking easier or harder. Results: Study participants felt that a help provider with lived experience of mental illness or distress would make mental health help-seeking easier. Similarly, rural life experience in a help provider was thought to facilitate help-seeking. Participants also believed that flexible and informal meeting settings would make it easier to seek help for mental distress. Conclusions: Engaging rural mental health peer support workers in a flexible/informal setting, as a complement to conventional health service provision, may increase rural help-seeking for mental distress. Increased mental health help-seeking is likely to have a positive impact on instances of serious mental illness.

DOI 10.1111/ajr.12603
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Kerry Inder
2019 Cheesmond NE, Davies K, Inder KJ, 'Exploring the role of rurality and rural identity in mental health help-seeking behavior: A systematic qualitative review.', Journal of Rural Mental Health, 43 45-59 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1037/rmh0000109
Co-authors Kerry Inder
2019 Akter S, Rich J, Davies K, Inder K, 'Access to maternal healthcare services among Indigenous women in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh: A cross-sectional study', BMJ Open, 9 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-033224
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Shahinoor Akter Uon, Kerry Inder, Jane Rich
2019 Akter S, Davies K, Rich JL, Inder KJ, 'Indigenous women s access to maternal healthcare services in lower- and middle-income countries: a systematic integrative review', International Journal of Public Health, 64 343-353 (2019) [C1]

Objectives: Globally, Indigenous people have lower-health status compared to non-Indigenous people due to unequal access to health care. Barriers or enablers to accessing maternal... [more]

Objectives: Globally, Indigenous people have lower-health status compared to non-Indigenous people due to unequal access to health care. Barriers or enablers to accessing maternal health services by Indigenous women are not well researched. This review aims to determine accessibility and utilisation of maternal primary healthcare services among Indigenous women in lower- and middle-income countries. Methods: We conducted a systematic integrative review of published and grey literature published between 2000 and 2017. Studies on maternal healthcare service utilisation by Indigenous women in lower- and middle-income countries were included. From 3092 articles identified, 10 met the eligibility criteria. Results: The most prominent barrier to accessing maternal primary healthcare services was the top-down nature of intervention programmes, which made programmes culturally unfriendly for Indigenous women. Distance, cost, transport, accommodation, language barriers and lack of knowledge about existing services also impacted access. Conclusions: Findings provided insights into understanding the gaps in existing policies for Indigenous women and their access to maternal health services. Results suggested that efforts be made to ensure appropriate programmes for Indigenous women¿s maternal health right.

DOI 10.1007/s00038-018-1177-4
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Shahinoor Akter Uon, Jane Rich, Kerry Inder
2019 Dalton H, Read DMY, Booth A, Perkins D, Goodwin N, Hendry A, et al., 'Formative Evaluation of the Central Coast Integrated Care Program (CCICP), NSW Australia.', International journal of integrated care, 19 15 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.5334/ijic.4633
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Hazel Dalton, Tonelle Handley, Angela Booth, Nicholas Goodwin, David Perkins
2018 Handley T, Rich J, Davies K, Lewin T, Kelly B, 'The Challenges of Predicting Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviours in a Sample of Rural Australians with Depression.', International journal of environmental research and public health, 15 1-9 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph15050928
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Tonelle Handley, Terry Lewin, Jane Rich, Brian Kelly
2017 Davies K, Gray M, 'The place of service-user expertise in evidence-based practice', JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WORK, 17 3-20 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1468017316637222
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Mel Gray
2017 Rich JL, Handley T, Davies K, Perkins D, 'Understanding the Mental Health of Rural Young Adults: Risk and Protective Factors', International Journal of Mental Health and Psychiatry, 3 1-4 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.4172/2471-4372.1000154
Co-authors David Perkins, Jane Rich
2017 Gray M, Davies K, Butcher L, 'Finding the right connections: Peer support within a community-based mental health service', International Journal of Social Welfare, 26 188-196 (2017) [C1]

Gray M., Davies K., Butcher L. Finding the right connections: Peer support within a community-based mental health service. This article reports on a qualitative study that examine... [more]

Gray M., Davies K., Butcher L. Finding the right connections: Peer support within a community-based mental health service. This article reports on a qualitative study that examined the organisational enablers and barriers to implementing peer support work in an Australian, rural, community-based mental health service. Interviews with 19 peer and non-peer staff were conducted to identify attitudes towards peer support and whether there were organisational values, practices and strategies that might support the implementation of peer support. The findings revealed that peer support workers were valued for their ability to build trusting connections with clients and to accept client choice in a non-judgemental way. However, peer support workers tended to ¿fill service gaps¿ within intensive, administrative case-management environments. These findings highlight the importance of an organisational-wide approach to integrating peer support, where the responsibilities for adopting new ways of working fall to all staff, not just the peer support workers themselves. Key Practitioner Message: ¿ Practitioners placed high value on the peer support workers on their teams due to their unique personalised engagement with clients; ¿ The roles of peer support workers were poorly understood by team members; ¿ Organisational integration of peer support principles could improve the way all staff engage with clients to reflect a recovery orientation.

DOI 10.1111/ijsw.12222
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Mel Gray
2016 Ariong SB, Gray M, Davies K, 'Sociocultural context and the success of international aid on National Agricultural Advisory Services program in eastern Uganda', Journal of Social Development in Africa, 31 165-195 (2016) [C1]
Co-authors Mel Gray
2015 Davies K, Gray M, 'Mental health service users' aspirations for recovery: Examining the gaps between what policy promises and practice delivers', British Journal of Social Work, 45 i45-i61 (2015) [C1]

This paper draws on findings from an Australian study of mental health service users' perspectives on service user participation to examine the challenges for translating rec... [more]

This paper draws on findings from an Australian study of mental health service users' perspectives on service user participation to examine the challenges for translating recovery policy into practice. It considers the ways in which national mental health policies and developing welfare reforms reflect and/or contradict the highly personal mode of recovery important to service users; though they seemingly signal potential wins for service user empowerment, they are accompanied by losses for those who do not fit neatly into clinical categorisations. The service users (n = 11) and service providers (n = 6) interviewed for this exploratory qualitative study revealed that recovery was a lifelong process of fluctuating capacity and described a system poorly equipped and often unwilling to move beyond tokenistic modes of participation. The analysis of service user perspectives against the backdrop of policy reform reveals the ongoing tensions between personal and clinical definitions of recovery.

DOI 10.1093/bjsw/bcv089
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Mel Gray
2014 Davies K, Gray M, Butcher L, 'Lean on me: the potential for peer support in a non-government Australian mental health service', Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development, 24 109-121 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02185385.2014.885213
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Mel Gray
2014 Davies K, Gray M, Webb SA, 'Putting the parity into service-user participation: An integrated model of social justice', International Journal of Social Welfare, 23 119-127 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ijsw.12049
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Mel Gray
2012 Davies K, 'Out of the evidence loop: Young people s lack of power in evidence-based practice', Parity, 25 28-29 (2012)
Show 16 more journal articles

Review (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2009 Davies K, 'Book Review of Frontiers of Social Research: Japan and Beyond (2009)

Conference (19 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Akter S, Inder K, Davies K, Rich J, 'Antenatal care (ANC) service utilisation among Indigenous women in Chittagong Hill Tracts Bangladesh', Cairns (2019)
Co-authors Shahinoor Akter Uon, Kerry Inder
2019 Akter S, Davies K, Rich J, Inder K, 'Attitudes towards & experiences of accessing maternal health care services among the Indigenous women in Khagrachhari district, Bangladesh', Kuala Lampur, Malaysia (2019)
Co-authors Kerry Inder, Shahinoor Akter Uon
2019 Akter S, Inder K, Davies K, Rich J, 'Maternal health care access among Indigenous women in Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh', Adelaide (2019)
Co-authors Shahinoor Akter Uon, Kerry Inder
2019 Akter S, Inder K, Davies K, Rich J, 'Review of Indigenous women s access to maternal healthcare in low-middle income countries', Adelaide (2019)
Co-authors Jane Rich, Shahinoor Akter Uon, Kerry Inder
2018 Dalton H, Perkins D, Goodwin N, Hendry A, Read D, Booth A, et al., 'Using the Project Integrate Framework for assessing progress towards care integration: results from a formative evaluation of a complex intervention in Central Coast Local Health District, NSW Australia', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INTEGRATED CARE (2018)
DOI 10.5334/ijic.s2182
Co-authors Nicholas Goodwin, Hazel Dalton, Tonelle Handley, Angela Booth, David Perkins
2018 Davies K, Booth A, Livingstone F, ' It Made It Real : Applying Rural Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training in Everyday Life', It Made It Real : Applying Rural Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training in Everyday Life, Quebec, Canada (2018)
DOI 10.1177/1609406917748701
Co-authors Angela Booth
2018 Dalton H, Perkins D, Goodwin N, Hendry A, Davies K, Read D, Handley T, 'Use of the Project Integrate Framework for situational analysis and benchmarking of progress towards care integration in the Central Coast NSW', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INTEGRATED CARE (2018)
DOI 10.5334/ijic.s1088
Co-authors Hazel Dalton, Tonelle Handley, Angela Booth, David Perkins, Nicholas Goodwin
2017 Livingstone F, Davies K, Handley T, 'How effective are they? An evaluation of community and clinician-targeted rural suicide prevention workshops', Albury, NSW (2017)
Co-authors David Perkins, Tonelle Handley
2017 Davies K, Handley T, Livingstone F, de Jaeger A, '"Making the journey easier": An evaluation of community- and clinician-targeted rural suicide prevention workshops', "Making the journey easier": An evaluation of community- and clinician-targeted rural suicide prevention workshops, Kingscliff, NSW, Australia (2017) [E1]
Co-authors Tonelle Handley
2017 Davies K, Blacklock N, Turner N, Livingstone F, 'We-Yarn: Starting the discussion about Aboriginal suicide prevention', Sydney, Australia (2017)
2017 Davies K, Livingstone F, Booth A, ' It made it real': Applying rural suicide prevention gatekeeper training in everyday life', International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Quebec, Canada (2017)
Co-authors Angela Booth
2016 Rich JL, Booth A, Rowlands A, Reddy P, Crestani A, Davies K, 'The Step by Step bush fire support service: evaluation of a psycho-social recovery and resilience model', Broadbeach, Gold Coast, Australia (2016)
Co-authors Angela Booth, Jane Rich
2016 Davies K, Turner N, Read D, Livingstone F, 'Evaluating the impact of Farm-Link s Aboriginal suicide prevention activities', Orange, NSW Australia (2016)
2016 Livingstone F, Turner N, Davies K, Read D, Booth A, Dalton H, Perkins D, 'Connecting the Dots a Strengths-Based Approach to Aboriginal Suicide Prevention', Canberra (2016)
Co-authors David Perkins, Hazel Dalton, Angela Booth
2014 Davies K, Gray M, Butcher L, 'Examining the potential for peer support work to enhance recovery-oriented practice', 6th Australian Rural & Remote Mental Health Symposium, Albury, NSW (2014)
Co-authors Mel Gray
2011 Davies K, 'Consumer perspectives on participation and evidence: tools for socially just services?', Melbourne (2011)
2011 Davies K, ' Our stories are important too : Service user expertise and Evidence-based Practice', La Trobe University, Melbourne (2011)
2009 Davies K, 'Consumer perspectives on evidence: a tool for shaping human services', Vilnius, Lithuania (2009)
2006 Davies K, 'Can swinging from trees reduce poverty?', Proceedings of : the challenges we face : National Outdoor Conference, Gold Coast, Australia (2006)
Show 16 more conferences

Report (15 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Davies K, Buykx P, Curryer C, Krogh C, 'Client-centric commissioning: an Evidence Check rapid review', NSW Department of Communities and Justice, 71 (2020)
Co-authors Cassie Curryer, Chris Krogh, Penny Buykx
2018 Dalton HE, Read D, Handley T, Booth A, Davies K, Goodwin N, Hendry A, 'Central Coast Integrated Care Program: Formative Evaluation Report', Central Coast Local Health District (2018)
Co-authors Hazel Dalton, Tonelle Handley, Angela Booth
2018 Read D, Dalton H, Booth A, Davies K, Handley T, Goodwin N, et al., 'Central Coast Integrated Care Program: Formative Evaluation, Technical Paper', Central Coast Local Health District (2018)
Co-authors Hazel Dalton, David Perkins, Angela Booth, Tonelle Handley
2017 Davies K, Turner N, Booth A, Read D, 'Report on the evaluation of the We-Yarn project', Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health, 19 (2017)
Co-authors Angela Booth
2017 Davies K, 'Review of the Division of Local Government and Community Development, Ministry of Internal Affairs', Government of Tonga, 35 (2017)
2017 Davies K, 'Final evaluation of the Kiribati Red Cross Society Community-based Health Program', Australian Red Cross (2017)
2017 Handley TE, Davies K, Rich J, Booth A, Considine R, 'Mental health of Port Stephens youth: Needs analysis study for Caring for Our Port Stephens Youth', Caring for our Port Stephens Youth, 62 (2017)
Co-authors Angela Booth, Tonelle Handley
2015 Shepherd M, Davies K, Poon K, Tynnemark L, Balpe A, Garces H, 'Mid Term Review of Red Cross support to the Typhoon Haiyan Response Operation in the Philippines', International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (2015)
2015 Dawkins Z, Davies K, 'Pacific Disaster Management Partnership Evaluation Report', Australian Red Cross (2015)
2015 Davies K, 'Final evaluation of the Vanuatu Red Cross Society water, sanitation and health program in West Ambrym', Australian Red Cross (2015)
2014 Davies K, 'Evaluation of the Timor Leste Red Cross integrated approach to health, livelihoods, disaster, water and sanitation programming', Australian Red Cross (2014)
2014 Davies K, 'Annual review of the Pacific Disaster Management Program', Australian Red Cross (2014)
2014 Davies K, 'Mid-term review of the Regional Pacific Health Program', Australian Red Cross (2014)
2011 Davies K, 'Evaluation and redesign of the Vanuatu Red Cross Society Community-based First Aid program', Australian Red Cross (2011)
2008 Davies K, 'Real-time review of the public health tsunami recovery program', Australian Red Cross, 6 (2008)
Show 12 more reports

Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Davies K, Service-user perspectives on evidence: Shaping participatory mental health and homelessness services, University of Newcastle (2012)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 14
Total funding $618,453

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20211 grants / $2,500

Research output Scheme Funding$2,500

Funding body: College of Human and Social Futures, University of Newcastle

Funding body College of Human and Social Futures, University of Newcastle
Scheme 2021 CHSF Research Output Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20204 grants / $112,955

Regional youth in precarious times: Work, wellbeing and debt$70,000

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Dr David Farrugia (Lead); Dr Julia Cook; A/Prof Kate Senior; Dr Steven Threadgold; Dr Julia Coffey; Dr Kate Davies; Dr David Savage; Prof Helen Cahill (University of Melbourne).

Scheme Research Programs Pilot Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Evidence check review: Client-centric commissioning$25,000

Funding body: The Sax Institute

Funding body The Sax Institute
Project Team Doctor Kate Davies, Associate Professor Penny Buykx, Doctor Chris Krogh
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1901481
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON Y

Knowledge and its use in complemetary and alternative medicine: Practitioners' perspectives and practices$12,955

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

A/Prof Caragh Brosnan (Lead), Dr Kate Davies, Dr Milena Heinsch, Dr Amie Steel and Dr Pia Vuolanto

Scheme Strategic Network and Pilot Project Grants Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Faculty of Education and Arts New Start Grant$5,000

Who is a 'Peer Mentor'? Exploring peer mentoring models for people living with disability in the Hunter region.

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Scheme New Start Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20181 grants / $21,700

Parent engagement in child protection processes project$21,700

Qualitative research examining the engagement of parents of children who have had children removed in the child protection system.

Funding body: NSW Department of Family and Community Services

Funding body NSW Department of Family and Community Services
Project Team

Associate Professor Nicola Ross (UON, lead), Jessica Cocks (Life Without Barriers), Wendy Foote (UON), Kate Davies (UON)

Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON N

20175 grants / $342,468

Central Coast LHD Integrated Care Formative Evaluation$133,604

Funding body: Central Coast Local Health District

Funding body Central Coast Local Health District
Project Team Professor David Perkins, Doctor Hazel Dalton, Doctor Kate Davies, Doctor Tonelle Handley, Doctor Donna Read, Mrs Angela Booth
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700888
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

GP’s with a Special Interest in Mental Health$100,000

Funding body: Murrumbidgee Primary Health Network

Funding body Murrumbidgee Primary Health Network
Project Team Doctor Tonelle Handley, Doctor Hazel Dalton, Professor David Perkins, Louise Upton, Sarah Connor, Jane Connolly, Sean Mutchmor, Doctor Kate Davies
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1701306
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON Y

Early career research PhD scholarship$78,864

Scholarship to recruit and supervise a PhD candidate to examine peer work in rural mental health.

Funding body: The University of Newcastle

Funding body The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Kate Davies

Scheme Early Career Researcher PhD Support
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

IMHpact evaluation$20,000

Collection of baseline data to inform the evaluation of the mental health integrated partnership program on the Mid North Coast

Funding body: Mid North Coast Local Health District

Funding body Mid North Coast Local Health District
Project Team

Pamela Johnson, Lee Ridoutt, Victoria Hirst, Donna Read, Kate Davies, David Perkins

Scheme Mid North Coast Local Health District Research Support program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON N

Evaluation of We-Yarn Aboriginal suicide prevention workshops$10,000

We-Yarn: Aboriginal suicide prevention workshops – evaluation component

Funding body: Hunter New England and Central Coast Primary Health Network (HNECC)

Funding body Hunter New England and Central Coast Primary Health Network (HNECC)
Project Team

Kate Davies, Nicole Turner, Donna Read, Angela Booth, Tonelle Handley

Scheme Mental health
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON N

20162 grants / $48,830

Needs Analysis Study - Mental Health of Port Stephens Youth$41,330

Funding body: Caring for Our Port Stephens Youth (COPSY)

Funding body Caring for Our Port Stephens Youth (COPSY)
Project Team Doctor Tonelle Handley, Doctor Kate Davies, Doctor Jane Rich
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1601159
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Farm-Link evaluation$7,500

Evaluation of the Farm-Link (now known as GoodSPACE) rural suicide prevention program.

Funding body: Hunter New England and Central Coast Primary Health Network (HNECC)

Funding body Hunter New England and Central Coast Primary Health Network (HNECC)
Project Team

Kate Davies, Angela Booth, Tonelle Handley, David Perkins

Scheme Mental health
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON N

20141 grants / $90,000

Social Work$90,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Emeritus Professor Mel Gray, Doctor Kylie Agllias, Doctor Amanda Howard, Doctor Tamara Blakemore, Doctor Leanne Schubert, Doctor Milena Heinsch, Doctor Kate Davies, Ms Tiani Hetherington
Scheme Research Programme 2014
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1400923
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2021 PhD Employee Voice And Mental Health During University Restructure PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), College of Human and Social Futures, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2021 PhD Making Mental Health Help-Seeking Easier: A Rural Perspective PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2020 PhD Examining Access to Health Services for Women of Reproductive Age from Ethnic Communities in Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) of Bangladesh PhD (Public Health & BehavSci), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Kate Davies

Positions

Lecturer
School of Humanities and Social Science
School of Humanities and Social Science
College of Human and Social Futures

Casual Academic
School of Humanities and Social Science
School of Humanities and Social Science
College of Human and Social Futures

Contact Details

Email kate.davies@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 4055 3106

Office

Room W342
Building Behavioural Sciences Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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