Dr Kate Senior

Dr Kate Senior

Associate Professor

School of Humanities and Social Science

Career Summary

Biography

Kate Senior is a medical anthropologist with extensive (20 years+) experience working with people in remote Aboriginal communities. Her work focuses on how people live and understand health and well being and the barriers they face when accessing health services. Recently Kate's research has focussed on the health and well being of Indigenous adolescents and in 2012 Kate was awarded an Australain Research Council Future Fellowship to explore young people's lived experiences of the social determinants of Health. The other major strand of Kate's research is on young people's relationships and sexual health. She was the chief Inverstigator of an ARC Linkage project "Culture, context and risk" which explored young people's understanding of relationships and sexual risk in the Northern Territory, South Australia and Western Australia. Arising from this research is an interest in innovative research methodologies, particulary arts based methods. She has transformed the body mapping technique she used to engage young people in senstive conversations about sexual health into the eductaional game "Life Happens". A key focus of research in 2019 was adaptingLife Happens to explore issues of consent in Australian university residences. 

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Australian National University
  • Bachelor of Arts, Australian National University
  • Master of Letters, Australian National University

Keywords

  • Arts based methods
  • community based research
  • ethnography

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
160104 Social and Cultural Anthropology 70
111701 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
5/8/2014 - 30/6/2019 Associate Professor Anthropology, Centre for Health Initiatives University of Wollongong
Australia

Awards

Distinction

Year Award
2017 UOW woman of impact
University of Wollongong

Prize

Year Award
2017 Vice Chancellors award for Interdisciplinary research excellence
University of Wollongong
2017 Vice Chancellor's Award for Community Engagement
University of Wollongong

Prestigious works / other achievements

Year Commenced Year Finished Prestigious work / other achievement Role
2017 2018 Life Happens sexual health game resource used in schools nationally Creator
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (34 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Kaewpramkusol R, Senior K, Chenhall R, Nanthamongkolchai S, 'Young Thai People's Exposure to Alcohol Portrayals in Society and the Media: A Qualitative Study for Policy Implications', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 26 266-277 (2019)
DOI 10.1007/s12529-019-09785-4
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2019 Kaewpramkusol R, Senior K, Nanthamongkolchai S, Chenhall R, 'A qualitative exploration of the Thai alcohol policy in regulating alcohol industry's marketing strategies and commercial activities', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 38 25-33 (2019)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12885
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2019 Kaewpramkusol R, Senior K, Nanthamongkolchai S, Chenhall R, 'Brand advertising and brand sharing of alcoholic and non-alcoholic products, and the effects on young Thai people's attitudes towards alcohol use: A qualitative focus group study', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 38 284-293 (2019)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12910
Citations Web of Science - 1
2019 Kaewpramkusol R, Senior K, Nanthamongkolchai S, 'How do parents and friends accommodate alcohol consumption in young Thai people? A qualitative focus group study', DRUGS-EDUCATION PREVENTION AND POLICY, (2019)
DOI 10.1080/09687637.2019.1685465
2018 Kariippanon K, Senior K, 'Re-thinking knowledge landscapes in the context of grounded aboriginal theory and online health communication', Croatian Medical Journal, 59 33-38 (2018)
DOI 10.3325/cmj.2018.59.33
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2018 Chenhall RD, Senior K, 'Living the Social Determinants of Health: Assemblages in a Remote Aboriginal Community', Medical Anthropology Quarterly, 32 177-195 (2018)

© 2017 by the American Anthropological Association This article provides a critical discussion of the social determinants of health framework and compares it with theoretical pers... [more]

© 2017 by the American Anthropological Association This article provides a critical discussion of the social determinants of health framework and compares it with theoretical perspectives, such as that offered by assemblage theory, offering an alternative view of the complex interplay between human relationships and the structures around us. We offer an ethnographic perspective, discussing the lived experiences of the social determinants in an Indigenous community in a remote part of northern Australia.

DOI 10.1111/maq.12418
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
2018 Kaewpramkusol R, Senior K, Chenhall R, Nanthamongkolchai S, Chaiyasong S, 'A qualitative exploration of Thai alcohol policy in regulating availability and access', International Journal of Drug Policy, 58 1-8 (2018)

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Background: Despite abundant alcohol control regulations and measures in Thailand, prevalence of alcohol consumption has been relatively steady for the past d... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Background: Despite abundant alcohol control regulations and measures in Thailand, prevalence of alcohol consumption has been relatively steady for the past decade and alcohol-related harm remains high. This study aims to explore, through the perspectives of key public health stakeholders, the current performance of regulations controlling alcohol availability and access, and the future directions for the implementation of Thai alcohol policy. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with public health stakeholders from three sectors; the government, academia and civil society. Their perceptions about the current alcohol situation, gaps in the current policies, and future directions of alcohol policy were discussed. Audio data were transcribed verbatim, systematically coded and analysed. Results: The three key concerning issues were physical availability, economic availability and commercial access, which referred to outlet density, taxation and pricing, and compliance to stipulated regulations, respectively. First, Thailand failed to control the number of alcohol outlets. The availability problem was exacerbated by the increased numbers of liquor licences issued, without delineating the need for the outlets. Second, alcohol tax rates, albeit occasionally adjusted, are disproportionate to the economic dynamic, and there is yet a minimum pricing. Finally, compliance to age and time restrictions was challenging. Conclusions: The lack of robustness of enforcement and disintegration of government agencies in regulating availability and access hampers effectiveness of alcohol policy. Comprehensive regulations for the control of availability of and access to alcohol are required to strengthen alcohol policy. Consistent monitoring and surveillance of the compliances are recommended to prevent significant effects of the regulations diminish over time.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugpo.2018.04.012
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2018 Burbank V, Senior K, McMullen S, 'Is it agency? An integrative interpretation of female adolescents sexual behaviour in three remote Australian Aboriginal communities', Australian Journal of Anthropology, 29 316-331 (2018)

© 2018 Australian Anthropological Society In this paper we attempt to understand at least some of the complex and interacting forces ¿ cultural, biological, developmental and hist... [more]

© 2018 Australian Anthropological Society In this paper we attempt to understand at least some of the complex and interacting forces ¿ cultural, biological, developmental and historical ¿ that influence adolescents¿ sexual behaviour in three remote Australian Aboriginal communities. We use the concept of ¿agency¿ only as a foil for our interpretation. Drawing upon ethnographic material, we focus on: ¿walkin¿ around at night¿, avoidance of arranged marriages and the exchange of sexual favours for drugs and money. Cognitive, evolutionary, and neuroscience enable us to illustrate the interpenetration of sociocultural and psychobiological factors in adolescent girls¿ behaviour: expectations about marriage, a desire for love, sexual urges, a brain that is highly responsive to peers and rewards, a disadvantaged and uncertain environment, and challenges to effective adult control.

DOI 10.1111/taja.12292
2018 Senior K, 'Kete pikau: A basket of knowledge guidelines from back home ', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 26 353 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/ajr.12479
2018 Senior K, Chenhall R, Hall J, Daniels D, 'Re-thinking the health benefits of outstations in remote Indigenous Australia', Health and Place, 52 1-7 (2018)

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd The small, decentralised communities, known as outstations which satellite larger Indigenous Australian remote communities have often been conceptualised as pl... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd The small, decentralised communities, known as outstations which satellite larger Indigenous Australian remote communities have often been conceptualised as places that are beneficial to health and well-being. This paper provides an exploration of the meaning of their outstation for one family and the benefits that this connection brings to them, which are expressed in a deep connection to the land, continuing relationships with ancestors and a safe refuge from the stresses of the larger community. We argue that the outstation provides a place for people to be in control of their lives and form hopes and plans for the future. These benefits are position in a context where the future liveability and sustainability of the outstation is both fragile and vulnerable.

DOI 10.1016/j.healthplace.2018.04.007
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2017 Senior K, Helmer J, Chenhall R, ' As long as he s coming home to me : vulnerability, jealousy and violence in young people s relationships in remote, rural and regional Australia', Health Sociology Review, 26 204-218 (2017)

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Drawn from a sample of 88 Indigenous young people in five locations in urban and remote Northern Australia, thi... [more]

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Drawn from a sample of 88 Indigenous young people in five locations in urban and remote Northern Australia, this research utilised a combination of qualitative approaches to encourage young people to discuss their ideas about sexual relationships and violence. Indigenous youth discussed highly public displays of violence, as well as violence within intimate settings and the interrelationships between these two arenas. A key finding of this research was that young people described violence as an accepted part of their sexual relationships and this normalisation led to significant tensions in their experiences and management of their everyday relationships. While violence around young people's relationships in remote communities was reported to some extent as being controlled through both the public and controlled form they take, we found that the increasing mobility of young people from remote to urban locations due to education opportunities and the impact of social media can lead to more serious forms of violence and tension in the maintenance of young people's sexual relationships. This contributes new findings to the literature on Indigenous young people's experiences in relationship forming and management, an area that has received little attention in the academic literature.

DOI 10.1080/14461242.2016.1157697
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2016 Thomas SL, David J, Randle M, Daube M, Senior K, 'Gambling advocacy: Lessons from tobacco, alcohol and junk food', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 40 211-217 (2016)

© 2015 Public Health Association of Australia. Objective: To explore the attitudes and opinions of public health experts in gambling and related unhealthy commodity industries tow... [more]

© 2015 Public Health Association of Australia. Objective: To explore the attitudes and opinions of public health experts in gambling and related unhealthy commodity industries towards the tactics used by the gambling industry to prevent reform and the advocacy responses to these tactics. Methods: In-depth interviews (30-60 minutes) with a convenience sample of 15 public health experts and stakeholders with a public health approach to gambling (n=10), or other unhealthy commodity industries (food, alcohol, tobacco, n=5). Results: Participants described the influences of political lobbying and donations on public policy, and industry framing of problem gambling as an issue of personal responsibility. Industry funding of, and influence over, academic research was considered to be one of the most effective industry tactics to resist reform. Participants felt there was a need to build stronger coalitions and collaborations between independent academics, and to improve the utilisation of media to more effectively shift perceptions of gambling harm away from the individual and towards the product. Conclusions and implications: Gambling industry tactics are similar to the tactics of other unhealthy commodity industries. However, advocacy initiatives to counter these tactics in gambling are less developed than in other areas. The formation of national public health coalitions, as well as a strong evidence base regarding industry tactics, will help to strengthen advocacy initiatives.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12410
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
2015 Burbank V, Senior K, McMullen S, 'Precocious Pregnancy, Sexual Conflict, and Early Childbearing in Remote Aboriginal Australia', Anthropological Forum, 25 243-261 (2015)

© 2015 Discipline of Anthropology and Sociology, The University of Western Australia. Ideas from evolutionary theory and a consideration of social and cultural factors are used to... [more]

© 2015 Discipline of Anthropology and Sociology, The University of Western Australia. Ideas from evolutionary theory and a consideration of social and cultural factors are used to argue that teenage pregnancy in three remote Aboriginal communities represents a strategic response to current environments characterised by pervasive and sustained risk and uncertainty. Ethnographic studies of the communities find that these environments both provoke and enable the reproductive strategies of adolescent boys and girls but raise the question of the effects of father absent socialisation.

DOI 10.1080/00664677.2015.1027657
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2015 Helmer J, Senior K, Davison B, Vodic A, 'Improving sexual health for young people: making sexuality education a priority', Sex Education, 15 158-171 (2015)

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. How well do young people understand their developing sexuality and what this means? This paper reports on findings from the Our Lives: Culture, Cont... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. How well do young people understand their developing sexuality and what this means? This paper reports on findings from the Our Lives: Culture, Context and Risk project, which investigated sexual behaviour and decision-making in the context of the everyday life experience and aspirations of Indigenous and non-Indigenous young people (16¿25 years) in the Northern Territory, Western Australia and in South Australia. Using qualitative data, this paper focuses on what participating young people thought was necessary to improve the quality of sexuality education. Participants suggest that current forms of sexuality education are too clinical, didactic and unengaging, and are missing in relevant content. Young people requested more information on relationships, first sexual experiences and negotiating condom use. These requests indicate that young people realise that they need more knowledge in order to have healthy relationships, which conflicts with the popular belief that providing young people with open, honest information around sex will encourage them to have sex or increase sexual risk taking. Making sexuality education more of a priority and listening to the needs of young people could be a positive step towards improving sexual health and well-being.

DOI 10.1080/14681811.2014.989201
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 23
2015 Helmer J, Senior K, Cunningham T, 'The Need for a Comprehensive Survey of Youth Wellbeing in the Northern Territory', Applied Research in Quality of Life, 10 509-523 (2015)

© 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht and The International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies (ISQOLS). There is a lack of comprehensive data available to measure th... [more]

© 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht and The International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies (ISQOLS). There is a lack of comprehensive data available to measure the wellbeing of young people in the Northern Territory which means that programs and policies are developed largely without an evidence base negatively impacting on the relevance and sustainability of these programs. This paper argues that there is a need for a comprehensive survey to be conducted which addresses current gaps in data collection particularly in relationship to the measurement of wellbeing of young people. The need to measure wellbeing is discussed. The types of wellbeing measures and measurement frameworks which could be used are described and recommendations made for the development of a survey.

DOI 10.1007/s11482-014-9331-5
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2014 Senior K, Helmer J, Chenhall R, Burbank V, ''Young clean and safe?' Young people's perceptions of risk from sexually transmitted infections in regional, rural and remote Australia', Culture, Health and Sexuality, 16 453-466 (2014)

This paper examines young people's perceived vulnerability to sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and their efforts to create a sense of personal safety within an environm... [more]

This paper examines young people's perceived vulnerability to sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and their efforts to create a sense of personal safety within an environment in which risks may be high and where STIs are highly stigmatised. The paper reports on findings from research involving both Indigenous and non-Indigenous 16- to 25-year-olds from remote, rural and regional Australia, including communities in the Northern Territory, Western Australia and South Australia. The study used qualitative methods, including body mapping and scenario based interviewing, to explore how young people made decisions about potential sexual partners and how STIs were understood within the context of young people's everyday social worlds. The paper has important implications for the design and implementation of sexual-health education programmes by documenting the stigmatisation of young people with STIs and the protective mechanisms peer groups employ to create perceptions of personal safety. © 2014 © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

DOI 10.1080/13691058.2014.888096
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 20
2013 Senior K, Chenhall R, 'Health beliefs and behavior: The practicalities of "looking after yourself" in an Australian aboriginal community health beliefs and behavior', Medical Anthropology Quarterly, 27 155-174 (2013)

Recently, social determinants of health frameworks are receiving some criticism in that they do not engage with questions related to individual subjectivity and agency as they rel... [more]

Recently, social determinants of health frameworks are receiving some criticism in that they do not engage with questions related to individual subjectivity and agency as they relate to health decision-making behavior. This article examines the different ways in which people living in a remote Arnhem Land community in the Northern Territory of Australia, take responsibility for their own health and the extent to which they are able to prevent illness. A number of related sub-questions are explored relating to how people perceive their health and their role in health care in their community, including their engagement with the health clinic, traditional medicines, and the influence of sorcery on ill health and sickness. © 2013 by the American Anthropological Association.

DOI 10.1111/maq.12021
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
2013 Cunningham T, Ivory B, Chenhall R, McMahon R, Senior K, 'Youth gangs in a remote Indigenous community: Importance of cultural authority and family support', Trends and Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice, (2013)

The Indigenous community of Wadeye in the Northern Territory, Australia has been described as a community 'under siege from continual gang violence' (Rioting flares agai... [more]

The Indigenous community of Wadeye in the Northern Territory, Australia has been described as a community 'under siege from continual gang violence' (Rioting flares again at Wadeye. The Australian 7 August. www.theaustralian. news.com.au/story/0,25197,22195888-2702,00.html; Gang violence plagues Wadeye. ABC News 1 December. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2008-12-01/gang-violence- plagues-wadeye/224208; Wadeye worst in 50 years. NT News 2 November. http://www.ntnews.com.au/article/2012/11/02/314788-ntnews.html). The gangs appear to have emerged in the early 1980s and are generally defined through youth aligning themselves along cultural, clan and family affiliations into groups with contemporary Americanised gang characteristics, symbolic links with heavy metal music and clearly defined turf boundaries. Although they do engage in some relatively minor drug (predominately cannabis) distribution for profit, the rationale for these groups appears to be either as a provocative and offensive structure, or at other times as a defence mechanism. Despite the portrayal of gangs as the focus of criminal activity in the community, there has been little research to explore the relationship between the gangs and the criminal profile of the community. Nor has there been research that examines gang activity from the perspective of the members or within a broader community context. Without this level of understanding, it is very difficult to design interventions that meet the needs of youth in the community. This paper presents data from a survey of young people who were involved in gangs in Wadeye and interviews with gang members who were incarcerated in Darwin Correctional Centre. © Australian Institute of Criminology 2013.

Citations Scopus - 2
2013 Chenhall RD, Senior K, '"The concepts are universal, it is the picture you paint that is different": Key issues for Indigenous Australian alcohol and drug residential treatment centres', Therapeutic Communities, 34 83-95 (2013)

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to improve current evaluation designs for Indigenous Australian residential alcohol and drug treatment centres, by understanding the context... [more]

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to improve current evaluation designs for Indigenous Australian residential alcohol and drug treatment centres, by understanding the context of treatment in this modified TC context. The aim of the research is to present an analysis of the key features of treatment associated with four Indigenous Australian alcohol and drug treatment centres, as expressed by staff working in these centres. Design/methodology/ approach - Ethnographic observations were made at each site between 2008 and 2009 with the first author attending treatment groups, education sessions, staff meetings and other events. The first author conducted informal conversational discussions with all programme staff and board members. In addition, 23 staff and 15 board members participated in a semi-structured interview with an emphasis on gaining views on the essential elements of residential alcohol and drug treatment, potential barriers to effective treatment delivery and "what works" in residential treatment. Findings - A number of key themes emerged, including the importance of the flexibility of programmes to include a wide variety of treatment approaches, the importance of culture (although defined differently) in the delivery of appropriate service, provision of safe spaces that allow for clients and staff interaction, the potential for improvement in the provision of effective client case management, the need to reduce job-related stress through staff professional development and organisational culture change and the need to address the difficulties experienced in the provision of effective aftercare. Originality/value - Currently, there is very little evidence related to Indigenous Australian approaches to the treatment of alcohol and drug misuse. The paper contributes to the understanding of the key features of treatment delivery, as identified by staff employed in drug and alcohol residential treatment. This understanding is vital so that government agencies can provide appropriate funding to areas of need for treatment services. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

DOI 10.1108/TC-05-2013-0011
Citations Scopus - 3
2013 Chenhall R, Davison B, Fitz J, Pearse T, Senior K, 'Engaging youth in sexual health research: Refining a "youth friendly" method in the Northern Territory, Australia', Visual Anthropology Review, 29 123-132 (2013)

This article describes the application and adaptation of body mapping as a tool for exploring sexual health and sexual decision making among young people aged 16-25. It argues tha... [more]

This article describes the application and adaptation of body mapping as a tool for exploring sexual health and sexual decision making among young people aged 16-25. It argues that while body mapping engaged youth to discuss general health issues, young people were reluctant to engage with issues related to sexual health, due to feelings of shame and fear of stigma. Sexual health case scenarios were developed and used in conjunction with body-mapping exercises. The use of scenarios was an effective way to explore sensitive information, while protecting young people from revealing any specific identifiable information about themselves. In this article, we suggest that utilizing a combination of methodological approaches (the visual body maps and written case scenarios) in sexual health research with young people has the potential to enhance and enrich the quality of the data, and allow for a safe and enabling environment. This is particularly important where long-term fieldwork might be difficult or constrained. © 2013 by the American Anthropological Association.

DOI 10.1111/var.12009
Citations Scopus - 15
2012 Nixon M, Chenhall R, Senior K, Belton S, 'Ethics: Response to Chenhall, Senior and Belton, AT 27(5)', Anthropology Today, 28 26-27 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8322.2012.00889.x
Citations Scopus - 1
2012 Chenhall R, Senior K, 'Treating indigenous australians with alcohol/drug problems: Assessing quality of life', Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, 30 130-145 (2012)

This study investigated the quality of life (QoL) of clients in an Indigenous Australian residential alcohol and drug treatment center. Qualitative and quantitative data were coll... [more]

This study investigated the quality of life (QoL) of clients in an Indigenous Australian residential alcohol and drug treatment center. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from a random sample of Indigenous clients utilizing the Self Evaluated Individual Quality of Life-Direct Weight tool. The findings from this study provide support for the inclusion of QoL as important in understanding the recovery process from substance misuse. A discrepancy was found between the self-reported aspirations of clients and the focus of the treatment provided, and recommendations were provided for inclusion of new areas in the education provided to the clients of this service. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/07347324.2012.663290
Citations Scopus - 10
2012 Senior KA, Chenhall RD, 'Boyfriends, babies and basketball: Present lives and future aspirations of young women in a remote Australian Aboriginal community', Journal of Youth Studies, 15 369-388 (2012)

This paper explores the aspirations of a group of young women in a remote Aboriginal community in the Northern Territory of Australia. It examines how their hopes and expectations... [more]

This paper explores the aspirations of a group of young women in a remote Aboriginal community in the Northern Territory of Australia. It examines how their hopes and expectations are influenced by the reality of their everyday lives and the extent to which they are able to influence the course of their lives and become agents for change in their own communities. As with adolescents in lower socio-economic groups, the majority of young women in River Town have not developed life goals or clear strategies of how to achieve these goals. The choices that young women have are constrained by their narrow range of experience, which is characterized by early pregnancies and the potential threat of male violence. However, young women have articulated specific domains where they are able to control and structure their lives. This paper discusses the experiences of young women in this remote Aboriginal community. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/13676261.2012.663890
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
2011 Chenhall R, Senior K, Belton S, 'Negotiating human research ethics: Case notes from anthropologists in the field (Respond to this article at )', Anthropology Today, 27 13-17 (2011)

The human ethics issues surrounding the conduct of health science research have been the subject of increasing debate among biomedical and social science researchers in recent yea... [more]

The human ethics issues surrounding the conduct of health science research have been the subject of increasing debate among biomedical and social science researchers in recent years. Ethics procedures in health-science research are typically concerned with protecting anonymity and confidentiality, and are tailored to work that primarily uses quantitative methodologies. For qualitative research in the health social sciences, a different set of ethical issues often arises in the research process. This article examines three case studies of qualitative researchers working with Indigenous Australian communities, focusing on the researchers' experiences with ethics committees and how they approached a range of ethical issues arising in the course of their research. Key issues include: obtaining informed consent for participant observation; the evolving nature of qualitative research; the difficulties in foreseeing changes in approach; and the distinction between the research team and the researched in participatory action research. © RAI 2011.

DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8322.2011.00827.x
Citations Scopus - 12
2010 Chenhall RD, Senior K, Cole D, Cunningham T, O'Boyle C, 'Individual quality of life among at risk indigenous youth in Australia', Applied Research in Quality of Life, 5 171-183 (2010)

This paper reports the findings from a pilot study in which the Schedule for Individual Quality of Life (SEIQoL-DW) was used to determine how 15 at-risk Indigenous Australian male... [more]

This paper reports the findings from a pilot study in which the Schedule for Individual Quality of Life (SEIQoL-DW) was used to determine how 15 at-risk Indigenous Australian male youths aged between 14 and 19 conceptualised their quality of life. The youths, who were referred with problems associated with drug and alcohol misuse and criminal activity, were attending a diversionary program run by an Indigenous organisation in the Northern Territory, Australia. Quality of life was measured before and at the end of the nine-day programme in order to evaluate outcomes. Program staff found the SEIQoL-DW to be particularly useful in identifying culturally specific quality of life domains, allowing interventions to focus on improving the life areas that were of particular value to individuals as well as recognizing any deficits in their understanding the options available to them. While a control group was not used, mean SEIQoL-DW scores increased significantly over the course of the program. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V./The International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies (ISQOLS).

DOI 10.1007/s11482-010-9101-y
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2009 Chenhall R, Senior K, '"Those young people all crankybella": Indigenous youth mental health and globalization', International Journal of Mental Health, 38 28-43 (2009)

The subject of mental health has been discussed for some time in the literature on Australian Aboriginal peoples, although the volume of this work has been relatively small. This ... [more]

The subject of mental health has been discussed for some time in the literature on Australian Aboriginal peoples, although the volume of this work has been relatively small. This literature can be separated into two main approaches. The first has been concerned with documenting and analyzing disorders that are culturally specific to a particular group. The second, more recent body of literature understands mental health issues as resulting from a combination of factors related to the effects of colonization, such as loss of land, poverty, and the destruction of families. This literature is often aimed at diagnosis and the provision of appropriate services for Indigenous people without a comprehensive ethnographic understanding of the cultural specificities of certain mental health disorders. Although mental health problems are discussed, such as suicide, depression, and anxiety, little analysis is undertaken of how such states are locally experienced and understood. This paper reports the complexities involved in understanding mental health from the perspective of youth in a remote Aboriginal community in northern Australia. We argue that it is necessary to understand mental health within the broader context of the lives of Indigenous youth and, in particular, the interaction between their marginalization from participating in the opportunities that globalization offers with issues related to poverty, substance misuse, and specific cultural beliefs. © 2009 M.E. Sharpe, Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.2753/IMH0020-7411380302
Citations Scopus - 9
2009 Weston R, Brooks R, Gladman J, Senior K, Denley L, Silove D, et al., 'Ethical research in partnership with an Indigenous community', Australasian Psychiatry, 17 (2009)

Objective: The aim of this paper is to describe the implementation of the Community Safety Research Project (CSRP) focusing on violence prevention among Aboriginal communities in ... [more]

Objective: The aim of this paper is to describe the implementation of the Community Safety Research Project (CSRP) focusing on violence prevention among Aboriginal communities in western NSW in order to examine how practice converges with contemporary ethical guidelines. Method: A comparison was made of key project elements with the principles outlined in existing ethical guidelines, outlining the concrete issues that need to be confronted in practice. Results: The approach being pursued is consonant with the principles of contemporary guidelines; the results of the first phase qualitative study inquiring into workers' perceptions of violence revealed some differences in the understanding of violence between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal workers, with some ethical implications. Conclusions: Ethical approaches to research among Aboriginal communities include, but extend well beyond, the principle of avoiding harm. A comprehensive approach to ethical research requires significant ongoing expenditure of effort and resources with implications for project development, management and funding. © 2009 Informa UK Ltd.

DOI 10.1080/10398560902948738
Citations Scopus - 6
2008 D'abbs P, Schmidt B, Dougherty K, Senior K, 'Implementing a chronic disease strategy in two remote Indigenous Australian settings: A multi-method pilot evaluation', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 16 67-74 (2008)

Objective: To test an evaluation framework designed to evaluate implementation of the North Queensland Indigenous communities between August and December 2005. Setting: Both commu... [more]

Objective: To test an evaluation framework designed to evaluate implementation of the North Queensland Indigenous communities between August and December 2005. Setting: Both communities are located in CapeYork, North Queensland. Community A has an estimated population of around 600 people; Community B has an enumerated population of 750, although health centre records indicate a higher number. Participants: Process evaluation involved health centre staff in both communities; clinical audits used random samples from the adult population (each sample n = 30); ethnographic fieldwork was conducted with resident population. Main outcome measures: Health centre scores and qualitative findings using a System Assessment Tool; clinical audits - extent to which scheduled services recorded; selected primary health performance indicators; qualitative ethnographic findings. Results: On almost all indicators, implementation of NQICDS had progressed further in Community A than in Community B; however, some common issues emerged, especially lack of linkages between health centres and other groups, and lack of support for client self-management. Conclusions: The evaluation framework is an effective and acceptable framework for monitoring implementation of the NQICDS at the primary health centre level. © 2008 The Authors Journal Compilation © 2008 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2008.00955.x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2008 Senior K, Chenhall R, 'Lukumbat marawana: A changing pattern of drug use by youth in a remote Aboriginal community', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 16 75-79 (2008)

Objective: To examine marijuana use by youth in a remote Aboriginal community in Northern Australia over a 5-year period. Design: Participant observation, structured and unstructu... [more]

Objective: To examine marijuana use by youth in a remote Aboriginal community in Northern Australia over a 5-year period. Design: Participant observation, structured and unstructured interviews. Setting: Remote Indigenous Australian community. Participants: Young Aboriginal people and adult community members. Mainoutcome measure: Emergent themes of the attitudes towards marijuana use among remote Indigenous residents are reported. Results: Restrictions in the availability of alcohol and petrol have led to increased use of marijuana with serious social and community consequences. Conclusions: Efforts to control licit substances, such asalcohol, in remote communities need to be addressed in the context of understanding of the dynamics of alcohol and drug use in totality as well as interventions that address underlying structural and social inequalities. © 2008 The Authors Journal Compilation © 2008 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2008.00956.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
2008 Senior KA, Chenhall RD, ''Walkin' about at night': The background to teenage pregnancy in a remote Aboriginal community', Journal of Youth Studies, 11 269-281 (2008)

In Australia, Indigenous young women are more likely to become pregnant while in their teens than non-Indigenous young women. Factors such as poverty, educational outcomes and une... [more]

In Australia, Indigenous young women are more likely to become pregnant while in their teens than non-Indigenous young women. Factors such as poverty, educational outcomes and unemployment play a major role; however, there is little understanding of the attitudes of young women themselves with regards to pregnancy. This paper explores young women's decisions regarding their sexual relationships and pregnancy in a remote Australian Aboriginal community, called River Town. It focuses on young women's motivations to pursue sexual relationships and the information about sex and male behaviour to women that informs their decision-making. 'Walkin' about at night' is the term that River Town residents use to describe the nocturnal activities of adolescent females. The focus of this activity is for a young woman to find and maintain a relationship with a boy. Although it is considered by the young women to be one of the most exciting parts of their lives, it carries with it the risk of pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease. Young women are very aware of the first of these risks, if not the second, as teenage pregnancy is the norm in the community. © 2008 Taylor & Francis.

DOI 10.1080/13676260801946449
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 26
2007 Senior K, Chenhall R, ''Stopping sniffing is our responsibility': Community ownership of a petrol-sniffing program in Arnhem Land', HEALTH SOCIOLOGY REVIEW, 16 315-327 (2007)
DOI 10.5172/hesr.2007.16.3-4.315
Citations Web of Science - 5
2005 Senior K, Perkins D, 'What are the challenges for evaluating a palliative care service?', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 11 19-24 (2005) [C1]

This paper identifies the challenges in researching the impact of a rural palliative care service on its patients, carers and providers in the context of the National Palliative C... [more]

This paper identifies the challenges in researching the impact of a rural palliative care service on its patients, carers and providers in the context of the National Palliative Care Strategy. It describes the use of an anthropological method to overcome problems of acceptability and respondent burden and to enable the elaboration of meaning and valuation by participants. It uses the Griffith Area Palliative Care Service as a case study to illustrate the problems of such research and the value of the anthropological method over more conventional research and evaluation approaches. It makes recommendations about how to assess the outcomes of services such as palliative care where the focus of care is complex, individual and family, and the outcomes go far beyond what can be measured with the medical model.

DOI 10.1071/PY05038
Co-authors David Perkins
2003 Eagar K, Cromwell D, Owen A, Senior K, Gordon R, Green J, 'Health services research and development in practice: An Australian experience', Journal of Health Services Research and Policy, 8 7-13 (2003)

While there is a growing literature on how health services research can inform health policy decisions, the practical challenge is for health services researchers to develop an ef... [more]

While there is a growing literature on how health services research can inform health policy decisions, the practical challenge is for health services researchers to develop an effective interface with health policy-making processes and to produce outputs that lead to outcomes. The experience of the Centre for Health Service Development at the University of Wollongong, Australia, is used to illustrate the issues so commonly described in the literature and to reflect on our experience of trying to remain viable while producing relevant and valid research. A case study in a specific policy area - namely, the development of case-mix classifications and information systems to inform policy and funding in the subacute and non-acute hospital and community care sectors - is used as a practical example of the research-policy interface. © The Royal Society of Medicine Press Ltd 2003.

DOI 10.1258/135581903322405117
Citations Scopus - 7
2002 Perkins D, Senior K, Owen A, 'Mere tokenism or best practice: The Illawarra Division of General Practice Consumer Consultative Committee', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 8 81-87 (2002) [C1]

Divisions of General Practice were set up to improve links between GPs and consumers, to develop a population health perspective in general practice, and to improve patient care. ... [more]

Divisions of General Practice were set up to improve links between GPs and consumers, to develop a population health perspective in general practice, and to improve patient care. The Illawarra Division of General Practice established a consumer consultative committee as part of a broader strategy to achieve these objectives. An interview study with committee members indicates the difficulties experienced in this task and the persistence of two cultures. Various options are identified by which consumer participation might be improved as means of fostering better links, improved care and a population health perspective amongst GPs. The first step is a more sophisticated understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of current consultative arrangements.

Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors David Perkins
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $1,535,000

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $495,000

a place based model ofr Aboriginal community led solutions$495,000

Funding body: Australian Research Council

Funding body Australian Research Council
Project Team

Prof Kathleen Clapham, Prof Dawn Besarab, Prof Maggie Walter, Prof Valerie Harwood, A/Prof Kate Senior, A/Prof Peter Kelly, Dr Marlene Longbottom

Scheme ARC Discovery Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding C1200 - Aust Competitive - ARC
Category 1200
UON N

20121 grants / $675,000

Developing a research focus on the health and quality of life of adolescents in the Northern Territory$675,000

Funding body: Australian Research Council

Funding body Australian Research Council
Project Team

Kate Senior

Scheme Future Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding C1200 - Aust Competitive - ARC
Category 1200
UON N

20111 grants / $365,000

Culture, context and risk$365,000

Funding body: Australian Research Council

Funding body Australian Research Council
Project Team

Kate Senior, Richard Chenhall, Victoria Burbank

Scheme ARC Discovery Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding C1200 - Aust Competitive - ARC
Category 1200
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed8
Current3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 PhD Recent Changes in the Infrastructure and Values within and between Australia General Medicinal Practices in the Hunter Region: Social Analysis and Determinants PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2019 PhD Exploring Social Epigenetics to Develop a Risk Assessment for Health Care Professionals PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Indigeneity, Mining and Displacement: Adani and the Wangan and Jagalingou People PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 PhD An auto-ethnography of major psychotic illness Anthropology, University of Wollongong Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD the normalisation of a drinking culture in Thailand Public Health, University of Wollongong Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD Towards a healthier future. Young people's interactions with health serevices in a Northern Territory Town Anthropology, Charles Darwin University Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD The symbolic meaning of sun tanning in adolescents. A study of attitudes and behaviours in outdoor contexts Public Health, University of Wollongong Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD A double edged sword the meaning of digital technology and social media in a remote Aboriginal community Anthropology, University of Wollongong Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Growing up fast in Borroloola the experience of yougn women in a remote Aboriginal commuity Anthropology, Charles Darwin University Principal Supervisor
2009 PhD Kunmangurr legend and leadership Anthropology, Charles Darwin University Principal Supervisor
2008 PhD Work and employment in a remote Aboriginal community Anthropology, Charles Darwin University Principal Supervisor
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Dr Kate Senior

Position

Associate Professor
School of Humanities and Social Science
Faculty of Education and Arts

Contact Details

Email kate.senior@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 49217078

Office

Room W-349
Building Behavioural Sciences
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