Dr Justin Ellis

Dr Justin Ellis

Lecturer

School of Humanities and Social Science

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Justin Ellis is a lecturer in Criminology. His research examines the impact of digital technologies on trust in public institutions. His current focus is the scrutiny of public order policing through sousveillance within the LGBTIQ+ community in Sydney. His broader research focus is on the impact of digital technologies on institutional accountability and responsible government. His scholarship has been published in high-ranking internationally peer-reviewed journal Policing and Society and award-winning anthropology publication Kyoto Journal. Justin has over five years’ experience researching and lecturing in Criminology at three universities – the University of Sydney, the University of New South Wales and University of Technology, Sydney. His five years’ in legal affairs journalism in Sydney and close to 10 years living and working in Asia on sexual orientation and gender rights advocacy for Asia region publications provides him with a broad perspective on sexual citizenship and how this intersects with notions of crime, deviance and digital technology. Justin has peer reviewed for leading criminology journals Current Issues in Criminal Justice and New Media and Society. Justin is a member of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology, the Sydney Institute of Criminology, the American Society of Criminology and European Society of Criminology. He tweets @justRellis.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Sydney
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Sydney
  • Masters in Criminology, University of Sydney

Keywords

  • Communication technology
  • Criminology
  • LGBTIQ
  • accountability
  • digital media
  • journalism
  • legitimacy
  • policing
  • sousveillance
  • vulnerable populations

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
200102 Communication Technology and Digital Media Studies 40
160205 Police Administration, Procedures and Practice 30
160204 Criminological Theories 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
CRIM1020 Vicitimology
School of Humanities and Social Science - Faculty of Education and Arts - The University of Newcastle
A grounding in criminology requires the understanding of the interplay of two core components: the offender and the victim. Victimology, as the study of all aspects of victims and victimisation, has therefore developed as a sub-disciple of criminology, as the importance of the victim profile has been increasingly recognised both within academia and the criminal justice system more broadly. This course will help students cultivate a theoretical and practical understanding of the role of the victim in a variety of criminological contexts, with a focus on the application of this knowledge in a vocation environment, using contemporary examples to augment their understanding.
Co-ordinator 23/07/2019 - 31/12/2019
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Lee M, Ellis JR, 'Qualifying fear of crime: Multi-methods approaches', The Routledge International Handbook on Fear of Crime 155-169 (2017)
DOI 10.4324/9781315651781

Journal article (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Clancey G, Monchuk L, Anderson J, Ellis J, 'Lost in implementation: NSW police force crime prevention officer perspectives on crime prevention through environmental design', Crime Prevention and Community Safety, 20 139-153 (2018)

© 2018 Macmillan Publishers Ltd., part of Springer Nature. Crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) is practiced by various professions and agencies in many jurisdict... [more]

© 2018 Macmillan Publishers Ltd., part of Springer Nature. Crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) is practiced by various professions and agencies in many jurisdictions. The role police play in CPTED has received limited scrutiny from academics within Australia (and other countries). This article makes an important contribution to addressing this gap in the literature through providing New South Wales Police Force Crime Prevention Officers (CPOs) perspectives on their role in reviewing council development applications from a CPTED perspective. Findings show police-council relations vary considerably. Some police-council areas have clear policies in place to enable police to contribute to reviewing crime risks of development applications, whilst others do not. Many police feel their engagement in the planning and development process is often tokenistic, receiving limited feedback from councils about their recommendations. For these police, they see little ongoing relevance of reviewing development applications. If police are to remain involved, there is a need to develop clearer parameters of how police will contribute and what they can realistically be expected to contribute to this process.

DOI 10.1057/s41300-018-0043-x
2016 Ellis J, McGovern A, 'The end of symbiosis? Australia police media relations in the digital age', Policing and Society, 26 944-962 (2016)

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. As the police move further into areas of traditional journalistic practice, the ¿unhappy marriage¿ between the police and the media becomes more com... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. As the police move further into areas of traditional journalistic practice, the ¿unhappy marriage¿ between the police and the media becomes more complex. To what extent this symbiotic relationship has allowed for transparency has varied over time, subject to political, operational and technological change. While acknowledging the police premium on access to information, this relationship is further challenged by police oversight bodies, the spread of corporate mangerialism and media decentralisation. Through qualitative interviews with Australian police, crime, court and investigative journalists, we provide a fresh perspective on this relationship from the journalists' point of view. In particular we explore the impact of digital media, social media and mobile technology on this relationship integral to maintaining public confidence in the police. This research serves as the basis for further interrogation into police perceptions of the role of the media and how an increasingly mediated public sphere is influencing public confidence in the police.

DOI 10.1080/10439463.2015.1016942
Citations Scopus - 5
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Dr Justin Ellis

Position

Lecturer
School of Humanities and Social Science
School of Humanities and Social Science
Faculty of Education and Arts

Contact Details

Email justin.ellis@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5682

Office

Room MCG35
Building McMullin Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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