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Dr David Farrugia

Senior Lecturer

School of Humanities and Social Science

David Farrugia is supporting the development of strong regional communities

Sociologist Dr David Farrugia is supporting the development of strong regional communities through his study of how youth in regional areas are responding to conditions of high unemployment and industrial restructuring.

David Farrugia

Dr Farrugia, a member of the Newcastle Youth Studies Group, secured a 2016 Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Early Career Researcher Award to support his three-year project which will provide an innovative evidence base for the design of welfare interventions and social policies that support marginalised young people to build fulfilling employment futures.

The project, titled ‘The Formation of Young Workers: A Multi Sited Study on the Periphery’, has two components. The first part focuses on key social changes connected with the geographical distribution of work.

Dr Farrugia says an important example of this is the shift in Australia from an economy that’s based primarily on manufacturing and primary industries to an economy that is based on services. Anything from accountants at one end to the people that make those accountants coffee in the morning.

“This shift has taken place differently in areas. In the big cities we have seen the explosion of a service sector. But in the regions you have places that were dependant on one or two industries and the absence of those industries creates a really unique situation in the labour market,” he said.

Changes to labour market are also related to changes in the relationship between young people and work, which is the second component of Dr Farrugia’s project.

“Because of where young people today tend to work, there has been a breakdown in any kind of meaningful distinction between the person you are in general, the skills that you have to go to work, and the actual practice of doing your job,” Dr Farrugia explains.

“They are expected not just to get jobs but to invest themselves in work and to have work be fundamental to who they are. For example, young people are disproportionately working in jobs that involve face-to-face interaction with people – anything from working in a café to a hotel. These types of businesses value ‘youthfulness’. If you can present an appropriately youthful disposition this is seen as a ‘nice encounter’ that the customer will enjoy.

“This kind of service work encourages young people to believe: What I do in my work is I perform my personality. So, what’s happening is the distinction between your life, your personality and your work is breaking down. There are now an increasing number of jobs where your job is your personality, and the interaction is the work.”

While government policy is often aimed at strengthening service labour markets in big cities, Dr Farrugia says little has been done to examine regional and outer-urban areas – as they are seen as irrelevant to policy makers.

“These are young people who are seen, in a sense, as uninteresting and unimportant. Not only that but they are encouraged, If you can’t get a job, move, go to where there is work,” Dr Farrugia said.

“This ignores the fact that young people form identities as workers in the context of local place to which they are often really attached and have provided the only resources they have had for navigating the labour market.”

A longitudinal study and in-depth interviews with a group of about 90 young people will focus on regions where there has been a particular pattern of industrial restructuring and change to the labour market in general and, particularly, the youth labour market.

However, while the project is set in regional Australia, Dr Farrugia says these areas are important focal points of broader social and economic changes that reflect the dynamics of globalisation.

“These regions are hotspots of very rapid changes in the labour market – changes that are emblematic of broader changes in the global organisation of work that have seen countries like Australia shift to increasingly urban-centric service economies.” Dr Farrugia said.

“Regional areas teach us not just about the regions, they teach us about the Australian labour force, the Australian labour market and Australia’s position within the dynamics of globalisation – and that is why they need to be studied. That is why they need to be included in government policy,” Dr Farrugia concludes.

Supporting the development of regional communities

David Farrugia is supporting the development of strong regional communities

University of Newcastle sociologist Dr David Farrugia is questioning the assumptions on which our policies around rural youth are based.

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Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
My research specialisations include sociological explorations of youth, with a particular focus on the relationship between identities and youth inequalities, as well as contemporary sociological theory.

I have researched and published in the area of youth homelessness, focusing on the identities, embodied experiences and personal relationships which emerge during the experience of homelessness for young people. My Post-Doctoral work explored the relationship between globalisation, national geographical inequalities, and the identities and biographies of young people in regional Victoria. In all cases my work is concerned with exploring young people's identities as a means of understanding the production and reproduction of contemporary youth inequalities.

I have also researched and published in the area of contemporary sociological theory, with a particular focus on theories of social change, practice theories, and the intersections between sociological and geographical thinking.

In the course of my research I have explored the means by which young people make sense of and navigate their lives, and connected these navigations with the inequalities that differentiate young people's lives from one another. The youth period is becoming increasingly insecure and difficult to negotiate, especially for young people from lower social classes and those in rural areas. In my work on youth homelessness, and rural and regional youth, I have documented ways in which young people are actively responding to these inequalities and the social pressures that impact on youth in contemporary capitalist societies.

Teaching Expertise
Sociology

Identities

Sociological Studies of Youth

Sociological Studies of Space and Place

Rural and Regional Sociology

Contemporary Sociological Theory


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Melbourne
  • Bachelor of Arts (Honours)(Psychology), Australian National University

Keywords

  • Homelessness
  • Rural Youth
  • SOCA3230 Identity and Culture
  • Social Change
  • Sociological Theory
  • Youth
  • Youth Inequality

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
160899 Sociology not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Farrugia D, Spaces of youth: Work, citizenship and culture in a global context, Routledge, Abington, Oxon (2018) [A1]
DOI 10.4324/9781315692272
2016 Farrugia D, Youth homelessness in late modernity: reflexive identities and moral worth, Springer, Singapore, 172 (2016) [A1]
DOI 10.1007/978-981-287-685-0

Chapter (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Farrugia DM, 'Space and place in studies of childhood and youth', Handbook of Children and Youth Studies, Springer, Singapore 609-624 (2015) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-981-4451-15-4_25
Citations Scopus - 3
2015 Farrugia DM, Smyth J, Harrison T, ''Vulnerable', 'At-Risk', 'Disengaged': Regional Young People', Interrogating Conceptions of 'Vulnerable Youth' in Theory, Policy and Practice, Sense Publishers, Rotterdam 165-180 (2015) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-94-6300-121-2_11
2013 Farrugia DM, 'The Possibility of Symbolic Violence in Interviews with Young People Experiencing Homelessness.', Negotiating Ethical Challenges in Youth Research, Routledge, New York 109-121 (2013) [B1]
Citations Scopus - 1
2010 Farrugia DM, Watson J, '"If anyone helps you then you're a failure": Youth Homelessness, Identity, and Relationships in Late Modernity.', For We Are Young And...?, Melbourne University Press, Melbourne, Vic 142-157 (2010)
Show 1 more chapter

Journal article (31 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Farrugia D, 'Class, place and mobility beyond the global city: stigmatisation and the cosmopolitanisation of the local', Journal of Youth Studies, (2019)

© 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This paper draws on a multi-sited qualitative study of youth in regional Australia to explore the conte... [more]

© 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This paper draws on a multi-sited qualitative study of youth in regional Australia to explore the contemporary relationship between class, place attachment, and the imperative towards mobility and cosmopolitanism. The paper shows how local classed identities shape how young people situate themselves and their localities in relation to the rest of the world, and how experiences of mobility produce classed attachments to place. Here, place is made meaningful within the broader cultural politics of inequality in neoliberalism, in which the moral denigration of figures of the working class come to stand for the disadvantage currently associated with regional places. However local classed histories offer some young people the capacity for resistance, whilst others are unable to reframe their localities in positive terms. Moreover, whilst cosmopolitanism is a mode of classed distinction across the two research sites, this can be enacted either through practices of mobility, or through the repositioning of the local in cosmopolitan terms through the identity practices of middle-class youth. The paper therefore reveals new ways in which local social and economic histories offer young people different ways in which to relate to notions of mobility as well as to reconstruct the meaning of their home.

DOI 10.1080/13676261.2019.1596236
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2019 Farrugia D, Hanley JE, Sherval M, Askland HH, Askew MG, Coffey JE, Threadgold SR, 'The local politics of rural land use: Place, extraction industries and narratives of contemporary rurality', JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY, 55 306-322 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1440783318773518
Co-authors Julia Coffey, Steven Threadgold, Meg Sherval, Hedda Askland, Joanne Hanley
2019 Farrugia D, 'How youth become workers: Identity, inequality and the post-Fordist self', JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY, (2019)
DOI 10.1177/1440783319865028
2019 Farrugia D, 'Class and the post-Fordist work ethic: Subjects of passion and subjects of achievement in the work society', Sociological Review, (2019)

© The Author(s) 2019. This article explores how the ¿post-Fordist work ethic¿ contributes to the formation of classed subjectivities. Drawing on the work of Kathi Weeks, the artic... [more]

© The Author(s) 2019. This article explores how the ¿post-Fordist work ethic¿ contributes to the formation of classed subjectivities. Drawing on the work of Kathi Weeks, the article approaches the post-Fordist promise of self-realisation through work in terms of the individualised accrual of value that has become so central to the experience of class within the cultural politics of neoliberalism. Empirically, the article draws on a programme of research on the formation of young workers to describe two ideal typical manifestations of the post-Fordist work ethic, characterised as ¿subjects of achievement¿ and ¿subjects of passion¿, which reflect classed differences in the way that self-realisation through work is defined and experienced. In this way, the article argues that the contemporary work ethic is inflected with forms of class distinction that pre-date the shift to post-Fordism, and that these distinctions within the post-Fordist work ethic are critical to classed modes of contemporary subjectification. This differentiation reflects the ideological history of work and class under capitalism as well as the promise of individualised self-realisation that is so critical to subject formation in the post-Fordist present.

DOI 10.1177/0038026118825234
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2019 Farrugia D, 'The formation of young workers: The cultivation of the self as a subject of value to the contemporary labour force', Current Sociology, 67 47-63 (2019) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2018. This article explores the practices through which young people cultivate themselves as subjects of value to the post-Fordist labour force. In this, the artic... [more]

© The Author(s) 2018. This article explores the practices through which young people cultivate themselves as subjects of value to the post-Fordist labour force. In this, the article goes beyond an existing emphasis on young people¿s ¿transitions¿ through employment, to a focus on the practices through which young people are formed as labouring subjects, and therefore on the relationship between youth subjectivities and post-Fordist labour force formation. Theoretically, the article builds upon increasingly influential suggestions in studies of post-Fordism that the formation of post-Fordist workers now takes place through the conversion of the whole of a subject¿s life into the capacity for labour, including affective styles, modes of relationality, and characteristics usually not considered as productive dimensions of the self. In this context, the article shows that whilst young people form themselves as workers through practices that are not specific to institutionalised definitions of education and labour, these practices ¿ and the modes of selfhood they aim to cultivate ¿ vary in ways that contribute to classed divisions within post-Fordist societies. In this, the study of the formation of young workers offers a critical insight into the way that the formation of subjectivities intertwines with the disciplinary requirements of post-Fordist labour in their classed manifestations.

DOI 10.1177/0011392118793681
2018 Farrugia D, 'Youthfulness and immaterial labour in the new economy', Sociological Review, 66 511-526 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0038026117731657
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
2018 Sherval M, Askland H, Askew M, Hanley J, Farrugia D, Threadgold SR, Coffey J, 'Farmers as modern-day stewards and the rise of new rural citizenship in the battle over land use', Local Environment: the international journal of justice and sustainability, 23 100-116 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13549839.2017.1389868
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Julia Coffey, Steven Threadgold, Joanne Hanley, Hedda Askland, Meg Sherval
2018 Threadgold SR, Farrugia D, Askland H, Askew M, Hanley J, Sherval M, Coffey J, 'Affect, risk and local politics of knowledge: changing land use in Narrabri, NSW', Environmental Sociology, 4 393-404 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/23251042.2018.1463673
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Meg Sherval, Hedda Askland, Steven Threadgold, Joanne Hanley, Julia Coffey
2018 Threadgold SR, Farrugia D, Coffey J, 'Young subjectivities and affective labour in the service economy', Journal of Youth Studies, 21 272-287 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13676261.2017.1366015
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Steven Threadgold, Julia Coffey
2018 Coffey J, Threadgold SR, Farrugia D, Sherval M, Hanley J, Askew M, Askland H, ' If you lose your youth, you lose your heart and your future : Affective figures of youth in community tensions surrounding a proposed Coal Seam Gas project', Sociologica Ruralis, 58 665-683 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/soru.12204
Co-authors Steven Threadgold, Joanne Hanley, Julia Coffey, Hedda Askland, Meg Sherval
2018 Coffey JE, Farrugia DM, Adkins L, Threadgold SR, 'Gender, Sexuality, and Risk in the Practice of Affective Labour for Young Women in Bar Work', SOCIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ONLINE, 23 728-743 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1360780418780059
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Julia Coffey, Steven Threadgold
2017 Farrugia D, Wood BE, 'Youth and Spatiality: Towards Interdisciplinarity in Youth Studies', Young, 25 209-218 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1103308817712036
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
2016 Farrugia D, Gerrard J, 'Academic Knowledge and Contemporary Poverty: The Politics of Homelessness Research', Sociology, 50 267-284 (2016) [C1]

© 2015, The Author(s) 2015. This article explores the field of homelessness research in relation to the dynamics of contemporary inequality and governmentality, arguing that the d... [more]

© 2015, The Author(s) 2015. This article explores the field of homelessness research in relation to the dynamics of contemporary inequality and governmentality, arguing that the dominant perspectives within this field have developed in ways that can converge with the demands of neoliberal governance. The article discusses the causal focus of much homelessness research, the emergence of the ¿orthodoxy¿ of homelessness research and new approaches emphasising subjectivity and arguing for a ¿culture of homelessness¿. We suggest that homelessness has been constructed as a discrete analytical object extraordinary to the social relations of contemporary inequality. The authority to represent homelessness legitimately has been constituted through positioning ¿the homeless¿ outside of a community of valorised and normatively legitimate subjectivities. The article concludes with reflections on an alternative politics of homelessness research that moves towards a critical engagement with the position of homelessness within the structural dynamics of late modernity.

DOI 10.1177/0038038514564436
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 8
2016 Farrugia D, Smyth J, Harrison T, 'Affective Topologies of Rural Youth Embodiment', Sociologia Ruralis, 56 116-132 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 European Society for Rural Sociology. This article explores the affective, embodied dimensions of young rural people's relationship with space and place. Relationship ... [more]

© 2015 European Society for Rural Sociology. This article explores the affective, embodied dimensions of young rural people's relationship with space and place. Relationship with space and place has been recognised as a significant dimension of rural youths' subjectivities but it has been primarily understood through representational perspectives which focus on young people's perceptions, images, or discursive constructions of their local places. In contrast, this article draws on non-representational approaches to subjectivity and space to highlight the embodied, sensuous entanglements between young people's subjectivities and the spaces they have inhabited and experienced. Qualitative data gathered as part of a project exploring youths' subjectivities in regional Australia shows that young people's experience of their rural locale, as well as their relationship to the city, reflect an affective topology of relations of proximity and rhythmic tempo which emerges from the relationship between the space of their bodily hexis and the spaces and places they are situated within. These non-representational, embodied processes are intrinsic to rural youths' subjectivities and structure how young people approach and navigate their futures. © 2015 The Authors. Sociologia Ruralis

DOI 10.1111/soru.12077
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
2016 Farrugia D, Smyth J, Harrison T, 'Moral distinctions and structural inequality: Homeless youth salvaging the self', Sociological Review, 64 238-255 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Editorial Board of The Sociological Review. This paper explores the construction and contestation of moral distinctions as a dimension of contemporary structural inequa... [more]

© 2016 The Editorial Board of The Sociological Review. This paper explores the construction and contestation of moral distinctions as a dimension of contemporary structural inequality through a focus on the subjectivities constructed by young people who have experienced homelessness. Empirical material from two research projects shows that in young people's narratives of homelessness, material insecurity intertwines with the moral economies at work in neoliberal capitalist societies to construct homelessness as a state of moral disgrace, in which an ungovernable experience is experienced as a moral failure. When young people gain access to secure housing, the increasing stability and security of their lives is narrated in terms of a moral adherence to personal responsibility and disciplined conduct. Overall the paper describes an economy of worth organized around distinctions between order and chaos, self-governance and unruliness, morality and disgrace, which structures the experience of homelessness. As young people's position in relation to these moral ideals reflects the material conditions of their lives, their experiences demonstrate the way that moral hierarchies contribute to the existence and experience of structural inequalities in neoliberal capitalist societies.

DOI 10.1111/1467-954X.12252
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2016 Farrugia D, 'The mobility imperative for rural youth: the structural, symbolic and non-representational dimensions rural youth mobilities', Journal of Youth Studies, 19 836-851 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. ABSTRACT: Mobilities of money, symbols and young people themselves are central to the formation of the contemporary youth period. While rural young ... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. ABSTRACT: Mobilities of money, symbols and young people themselves are central to the formation of the contemporary youth period. While rural young people remain marginal to theoretical development in youth studies, this paper shows that mobilities are especially significant for rural youth, who experience a kind of mobility imperative created by the accelerating concentration of economic and cultural capital in cities. Drawing on theory and evidence from contexts including Europe, Australia, Africa and South America, this paper explores the mobility imperative for rural youth and offers a new theoretical framework for understanding rural youth mobilities. The framework understands mobilities across three dimensions: the structural, the symbolic and the non-representational. These dimensions refer to material inequalities between rural and urban places in a global context; symbolic hierarchies that concentrate the resources for ¿youthfulness¿ in cities and the affective entanglements between embodied subjectivities and spaces that emerge as young people move. The paper shows how these dimensions interact in the production and experience of the mobility imperative, offering an ontological and theoretical platform for future research into rural youth mobilities.

DOI 10.1080/13676261.2015.1112886
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 18
2015 Gerrard J, Farrugia D, 'The "lamentable sight' of homelessness and the society of the spectacle', URBAN STUDIES, 52 2219-2233 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0042098014542135
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 18
2015 Farrugia DM, Woodman D, 'Ultimate concerns in late modernity: Archer, Bourdieu and reflexivity', British Journal of Sociology, 66 626-644 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1468-4446.12147
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 16
2014 Farrugia D, 'Beside One's Self: Homelessness Felt and Lived', JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY, 50 387-389 (2014)
DOI 10.1177/1440783312447155
2014 Farrugia D, Smyth J, Harrison T, 'Emplacing young people in an Australian rural community: an extraverted sense of place in times of change', Journal of Youth Studies, 17 1152-1167 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13676261.2014.901495
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2014 Coffey J, Farrugia D, 'Unpacking the black box: the problem of agency in the sociology of youth', JOURNAL OF YOUTH STUDIES, 17 461-474 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13676261.2013.830707
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 37
Co-authors Julia Coffey
2014 Farrugia D, 'Towards a spatialised youth sociology: the rural and the urban in times of change', JOURNAL OF YOUTH STUDIES, 17 293-307 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13676261.2013.830700
Citations Scopus - 45Web of Science - 36
2014 Farrugia D, Smyth J, Harrison T, 'Rural young people in late modernity: Place, globalisation and the spatial contours of identity', Current Sociology, 62 1036-1054 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0011392114538959
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 16
2013 Farrugia D, 'Young people and structural inequality: beyond the middle ground', Journal of Youth Studies, 16 679-693 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13676261.2012.744817
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 34
2013 Farrugia D, 'Addressing the problem of reflexivity in theories of reflexive modernisation: Subjectivity and structural complexity', Journal of Sociology, 5 872-886 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1440783313480396
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
2013 Farrugia D, 'The reflexive subject: Towards a theory of reflexivity as practical intelligibility', Current Sociology, 61 283-300 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0011392113478713
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 36
2012 Farrugia D, 'Surviving Teenage Motherhood: Myths and Realities', INTERNATIONAL SOCIOLOGY, 27 280-282 (2012)
DOI 10.1177/0268580911428019b
2011 Farrugia D, 'Youth homelessness and individualised subjectivity', Journal of Youth Studies, 14 761-775 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13676261.2011.605438
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
2011 Farrugia D, 'Homeless youth managing relationships: Reflexive intersubjectivity and inequality', Young, 19 357-373 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/110330881101900401
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2011 Farrugia D, 'The symbolic burden of homelessness Towards a theory of youth homelessness as embodied subjectivity', JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY, 47 71-87 (2011)
DOI 10.1177/1440783310380989
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 34
2009 Farrugia D, 'Exploring stigma: Medical knowledge and the stigmatisation of parents of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder', Sociology of Health and Illness, 31 1011-1027 (2009)

This paper analyses 12 parent interviews to investigate the stigmatisation of parents of children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. Drawing on poststructural accounts of... [more]

This paper analyses 12 parent interviews to investigate the stigmatisation of parents of children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. Drawing on poststructural accounts of the relationship between knowledge and subjectivity, the stigma concept is critically interrogated in order to address previous individualistic constructions of stigmatisation and to place stigma within the power dynamics of social control. The results of the study indicate that a child's diagnosis with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is critical for parents to resist stigmatisation. Parents experienced considerable enacted stigma, but successfully resisted felt stigma by deploying medical knowledge to articulate unspoiled subject positions. The institutionalisation of medical knowledge within the autism community was critical to this process. Resistance to enacted stigma was successful to the degree that medical constructions of deviance deployed by parents were accepted by others, notably those in power within institutions. It is concluded that poststructural accounts of subjectivity and social control provide a useful way of conceptualising stigmatisation. An acceptance of the painful nature of stigma as lived experience co-exists with an emphasis on the constantly negotiated nature of embodied subjectivity as a contingent social process to illustrate the conditions for active resistance to stigmatisation. © 2009 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/j.1467-9566.2009.01174.x
Citations Scopus - 96
Show 28 more journal articles

Conference (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Threadgold S, Coffey J, Farrugia D, 'Scenes, bar work and immaterial labour: The reflexive and ironic reproduction of class', Deakin University (2018)
Co-authors Steven Threadgold, Julia Coffey
2016 Farrugia D, Threadgold SR, Coffey J, 'Affective Labour: Towards a New Research Agenda for Youth Studies.', Australian Catholic University. Nov 28 Dec 1. 2016. (2016)
Co-authors Julia Coffey, Steven Threadgold

Report (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Askland HH, Askew M, Hanley J, Sherval M, Farrugia D, Threadgold S, Coffey J, 'Local Attitudes to Changing Land Use - Narrabri Shire', NSW Departmment of Primary Industries, 113 (2016)
Co-authors Joanne Hanley, Steven Threadgold, Julia Coffey, Hedda Askland, Meg Sherval
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 9
Total funding $635,776

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20192 grants / $204,696

Young Hospitality Workers and Value Creation in the Service Economy$199,696

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Doctor David Farrugia, Doctor Steven Threadgold, Doctor Julia Coffey, Professor Lisa Adkins, Professor Rosalind Gill
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1800136
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Journal of Youth Studies Conference 2019$5,000

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Dr Steven Threadgold (Lead), Dr David Farrugia, Professor Pam Nilan, Professor Anita Harris (Deakin University), Dr Brady Robards (Monash University), A/Professor Dan Woodman (University of Melbourne), Professor Rachel Brooks (University of Surrey, UK)

Scheme Strategic Network and Pilot Project Grants Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20163 grants / $374,080

The Formation of Young Workers: A Multi Sited Study on the Periphery$350,974

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Doctor David Farrugia
Scheme Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1500267
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Young People, Insecurity and Affective Labour: a Study of 'Front of House' Service Labour$13,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team

Dr Steven Threadgold; Prof Lisa Adkins; Dr Julia Coffey; Dr David Farrugia

Scheme FEDUA Strategic Networks and Pilot Projects Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

DVC(RI) Research Support for DECRA (DE16)$9,606

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor David Farrugia
Scheme DECRA Support
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1600522
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20153 grants / $42,000

Attitudes to Changing Land Use - the Narrabri Shire$25,000

Funding body: NSW Department of Primary Industries

Funding body NSW Department of Primary Industries
Project Team Doctor Hedda Askland, Doctor David Farrugia, Doctor Meg Sherval, Doctor Julia Coffey, Doctor Steven Threadgold, Dr MICHAEL Askew
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401491
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON Y

Newcastle Youth Studies Group - Theoretical Innovations and Challenges in Youth Sociology: One day symposium$15,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Doctor Steven Threadgold, Professor Pamela Nilan, Doctor Julia Coffey, Doctor David Farrugia, Doctor Hedda Askland
Scheme Strategic Networks Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500904
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Journal of Youth Studies 2015: Contemporary Youth Contemporary Risks, Copenhagen Denmark, 30 March-1 April 2015$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Doctor David Farrugia
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500200
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20141 grants / $15,000

Network for Youth Research Outside the Northern Metropole$15,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Pamela Nilan, Doctor Steven Threadgold, Conjoint Professor Andy Furlong, Doctor David Farrugia, Doctor Julia Coffey, Doctor Hedda Askland, Doctor Lena Rodriguez
Scheme Strategic Networks Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400957
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Navigating the city and negotiating (un)employment: A study on the labouring subjectivities of Black African youth in Newcastle, Australia. PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Table Top Gaming using Social Existential Theory PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 PhD Case Management in Youth Desistance: A Governmentality Approach PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Grounding Globalities in the Cosmopolitan Practices of Youth PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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News

FEDUA's Centre for Social Research and Regional Futures wins tender

August 24, 2016

A research team led by FEDUA’s Centre for Social Research and Regional Futures successfully tendered for a position on a Govt panel for research services.

Research Directions 2016

July 7, 2016

This issue of Research Directions has a focus on researchers in the early and mid-stages of their careers.

UON ranked in the world's top 150 for Sociology

March 22, 2016

The University of Newcastle (UON) Australia's sociology discipline has ranked in the top 150 in the world in the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2016.

ARC DECRA funding success

November 3, 2015

Dr David Farrugia has been awarded more than $330,000 in ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) funding commencing in 2016 for his research pro

Dr David Farrugia

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Humanities and Social Science
Faculty of Education and Arts

Contact Details

Email david.m.farrugia@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4985 4385

Office

Room W3.19.
Building Behavioural sciences.
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