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Dr Craig Dalton

Conjoint Senior Lecturer

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Craig Dalton is a public health physician with a MMSc in Clinical Epidemiology from the University of Newcastle and is a graduate of the CDC Epidemic Intelligence Service, Atlanta, Georgia. He completed a Preventive Medicine Fellowship in the Foodborne and Diarrhoeal Disease Branch at CDC in 1995.

He is a public health physician employed with the NSW Government and conjoint senior lecturer in the School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle. My main experience is in health protection issues - communicable diseases and environmental health. He is director of www.flutracking.net - a national online survey of 16,000 participants every Monday morning in winter to track influenza-like illness.

He is course coordinator for Buddhist and other Contemplative Traditions RELT1022 at the University of Newcastle. He has a great interest in the underlying philosophy of public health and the exploration of eastern concepts of interdependence in developing such a philosophy, to this end I have been piloting a program of Contemplative Practice in Public Health for public health practitioners.

Research Expertise
Craig's research expertise is in areas of applied public health practice. He founded the national influenza-like illness surveillance system Flutracking.net and has expertise in influenza surveillance, foodborne disease epidemiology and environmental health impact assessment.

Teaching Expertise
Craig is the course coordinator for RELT1022 Buddhist and other Contemplative Traditions. 


Qualifications

  • Master of Medical Science, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Medicine, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • contemplative practice
  • public health

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
050204 Environmental Impact Assessment 20
111706 Epidemiology 35
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 45
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (58 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Cashman P, Moberley S, Dalton C, Stephenson J, Elvidge E, Butler M, Durrheim DN, 'Vaxtracker: Active on-line surveillance for adverse events following inactivated influenza vaccine in children.', Vaccine, 32 5503-5508 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.07.061
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors David Durrheim
2014 Cashman P, Moberley S, Dalton C, Stephenson J, Elvidge E, Butler M, Durrheim DN, 'Vaxtracker: Active on-line surveillance for adverse events following inactivated influenza vaccine in children', Vaccine, 32 5503-5508 (2014) [C1]

Vaxtracker is a web based survey for active post marketing surveillance of Adverse Events Following Immunisation. It is designed to efficiently monitor vaccine safety of new vacci... [more]

Vaxtracker is a web based survey for active post marketing surveillance of Adverse Events Following Immunisation. It is designed to efficiently monitor vaccine safety of new vaccines by early signal detection of serious adverse events. The Vaxtracker system automates contact with the parents or carers of immunised children by email and/or sms message to their smart phone. A hyperlink on the email and text messages links to a web based survey exploring adverse events following the immunisation. The Vaxtracker concept was developed during 2011 (n= 21), and piloted during the 2012 (n= 200) and 2013 (n= 477) influenza seasons for children receiving inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in the Hunter New England Local Health District, New South Wales, Australia. Survey results were reviewed by surveillance staff to detect any safety signals and compare adverse event frequencies among the different influenza vaccines administered. In 2012, 57% (n= 113) of the 200 participants responded to the online survey and 61% (290/477) in 2013. Vaxtracker appears to be an effective method for actively monitoring adverse events following influenza vaccination in children.

DOI 10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.07.061
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors David Durrheim
2014 Cashman P, Moberley S, Dalton C, Stephenson J, Elvidge E, Butler M, Durrheim DN, 'Vaxtracker: Active on-line surveillance for adverse events following inactivated influenza vaccine in children', Vaccine, 32 5503-5508 (2014)

Vaxtracker is a web based survey for active post marketing surveillance of Adverse Events Following Immunisation. It is designed to efficiently monitor vaccine safety of new vacci... [more]

Vaxtracker is a web based survey for active post marketing surveillance of Adverse Events Following Immunisation. It is designed to efficiently monitor vaccine safety of new vaccines by early signal detection of serious adverse events. The Vaxtracker system automates contact with the parents or carers of immunised children by email and/or sms message to their smart phone. A hyperlink on the email and text messages links to a web based survey exploring adverse events following the immunisation. The Vaxtracker concept was developed during 2011 (n= 21), and piloted during the 2012 (n= 200) and 2013 (n= 477) influenza seasons for children receiving inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in the Hunter New England Local Health District, New South Wales, Australia. Survey results were reviewed by surveillance staff to detect any safety signals and compare adverse event frequencies among the different influenza vaccines administered. In 2012, 57% (n= 113) of the 200 participants responded to the online survey and 61% (290/477) in 2013. Vaxtracker appears to be an effective method for actively monitoring adverse events following influenza vaccination in children.

DOI 10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.07.061
Co-authors David Durrheim
2014 Dalton C, Wilson S, 'Removing incongruence - or Academic assimilation?', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 8 248-249 (2014) [C3]
2013 Dalton CB, Carlson SJ, Butler MT, Elvidge E, Durrheim DN, 'Building Influenza Surveillance Pyramids in Near Real Time, Australia', Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19 1863-1865 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3201/eid1911.121878
Co-authors David Durrheim
2013 Carlson SJ, Dalton CB, Butler MT, Fejsa J, Elvidge E, Durrheim DN, 'Flutracking weekly online community survey of influenza-like illness annual report 2011 and 2012', Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report, 37 E398-E406 (2013) [C1]
Co-authors David Durrheim
2012 Hurt AC, Hardie K, Wilson NJ, Deng YM, Osbourn M, Leang SK, et al., 'Characteristics of a widespread community cluster of H275Y Oseltamivir-Resistant A (H1N1)pdm09 influenza in Australia', Journal of Infectious Diseases, 206 148-157 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 54Web of Science - 49
Co-authors Peter Wark, David Durrheim
2012 Dalton CB, 'The media and public health: Complexity, controversy and combat', Medical Journal of Australia, 197 546-547 (2012) [C3]
2012 Dalton CB, 'Banning retail tobacco sales: Time to start the discussion', Drug and Alcohol Review, 31 718-720 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2011 Dalton CB, Carlson SJ, Butler MT, Feisa J, Elvidge E, Durrheim DN, 'Flutracking weekly online community survey of influenza-like illness annual report, 2010.', Communicable diseases intelligence, 35 288-293 (2011) [C2]

Flutracking is a national weekly online survey of influenza-like illness (ILI) completed by community members. Flutracking integrates participants' ILI symptom information with th... [more]

Flutracking is a national weekly online survey of influenza-like illness (ILI) completed by community members. Flutracking integrates participants' ILI symptom information with their influenza vaccination status to monitor influenza activity and field vaccine effectiveness (FVE). This report summarises results from the 2010 Flutracking season compared with previous seasons. Nationally, participation in Flutracking has more than doubled between 2008 and 2010, with 5,346 new participants enrolled or recruited in 2010 and a peak weekly participation of 10,773. By the end of the 2010 season, 5,904 of 9,109 (64.8%) participants had received the monovalent pandemic vaccine and/or the 2010 seasonal vaccine. From 2007 to 2010 FVE calculations demonstrated that the seasonal vaccine was effective except in 2009 during the pandemic. Peak 2010 ILI activity occurred in early June and August, and peak weekly 2010 ILI rates (4.2% among unvaccinated participants) were lower than the peak ILI rates during the 2009 pandemic (6.0% among unvaccinated participants). However, the decrease in laboratory notifications was much larger than the decrease in Flutracking rates. In summary, the number of Flutracking participants continued to steadily increase over the 2010 influenza season. The system has shown value in providing weekly vaccination uptake data during and beyond the 2009 influenza pandemic, as well as rapid FVE estimates that are qualitatively aligned with findings from other analyses of vaccine efficacy. Flutracking has also provided estimates of weekly community ILI activity that were not biased by health seeking behaviour and clinician testing practices.

Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors David Durrheim
2011 Dalton CB, Merritt TD, Unicomb LE, Kirk MD, Stafford RJ, Lalor K, Ozfoodnet Working Group, 'A national case-control study of risk factors for listeriosis in Australia', Epidemiology and Infection, 139 437-445 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/s0950268810000944
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2010 Dawood FS, Hope KG, Durrheim DN, Givney R, Fry AM, Dalton CB, 'Estimating the Disease Burden of Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus Infection in Hunter New England, Northern New South Wales, Australia', Plos One, 5 7 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0009880
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
Co-authors David Durrheim
2010 Eastwood K, Durrheim DN, Merritt T, Massey PD, Huppatz C, Dalton CB, et al., 'Field exercises are useful for improving public health emergency responses', WSPAR: Western Pacific Surveillance and Response Journal, 1 1-7 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.5365/wpsar.2010.1.1.003
Co-authors David Durrheim
2010 Dalton CB, Cretikos MA, Durrheim DN, Seppelt IM, Rawlinson WD, Dwyer DE, 'Comparison of adult patients hospitalised with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza and seasonal influenza during the 'PROTECT' phase of the pandemic response', Medical Journal of Australia, 192 357-358 (2010) [C3]
Citations Web of Science - 4
Co-authors David Durrheim
2010 Carlson SJ, Durrheim DN, Dalton CB, 'Flutracking provides a measure of field influenza vaccine effectiveness, Australia, 2007-2009', Vaccine, 28 6809-6810 (2010) [C3]
DOI 10.1016/j.vaccine.2010.08.051
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors David Durrheim
2010 Dalton CB, 'Decision aids and screening: Editorial was amoral (Letter)', British Medical Journal, 341 1118 (2010) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2010 Carlson SJ, Dalton CB, Durrheim DN, Fesja J, 'Online flutracking survey of influenza-like illness during Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Australia', Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16 1960-1962 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.3201/eid1612.100935
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors David Durrheim
2010 Hope K, Durrheim DN, Barnett D, D'Este CA, Kewley CD, Dalton CB, et al., 'Willingness of frontline health care workers to work during a public health emergency', Australian Journal of Emergency Management, 25 39-47 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11
Co-authors Catherine Deste, David Durrheim
2010 Huppatz C, Gawarikar Y, Levi CR, Kelly PM, Williams D, Dalton CB, et al., 'Should there be a standardised approach to the diagnostic workup of suspected adult encephalitis? A case series from Australia', BMC Infectious Diseases, 10 1-6 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2334-10-353
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors David Durrheim, Chris Levi
2009 Dalton CB, Merritt T, Durrheim DN, Munnoch S, Kirk M, 'A structured framework for improving outbreak investigation audits', BMC Public Health, 9 472 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-9-472
Co-authors David Durrheim
2009 Dawood FS, Dalton CB, Durrheim DN, Hope KG, 'Rates of hospitalisation for acute respiratory illness and the emergence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus in the Hunter New England Area Health Service', Medical Journal of Australia, 191 573-574 (2009) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors David Durrheim
2009 Parrella A, Dalton CB, Pearce R, Litt JCB, 'ASPREN surveillance system for influenza-like illness: A comparison with FluTracking and the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System', Australian Family Physician, 38 932-936 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 9
2009 Huppatz C, Durrheim DN, Levi CR, Dalton CB, Williams D, Clements MS, Kelly PM, 'Etiology of encephalitis in Australia, 1990-2007', Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15 1359-1365 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.3201/eid1509.081540
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 37
Co-authors Chris Levi, David Durrheim
2009 Huppatz C, Kelly PM, Levi CR, Dalton CB, Williams D, Durrheim DN, 'Encephalitis in Australia, 1979-2006: Trends and aetiologies', Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report, 33 192-197 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11
Co-authors Chris Levi, David Durrheim
2009 Carlson SJ, Dalton CB, Tuyl FA, Durrheim DN, Fejsa J, Muscatello DJ, et al., 'Flutracking surveillance: Comparing 2007 New South Wales results with laboratory confirmed influenza notifications', Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report, 33 323-326 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7
Co-authors Frank Tuyl, David Durrheim
2009 Dalton CB, Durrheim DN, Fejsa J, Francis JL, Carlson S, Tursan D'Espaignet E, Tuyl FA, 'Flutracking: A weekly Australian community online survey of influenza-like illness in 2006, 2007 and 2008', Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report, 33 316-322 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11
Co-authors David Durrheim, Frank Tuyl
2008 Kirk MD, Mckay I, Hall GV, Dalton CB, Stafford R, Unicomb L, Gregory J, 'Foodborne disease in Australia: The OzFoodNet experience', CLINICAL INFECTIOUS DISEASES, 47 392-400 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1086/589861
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 23
2008 Huppatz CM, Munnoch SA, Worgan T, Merritt TD, Dalton CB, Kelly PM, Durrheim DN, 'A norovirus outbreak associated with consumption of NSW oysters: Implications for quality assurance systems', Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report, 32 88-91 (2008) [C2]
Citations Scopus - 11
Co-authors David Durrheim
2008 Dalton CB, Durrheim DN, Conroy MA, 'Likely impact of school and childcare closures on public health workforce during an influenza pandemic: A survey', Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report, 32 261-262 (2008) [C2]
Citations Scopus - 17
Co-authors David Durrheim
2008 Cretikos M, Eastwood K, Dalton CB, Merritt TD, Tuyl FA, Winn L, Durrheim DN, 'Household disaster preparedness and information sources: Rapid cluster survey after a storm in New South Wales, Australia', BMC Public Health, 8 1-9 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-8-195
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Frank Tuyl, David Durrheim
2008 Unicomb LE, Dalton CB, Gilbert GL, Becker NG, Patel MS, 'Age-specific risk factors for sporadic campylobacter infection in regional Australia', Foodborne Pathogens and Disease, 5 79-85 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1089/fpd.2007.0047
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
2008 Dalton CB, Cretikos MA, Durrheim DN, 'A food 'lifeboat': Food and nutrition considerations in the event of a pandemic or other catastrophe [Letter]', Medical Journal of Australia, 188 679 (2008) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors David Durrheim
2008 Unicomb LE, O'Reilly LC, Kirk MD, Stafford RJ, Smith HV, Becker NG, et al., 'Risk factors for infection with Campylobacter jejuni flaA genotypes', Epidemiology and Infection, 136 1480-1491 (2008)

We aimed to explore Campylobacter genotype-specific risk factors in Australia. Isolates collected prospectively from cases recruited into a case-control study were genotyped using... [more]

We aimed to explore Campylobacter genotype-specific risk factors in Australia. Isolates collected prospectively from cases recruited into a case-control study were genotyped using flaA restriction fragment-length polymorphism typing ( flaA genotyping). Exposure information for cases and controls was collected by telephone interview. Risk factors were examined for major flaA genotypes using logistic and multinomial regression. Five flaA genotypes accounted for 325 of 590 (55%) cases - flaA-6b (n=129), flaA-6 (n=70), flaA-10 (n=48), flaA-2 (n=43), flaA-131 (n=35). In Australia, infections due to flaA-10 and flaA-2 were found to be significantly associated with eating non-poultry meat (beef and ham, respectively) in both case-control and inter-genotype comparisons. All major genotypes apart from flaA-10 were associated with chicken consumption in the case-control comparisons. Based on several clinical criteria, infections due to flaA-2 were more severe than those due to other genotypes. Thus genotype analysis may reveal genotype-specific niches and differences in virulence and transmission routes. © 2008 Cambridge University Press.

DOI 10.1017/S0950268807000246
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors John Ferguson
2007 Mickan L, Doyle R, Valcanis M, Dingle KE, Unicomb L, Lanser J, et al., 'Multilocus sequence typing of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from New South Wales, Australia', Journal of Applied Microbiology, 102 144-152 (2007)

Aims: Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was used to examine the diversity and population structure of Campylobacter jejuni isolates associated with sporadic cases of gastroenterit... [more]

Aims: Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was used to examine the diversity and population structure of Campylobacter jejuni isolates associated with sporadic cases of gastroenteritis in Australia, and to compare these isolates with those from elsewhere. Methods and Results: A total of 153 Camp. jejuni isolates were genotyped. Forty sequence types (STs) were found, 19 of which were previously undescribed and 21 identified in other countries. The 19 newly described STs accounted for 43% of isolates, 16 of which were assigned to known clonal complexes. Eighty-eight percent of isolates were assigned to a total of 15 clonal complexes. Of these, four clonal complexes accounted for 60% of isolates. Three STs accounted for nearly 40% of all isolates and appeared to be endemic, while 21 STs were represented by more than one isolate. Seven infections were acquired during international travel, and the associated isolates all had different STs, three of which were exclusive to the travel-acquired cases. Comparison of serotypes among isolates from clonal complexes revealed further diversity. Eight serotypes were identified among isolates from more than one clonal complex, while isolates from six clonal complexes displayed serotypes not previously associated with those clonal complexes. Conclusions: Multilocus sequence typing is a useful tool for the discrimination of subtypes and examination of the population structure of Camp. jejuni associated with sporadic infections. Significance and Impact of the Study: This study highlights the genotypic diversity of Camp. jejuni in Australia, demonstrating that STs causing disease have both a global and a local distribution evident from the typing of domestically and internationally acquired Camp. jejuni isolates. © 2007 The Authors.

DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2672.2006.03049.x
Citations Scopus - 30
Co-authors John Ferguson
2007 Djordjevic SP, Unicomb LE, Adamson PJ, Mickan L, Rios R, Adamson P, et al., 'Clonal complexes of Campylobacter jejuni identified by multilocus sequence typing are reliably predicted by restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses of the flaA gene', Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 45 102-108 (2007)

Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) has provided important new insights into the population structure of Campylobacter jejuni and is rapidly becoming the gold standard for typing th... [more]

Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) has provided important new insights into the population structure of Campylobacter jejuni and is rapidly becoming the gold standard for typing this species. However, the methodology is comparatively costly and slow to perform for the routine surveillance testing of large numbers of isolates required by public health laboratories. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the flaA gene (RELP-flaA) and sequencing of the variable region in the fla locus (SVR-fla) were compared to MLST to determine if a low cost alternative could be found that reliably predicts clonal lineage (as determined by MLST). An isolate of C. jejuni from each of 153 patients from New South Wales, Australia, collected sequentially over a period of 30 months from 1999 to 2001 and comprising 40 sequence types (ST) from 15 clonal complexes (CC) was examined. Of 15 CC, 12 were represented by more than one isolate and a predominant RFLP-flaA type was found for 10 (83%). Of these, seven (70%) correctly predicted the predominant MLST CC with a probability of >0.8. Of 40 STs detected, 19 were reported for the first time, 9 of which were represented by more than one isolate. Eight of these were represented by a single RFLP-flaA type. Only two of eight major SVR-fla types were able to predict CC with a probability of >0.8, indicating that flaA-RFLP is a more reliable predictor of CC than SVR-fla and thus offers an alternative to MLST for use in routine surveillance. Copyright © 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

DOI 10.1128/JCM.01012-06
Citations Scopus - 25
Co-authors John Ferguson
2006 Hope K, Durrheim DN, Tursan D'Espaignet E, Dalton CB, 'Syndromic surveillance: is it a useful tool for local outbreak detection? (Editorial)', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 60 374-375 (2006) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 15
Co-authors David Durrheim
2006 O'Reilly LC, Inglis TJJ, Unicomb L, Adamson P, Cheung K, Dalton C, et al., 'Australian multicentre comparison of subtyping methods for the investigation of Campylobacter infection', Epidemiology and Infection, 134 768-779 (2006)

In order to identify subtyping methods able to contribute to the surveillance or investigation of Australian Campylobacter infection, six genotypic and three phenotypic subtyping ... [more]

In order to identify subtyping methods able to contribute to the surveillance or investigation of Australian Campylobacter infection, six genotypic and three phenotypic subtyping methods were evaluated on a collection of 84 clinical isolates collected over a 30-month period from one region in Australia. The aim was to compare the logistics of various subtyping methods and examine their ability to assist in finding outbreaks or common sources of sporadic infection. The genotypic subtyping methods used were sequencing of the short variable region of the flaA gene, two methods using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the flaA gene using either DdeI or EcoRI with PstI, automated ribotyping, pulsed field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. The phenotypic methods employed included Laboratory of Enteric Pathogens serotyping, Lior biotyping and antibiotic resistotyping. The level of agreement between subtyping results was determined. Phenotypic methods showed little agreement whereas genotypic typing methods showed a high level of agreement. Using the premise that five of the six genotypic typing methods were in agreement 15 genotypic groupings were identified. Sequencing of the short variable region of the flaA gene, RFLP of the flaA gene or automated ribotyping in conjunction with multilocus sequence typing best identified genotypic groupings. An alternative combination of RFLP of the flaA gene followed by ribotyping was equally satisfactory. RFLP of the flaA gene appeared to be suitable as a preliminary typing method based on ease of operation, equipment availability and cost. © 2006 Cambridge University Press.

DOI 10.1017/S0950268805005777
Citations Scopus - 21
2006 Monaghan K, Dalton CB, Durrheim DN, Whyte IM, 'Mercury Incident in a Boarding House: An Integrated Public Health Response in Newcastle, Australia', Environmental Health, 6 72-79 (2006) [C2]
Co-authors David Durrheim
2006 Dalton CB, 'Business continuity management and pandemic influenza.', New South Wales public health bulletin, 17 138-141 (2006)

Pandemic influenza planning presents challenges for both government and businesses. Effective cooperation and communication before and during a pandemic will help mitigate the maj... [more]

Pandemic influenza planning presents challenges for both government and businesses. Effective cooperation and communication before and during a pandemic will help mitigate the major threats to societal function. The major challenges for government include communicating a realistic estimate of pandemic risk, managing community anxiety, communicating the need for rationing of vaccines and antiviral medications, setting standards for preparedness, and gaining the trust of essential service workers. For businesses the challenges are tailoring generic planning guides to local use, and making links with local and regional partners in pandemic planning.

Citations Scopus - 3
2006 Willmore A, Sladden T, Bates L, Dalton CB, 'Use of a geographic information system to track smelter-related lead exposures in children: North Lake Macquarie, Australia, 1991-2002', International Journal of Health Geographics, 5 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1476-072X-5-30
Citations Scopus - 7
2005 Unicomb LE, Simmons G, Merritt T, Gregory J, Nicol C, Jelfs P, et al., 'Sesame Seed Products Contaminated with Salmonella: Three Outbreaks Associated with Tahini', Epidemiology and Infection, 133 1065-1072 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S0950268805004085
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 24
2005 Dalton CB, Bates LI, 'Impact of Closure of a Large Lead-Zinc Smelter on Elevated Blood Levels of Children in Adjacent Suburbs, Boolaroo, Australia', Transactions on Ecology and the Environment (Environmental Exposure and Health), 85 377-387 (2005) [C3]
Citations Web of Science - 4
2004 Dalton C, 'Foodborne disease surveillance in NSW: moving towards performance standards.', New South Wales public health bulletin, 15 2-5 (2004)
2004 Dalton CB, Gregory J, Kirk MD, Stafford RJ, Kraa E, Gould D, 'Foodborne disease outbreaks in Australia, 1995-2000', Communicable Diseases Intelligence, 28 211-224 (2004) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 45
2003 Sharma H, Unicomb L, Forbes W, Djordjevic S, Valcanis M, Dalton C, Ferguson J, 'Antibiotic resistance in Campylobacter jejuni isolated from humans in the Hunter Region, New South Wales.', Commun Dis Intell Q Rep, 27 Suppl S80-S88 (2003)
2003 Unicomb L, Bird P, Dalton C, 'Outbreak of Salmonella Potsdam associated with salad dressing at a restaurant.', Communicable diseases intelligence, 27 508-512 (2003)

Between 27 January and 7 February 2002, 12 cases of Salmonella Potsdam infection were notified to NSW Health of which nine were residents of the Hunter Health Area. Interviews wit... [more]

Between 27 January and 7 February 2002, 12 cases of Salmonella Potsdam infection were notified to NSW Health of which nine were residents of the Hunter Health Area. Interviews with two cases notified by two local doctors initiated the investigation and revealed exposure to foods from the same restaurant (restaurant A). All New South Wales S. Potsdam cases, those accompanying cases to restaurant A and people from restaurant A booking lists were interviewed. Of the 34 people interviewed, 17 met the case definition. The epidemiological investigation did not detect a food source of S. Potsdam infection, however, shell egg-based Caesar salad dressing and mayonnaise, and a swab of a cap from a mayonnaise bottle collected at restaurant A tested positive for S. Potsdam. Environmental and laying hen feed samples from the egg supplier to restaurant A and meat meal, (the major component of laying hen feed) tested positive for various Salmonella serotypes. The investigation identified problems of inadequate cleaning, time-temperature abuse, and ignorance of the hazardous nature of raw shell eggs at the restaurant level, poor sanitation and a lack of hygiene inspections at the egg production level, and problems with cleaning, storage and lack of bacterial monitoring of final product at the animal rendering plant. Investigation of 12 notified cases of Salmonella resulted in public health interventions, which likely prevented further cases of foodborne disease due to Salmonella and other pathogens in the Hunter Health Area and elsewhere in New South Wales.

Citations Scopus - 10
2003 Bennett CM, Dalton C, Beers-Deeble M, Milazzo A, Kraa E, Davos D, et al., 'Fresh garlic: a possible vehicle for Salmonella Virchow', EPIDEMIOLOGY AND INFECTION, 131 1041-1048 (2003)
DOI 10.1017/S0950268803001158
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
2003 Dalton C, Bird P, 'Risk assessment for the consumption of fish with elevated selenium levels.', N S W Public Health Bull, 14 174-176 (2003)
2002 Yohannes K, Dalton CB, Halliday L, Unicomb L, Kirk M, 'An outbreak of gastrointestinal illness associated with the consumption of escolar fish', Communicable Diseases Intelligence, 26 441-445 (2002) [C1]
2001 Rea MD, Dalton CB, Ebeling PW, Ferguson JK, 'Pertussis death in the Hunter region of New South Wales', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 175 172-173 (2001)
Co-authors John Ferguson
2000 Dalton C, 'Unexpected beneficial effects of measles immunisation - Measles vaccination may be marker for other health seeking behaviours', BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, 320 938-938 (2000)
DOI 10.1136/bmj.320.7239.938
2000 Dalton C, Emerton D, Buckoke C, Finlay R, Engler T, Shann F, Aaby P, 'Unexpected beneficial effects of measles immunisation (multiple letters)', British Medical Journal, 320 938-940 (2000)
2000 Voetsch AC, Dalton CB, Crerar SK, 'Enhanced surveillance for foodborne disease in the Hunter - A model for national surveillance in Australia?', FOOD AUSTRALIA, 52 97-99 (2000)
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
1999 Dalton CB, Mintz ED, Wells JG, Bopp CA, Tauxe RV, 'Outbreaks of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection in American adults: a clinical and epidemiologic profile', EPIDEMIOLOGY AND INFECTION, 123 9-16 (1999)
DOI 10.1017/S0950268899002526
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 37
1999 Skull SA, Krause V, Roberts LA, Dalton CB, 'Evaluating the potential for opportunistic vaccination in a Northern Territory hospital', JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, 35 472-475 (1999)
DOI 10.1046/j.1440-1754.1999.355406.x
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
1998 Skull SA, Krause V, Dalton CB, MacKenzie B, 'Serotyping delays and implications for public health action: The Northern Territory experience of the 1996 national outbreak of Salmonella Mbandaka and a comparison with Western Australia', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE, 28 660-661 (1998)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-5994.1998.tb00665.x
Citations Web of Science - 1
1998 Scheil W, Cameron S, Dalton C, Murray C, Wilson D, 'A South Australian Salmonella Mbandaka outbreak investigation using a database to select controls', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 22 536-539 (1998)
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.1998.tb01434.x
Citations Scopus - 54Web of Science - 55
1997 Dalton C, 'Commentary. An outbreak of Norwalk virus gastroenteritis following consumption of oysters.', Communicable diseases intelligence, 21 321-322 (1997)
Citations Scopus - 1
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $40,000

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20091 grants / $25,000

Weekly online community survey for early detection of seasonal and pandemic influenza and vaccine failure$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Craig Dalton, Conjoint Professor David Durrheim, Dr Edouard Tursan D'Espaignet, Associate Professor Heath Kelly
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189799
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20041 grants / $15,000

Psychological and social monitoring of Hunter environmental change.$15,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Nick Higginbotham, Professor Linda Connor, Conjoint Professor Glenn Albrecht, Conjoint Professor Wayne Smith, Doctor Craig Dalton
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0183538
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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News

Flu season

Make your mark on national flu map

April 29, 2015

When you're feeling under the weather it's usually good manners to keep your germs to yourself, but a national surveillance system is encouraging the community to share their symptoms this flu season.

Flu season

Share your flu symptoms

June 2, 2014

A record 17,000 people are sharing their flu symptoms each week for good through a growing online health surveillance system designed to alert health officials to epidemic outbreaks of the potentially life-threatening disease.

Manflu myth

Newcastle researchers question existence of manflu

May 7, 2013

Men are popularly maligned for wilting like cheap supermarket flowers at the first winter sniffle, however data from Flutracking.net, Australia's online influenza-like illness surveillance system, raises questions about the existence of Manflu.

Dr Craig Dalton

Positions

Conjoint Senior Lecturer
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Casual Academic
School of Humanities and Social Science
Faculty of Education and Arts

Contact Details

Email craig.dalton@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4924 6345

Office

Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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