Dr Alicia Kulczynski

Dr Alicia Kulczynski

Senior Lecturer

Newcastle Business School (Marketing)

Consumers, concerts and crows feet

From the wrinkles in a brand ambassador’s smile, to the way the product name sounds in your mouth, Dr Alicia Kulczynski studies the underlying factors that motivate consumer attitudes and behaviour.

Alicia is currently the Head of the Marketing and Tourism Discipline in the Newcastle Business School, and a Senior Lecturer of Marketing at the University of Newcastle.

Utilising her research expertise in consumer behaviour, branding, and advertising, Alicia designs marketing experiments that show how consumers react and behave in response to advertising and branding stimuli.

“I conduct engaged research with both local and international SME’s that is of value to end users, and I have conducted impactful research that has influenced the development of strategies and marketing efforts for large, international brands,” Alicia explains.

An early career researcher with an impressive collaboration and publication record, Alicia has published in international academic journals such as the International Journal of Research in Marketing, European Journal of Marketing, Psychology & Marketing and Journal of Brand Management.

The science of perception

Tracing Alicia’s career trajectory gives insight into how she became expert at this very specific science.

She first obtained undergraduate degrees in both Science (Forensic) and Arts (Communication Studies) from the University of Newcastle, then seamlessly combined these seemingly disparate interests to become a leading expert in consumer response, earning a PhD in Management (Marketing) in 2014.

“The thing that motivates me or excites me the most about my research is I get to combine my love for design with my academic ability and knowledge in marketing,” Alicia says.

Associate Professor Jasmina Ilicic (Monash) and Stacey Baxter (University of Sydney) are close collaborators with Alicia. After uniting as unknowns at an Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference in 2012, the three bonded over similar research interests. They have built an international reputation in record time working hard on fascinating aspects of the nuances of marketing.

Sourcing authenticity

Three specific areas of consumer response research make up the majority of Alicia’s study – the largest being understanding the influence of spokesperson characteristics on consumer evaluations of marketing communications.

A particularly interesting focus of Alicia’s is on the smile in relation to endorsement authenticity. Alicia and her collaborators have made significant advances in this area, finding it was possible to boost consumer perceptions of celebrity genuineness through the use of a particular smile in advertising.

“In relation to spokesperson and celebrity characteristics I have examined the effect of smiling, and the types of smiles, facial characteristics such as symmetry, characteristics of eyes, and hair colour, to name a few, on consumer evaluations of concepts such as genuineness, purity and source trustworthiness, source authenticity, attachment, and source credibility,” Alicia says.

“These in turn have flow on attitudinal and behavioural effects with implications for marketing practice.”

Valuing words and music

A second area of expertise for Alicia is the use of psycholinguistics (sounds in words) in branding. Her work in this area includes collaborative investigations into the responses of children to pseudohompohone priming, and phonetic symbolism in branding.

“I have looked at how the sounds in words, names, and brand names influence consumer evaluations of product attributes,” Alicia says.

“Sounds in words and pictures can prime perceptions of attributes, brand meaning, attitudes, desire, and purchase intention.”

Thirdly, Alicia has studied consumer behaviour in relation to popular music concert attendance.

“This year I was contacted by the Director of Marketing and Communications for the world’s largest music festival brand with headquarters in Miami, Florida acknowledging my impact to changing practice in the field,” Alicia says.

It was very affirming to be told that my research works “particularly on motivations for concert attendance, have been invaluable in the development of our strategies and in organizing our marketing efforts” by Ultra Music Festival and Ultra Worldwide’s Albert Berdellans.

Marketing health

Whilst the majority of Alicia’s research is commercial and conducted to assist brand managers and advertisers, it spans many contexts, such as communicating with children, message strategies for promoting healthy eating, and cause related marketing.

Most recently, Alicia has been invited, as a consumer behaviour and marketing expert, to partner with a Swedish SME on a project on market investigation of a diabetes management system in Australia.

“For this project I will be leading activities that drive understanding the preferences of patients and health care professionals, including assessing consumer attitudes towards the diabetes technology, and intention to adopt the technology before introduction to the Australian market.”

Alicia’s end goal is to become a transdisciplinary expert, combining her STEMM mindset and research prowess with her ability to collaborate with a broader group of stakeholders in order to assist research in areas that will make a difference.

“All humans are consumers, and through my research I am able to gain a solid understanding of human behaviour.”

“Knowing their preferences and how humans respond to different kinds of stimuli is beneficial to many areas of research outside of marketing.”

Consumers, concerts and crows feet

From the wrinkles in a brand ambassador’s smile, to the way the product name sounds in your mouth, Dr Alicia Kulczynski studies the underlying factors that motivate consumer attitudes and behaviour.Alicia is currently the Head of the Marketing and Tourism…

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Career Summary

Biography

Alicia holds a PhD in Management (Marketing), and is a Senior Lecturer of Marketing for the Newcastle Business School at the University of Newcastle, Australia.

Alicia is currently the Head of the Marketing and Tourism Discipline in the Newcastle Business School. 

Alicia investigates consumer response to brand stimuli and advertising messages, with a focus on understanding the influence of spokesperson characteristics on consumer evaluations of marketing communications, and the use of psycho-linguistics in branding. Alicia has expertise in understanding consumer attitudes and behavior using experimental design, and has published in international academic journals such as the International Journal of Research in Marketing, European Journal of Marketing, Psychology & Marketing, Journal of Brand Management, Journal of Advertising Research, Marketing Letters, and Journal of Advertising. 



Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts (Communication Studies), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Forensic), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Advertising
  • Applied Marketing Research
  • Brand Development and Marketing
  • Branding
  • Consumer Psychology
  • Marketing Research
  • Phonetic Symbolism
  • Spokespeople

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified 80
150604 Tourism Marketing 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Casual Academic University of Newcastle
Newcastle Business School
Australia
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
Newcastle Business School
Australia
Casual Academic University of Newcastle
Newcastle Business School
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2013 Packers Prize, Best research poster in the Faculty of Business and Law Research Showcase
Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle

Research Award

Year Award
2018 Best Paper Award, Product and Brand Management Track, ANZMAC 2018
The University of Adelaide
2017 Faculty Early Career Research and Innovation Award
Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle
2017 Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Early Career Research and Innovation Excellence
The University of Newcastle
2015 Best Paper Award, Brand and Brand Management Track, ANZMAC 2015, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
ANZMAC
2010 Best Paper Award, Tourism, Sports, Arts and Heritage Marketing track, ANZMAC 2010, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
ANZMAC

Teaching Award

Year Award
2016 Faculty Teaching Excellence Award
The University of Newcastle
2016 Vice Chancellor's Award for Teaching Excellence and Contribution to Student Learning
The University of Newcastle
2011 Excellence in Online Postgraduate Coursework Teaching Award
Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle
2009 Excellence in Teaching by Sessional Staff
Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle

Thesis Examinations

Year Level Discipline Thesis
2018 Honours Business Using the F-word: Hashtags and Online Social Movements
2014 Honours Business ‘Product placements don’t impact my attitudes, I don’t even process them!’: Examining how product-placement prominence and cognitive load collectively influence attitudes towards a brand
2013 Honours Business Fan Loyalty: The Influence of Sports Involvement and Fan Identification in Australian Sport
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.

Highlighted Publications

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Kulczynski A, Baxter SM, Young T, 'Measuring Motivations for Popular Music Concert Attendance', Event Management: an international journal, 20 239-254 (2016) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Stacey Baxter, Tamara Young
2016 Kulczynski A, Ilicic J, Baxter SM, 'When Your Source Is Smiling, Consumers May Automatically Smile with You: Investigating the Source Expressive Display Hypothesis', Psychology and Marketing, 33 5-19 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/mar.20857
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2017 Kulczynski A, Ilicic J, Baxter SM, 'Pictures are grate! Examining the effectiveness of pictorialbased homophones on consumer judgments', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN MARKETING, 34 286-301 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ijresmar.2016.07.002
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2018 Ilicic J, Kulczynski A, Baxter S, 'How a Smile Can Make a Difference: Enhancing the Persuasive Appeal Of Celebrity Endorsers: Boosting Consumer Perceptions of Celebrity Genuineness Through the Use of a Duchenne Smile in Advertising', Journal of Advertising Research, 58 51-64 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.2501/JAR-2016-003
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Stacey Baxter

Journal article (26 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Hook M, Baxter S, Kulczynski A, ' I'm like you, you're like me, we make a great brand community! Similarity and children's brand community participation.', Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, 52 (2020)

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd Moving beyond a common brand interest, homophily is employed to understand the impact of characteristic similarity between child members of a brand community o... [more]

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd Moving beyond a common brand interest, homophily is employed to understand the impact of characteristic similarity between child members of a brand community on attitudes toward the brand community and community participation desire. Three experimental studies were undertaken, assessing member similarity, respect, and member deviance with relation to brand community attitudes and participation desire. Results suggest greater similarity enhances children's attitudes toward the community and participation desire, explained by an increased respect towards the community. When a community member is deviant (disloyal), respect, and subsequently attitudes and participation desire, decline. By introducing homophily to child-oriented brand communities; this research contributes to the sparse literature, with results highlighting marketers should emphasize member similarity when promoting brand communities aimed at children.

DOI 10.1016/j.jretconser.2019.101895
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2019 Ilicic J, Baxter SM, Kulczynski A, 'Keeping it real: examining the influence of co-branding authenticity in cause-related marketing', Journal of Brand Management, 26 49-59 (2019) [C1]

© 2018, Macmillan Publishers Ltd., part of Springer Nature. We introduce co-branding authenticity (genuine and real) as a driver of consumer intentions to purchase cause-related p... [more]

© 2018, Macmillan Publishers Ltd., part of Springer Nature. We introduce co-branding authenticity (genuine and real) as a driver of consumer intentions to purchase cause-related products. We argue that celebrity social responsibility influences the perceived authenticity of triadic co-branding partnerships (celebrity, brand, and cause). Across three experiments, we demonstrate that celebrity social responsibility increases perceptions of co-branding authenticity, which, in turn, enhances purchase intentions of cause-related products. We demonstrate that co-branding authenticity is a stronger predictor of purchase intentions of cause-related products than co-branding fit. We also determine that the effect of co-branding authenticity on the purchase intention of cause-related products is influenced by consumer self-transcendence values. Consumers high in self-transcendence (i.e., concerned with the welfare of other people) possess greater intentions to purchase the cause-related product when the celebrity is perceived as socially responsible and the co-branding partnership is perceived as authentic. This research has important ramifications for brand managers in the selection of partners with which to form a triadic co-branding partnership for the purpose of enhancing corporate social responsibility.

DOI 10.1057/s41262-018-0109-1
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2018 Ilicic J, Baxter S, Kulczynski A, 'Pseudohomophones as brand names: Prioritising the emotionally interesting homophone', European Journal of Marketing, 52 1909-1930 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1108/EJM-07-2017-0485
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2018 Ilicic J, Baxter SM, Kulczynski A, 'Spot the difference: examining facial characteristics that enhance spokesperson effectiveness', European Journal of Marketing, 52 348-366 (2018) [C1]

© 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: This research aims to examine the effect of spokesperson facial symmetry on advertisement attitude, brand attitude and purchase intent... [more]

© 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: This research aims to examine the effect of spokesperson facial symmetry on advertisement attitude, brand attitude and purchase intention and the mediating role of source authenticity on attitudinal and behavioral judgments. Design/methodology/approach: Two studies were undertaken. Study 1 examined the effect of facial symmetry on source authenticity and endorsement effectiveness. Study 2 investigated the influence of the authentic facial cues of freckles and moles on source authenticity and advertisement attitude, brand attitude and purchase intention. Findings: Findings indicate that source authenticity is the mechanism that explains attitudinal and behavioral judgments toward advertisements featuring asymmetrical spokespeople. The phenomenon observed is due to a proposed source authenticity overgeneralization effect, whereby spokespeople with asymmetrical faces are perceived as more genuine and real which, subsequently, results in more positive attitude toward the advertisement, attitude toward the brand and greater purchase intention than advertisements featuring spokespeople with symmetrical faces. The addition of authentic (biological) facial cues (i.e. freckles and moles) on spokespeople with a symmetrical facial structure, however, can heighten perceptions of source authenticity and the manifestation of the source authenticity overgeneralization effect. Research limitations/implications: This research has implications for marketing managers in the selection and depiction of spokespeople in their advertisements. However, this research is limited, as it only examines the facial feature characteristics of symmetry, freckles, and moles. Originality/value: This research shows that an asymmetrical facial structure can positively influence source, attitudinal and behavioral judgments. This research also identifies that although symmetrical facial structures dilute source- and endorsement-based judgments, the addition of authentic facial cues, freckles and moles, can reverse the negative effects and enhance perceptions of source authenticity, attitude toward the advertisement, attitude toward the brand and purchase intentions.

DOI 10.1108/EJM-03-2017-0226
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2018 Baxter SM, Ilicic J, Kulczynski A, 'Roses are red, violets are blue, sophisticated brands have a Tiffany Hue: The effect of iconic brand color priming on brand personality judgments', Journal of Brand Management, 25 384-394 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 Macmillan Publishers Ltd., part of Springer Nature. Iconic brand color priming is introduced as a cue to consumer perceptions of brand personality. Although previous resear... [more]

© 2017 Macmillan Publishers Ltd., part of Springer Nature. Iconic brand color priming is introduced as a cue to consumer perceptions of brand personality. Although previous research has examined generic color meanings (e.g., purple is exciting, gray is passive and dull, and blue is competent), we demonstrate an iconic (widely recognized and well-established) brand color associative priming process. Through three experiments, we show that the personality tied to an iconic brand color can be created by brand managers, learned by consumers, and leveraged by other brands. Study 1 provides evidence that consumers perceived the iconic Cadbury purple, as opposed to a generic purple color, as sincere, aligning with consumer perceptions of the brand. Study 2 shows that exposure to a brand color prime (Apple gray), compared to a generic gray, influences brand personality perceptions (i.e., excitement) for an unknown brand. In Study 3, a schema congruity brand color priming effect is observed, whereby brand color priming enhancement occurs only when a brand color prime is placed in a product category that is congruent. When the brand color prime is incongruent with the product category schema, the priming effect weakens. This research provides evidence that brand personality can be primed, or leveraged, through embedding iconic brand colors within brand communications.

DOI 10.1057/s41262-017-0086-9
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2018 Hook M, Baxter S, Kulczynski A, 'Antecedents and consequences of participation in brand communities: A literature review', Journal of Brand Management, 25 277-292 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 Macmillan Publishers Ltd., part of Springer Nature. With hundreds of articles dedicated to investigating brand communities, there is now a need to consolidate the literatur... [more]

© 2017 Macmillan Publishers Ltd., part of Springer Nature. With hundreds of articles dedicated to investigating brand communities, there is now a need to consolidate the literature. This review addresses the need to reconcile the findings of brand community participation literature through undertaking a literature review. Over 1900 articles were examined, 41 in detail. Findings reveal that three forms of brand community participation have been studied: offline, online, and social-media-based, each uncovering the antecedents and consequences of brand community participation. Antecedents were grouped into five categories (self-related, social-related, information-related, entertainment-related and technology-related) and consequences into three categories (brand-related, brand community-related, and social-related). From the review, several future research directions are uncovered, including 16 specific research questions. By scrutinising the vast literature on brand community participation, and presenting multiple avenues for future research, this review presents findings useful for academics and practitioners alike.

DOI 10.1057/s41262-017-0079-8
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2018 Ilicic J, Baxter SM, Kulczynski A, 'To Meet or Meat? Homophones in Advertising Encourage Judgments and Behaviors in Children', Journal of Advertising, 47 378-394 (2018) [C1]

© 2018, © 2018, American Academy of Advertising. Despite research on the influence of homophone priming on consumer judgments and behaviors in adults (e.g., the homophone bye prim... [more]

© 2018, © 2018, American Academy of Advertising. Despite research on the influence of homophone priming on consumer judgments and behaviors in adults (e.g., the homophone bye primes purchase; target: buy), there is no research to date on the effectiveness of homophone priming on children¿s judgments and behaviors. We examine the priming effect of homophonous devices in advertising on children¿s (aged six to 13) judgments and behaviors (i.e., the use of the word meet in advertising primes children¿s desire to eat chicken; target: meat). Across three studies we provide evidence that homophonous priming effects decrease with age, whereby younger and less skilled child readers focus on the phonology of words, which results in homophone priming. We show that older and more skilled child readers are better able to process the orthography (spelling) of a word and the meaning of the prime, resulting in homophone priming suppression. We illustrate that facilitating, or prompting, spelling verification in younger children results in their ability to disambiguate the word¿s meaning and, subsequently, suppress the irrelevant homophone. This research has implications for advertisers in terms of the execution of their advertisements to influence young children¿s judgments and behaviors.

DOI 10.1080/00913367.2018.1539361
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2018 Ilicic J, Kulczynski A, Baxter S, 'How a Smile Can Make a Difference: Enhancing the Persuasive Appeal Of Celebrity Endorsers: Boosting Consumer Perceptions of Celebrity Genuineness Through the Use of a Duchenne Smile in Advertising', Journal of Advertising Research, 58 51-64 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.2501/JAR-2016-003
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2017 Baxter SM, Ilicic J, Kulczynski A, Lowrey TM, 'Using sublexical priming to enhance brand name phonetic symbolism effects in young children', Marketing Letters, 28 565-577 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11002-017-9430-9
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2017 Baxter S, Ilicic J, Kulczynski A, 'You see Froot, you think fruit: examining the effectiveness of pseudohomophone priming', European Journal of Marketing, 51 885-902 (2017) [C1]

© 2017, © Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: This paper aims to introduce pseudohomophone phonological priming effects (non-words that sound like real words with a single semant... [more]

© 2017, © Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: This paper aims to introduce pseudohomophone phonological priming effects (non-words that sound like real words with a single semantic representation, such as Whyte primes white) on consumers¿ product attribute and benefit-based judgments. Design/methodology/approach: Four studies were conducted. Study 1 examines whether pseudohomophone brand names (e.g. Whyte) prime associative meaning (i.e. the perception of light bread; target: white). Study 2 investigates the pseudohomophone priming process. In Study 3, the authors examine the influence of brand knowledge of pseudohomophone priming effects. Findings: The findings indicate that pseudohomophone brand names prime associative meaning, due to retrieval of phonology (sound) of the word during processing. Pseudohomophone priming effects for a semantically (meaningful) incongruent brand name manifest only when consumers do not have knowledge of the brand, with cognitive capacity constraints rendering consumers with strong brand knowledge unable to mitigate the pseudohomophone priming effect. Research limitations/implications: This research has implications for brand managers considering the creation of a name for a new brand that connotes product attributes and benefits. However, this research is limited, as it only examines pseudohomophone brand names with a single semantic representation. Originality/value: This research shows that sounds activated by pseudohomophones in brand names can influence product judgments. This research also identifies limitations of the applicability of pseudohomophone brand names by identifying a condition under which priming effects are attenuated.

DOI 10.1108/EJM-01-2016-0038
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2017 Hook M, Baxter S, Kulczynski A, 'Antecedents and Consequences of Children's Brand Community Participation: A Replication and Extension Study', Journal of Marketing Behavior, 3 63-72 (2017)
DOI 10.1561/107.00000042
2017 Kulczynski A, Ilicic J, Baxter SM, 'Pictures are grate! Examining the effectiveness of pictorialbased homophones on consumer judgments', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN MARKETING, 34 286-301 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ijresmar.2016.07.002
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2016 Kulczynski A, Baxter SM, Young T, 'Measuring Motivations for Popular Music Concert Attendance', Event Management: an international journal, 20 239-254 (2016) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Stacey Baxter, Tamara Young
2016 Baxter SM, Kulczynski A, Ilicic J, 'Ads aimed at dads: Exploring consumers reactions towards advertising that conforms and challenges traditional gender role ideologies', International Journal of Advertising, 35 970-982 (2016)

© 2015 Advertising Association. Employing gender role ideology theory, this research investigates Australian consumer attitudes towards current advertisements portraying males as ... [more]

© 2015 Advertising Association. Employing gender role ideology theory, this research investigates Australian consumer attitudes towards current advertisements portraying males as caregivers. Results of an experiment demonstrate that consumers perceive in-ad gender role portrayals of males as caregivers as atypical of the current advertising environment. Consumers who, in particular, hold a non-traditional (egalitarian) gender role ideology report a more positive attitude towards advertising that challenges traditional gender role ideologies (i.e., advertising that depicts males as caregivers). We suggest that non-traditional advertising that challenges traditional gender roles provides advertisers with an opportunity to stand out; however, advertisers must ensure that their key product-related message components are not overshadowed.

DOI 10.1080/02650487.2015.1077605
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2016 Baxter SM, Kulczynski A, Ilicic J, 'Ads aimed at dads: exploring consumers' reactions towards advertising that conforms and challenges traditional gender role ideologies', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ADVERTISING, 35 970-982 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/2650487.2015.1077605
Citations Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2016 Kulczynski A, Ilicic J, Baxter SM, 'When Your Source Is Smiling, Consumers May Automatically Smile with You: Investigating the Source Expressive Display Hypothesis', Psychology and Marketing, 33 5-19 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/mar.20857
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2016 Hook M, Baxter SM, Kulczynski A, 'Children's participation in brand-based social networks: Examining the role of evaluative social identity, self-esteem and anticipated emotions on commitment and desire to recommend', International Journal of Consumer Studies, 40 552-561 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ijcs.12300
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2016 Ilicic J, Baxter SM, Kulczynski, 'White eyes are the window to the pure soul: Metaphorical association and overgeneralization effects for spokespeople with limbal rings', International Journal of Research in Marketing, 33 840-855 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ijresmar.2016.02.001
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2016 Ilicic J, Baxter SM, Kulczynski A, 'The impact of age on consumer attachment to celebrities and endorsed brand attachment', Journal of Brand Management, 23 273-288 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1057/bm.2016.5
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2015 Baxter S, Ilicic J, Kulczynski A, 'What s in a name? Examining the effect of phonetic fit between spokesperson name and product attributes on source credibility', Marketing Letters, 26 525-534 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11002-014-9287-0
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2015 Wyllie J, Baxter SM, Kulczynski A, 'Healthy Kids: Examining the Effect of Message Framing and Polarity on Children's Attitudes and Behavioral Intentions', Journal of Advertising, 44 140-150 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/00913367.2015.1018462
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Stacey Baxter, Jessica Wyllie
2015 Baxter SM, Ilicic J, Kulczynski A, Lowrey T, 'Communicating product size using sound and shape symbolism', Journal of Product and Brand Management, 24 472-480 (2015) [C1]

© Emerald Group Publishing Limited Purpose ¿ The purpose of this paper is to investigate children¿s perception of a product¿s physical attribute (size) when presented with brand e... [more]

© Emerald Group Publishing Limited Purpose ¿ The purpose of this paper is to investigate children¿s perception of a product¿s physical attribute (size) when presented with brand elements (brand name and brand logo) manipulated using sound and shape symbolism principles (brand name sounds and brand logo shape), across children of different developmental ages. Design/methodology/approach ¿ The relationship between sounds and shapes was examined in a pilot study. A 2 _ 2 experiment was then undertaken to examine the effect of brand name characteristics (front vowel sound versus back vowel sound) and brand logo design (angular versus curved) on children¿s (from 5 to 12 years) product-related judgments. Findings ¿ Older children use non-semantic brand stimuli as a means to infer physical product attributes. Specifically, only older children are able to perceive a product to be smaller (larger) when the product is paired with a brand name containing a front (back) vowel sound or an angular (curved) brand logo (single symbolic cue). We illustrate that brand logo-related shape symbolism effects are weaker and appear later in age when compared with brand name-related sound symbolism effects. Further, younger children are able to infer product attribute meaning when exposed to two symbolic cues (that is, brand name and brand logo). Practical implications ¿ When selecting an inventive brand element, consideration should be given to the relationship between the vowel sounds contained in a brand¿s name and product attributes, and also the shape of the brand¿s logo and product attributes. Originality/value ¿ This is the first experiment undertaken to examine the combination of brand name- and brand logo-related symbolism effects in the context of children. We demonstrate that age-based bounds may be overcome through the provision of multiple symbolic cues.

DOI 10.1108/JPBM-11-2014-0748
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2015 Ilicic J, Baxter SM, Kulczynski A, 'Names versus faces: Examining spokesperson-based congruency effects in advertising', European Journal of Marketing, 49 62-81 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1108/EJM-10-2013-0579
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2014 Baxter SM, Kulczynski A, Ilicic J, 'Revisiting the automaticity of phonetic symbolism effects', International Journal of Research in Marketing, 31 448-451 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier B.V. This research extends our understanding of the automaticity of phonetic symbolism judgments for adults and children. Replicating Study 2 from Yorkston and Men... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier B.V. This research extends our understanding of the automaticity of phonetic symbolism judgments for adults and children. Replicating Study 2 from Yorkston and Menon (2004), we demonstrate that phonetic-based inferences are automatic and relatively effortless for adults, but not for children. Phonetic symbolism effects have a developmental grounding, with initial phonetic-based judgments not present in younger children (6 to 9. years). Older children (10 to 13. years), however, demonstrate phonetic-based effects only when cognitive constraints are not imposed.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijresmar.2014.08.002
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2012 Perkins AA, 'How devoted are you? An examination of online music fan behaviour', Annals of Leisure Research, 15 354-365 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/11745398.2012.737301
Citations Scopus - 7
2012 Baxter SM, Perkins AA, 'The presence of violent messages in child-oriented magazine advertising: Considerations for Australian advertising guidelines', Marketing Bulletin, 23 1-8 (2012) [C1]
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
Show 23 more journal articles

Conference (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Dean AM, Griffin M, Kulczynski A, 'Applying Service Logic to Education: The Co-creation Experience and Value Outcomes', IRSSM-6: THE 6TH INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM IN SERVICE MANAGEMENT - SERVICE IMPERATIVES IN THE NEW ECONOMY: SERVICE EXCELLENCE FOR SUSTAINABILITY, Kuching, MALAYSIA (2016) [E1]
DOI 10.1016/j.sbspro.2016.05.383
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Alison Dean
2012 Perkins AA, 'Exploring motivations for popular music concert attendance', ANZMAC 2012 Proceedings, Adelaide (2012) [E1]
2010 Baxter SM, Perkins AA, 'Examining the nature of Australian child-directed magazine advertising', ANZMAC 2010. Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference 2010 - 'Doing More with Less', Canterbury, NZ (2010) [E1]
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2010 Perkins AA, 'Identification in popular music: A netnographic exploration of online fan communities', ANZMAC 2010. Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference 2010 - 'Doing More with Less', Canterbury, NZ (2010) [E1]
Show 1 more conference
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 9
Total funding $61,940

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20161 grants / $20,000

Priority Research Initiative: Social Marketing Research Team for Youth (SMRTY)$20,000

Funding body: Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Stacey Baxter (University of Newcastle), Jasmina Ilicic (Monash University), Associate Profesor Erica James (University of Newcastle), Alicia Kulczynski (University of Newcastle) and Sonia Vilches-Montero (University of Newcastle)

Scheme Priority Research Initiative
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20153 grants / $22,020

Phonological Priming in Children$10,000

Funding body: Newcastle Business School - The University of Newcaslte

Funding body Newcastle Business School - The University of Newcaslte
Project Team

Stacey Baxter (Chief Investigator, University of Newcastle), Alicia Kulczynski (University of Newcastle) and Jasmina Ilicic (Monash University)

Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

To Pair, Peir, or Pear? Examining the Effectiveness of Homophonous Priming in Children$9,020

Funding body: Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Alicia Kulczynski (Chief Investigator, University of Newcastle), Stacey Baxter (University of Newcastle) and Jasmina Ilicic (Monash University)

Scheme Faculty Research Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Measuring Doctor Satisfaction with General Practice Doctor Surgeries$3,000

Funding body: Blackbutt Doctors Surgery

Funding body Blackbutt Doctors Surgery
Project Team Doctor Alicia Kulczynski, Doctor Stacey Baxter, Dr Jasmina Ilicic
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500823
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20144 grants / $12,650

Eyes are the Window to the Soul$3,650

Funding body: Newcastle Business School - The University of Newcaslte

Funding body Newcastle Business School - The University of Newcaslte
Project Team

Stacey Baxter (Chief Investigator, University of Newcastle), Alicia Kulczynski (University of Newcastle) and Jasmina Ilicic (Monash University)

Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Guidelines for selecting and modifying typeface used in wordmarks$3,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Alicia Kulczynski
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301303
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Guidelines for Selecting and Modifying Typeface used in Wordmarks$3,000

Funding body: Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Spokespeople in Advertising$3,000

Funding body: School of Marketing and Management - University of Adelaide | Australia

Funding body School of Marketing and Management - University of Adelaide | Australia
Project Team

Jasmina Ilicic (Chief Investigator, University of Adelaide), Stacey Baxter (University of Newcastle) and Alicia Kulczynski (University of Newcastle)

Scheme School of Marketing and Management Competitive Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20131 grants / $7,270

Phonetic Symbolism and Brand Congruence$7,270

Funding body: Newcastle Business School - The University of Newcaslte

Funding body Newcastle Business School - The University of Newcaslte
Project Team

Stacey Baxter (Chief Investigator), Alicia Kulczynski (University of Newcastle), Jasmina Ilicic (University of Adelaide) and Tina Lowrey (HEC Paris)

Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current5

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 PhD Brands as Social Justice Warriors: The Effect on Consumer Attitudes and Behaviours PhD (Management), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2019 PhD How Social Media Promotes Entrepreneurship in the Women of Saudi Arabia PhD (Management), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD The Influence Optimum Stimulation Level has on Touchpoints, as a Consumer Searches for Information and Evaluates Alternatives within an Omni-Channel Context PhD (Management), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Celebrity-brands: Examining the impact of celebrity authenticity and celebrity-brand investment on consumer attitudes and behavioural intentions. PhD (Management), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD The Effects of Social Media-Expressed Complaints on the Firm PhD (Management), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Understanding the Factors Influencing Children’s Participation in Brand Communities
Received University of Newcastle, Faculty of Business and Law 2018 Thesis Excellence Award
PhD (Management), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 Professional Doctorate A Study of Consumers’ Upgrade Intention of High-Technology Products Marketing, Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Sole Supervisor
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News

When you’re smiling, the whole world buys with you

May 7, 2018

The power of a genuine smile has been proven, with research from the University of Newcastle and Monash University showing a ‘genuine’ smile from a celebrity endorser can boost product likeability and even improve consumer attitude toward a celebrity

Dr Alicia Kulczynski

Positions

Senior Lecturer
Newcastle Business School
Faculty of Business and Law

Casual Academic
Newcastle Business School
Faculty of Business and Law

Casual Academic
Newcastle Business School
Faculty of Business and Law

Focus area

Marketing

Contact Details

Email alicia.kulczynski@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 6805

Office

Room X-720
Building NeW Space
Location City Campus

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