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Dr Hedda Askland

Senior Lecturer

School of Humanities and Social Science (Sociology and Anthropology)

Hedda Askland is shining a light on displaced communities in our own backyards

With stories of war and the impacts of global warming inundating our news, we are overwhelmed with media imagery of displaced communities in developing countries – their homes shattered and futures unclear. But what about displaced communities in developed countries like Australia?

Dr Hedda Askland is shining a light on displaced communities in our own backyards

Dr Hedda Askland, an anthropologist and member of the University of Newcastle’s Centre for Social Research and Regional Futures (CSRRF), examines the deep-rooted forces behind home, identity and belonging amongst people experiencing significant social, political and environmental change. Through her research with exile and refugee communities, as well as communities exposed to large-scale development projects, she has found we don’t have to look past our own backyards to find people suffering experiences of displacement.

“In contrast to my previous work with East Timorese living in Australia during a time of political upheaval, I currently work with local, long-established communities in Australia that co-exist with large scale industry. This project looks at people we don’t normally think of as refugees or migrants because they don’t travel across borders – some of them don’t even leave their house,” Askland said.

“…this project is looking at people we don’t normally think of as refugees or migrants because they don’t travel across borders – some of them don’t even leave their house”

Askland is currently conducting an ethnographic study in the Upper Hunter and Mid-Western regions, in which she explores people’s connection to place, their lived experiences of environmental and social change in the context of development, and the possibilities of environmentally-induced relief through movement and migration. At the moment she is working on a case study in the village of Wollar – a historic village on the edge of the Great Dividing Range that is surrounded by three open-cut coalmines.

Prior to the mining boom, Wollar was a community of about 400 people. There was a shop that sold everything from food to farming supplies, two churches, a local bushfire brigade, a mechanic, a nursery and a school. Today, only about 10 percent of the population remain, the nursery is relocating, there are only eight children left in the school and the shop is owned by mining company Peabody Energy – selling only expensive essentials. The closest town, Mudgee, is 50km away and Askland estimates the average age of residents is approximately 60 years old.

“When I speak with people in Wollar, they exhibit a real sense of distress that is connected to the future, especially in relation to the planned expansion of the mine, which will move the mine boundary to only 1.5km from the village,” Askland said.

“This is when I realised we needed to expand the current concepts we have for explaining displacement to something that is about people’s lived experiences and incorporates their imagined futures.”

As a result Askland is developing a concept she has termed ‘eritalgia’, which will assist in better understanding the role the future plays in the lived experiences of social and environmental change.

“The concept adds to the existing concepts ‘nostalgia’, which describes people’s connection to place in the past, and ‘solastalgia’, a term developed by Professor Glenn Albrecht to describe place-based melancholia, trauma or distress in the present. In contrast to these concepts, ‘eritalgia’ points to the embodied sense of displacement that may occur when there is a rupture between lived realities and imagined emplaced self,” Askland explains.

“I believe our understanding of place-based stress and relief must be expanded to incorporate people’s imagined futures, and that by creating a triadic concept such as this we can better understand displacement as an existential condition of loss, as it manifests in relation to the past, the present and the future”.

“By unpacking displacement in the context of what is happening in regional New South Wales, I will challenge conventional ways of understanding and speaking about displacement and relocation. Looking at the loss of community, questions of social cohesion, and individual sense of self as it is happening in Wollar, I am able to explore the question of home as it relates to place and mobility,” Askland explains.

“Not home as a physical place but home as a space in which our sense of self, physical landscape and social landscape are in harmony.”

“When this is aligned, people articulate a sense of home. This project will expand how we understand emplaced and existential loss, and connect it to both spatial and temporal dimensions. It will create an evidence base and theoretical framework for showing the significance of this issue, add to our understanding of the impacts development projects may have on communities and individuals, and show how mobility and migration might both cause and relieve environmentally-induced stress.”

“I hope that through this research I am able to initiate a public debate and awareness about how displacement as an experiential condition is not restricted to refugees and other migrants, but in fact can occur in our own backyard.”

Dr Hedda Askland is shining a light on displaced communities in our own backyards

Hedda Askland is shining a light on displaced communities in our own backyards

Dr Hedda Haugen Askland examines the deep-rooted forces behind home, identity and belonging in exile and refugee communities

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

I am a Norwegian social anthropologist who works in the School of Humanities and Social Science (HASS). I am the Project Director of the Centre for Social Research and Regional Futures (CSRRF) and Deputy Director of the Centre for 21st Century Humanities (C21CH).

My research centres on questions of exile and displacement, place, home, identity and belonging. I have explored these phenomena as they transpire within transnational, translocal and local contexts, working with refugees and asylum seekers from East Timor living in Australian metropolitan centres and mining affected rural communities in New South Wales.

My early work looked at how political and social conflicts in home countries shape everyday realities, communities and identities of former refugees. Through my postgraduate studies (Master of Social Science (research) and PhD), I explored issues related to migration, diaspora, exile, home, community, identity and belonging. Whereas my Master thesis considers the question of a particular group of young East-Timorese exiles in the immediate aftermath of the Indonesian occupation and explores the impact of the Australian Government's immigration policies on the situation of this particular group of asylum seekers, my PhD focuses on issues related to the broader diasporic community. As part of my PhD, I investigated how political unrest and national crisis affect exiles’ experiences of self, community and nation. This was an ethnographic study of East-Timorese expatriates’ lives after the realisation of independence in East Timor that shines a light on how expatriates and diaspora communities experience and relate to violence and radical political change in their home country.

Following my PhD, I spent almost five years as a research fellow in the School of Architecture and Built Environment (SABE). During this period, I managed a two-year ALTC funded project that explored the question of creativity in the context of design and architecture education. This project initiated my pedagogical interests and aspirations to work on developing (and delivering) courses that adopt a student-centred and project-based learning approach, and to think creatively about teaching and assessment so to develop innovative and fun modes for learning whist maintaining an emphasis on theory and rigorous content. As part of my work at SABE, I was also part of two interdisciplinary teams that worked on research project that considered (a) the themes of cultural built heritage, resilience and natural disasters, and (b) ethnography, architectural practice, creativity and management.

When I started in my current position as Senior Lecturer in HASS, I decided to explore how I could merge my previous research on refugees, exile and displacement with my more recent exposure to research on matters related to the natural and built environment. This resulted in what is today my main ethnographic project: Land use, kinship and migration: large-scale resource extraction and the question of home. This is a longitudinal research project in which I explore experiences of environmental and social change at the coal frontier, exploring specifically how movement of people and minerals can be conceptualised in relation to displacement. In conjunction with this ongoing project, I have been involved in a number of other research project that explore matters of land use within rural zones, land use change, energy and extraction.

The overarching theme for all of these projects is how they all speak to matters of place and the meeting between large-scale forces (e.g. industry and climate change) and small local communities. Through ethnographic research, I investigate how mining, land use and land use change relate to place, power, home and exile, paying particular attention to the intersection of mythology, ontology and ecology in the establishment of people’s experiences of self and other. My research program has seen me work with rural communities across New South Wales, various government departments, NGOs and local organisations. Based on my expertise in the area, I have given expert statements on different extractive project applications under consideration by the Minister of Planning. I was an expert witness on social impact in the Rocky Hill court case in the Land and Environment Court, which resulted in the unprecedented rejection of the mine proposal on the grounds of social impact and climate change.  

Teaching Expertise
I currently have the pleasure to be the Honours convenor for the Societies, Cultures and Human Services Cluster. As part of this, I get to teach our fourth years students in the coursework component of their honours. I also teach into our undergraduate and postgraduate degrees. My teaching includes both traditional (face-to-face) and online modes at both the Ourimbah and Callaghan campuses.

The courses that I teach or contribute to include:

SOCA1020: What is Anthropology?

HASS1000: BA Futures

HASS2000: BA Practice

SOCA3850: Indigenous People in the Contemporary World

SCHS4090: Societies, Cultures and Human Services Honours I

SCHS4100: Societies, Cultures and Human Services Honours II

SOCA6571: Development and Social Change

Collaborations
As part of my research, I have worked in a number of interdisciplinary research teams with members from a number of faculties and universities (including: RMIT University, Deakin University, the University of Tasmania, Monash University, Queensland University of Technology and Melbourne University). I have worked as part of multi-disciplinary teams based at The University of Newcastle, which included the disciplines of anthropology, indigenous studies, architecture, construction management, architectural history and design, law, human geography, public health, electrical engineering and computing, transitioning studies and engineering. I aspire to bring my disciplinary expertise as an ethnographer and social anthropologist into interdisciplinary teams and to use the interdisciplinary nature of this research as a foundation to expand knowledge by exploring new terrains and methodologies.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Master of Social Science, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Climate change
  • Development Induced Displacement and Resettlement
  • Diaspora and exile
  • Displacement
  • Environmental change
  • Ethnography
  • Home
  • Identity
  • Land use
  • Mining
  • Place
  • Rural communities
  • Social anthropology
  • Social change and development

Languages

  • Norwegian (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
160104 Social and Cultural Anthropology 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2014 -  Membership - Sydney Southeast Asia Centre Sydney Southeast Asia Centre
Australia
1/01/2010 - 31/12/2011 Membership - European Association of Social Anthropologists (EASA) European Association of Social Anthropologists (EASA)
United Kingdom
1/01/2005 -  Membership - Australian Anthropological Society (AAS) Australian Anthropological Society (AAS)
Australia

Awards

Research Award

Year Award
2016 Vice Chancellor's Early Career Research and Innovation Excellence Award (Individual Award, FEDUA)
Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle, Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
SCHS4100 Societies, Cultures and Human Services Honours II
The University of Newcastle
This course is the second of two Honours level courses which build knowledge and understanding about the history and philosophy of research in Sociology and Anthropology. This knowledge and understanding is used to develop insights into the ways that problems in Sociology and Anthropology are conceived and acted on. The course enhances skills and capacities in reading and literature reviewing, critical reasoning and argument, essay writing and verbal communication. The course includes: discussions of pure and applied research methods in Sociology and Anthropology; ethical and research design issues; student-based presentations of key issues and research proposals; and on-line bibliographic searches and writing techniques.
SCHS4100 13/05/2019 - 13/06/2019
SOCA6571 Development and Social Change
University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
This course aims to provide students with the concepts and analytical skills to understand the rapid changes that are taking place in developing countries. The course examines globalisation and economic development in relation to states and specific social and cultural groups, as well as forces of internal change including gender, ethnicity and social movements. The course will focus on governmental as well as non-governmental actors on local, national and international levels.
Course Coordinator and Lecturer 5/01/2015 - 13/05/2019
SCHS4090 Societies, Cultures and Human Services Honours I
NEWCASTLE UNIVERSITY
This course introduces students to key debates and perspectives on theory and methods in the social sciences, more specifically sociology and anthropology, human services and criminology. Through interdisciplinary enquiry, the students will explore the questions of 'what is knowledge?' and 'how do we know what we know?'. The core concept of the course is 'epistemology' and a central learning objective is for the students to gain insight into how epistemology features in their own research. Through this course, students will gain an understanding of how research problems are conceived and acted upon in the disciplines of anthropology and sociology, human services and criminology. They will explore the philosophical underpinnings of social research, as well as ethical and political components of research.
Course Coordinator and Seminar Leader 20/02/2018 - 13/06/2019
SOCA1020 Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
This course introduces students to the history of anthropology and anthropological thought; the nature of anthropological fieldwork, and theoretical, empirical, and methodological debates within the discipline. The course examines how the study of other cultures and societies can help us deal with urgent problems confronting the contemporary world.
Course Coordinator and Lecturer 2/06/2014 - 14/11/2015
SOCA3850 Indigenous Peoples and the Contemporary World
University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Explores the contemporary socio-cultural, economic and political situation of indigenous peoples in the contemporary world. This course is divided into two complementary sections. Section 1 looks at definitions and parameters of 'indigenous' peoples and their overlap with 'ethnic minorities' and the concept of 'fourth world nations'. Section 2 describes the different types of indigenous peoples' struggles, for example struggles over land/marine rights, co-existence with settler/migrant communities, independence and nationhood, and reclamation of pre-colonial political boundaries and entities. The course will place distinct emphasis how contemporary challenges facing indigenous people relate to questions of land and land use, with exploration of post-colonial and de-colonial theory, through examples of contemporary land use struggles (e.g. Standing Rock).
Course Coordinator and Lecturer 2/06/2014 - 13/05/2019
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Askland HH, Ostwald M, Williams AP, Assessing Creativity: Supporting Learning in Architecture and Design, Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching, Sydney, 355 (2012) [A3]
2010 Williams AP, Ostwald M, Askland HH, Creativity, Design and Education: Theories, Positions and Challenges, Australian Learning & Teaching Council, Strawberry Hills, NSW, 199 (2010) [A2]

Chapter (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Askland HH, Bunn M, 'Extractive inequalities: Coal, land acquisition and class in rural New South Wales, Australia', Energy, Resource Extraction and Society: Impacts and Contested Futures 20-36 (2018) [B1]

© 2018 selection and editorial matter, Anna Szolucha; individual chapters, the contributors. From the 1970s, state¿driven pursuits for coal and revenue have radically transformed ... [more]

© 2018 selection and editorial matter, Anna Szolucha; individual chapters, the contributors. From the 1970s, state¿driven pursuits for coal and revenue have radically transformed rural landscapes and sociality in New South Wales, Australia. The region, which has a long history of coal mining, moved from being run by locally based enterprises that contributed to the sustainability of local communities to large-scale, global corporations relying on a translocal workforce. As coal operations emerged from the underground, a radical restructuring of spatial relations took place. This restructuring was also underpinned by the privatisation of coal and power supplies, with transnational extraction corporations becoming landholders in agricultural regions. As the mining boom intensified, mining companies emerged as a major landholder in rural areas of New South Wales. Seeking to purchase strategic properties for exploration, extraction or mitigation, mining companies approached and negotiated with individual, local landholders. In this paper, we consider how this process have followed class¿based lines and how class exposes distinct vulnerabilities and privileges in a meeting with a miner. We contend that there is a vacuum in the planning process, which exposes vulnerable communities that have limited capacity to contest these developments and define the future and meaning of their place of belonging.

DOI 10.4324/9781351213943
Co-authors Matthew Bunn
2012 Askland HH, Ostwald M, Williams AP, 'Assessing creativity: Revisiting the literature', Assessing Creativity: Supporting Learning in Architecture and Design, Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching, Sydney 1-16 (2012) [B1]
2012 Askland HH, Williams AP, 'The challenge of teaching creativity', Assessing Creativity: Supporting Learning in Architecture and Design, Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching, Sydney 29-46 (2012) [B1]
2012 Askland HH, Ostwald M, 'Assessing creativity: Academic and student perceptions', Assessing Creativity: Supporting Learning in Architecture and Design, Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching, Sydney 47-62 (2012) [B1]
2012 Ostwald M, Askland HH, 'Models and matrices', Assessing Creativity: Supporting Learning in Architecture and Design, Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching, Sydney 63-80 (2012) [B1]
2012 Ostwald M, Askland HH, 'Assessment regimes: Patterns of creative evaluation in architecture and design', Assessing Creativity: Supporting Learning in Architecture and Design, Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching, Sydney 81-100 (2012) [B1]
2012 Askland HH, 'Reflective journal review', Assessing Creativity: Supporting Learning in Architecture and Design, Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching, Sydney 255-270 (2012) [B1]
2012 Askland HH, Ostwald M, Williams AP, 'Overarching issues, strategic considerations and practical responses: Final thoughts on assessing design', Assessing Creativity: Supporting Learning in Architecture and Design, Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching, Sydney 289-298 (2012) [B1]
2011 Williams AP, Gu N, Askland HH, 'Virtuality - Offering opportunites for creativity', Design Creativity 2010, Springer, London 183-190 (2011) [B1]
Show 6 more chapters

Journal article (19 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Farrugia D, Hanley JE, Sherval M, Askland HH, Askew MG, Coffey JE, Threadgold SR, 'The local politics of rural land use: Place, extraction industries and narratives of contemporary rurality', JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY, 55 306-322 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1440783318773518
Co-authors Joanne Hanley, Meg Sherval, David M Farrugia, Julia Coffey, Steven Threadgold
2018 Sherval M, Askland H, Askew M, Hanley J, Farrugia D, Threadgold SR, Coffey J, 'Farmers as modern-day stewards and the rise of new rural citizenship in the battle over land use', Local Environment: the international journal of justice and sustainability, 23 100-116 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13549839.2017.1389868
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Meg Sherval, David M Farrugia, Joanne Hanley, Steven Threadgold, Julia Coffey
2018 Threadgold SR, Farrugia D, Askland H, Askew M, Hanley J, Sherval M, Coffey J, 'Affect, risk and local politics of knowledge: changing land use in Narrabri, NSW', Environmental Sociology, 4 393-404 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/23251042.2018.1463673
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Steven Threadgold, David M Farrugia, Julia Coffey, Meg Sherval, Joanne Hanley
2018 Austin EK, Handley T, Kiem AS, Rich JL, Lewin TJ, Askland HH, et al., 'Drought-related stress among farmers: findings from the Australian Rural Mental Health Study.', The Medical journal of Australia, 209 159-165 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.5694/mja17.01200
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors S Askarimarnani, David Perkins, Brian Kelly, Jane Rich, Anthony Kiem, Terry Lewin, Emma Austin Uon
2018 Askland HH, Bunn M, 'Lived experiences of environmental change: Solastalgia, power and place', Emotion, Space and Society, 27 16-22 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd The concept of solastagia has been developed by environmental philosopher Albrecht to understand the psychological trauma, also referred to as place-based dist... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd The concept of solastagia has been developed by environmental philosopher Albrecht to understand the psychological trauma, also referred to as place-based distress, experienced because of environmental change. In this article, we explore ways to further this concept. The article draws on ethnographic fieldwork in a village in the mid-western region of New South Wales (NSW), Australia, which is surrounded by three large open-cut coal mines. Over the past decade, the mines, in particular the Peabody-owned Wilpinjong mine closest to the village, have had a significant impact on biophysical, social and temporal landscapes in the area. We argue that whilst solastalgia may help explore the relationship between the environmental and human distress triggered in these circumstances, the sense of displacement and loss that emerge are entangled with questions of power and dispossession beyond the biophysical realm. Underpinned by a phenomenological framework of analysis, we contend that place-based distress should be understood as an ontological trauma, as the fabrics of place, belonging and the social relations embedded within disrupt the ongoing sense of being associated with home. These include the means to not only link to the past, but also to imagine the future.

DOI 10.1016/j.emospa.2018.02.003
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Matthew Bunn
2018 Coffey J, Threadgold SR, Farrugia D, Sherval M, Hanley J, Askew M, Askland H, ' If you lose your youth, you lose your heart and your future : Affective figures of youth in community tensions surrounding a proposed Coal Seam Gas project', Sociologica Ruralis, 58 665-683 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/soru.12204
Co-authors Joanne Hanley, David M Farrugia, Meg Sherval, Steven Threadgold, Julia Coffey
2017 Askland HH, 'Overheating. An Anthropology of Accelerated Change', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF ANTHROPOLOGY, 28 126-128 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/taja.12224
2016 Chapman M, Askland HH, Chambers J, Awad R, 'Architecture and ethnography: reflections on the structure and organisation of architectural practice', The International Journal of Design Management and Professional Practice, 10 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.18848/2325-162X/CGP
Co-authors Michael Chapman
2016 Askland HH, 'A dying village: mining and the experiential condition of displacement 130-130 (2016)
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 6
2015 Askland HH, ''It was all about independence': loss, division and rejuvenation amongst the East Timorese in Melbourne (vol 25, pg 321, 2014)', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF ANTHROPOLOGY, 26 143-143 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/taja.12134
2015 Askland HH, 'East Timorese in Australia: Affective Relations, Identity, and Belonging in a Time of Political Crisis', ASEAS : Österreichische Zeitschrift für Südostasienwissenschaften, 7 199-216 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.14764/10.ASEAS-2014.2-5
2014 Askland HH, 'Circulating Stories: East Timorese in Australia and Questions of Post-Independence Identity', Oceania, 84 105-120 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/ocea.5051
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2014 Askland HH, ''It was all about independence': loss, division and rejuvenation amongst the East Timorese in Melbourne', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF ANTHROPOLOGY, 25 321-336 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/taja.12107
Citations Web of Science - 4
2014 MacKee J, Askland HH, Askew L, 'Recovering cultural built heritage after natural disasters: A resilience perspective', International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, 5 202-212 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1108/IJDRBE-09-2012-0032#sthash.4CS1Q23V.dpuf
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Jamie Mackee
2014 Askland HH, Awad R, Chambers J, Chapman M, 'Anthropological quests in architecture: Pursuing the human subject', Archnet-IJAR, 8 284-295 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Archnet-IJAR, International Journal of Architectural Research. In this paper, we explore what architectural practice and, more specifically, the architectural research doma... [more]

© 2014 Archnet-IJAR, International Journal of Architectural Research. In this paper, we explore what architectural practice and, more specifically, the architectural research domain, may gain from the theoretical and methodological premise of anthropology and ethnography. The paper explores a historical link between anthropology and architecture as academic disciplines, arguing that the disciplines are aligned through anthropology's search for understanding the conditions of humanity and architecture's role in forming these very conditions. We do not intend to explicate the individual disciplines but are interested in the crossover between the two and, more specifically, what insights anthropology and ethnography may offer to the discipline of architecture. We consider the relationship between anthropology and architecture, as both a research domain and a profession, and question how anthropology-as an approach to research more so than a discipline-can contribute to the advancement of architectural practice and research.

Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Michael Chapman
2013 Askland HH, 'My Life as a Chameleon: Finding the Anthropological Self through Interdisciplinary Collaboration', Collaborative Anthropologies, 6 244-267 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1353/cla.2013.0021
2013 Askland HH, Gajendran T, Brewer G, 'Project organizations as organizational fields: expanding the level of analysis through Pierre Bourdieu's Theory of Practice', Engineering Project Organization Journal, 3 116-126 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/21573727.2013.768986
Co-authors Graham Brewer, Thayaparan Gajendran
2011 Williams AP, Ostwald M, Askland HH, 'The relationship between creativity and design and its implication for design education', Design Principles and Practices: An International Journal, 5 57-72 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2
2007 Askland HH, 'Habitus, practice and agency of young East Timorese asylum seekers in Australia', Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology, 8 235-249 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/14442210701516561
Citations Scopus - 3
Show 16 more journal articles

Conference (21 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Askland HH, Bunn M, 'Time - place - home: homelessness as spatial ruptures and temporal dissonance', The University of Sydney (2016)
Co-authors Matthew Bunn
2016 Foulcher NC, Askland HH, Gu N, 'Disruptions: Impact of digital design technologies on continuity in established design process paradigms', CAADRIA 2016, 21st International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia - Living Systems and Micro-Utopias: Towards Continuous Designing (2016) [E1]

© 2016, The Association for Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA), Hong Kong. This paper aims to provide a critical understanding of the discipline of arc... [more]

© 2016, The Association for Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA), Hong Kong. This paper aims to provide a critical understanding of the discipline of architectural education, exploring how digital technology forms part of two Australian architecture schools. Generally accepted as the unbroken and consistent existence or operation of something over a period of time, continuity represents stability without interruption. In the context of architectural design education, continuity aligns almost symbiotically with the design process; a system that facilitates a continuous loop of input, output and feedback for the designer- from defining the brief, collecting information, synthesising and presenting a design proposal. Preliminary findings of a larger research study that investigates the role of technology in architecture education, suggest that cultural patterns of technology adoption and valuation exist, valorising particular tools and establishing a framework for design teaching and practice that might disrupt the continuity of students' design process. Moreover, the study shows evidence of a disruption of continuity in design school narratives, emphasising the need to rethink design pedagogy and the place of technology herein. Reflecting on these observations, this paper explores the question: When the tools of digital technology challenge the established design process paradigm of an architectural school, how do educators respond to such a disruption in continuity?.

2015 Askland HH, 'Mining and displacement: introducing the concept of 'eritalgia'', Melbourne (2015) [E3]
2014 Foulcher NC, Gu N, Askland HH, 'The perceived effect of digital design technology on student learning in architectural technology', Across: Architectural Research through to Practice: 48th International Conference of the Architectural Science Association, Genova (2014) [E1]
2012 Askland HH, Gajendran T, Brewer GJ, 'Project organisations as organisational fields: An exploration of construction projects through Pierre Bourdieu's Theory of Practice', Working Paper Proceedings. Engineering Project Organizations Conference, Rheden, The Netherlands (2012) [E1]
Co-authors Thayaparan Gajendran, Graham Brewer
2012 Mackee J, Askland HH, Askew L, 'Maintaining place: Resilience as a means of protecting cultural built heritage in the face of natural disasters, a theoretical overview', RICS COBRA 2012, Las Vegas, Nevada (2012) [E1]
Co-authors Jamie Mackee
2012 Jones WM, Askland HH, 'Design briefs: Is there a standard', Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Engineering & Product Design Education, Antwerp, Belgium (2012) [E1]
Citations Scopus - 2
2012 Gajendran T, Askland HH, Dainty A, Brewer GJ, 'Cognitive interests, epistemological space and aspirational identity: How does identity form part of construction?', Conference Proceedings Joint CIB International Symposium of W055, WO65, WO89, W118, TG76, TG78, TG81 and TG84: International Congress on Construction Management Research, Montreal, Canada (2012) [E1]
Co-authors Graham Brewer, Thayaparan Gajendran
2012 Askland HH, 'My life as a chameleon', The University of Queensland (2012)
2011 Ostwald M, Askland HH, Williams AP, 'Assessing creativity as an aspired learning outcome: A four-part model', Conference Proceedings 45th Annual Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association, Sydney, NSW (2011) [E1]
2011 Askland HH, Williams AP, Ostwald M, 'Teaching creative design: A challenging field', Proceedings of the Desire'11 Conference: Creativity and Innovation in Design, Eindhoven, The Netherlands (2011) [E1]
DOI 10.1145/2079216.2079237
2011 Askland HH, Williams AP, Ostwald M, 'Finding common ground: A disciplinary approach to creativity', Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education (EPDE2011), London (2011) [E1]
2011 Askland HH, Ostwald M, Williams AP, 'Assessing creativity: Proposition', Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education (EPDE2011), London (2011) [E1]
Citations Scopus - 1
2011 Williams AP, Ostwald M, Askland HH, 'In search for unity: Finding a disciplinary approach to design creativity', Proceedings of IASDR2011, 4th World Conference on Design Research, Delft, The Netherlands (2011) [E1]
2010 Askland HH, Ostwald M, Williams AP, 'Changing conceptualisations of creativity in design', Proceedings of the DESIRE'10 Conference: Creativity and Innovation in Design, Aarhus, Denmark (2010) [E1]
2010 Williams AP, Ostwald M, Askland HH, 'The design studio, models of creativity and the education of future designers', Proceedings of the DESIRE'10 Conference: Creativity and Innovation in Design, Aarhus, Denmark (2010) [E1]
2010 Williams AP, Ostwald M, Askland HH, 'Assessing creativity in the context of architectural design education', Conference Proceedings. Design & Complexity: Design Research Society International Conference, Montreal (2010) [E1]
2010 Askland HH, 'Fighting for the homeland: East-Timorese refugees and the reproduction of locality in exile', Crisis and Imagination. EASA 11th Biennial Conference. Conference Programme and book of abstracts, Maynooth, Ireland (2010) [E3]
2010 Askland HH, Ostwald M, Williams AP, 'Creativity and design: An educational dilemma', On the Edge. Conference Papers of the 44th Annual Conference of ANZAScA, Auckland, NZ (2010) [E1]
2010 Williams AP, Askland HH, Ostwald M, 'Changes in students' attitudes toward architectural education', All Ireland Symposium on Built Environment Education. Abstracts and Papers, University of Ulster, Ireland (2010) [E1]
2010 Askland HH, Williams AP, Ostwald M, 'From ambiguity to complexity: Conceptualising creativity in the context of formal design education', Conference Proceedings: The First International Conference on Design Creativity (IDC2010), Kobe, Japan (2010) [E1]
Show 18 more conferences

Other (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Askland H, 'Place matters: Rocky Hill and social impact', Place matters: Rocky Hill and social impact: The Newcastle Herald (2019)
2017 Maguire AM, Askland H, 'Protesters fight invisible displacement by mine', : The Conversation (2017)
Co-authors Amy Maguire
2016 Askland HH, 'Communities in mining's shadow now a 'living hell'', (2016) [O1]
2016 Askland HH, 'What price can be placed on our future', (2016) [O1]
2013 Askland HH, Awad R, Chapman M, Johnson L, Nield L, 'Structures of architectural practice: an ethnographic study of architectural practice in Sydney', (2013)
Co-authors Michael Chapman
2010 Askland HH, 'Aust-timoresarar i Melbourne', ( pp.60-64) (2010)
2009 Askland H, Dibley T, 'East Timor Ten year after the Referendum', Special Edition: East Timor Ten Years after the Referendum (2009)
2009 Askland HH, Dibley T, Scambary J, Gutteling D, Parkinson C, Quinn M, Bexley A, 'Special Edition: East Timor Ten Year after the Referendum', (2009)
2009 Askland H, Dibley T, 'East Timor Ten year after the Referendum', Special Edition: East Timor Ten Years after the Referendum (2009)
2009 Askland HH, Dibley T, Scambary J, Gutteling D, Parkinson C, Quinn M, Bexley A, 'Special Edition: East Timor Ten Year after the Referendum', (2009)
Show 7 more others

Report (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Askland HH, Askew M, Hanley J, Sherval M, Farrugia D, Threadgold S, Coffey J, 'Local Attitudes to Changing Land Use - Narrabri Shire', NSW Departmment of Primary Industries, 113 (2016)
Co-authors Julia Coffey, David M Farrugia, Steven Threadgold, Meg Sherval, Joanne Hanley
2012 Williams A, Askland HH, 'Assessing Creativity: Strategies and Tools to Support Teaching and Learning in Architecture and Design (PP9-1288). Final Report' (2012)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 17
Total funding $416,378

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20192 grants / $106,568

Faculty matching funding for UON PRC Scheme 2019 - Centre for 21st Century Humanities$100,000

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle, Australia

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle, Australia
Project Team

Dr G Arrighi; Dr H Askland; Prof H Craig; Prof P Dwyer; A/Prof J Gulddal; A/Prof M Harvey; Prof V Haskins (Director); Prof M Johnson; A/Prof B Palmer; A/Prof T Pender; Prof L Ryan

Scheme Faculty Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Enabling Broader Low-Carbon Coalitions$6,568

Visions of the future of energy technology vary significantly within and across societies, both among experts and among the public. More often than not, such visions are driven by ‘hypes’ around a particular technology, be it carbon capture and storage (CCS), long-distance electricity interconnectors or microgrids (Martínez Arranz 2015, 2016; Zervos, Lins and Muth 2010). With anthropogenic climate change calling for urgent action and a move away from a fossil-fuel dependent energy sector to renewables or low-carbon intensive technologies, it is important to gain a better understanding how such visions are created, circulated and gain momentum.

Placed within an urgent context, where local, state and national governments need to act to ensure that emissions are reduced and climate targets are reached, energy debates have become highly polarised, creating pockets of local and global coalitions that support or reject distinct energy futures. These coalitions, what we in this project refer to as ‘advocacy coalitions’ (Sabatier and Jenkins-Smith 1988, 1993), consist ‘of actors from a variety of institutions who share a set of policy beliefs’ (Sabatier 2007: 8) seeking to set the agenda for energy policy and action. Understanding the mechanisms of these advocacy coalitions can help provide more robust low-carbon policies. This project seeks to develop a digital methodology to study these coalitions and their relations.

Funding body: Centre for 21st Century Humanities, University of Newcastle

Funding body Centre for 21st Century Humanities, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Dr Hedda Haugen Askland, Dr Alfonso Martínez Arranz

Scheme C21CH 2019 Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20182 grants / $101,745

Faculty matching funding for UON PRC Scheme - Centre for 21st Century Humanities$100,000

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Dr G Arrighi; Dr H Askland; Prof H Craig (Director); Prof P Dwyer; A/Prof J Gulddal; A/Prof M Harvey; Prof V Haskins; Prof M Johnson; Dr B Palmer; A/Prof T Pender; Prof L Ryan; Prof R Smith (Deputy Director).

Scheme Faculty funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Max Panck Institute for Social Anthropology, Germany, Guest Lecture 12 June 2018$1,745

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Hedda Askland

Scheme FEDUA Conference Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20172 grants / $63,700

Modelling climate change-driven human displacement in the Hunter region of NSW: An interdisciplinary assessment of risks and adaptation strategies$50,000

In 2014, more than 19.3 million people were displaced by disasters in 100 countries and since 2008, an average of 26.4 million people per year have been displaced by climate or weather-related events.i Climate change, the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC) argues, ‘in tandem with people’s increasing exposure and vulnerability, is expected to magnify this trend, as extreme weather events become more frequent and intense in the coming decades’.ii Whilst climate change and weather-related disasters mark the lives of people across the globe, the IDMC’s mapping shows that developing countries are consistently worse affected compared to developed countries. Discussion about ‘climate refugees’ or ‘environmental migrants’ accordingly tends to focus on the situation of people in developing countries. However, climate change is also having an impact on people in the developed world through extreme climate- and weather-events, droughts, desertification, sea level rise, and disruption of seasonal weather patterns.

The notion of climate change-induced displacement remains underexplored within the context of the developed world. This project will initiate an inquiry into climate change induced-displacement in Australia, using the Hunter Region of NSW as a case study. Cutting across conventional disciplinary boundaries, the project will draw on insights from engineering, information technology, law, public health and anthropology. By listening to the co-presence of diverse analytical perspectives, the researchers will seek collaborative moments driving new knowledge and a holistic understanding of risks and adaptation strategies in the context of climate change.iii Using climate models and projections of mobility and migration, the project will: (i) investigate how climate change may manifest within the lives of Hunter residents; (ii) assess risks of displacement; (iii) consider legal and logistical tools that are required to adapt to the projected climate reality; (iv) consider political tools for effective adaptation and mitigation; and (v) present a conceptual framework for understanding climate change induced displacement in the context of the Hunter, including how it relates to psychosocial and environmental distress.

Funding body: The University of Newcastle - Research and Innovation Division

Funding body The University of Newcastle - Research and Innovation Division
Project Team

Dr Hedda Haugen Askland, Dr Raymond Chiong, D Natalie, Lockart, Dr Amy Maguire, Dr Jane Rich

Scheme Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research and Innovation) Grant for Early Career Interdisciplinary Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Rural Land Use and Community Research Network$13,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Scheme FEDUA Strategic Networks and Pilot Projects (SNaPP)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20162 grants / $7,000

Eritalgia: Mining and the Disruption of Future Selves$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Scheme FEDUA Strategic Networks and Pilot Projects Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

EASA Biennial Conference 2016: Anthropological Legacies and Human Futures$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20154 grants / $97,865

Small Holdings Project$52,884

Funding body: NSW Department of Primary Industries

Funding body NSW Department of Primary Industries
Project Team Doctor Hedda Askland, Dr MICHAEL Askew
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501215
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON Y

Attitudes to Changing Land Use - the Narrabri Shire$25,000

Funding body: NSW Department of Primary Industries

Funding body NSW Department of Primary Industries
Project Team Doctor Hedda Askland, Doctor David Farrugia, Doctor Meg Sherval, Doctor Julia Coffey, Doctor Steven Threadgold, Dr MICHAEL Askew
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401491
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON Y

Newcastle Youth Studies Group - Theoretical Innovations and Challenges in Youth Sociology: One day symposium$15,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Doctor Steven Threadgold, Professor Pamela Nilan, Doctor Julia Coffey, Doctor David Farrugia, Doctor Hedda Askland
Scheme Strategic Networks Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500904
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

FEDUA New Staff Grant: Land use, kinship and migration: large-scale resource extraction and the question of home$4,981

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20141 grants / $15,000

Network for Youth Research Outside the Northern Metropole$15,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Pamela Nilan, Doctor Steven Threadgold, Conjoint Professor Andy Furlong, Doctor David Farrugia, Doctor Julia Coffey, Doctor Hedda Askland, Doctor Lena Rodriguez
Scheme Strategic Networks Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400957
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20124 grants / $24,500

Structures of Architectural Practice: an ethnographic study of six design practices in Sydney.$10,000

Funding body: NSW Architects Registration Board

Funding body NSW Architects Registration Board
Project Team Professor Michael Chapman, Doctor Hedda Askland, Mr Ramsey Awad, Associate Professor Lindsay Johnston, Professor Lawrence Nield
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200828
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Structures of Architectural Practice: an ethnographic study of six architectural design practices in Sydney$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Michael Chapman, Doctor Hedda Askland, Mr Ramsey Awad
Scheme Linkage Pilot Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1201026
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

New Staff Grant 2012$3,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Hedda Askland
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200558
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Australian Anthropological Society Conference 2012: Culture and Contest in a Material World, The University of Queensland, 26 -28 September 2012$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment
Project Team Doctor Hedda Askland
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1200931
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current7

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Indigeneity, Mining and Displacement: Adani and the Wangan and Jagalingou People PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD Animals, Politics and the Construction of Identity: Greyhound Racing in New South Wales PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Navigating the city and negotiating (un)employment: A study on the labouring subjectivities of Black African youth in Newcastle, Australia. PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Social work with male survivors of conflict-related sexual violence in Uganda: The experiences of practitioners and their intervention methods. PhD (Social Work), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD A Semiological Analysis of Ideological Mythology in Braun’s Post-war German Product Advertising PhD (Architecture), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Human Rights and Migration: Perspectives of Zimbabwean Migrants Living in Johannesburg, South Africa PhD (Social Work), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Everyday Witches: Identity and Community Among Young Australian Women Practising Witchcraft PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Being Healed: An Ethnography of Ayahuasca and the Self at the Temple of the Way of Light, Iquitos, Peru PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD The Tale of Two Schools: Design Technology, Digital Mediation and Aesthetic Dispositions within Architectural Design Education PhD (Architecture), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Beyond Resettlement as Refugee: Enduring and Emerging Dimensions of 'Displacement' as Cosmological Rupture for Central African Refugee Women PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Projects

Modelling climate change-driven human displacement in the Hunter region of NSW: An interdisciplinary assessment of risks and adaptation strategies 2017 -

The notion of climate change-induced displacement remains underexplored within the context of the developed world. This project will initiate an inquiry into climate change induced-displacement in Australia, using the Hunter Region of NSW as a case study. Cutting across conventional disciplinary boundaries, the project will draw on insights from engineering, information technology, law, public health and anthropology. By listening to the co-presence of diverse analytical perspectives, the researchers will seek collaborative moments driving new knowledge and a holistic understanding of risks and adaptation strategies in the context of climate change. Using climate models and projections of mobility and migration, the project will: (i) investigate how climate change may manifest within the lives of Hunter residents; (ii) assess risks of displacement; (iii) consider legal and logistical tools that are required to adapt to the projected climate reality; (iv) consider political tools for effective adaptation and mitigation; and (v) present a conceptual framework for understanding climate change induced displacement in the context of the Hunter, including how it relates to psychosocial and environmental distress. 

Grants

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research and Innovation) Grant for Early Career Interdisciplinary Research

Funding body: The University of Newcastle - Research and Innovation Division

Funding body The University of Newcastle - Research and Innovation Division
Scheme Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research and Innovation) Grant for Early Career Interdisciplinary Research

Collaborators

Name Organisation
Doctor Natalie Anne Lockart University of Newcastle
Doctor Hedda Haugen Askland University of Newcastle
Doctor Jane Louise Rich University of Newcastle
Doctor Raymond Jun Wen Chiong University of Newcastle

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News

Farmers face unexpected challenges as they navigate modern life on the land

November 7, 2019

As drought concerns farmers across the country, new research has shown Australian farmers are facing other unexpected challenges as regional Australia continues to evolve and more people from cities escape to a life in the country.

Farmers face unexpected challenges as they navigate modern life on the land

October 30, 2019

As drought concerns farmers across the country, new research has shown Australian farmers are facing other unexpected challenges as regional Australia continues to evolve and more people from cities escape to a life in the country.

Anthropologist Dr Hedda Askland plays part in unprecedented anti coalmine case win

February 19, 2019

Dr Hedda Askland, has played a significant part in an unprecedented court case that has put a stop to the proposed Rocky Hill Coal Mine in the Gloucester Valley.

Rural Land Use and Community Research Network

June 22, 2017

the Rural Land Use and Community Research Network has been strengthened by Faculty funding.

Rural Neighbours in times of change: a two day symposium

May 26, 2017

The Rural Land Use and Community Research Network brings together local and international scholars working in the area of rural land use.

FEDUA's Centre for Social Research and Regional Futures wins tender

August 24, 2016

A research team led by FEDUA’s Centre for Social Research and Regional Futures successfully tendered for a position on a Govt panel for research services.

Dr Hedda Askland

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Humanities and Social Science
Faculty of Education and Arts

Focus area

Sociology and Anthropology

Contact Details

Email hedda.askland@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 7067
Fax (02) 4921 6933
Link Twitter

Office

Room W344
Building Behavioural Science
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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