Dr Mark Flynn

Dr Mark Flynn

Executive Director, Better Health, Healthcare and Treatment - Global Impact Cluster

Office - DVC (Research and Innovation)

Career Summary

Biography

Mark is a forward-looking commercial leader with deep insights into global healthcare research and solutions, particularly around the industrialisation of ideas. Mark's most significant asset is his ability to evaluate clinical needs and take new research, projects and/or products global. Mark has the rare talent of envisioning a future state and is known as the standard bearer who plants the flag, signals larger teams as to program direction and objectives. His extensive experience translating medical and bio-engineering discoveries into translational research and commercial products, enables him to calculate process metrics, identify resources, and expedite delivery. Mark is a problem solver who engages people to take meaningful work to scale.

Mark has lead research, public awareness and innovation activities in clinical science and biotechnology for over twenty years. Building on his strong academic foundation and knowledge base, he integrates and aligns research and innovation strategy towards the broader initiatives of building research partnerships, developing innovative approaches to building research ecosystems, increasing awareness, influencing public policy, and determining the societal value of healthcare solutions.

He regularly speaks at international conferences, delivers keynote presentations, and publishes in books and high-impact peer-reviewed journals (academic, trade and consumer). He easily makes the transition between different stakeholders (retail, academics, advocates, and consumers) and tailor activities to deliver on their specific needs.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Melbourne
  • Master of Business Administration, Georgetown University - USA
  • Bachelor of Speech Pathology (Honours), La Trobe University
  • Graduate Diploma in Audiology, University of Melbourne

Keywords

  • biomaterials
  • biotechnology
  • neuroscience

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified 50
110315 Otorhinolaryngology 50

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2012 -  Adjunct Scientist University of Gothenburg
Sweden
1/01/2001 - 31/12/2002 Senior Lecturer (Audiology) University of Canterbury
New Zealand
1/01/1998 - 31/12/2000 Lecturer (Audiology) University of Canterbury
New Zealand
1/01/1995 - 31/12/1998 Lecturer La Trobe University
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2017 -  Chief Medical Officer (CMO) MYoroface AB, Gothenburg
Sweden
1/05/2016 - 31/12/2016 Chief Medical Officer Wise Neuro Srl, Milan
Italy
1/01/2015 - 30/04/2016 Director of Clinical Strategy Cochlear Bone Anchored Solutions AB
Sweden
1/01/2006 - 31/12/2015 Director of Research and Applications Cochlear Bone Anchored Solutions AB
Sweden
1/01/2002 - 31/12/2005 Director of Product Concept Definition Oticon A/S, Copenhagen
Denmark
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (40 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Kompis M, Kurz A, Flynn M, Caversaccio M, 'Estimating the benefit of a second bone anchored hearing implant in unilaterally implanted users with a testband', Acta Oto-Laryngologica, 136 379-384 (2016)

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. Conclusion Using a second bone anchored hearing implant (BAHI) mounted on a testband in unilaterally implanted BAHI users to test its potential adv... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. Conclusion Using a second bone anchored hearing implant (BAHI) mounted on a testband in unilaterally implanted BAHI users to test its potential advantage pre-operatively under-estimates the advantage of two BAHIs placed on two implants.Objectives To investigate how well speech understanding with a second BAHI mounted on a testband approaches the benefit of bilaterally implanted BAHIs.Method Prospective study with 16 BAHI users. Eight were implanted unilaterally (group A) and eight were implanted bilaterally (group B). Aided speech understanding was measured. Speech was presented from the front and noise came either from the left, right, or from the front in two conditions for group A (with one BAHI, and with two BAHIs, where the second device was mounted on a testband) and in three conditions for group B (same two conditions as group A, and in addition with both BAHIs mounted on implants).Results Speech understanding in noise improved with the additional device for noise from the side of the first BAHI (+0.7 to +2.1 dB) and decreased for noise from the other side (-1.8 dB to -3.9 dB). Improvements were highest (+2.1 dB, p = 0.016) and disadvantages were smallest (-1.8 dB, p = 0.047) with both BAHIs mounted on implants. Testbands yielded smaller advantages and higher disadvantages of the additional BAHI (average difference = -0.9 dB).

DOI 10.3109/00016489.2015.1121549
2016 Sadeghi AM, Flynn M, Davison T, Schulte M, Hillbratt M, 'Accuracy and precision of direct bone conduction measurements', B-ENT, 12 41-51 (2016)
2016 den Besten CA, Stalfors J, Wigren S, Blechert JI, Flynn M, Eeg-Olofsson M, et al., 'Stability, Survival, and Tolerability of an Auditory Osseointegrated Implant for Bone Conduction Hearing: Long-Term Follow-Up of a Randomized Controlled Trial', OTOLOGY & NEUROTOLOGY, 37 1077-1083 (2016)
DOI 10.1097/MAO.0000000000001111
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2015 Larsson A, Andersson M, Wigren S, Pivodic A, Flynn M, Nannmark U, 'Soft Tissue Integration of Hydroxyapatite-Coated Abutments for Bone Conduction Implants', CLINICAL IMPLANT DENTISTRY AND RELATED RESEARCH, 17 E730-E735 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/cid.12304
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2015 Briggs R, Van Hasselt A, Luntz M, Goycoolea M, Wigren S, Weber P, et al., 'Clinical Performance of a New Magnetic Bone Conduction Hearing Implant System: Results From a Prospective, Multicenter, Clinical Investigation', OTOLOGY & NEUROTOLOGY, 36 834-841 (2015)
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 19
2015 Nelissen RC, Wigren S, Flynn MC, Meijer GJ, Mylanus EAM, Hol MKS, 'Application and interpretation of resonance frequency analysis in auditory osseointegrated implants: A review of literature and establishment of practical recommendations', Otology and Neurotology, 36 1518-1524 (2015)

Copyright © 2015 Otology & Neurotology, Inc. Objective: To establish standardization of implant stability measurements in auditory osseointegrated implants by means of reso... [more]

Copyright © 2015 Otology & Neurotology, Inc. Objective: To establish standardization of implant stability measurements in auditory osseointegrated implants by means of resonance frequency analysis (RFA) through reviewing the currently published literature. Methods: Studies reporting on RFA in auditory osseointegrated implants were identified, and the outcomes and the way these were reported were evaluated. Results: Thirteen clinical studies reporting RFA outcomes of auditory osseointegrated implants were identified and analyzed, which demonstrated variations in methodology and reporting of data. The different reporting standards made a meta-analysis impossible. Heterogeneity and limitations were found in reporting of the types of implants, abutments, and SmartPegs used; study population sizes; follow-up duration; and, reporting of the implant stability quotient (ISQ). Conclusion: RFA is an interesting outcome of clinical studies on auditory osseointegrated implant research and might have potential as a clinically relevant tool for assessing implant stability. Because of the heterogeneous data that have been reported to date, the following guidelines for standardization of application and reporting were established. The implant and abutment type and length, and the type of SmartPeg should always be stated. Absolute standalone ISQ values should not be interpreted individually. ISQ values are at this moment most meaningful as a trend in the individual patient or in a population over time. No conclusions should be based on individual ISQ values. Standardized time points for RFA in research should be determined prospectively, with surgery as a baseline. After abutment replacement, individual ISQ trends from baseline cannot be interpreted anymore if the abutments differ in length.

DOI 10.1097/MAO.0000000000000833
Citations Scopus - 7
2014 Nelissen RC, Stalfors J, de Wolf MJF, Flynn MC, Wigren S, Eeg-Olofsson M, et al., 'Long-Term Stability, Survival, and Tolerability of a Novel Osseointegrated Implant for Bone Conduction Hearing: 3-Year Data From a Multicenter, Randomized, Controlled, Clinical Investigation', OTOLOGY & NEUROTOLOGY, 35 1486-1491 (2014)
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
2014 Kurz A, Flynn M, Caversaccio M, Kompis M, 'Speech understanding with a new implant technology: A comparative study with a new nonskin penetrating Baha system', BioMed Research International, 2014 (2014)

© 2014 Anja Kurz et al. Objective. To compare hearing and speech understanding between a new, nonskin penetrating Baha system (Baha Attract) to the current Baha system using a sk... [more]

© 2014 Anja Kurz et al. Objective. To compare hearing and speech understanding between a new, nonskin penetrating Baha system (Baha Attract) to the current Baha system using a skin-penetrating abutment. Methods. Hearing and speech understanding were measured in 16 experienced Baha users. The transmission path via the abutment was compared to a simulated Baha Attract transmission path by attaching the implantable magnet to the abutment and then by adding a sample of artificial skin and the external parts of the Baha Attract system. Four different measurements were performed: bone conduction thresholds directly through the sound processor (BC Direct), aided sound field thresholds, aided speech understanding in quiet, and aided speech understanding in noise. Results. The simulated Baha Attract transmission path introduced an attenuation starting from approximately 5 dB at 1000 Hz, increasing to 20-25 dB above 6000 Hz. However, aided sound field threshold shows smaller differences and aided speech understanding in quiet and in noise does not differ significantly between the two transmission paths. Conclusion. The Baha Attract system transmission path introduces predominately high frequency attenuation. This attenuation can be partially compensated by adequate fitting of the speech processor. No significant decrease in speech understanding in either quiet or in noise was found.

DOI 10.1155/2014/416205
Citations Scopus - 20
2012 Larsson A, Wigren S, Andersson M, Ekeroth G, Flynn M, Nannmark U, 'Histologic Evaluation of Soft Tissue Integration of Experimental Abutments for Bone Anchored Hearing Implants Using Surgery Without Soft Tissue Reduction', OTOLOGY & NEUROTOLOGY, 33 1445-1451 (2012)
DOI 10.1097/MAO.0b013e318268d4e0
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 25
2012 Flynn MC, Hillbratt M, 'Improving the Accuracy of Baha (R) Fittings through Measures of Direct Bone Conduction', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY, 5 S43-S47 (2012)
DOI 10.3342/ceo.2012.5.S1.S43
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
2012 Flynn MC, Hedin A, Halvarsson G, Good T, Sadeghi A, 'Hearing Performance Benefits of a Programmable Power Baha (R) Sound Processor with a Directional Microphone for Patients with a Mixed Hearing Loss', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY, 5 S76-S81 (2012)
DOI 10.3342/ceo.2012.5.S1.S76
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2011 Pfiffner F, Kompis M, Flynn M, Asnes K, Arnold A, Stieger C, 'Benefits of Low-Frequency Attenuation of Baha (R) in Single-Sided Sensorineural Deafness', EAR AND HEARING, 32 40-45 (2011)
DOI 10.1097/AUD.0b013e3181ecd002
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 18
2011 Dun CAJ, de Wolf MJF, Hol MKS, Wigren S, Eeg-Olofsson M, Green K, et al., 'Stability, Survival, and Tolerability of a Novel Baha Implant System: Six-Month Data From a Multicenter Clinical Investigation', OTOLOGY & NEUROTOLOGY, 32 1001-1007 (2011)
DOI 10.1097/MAO.0b013e3182267e9c
Citations Scopus - 45Web of Science - 43
2011 Flynn MC, Sadeghi A, Halvarsson G, 'Benefits of directional microphones and noise reduction circuits for improving Baha® hearing performance.', Cochlear implants international, 12 Suppl 1 (2011)
Citations Scopus - 4
2011 Flynn MC, 'Challenges and recent developments in sound processing for baha® 112-123 (2011)

© 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel. Osseointegrated auditory implants such as Baha® provide an efficient pathway for sound delivery and an excellent amplification choice for patients wi... [more]

© 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel. Osseointegrated auditory implants such as Baha® provide an efficient pathway for sound delivery and an excellent amplification choice for patients with conductive or mixed hearing loss or single-sided sensorineural deafness. But at the same time, bone conduction hearing provides a number of key challenges that need to be addressed. One solution is computer-based fitting software to measure in-situ thresholds directly through the Baha sound processor and to individually prescribe amplification settings based on the patient's hearing loss and degree of transcranial attenuation. Additionally, technologies such as automatic directional microphones and noise reduction systems further improve hearing performance in noisy situations. This paper highlights recent technological innovations and summarizes data on the advantages for the Baha patient population using the sound processing capabilities available in the latest Baha sound processors.

DOI 10.1159/000323592
Citations Scopus - 6
2010 Flynn MC, Sammeth CA, Sadeghi A, Cire G, Halvarsson G, 'Baha for single-sided sensorineural deafness: Review and recent technological innovations', Seminars in Hearing, 31 326-349 (2010)

An implantable bone conduction hearing system such as the Baha auditory osseointegrated implant is one amplification choice for patients with single-sided deafness (SSD). Several ... [more]

An implantable bone conduction hearing system such as the Baha auditory osseointegrated implant is one amplification choice for patients with single-sided deafness (SSD). Several published reports outline the benefits that Baha provides for speech recognition in noise as well as subjective preference. Recent advances in Baha sound processor technology (e.g., Cochlear Baha BP100) provide technological advantages specifically for persons with SSD. In particular, fitting software is now used to measure in situ bone conduction thresholds through the Baha sound processor and to individually prescribe amplification settings based on the patient's hearing loss and degree of transcranial attenuation. Additionally, technology such as automatic directional microphones and noise reduction systems may provide improved hearing in noise solutions for patients with SSD. This article reviews the research on Baha for SSD and presents data on the advantages for this patient population using new features available in the Baha BP100 sound processor. Copyright © 2010 by Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc.

DOI 10.1055/s-0030-1268033
Citations Scopus - 9
2010 Flynn MC, Sadeghi A, Halvarsson G, 'Results of the first clinical evaluation of Cochlear¿ Baha® BP100', Cahiers de l'Audition, 23 54-58 (2010)
2010 Flynn MC, Hillbratt M, 'Direct Bone Conduction - Facilitating a precise and personalized setting of the Baha® external processor', Cahiers de l'Audition, 23 59-63 (2010)
2010 Gottlow J, Sennerby L, Rosengren A, Flynn M, 'An Experimental Evaluation of a New Craniofacial Implant Using the Rabbit Tibia Model: Part I. Histologic Findings', OTOLOGY & NEUROTOLOGY, 31 832-839 (2010)
DOI 10.1097/MAO.0b013e3181dfbbab
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 14
2010 Sennerby L, Gottlow J, Rosengren A, Flynn M, 'An Experimental Evaluation of a New Craniofacial Implant Using the Rabbit Tibia Model: Part II. Biomechanical Findings', OTOLOGY & NEUROTOLOGY, 31 840-845 (2010)
DOI 10.1097/MAO.0b013e3181de4b79
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 17
2009 Flynn MC, Sadeghi A, Halvarsson G, 'Baha solutions for patients with severe mixed hearing loss', Cochlear Implants International, 10 43-47 (2009)

Patients with a mixed hearing loss present special challenges. The amplification demands of mixed hearing loss can drive powerful digital hearing aids to their limits and introduc... [more]

Patients with a mixed hearing loss present special challenges. The amplification demands of mixed hearing loss can drive powerful digital hearing aids to their limits and introduce distortion through saturation. Conversely, the Baha® System effectively bypasses the conductive component and focuses on compensating for the sensorineural component of the hearing loss. Ten patients with a mixed hearing loss participated in the present study. Results indicate that Baha provided significant benefits (p < 0.01) over conventional air conduction hearing instruments across the dimensions of audibility, speech understanding and sound quality. Given the increased output force of the latest Baha instruments, once the conductive component of a severe mixed hearing loss becomes greater than 30 dB, a Baha should be considered and evaluated on audiological grounds alone to provide optimal amplification. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

DOI 10.1002/cii.385
Citations Scopus - 12
2008 Vermeire K, Anderson I, Flynn M, Van De Heyning P, 'The influence of different speech processor and hearing aid settings on speech perception outcomes in electric acoustic stimulation patients', Ear and Hearing, 29 76-86 (2008)

OBJECTIVE: Electric acoustic stimulation (EAS) is an increasingly popular means of treating individuals with a steeply sloping mid-to-high frequency hearing loss, who traditionall... [more]

OBJECTIVE: Electric acoustic stimulation (EAS) is an increasingly popular means of treating individuals with a steeply sloping mid-to-high frequency hearing loss, who traditionally do not benefit from hearing instruments. These persons often have too much residual hearing to be considered for a cochlear implant. Several studies have demonstrated the ability both to preserve the remaining low-frequency hearing in these individuals, and to provide significant benefit through combining a cochlear implant with a hearing aid to amplify the same ear. These improvements in performance have been especially noted in noise. Often overlooked is that these outcomes may be influenced by the fitting parameters of both the cochlear implant and the hearing aid. DESIGN: This study assessed four EAS subjects, with a minimum of 1 month's EAS use, on eight different fitting parameters. Sentence testing in different noise levels (+15, +10, and +5 dB SPL) was conducted. Subjects also evaluated each condition using a visual analogue scale. RESULTS: Results demonstrated that a reduced overlap of cochlear implant and hearing aid amplification produced best results across listening conditions. CONCLUSIONS: The hearing aid should be fit to a patient-specific modified audiogram at least up to the point where low-frequency hearing is not measurable. The cochlear implant should be fit from a higher frequency point than is standard in patients without residual hearing in the implanted ear, to provide reduced overlap with the amplification provided by the hearing aid. Therefore, a small amount of overlap between the frequency ranges used by the hearing aid and the cochlear implant seems beneficial. © 2008 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

DOI 10.1097/AUD.0b013e31815d6326
Citations Scopus - 30
2008 Flynn MC, 'Baha® for conductive, mixed, and unilateral loss', Hearing Journal, 61 44-46 (2008)
DOI 10.1097/01.HJ.0000327763.24840.2f
Citations Scopus - 1
2006 Flynn MC, Flynn TS, 'Digital technology offers a better solution to feedback problems in pediatric patients', Hearing Journal, 59 58-63 (2006)
DOI 10.1097/01.HJ.0000286490.74197.6e
Citations Scopus - 1
2005 Flynn MC, Lunner T, 'Clinical verification of a hearing aid with Artificial Intelligence', Hearing Journal, 58 34-38 (2005)

In summary, it is crucial to remember that we observed differences between the standard digital hearing instruments and those built on a platform of parallel processing on measure... [more]

In summary, it is crucial to remember that we observed differences between the standard digital hearing instruments and those built on a platform of parallel processing on measures of performance in background noise and complex listening situations. While standard instruments will use single pieces of information in trying to predict the auditory environment, Oticon Syncro uses parallel processing to analyze multiple processing options and select the best solution. The underlying processing strategy is to maximize the speech-to-noise ratio at all times and thereby optimize speech understanding.

DOI 10.1097/01.HJ.0000286116.92711.77
Citations Scopus - 2
2004 Flynn MC, Schmidtke T, 'Benefits of bimodal stimulation for adults with a cochlear implant', International Congress Series, 1273 227-230 (2004)

Many clinics now recommend the trial of a hearing aid for the contralateral ear for adults with a cochlear implant (bimodal stimulation). This paper builds on earlier research and... [more]

Many clinics now recommend the trial of a hearing aid for the contralateral ear for adults with a cochlear implant (bimodal stimulation). This paper builds on earlier research and examines the utility of providing a hearing aid in the contralateral ear for adult cochlear implant users. Eight adults with a cochlear implant were fitted with an Oticon SUMO XP hearing aid. Performance was evaluated in terms of speech perception in quiet and noise (front, left and right), localisation performance (front, left and right) and subjective measures of benefit. Significant improvements were obtained for speech perception in both quiet and noise. For speech understanding in quiet, mean scores improved from 52% to 71% and in noise (+10 or +5 dB SNR) from 48% to 59%. While accurate localisation remained difficult, it was only with bimodal input that localisation ability was significantly above chance. Investigation of results from the Bimodal Benefit Questionnaire indicated the greatest perceived benefits were in terms of speech understanding in noise, localisation, perception of own voice, and perception of music. Following the study, all participants continued to wear the test hearing aid in combination with their cochlear implant and reported high satisfaction with bimodal stimulation. © 2004, Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.ics.2004.08.040
Citations Scopus - 7
2004 Flynn MC, Austin N, Flynn TS, Ford RPK, Buckland L, 'Universal Newborn Hearing Screening introduced to NICU infants in Canterbury Province, New Zealand', New Zealand Medical Journal, 117 (2004)

Aims: Universal Newborn Hearing Screening (UNHS) is being implemented worldwide as an effective method of early identification of hearing loss. The impact of delayed detection of ... [more]

Aims: Universal Newborn Hearing Screening (UNHS) is being implemented worldwide as an effective method of early identification of hearing loss. The impact of delayed detection of sensorineural hearing loss is a major lifelong impairment. The aim of the study was to assess the feasibility of introducing universal newborn hearing screening over the 12-month period in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Christchurch Women's Hospital, and to assess the costs, and resources required. Methods: Universal Newborn Hearing Screening was conducted over a 12 month period in the Neonatal Service of Christchurch Women's Hospital. Throughout the implementation period, data were collected to monitor and benchmark against World's best practice. Results: During the 12 months of the study, 435 babies were screened for hearing loss in the Neonatal Service at Christchurch Women's Hospital. Of these babies, 19 (4.37%) were referred for diagnostic 'auditory brainstem response' ABR testing to confirm hearing loss. Two babies were confirmed with hearing loss, with only one baby exhibiting a known risk factor for deafness. This resulted in a positive predictive index of 10.53%. Conclusions: This study highlights that UNHS can be implemented efficiently and cost-effectively within the Neonatal Service of a New Zealand Hospital. The results were consistent with best practice, and show the benefits of UNHS against 'at risk' screening. The ultimate success of this study will be in the implementation of UNHS across New Zealand. © NZMA.

Citations Scopus - 5
2004 Flynn MC, Davis PB, Pogash R, 'Multiple-channel non-linear power hearing instruments for children with severe hearing impairment: Long-term follow-up', International Journal of Audiology, 43 479-485 (2004)

The long-term benefits of multiple-channel non-linear technology for children with severe hearing impairment have yet to be fully investigated over the longer term. Twenty-one chi... [more]

The long-term benefits of multiple-channel non-linear technology for children with severe hearing impairment have yet to be fully investigated over the longer term. Twenty-one children with severe hearing loss participated in a study comparing performance on measures of audibility, speech understanding (in quiet and noise) and listening situations between the children's current analog hearing aids and a test hearing aid with multiple-channel non-linear compression (DigiFocus II Compact Power). Results were obtained from the children at 2 weeks, 8 weeks, 6 months and 12 months following the fitting of a multiple-channel non-linear hearing instrument. Compared with the children's own hearing instruments, the test instruments provided improved audibility, improvement in speech understanding in quiet and noise, and an improvement in listening skills. The gains in speech understanding were greater in noise than in quiet, suggesting that the test hearing instrument provided greatest improvement when listening to speech in noise. While performance increased over time, there was no statistically significant evidence to support continued acclimatization.

DOI 10.1080/14992020400050061
Citations Scopus - 13
2003 Flynn MC, Dowell RC, 'Effects of Background Noise and Reverberation on the Aided Speech Perception in Adults with a Severe or Severe-to-profound Hearing Impairment', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Audiology, 25 63-73 (2003)

The effects of three types of background noise (multi-talker speech babble, cafeteria noise and speech noise) and two levels of reverberation (0.5 s and 1.0 s) on open-set sentenc... [more]

The effects of three types of background noise (multi-talker speech babble, cafeteria noise and speech noise) and two levels of reverberation (0.5 s and 1.0 s) on open-set sentence recognition by 20 adults with severe sensorineural hearing impairment (PTA = 61-80 dB HL) and 14 adults with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing impairment (PTA = 81-100 dB HL) were investigated. Open-set sentences were presented at 70 dB SPL with noise levels adjusted for each participant to reduce ceiling and floor effects. The results indicated that, for adults with a severe hearing impairment, the four-talker babble had significantly (p < .05) higher speech recognition scores than the speech weighted noise or the cafeteria noise conditions. No significant differences between masking conditions were found for the adults with a severe-to-profound hearing impairment. An increase in reverberation time did not result in a significant (p > .05) decrease in speech perception score. The results of this study only partially support the assertion that ecologically valid tests of speech perception should include interference representative of the spectral and temporal characteristics of that found in external environments.

Citations Scopus - 1
2003 Kennedy EJ, Flynn MC, 'Training phonological awareness skills in children with Down syndrome', RESEARCH IN DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES, 24 44-57 (2003)
DOI 10.1016/S0891-4222(02)00168-3
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 25
2003 Flynn M, Cai Y, Baxter DA, Crow T, 'A computational study of the role of spike broadening in synaptic facilitation of Hermissenda.', Journal of computational neuroscience, 15 29-41 (2003)
DOI 10.1023/a:1024418701765
2003 Kennedy EJ, Flynn MC, 'Early phonological awareness and reading skills in children with Down syndrome.', Down's syndrome, research and practice : the journal of the Sarah Duffen Centre / University of Portsmouth, 8 100-109 (2003)

Increasingly, children with Down syndrome receive literacy instruction with the expectation of acquiring functional reading skills. Unfortunately, little is known about the proces... [more]

Increasingly, children with Down syndrome receive literacy instruction with the expectation of acquiring functional reading skills. Unfortunately, little is known about the processes underlying literacy skills in this special population. Phonological awareness contributes to literacy development in typically developing children, however, there is inconclusive evidence about these skills in younger children with Down syndrome. 9 children with Down syndrome (5.6-8.10 years) participated in this investigation. Due to the paucity of standardised phonological awareness measures for children with special needs, in particular children with Down syndrome, a variety of tasks were adapted from the literature. The assessment battery examined the skills of phonological awareness, literacy, speech production, expressive language, hearing acuity, speech perception, and auditory-visual memory. The results suggest that children with Down syndrome are at risks for reading acquisition difficulties due to reduced phonological awareness skills. These deficits are in addition to delays caused by reduced cognitive skills. Only one of the participants was able to demonstrate rhyme awareness, which may have been due to task effects. Written word recognition ability was correlated with tests of phonemic awareness, and error analysis of the spelling and non-word reading tasks suggested grapheme-phoneme connections deficits. Further research is needed to determine the best methods of assessment and intervention for phonological awareness in children with Down syndrome.

DOI 10.3104/reports.136
Citations Scopus - 21
2003 Clendon S, Flynn MC, Coombes T, 'Facilitating speech and language development in children with cochlear implants using computer technology', Cochlear Implants International, 4 119-136 (2003)

Little research exists to support the use of computer software with children with cochlear implants. The present study sought to address this deficit and investigate the efficacy ... [more]

Little research exists to support the use of computer software with children with cochlear implants. The present study sought to address this deficit and investigate the efficacy of using computer technology to facilitate the speech and language skills of five children with cochlear implants. Participants received 8 months of intervention focusing on the development of speech production and phonological awareness skills using the SpeechViewer III and Earobics computer software programs. Statistically significant gains were achieved in speech production, receptive language, syllabic and phonemic awareness, and non-word reading. Findings suggest that the use of computer software may be an efficient method for improving the speech and language skills of children with cochlear implants.

DOI 10.1002/cii.73
Citations Scopus - 3
2003 Clendon S, Flynn MC, Coombes T, 'Facilitating speech and language development in children with cochlear implants using computer technology.', Cochlear implants international, 4 119-136 (2003)
DOI 10.1179/cim.2003.4.3.119
2002 Bennetts LK, Flynn MC, 'Improving the classroom listening skills of children with Down syndrome by using sound-field amplification.', Down's syndrome, research and practice : the journal of the Sarah Duffen Centre / University of Portsmouth, 8 19-24 (2002)

Many children with Down syndrome have fluctuating conductive hearing losses further reducing their speech, language and academic development. It is within the school environment w... [more]

Many children with Down syndrome have fluctuating conductive hearing losses further reducing their speech, language and academic development. It is within the school environment where access to auditory information is crucial that many children with Down syndrome are especially disadvantaged. Conductive hearing impairment which is often fluctuating and undetected reduces the child's ability to extract the important information from the auditory signal. Unfortunately, the design and acoustics of the classroom leads to problems in extracting the speech signal through reduced speech intensity due to the increased distance of the student from the teacher in addition to masking from excessive background noise. One potential solution is the use of sound-field amplification which provides a uniform amplification to the teacher's voice through the use of a microphone and loudspeakers. This investigation examined the efficacy of sound-field amplification for 4 children with Down syndrome. Measures of speech perception were taken with and without the sound-field system and found that the children perceived significantly more speech in all conditions where the sound-field system was used (p < .0001). Importantly, listening performance with the sound-field system was not affected by reducing the signal-to-noise ratio through increasing the level of background noise. In summary, sound-field amplification provides improved access to the speech signal for children with Down syndrome and as a consequence leads to improved classroom success.

DOI 10.3104/reports.124
Citations Scopus - 21
2002 Flynn MC, Kennedy EJ, Johns J, Stanbridge R, 'Hearing and vision loss within residential care facilities - the need for improved service delivery', AUSTRALASIAN JOURNAL ON AGEING, 21 141-144 (2002)
DOI 10.1111/j.1741-6612.2002.tb00435.x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2002 Welahm NV, Flynn MC, 'Developing, implementing, and evaluating a hearing screening programme in the speech-language pathology clinic setting', International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 4 23-31 (2002)

Conducting hearing screening is one of the many important functions of the speech-language pathologist. Often, inadequate consideration is given to the acoustic environment in whi... [more]

Conducting hearing screening is one of the many important functions of the speech-language pathologist. Often, inadequate consideration is given to the acoustic environment in which screening is conducted and the impact of this environment upon results. This study examines the establishment of a hearing screening protocol at the University of Canterbury. Two phases of this study are reported: (a) an evaluation of the proposed screening environment and the development of screening protocols and (b) the screening of 586 participants over a 2-year period and validation of 120 participants by an audiologist. Initial results indicated that ambient noise levels in each speech-language pathology clinic room exceeded American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) (1985) criteria at 500 Hz, necessitating an increase in testing level from 20 dB HL to 25 dB HL at this frequency. Screening data indicated that 80.5% of participants passed the test screening battery. Sensitivity and specificity were 73.1 and 91.2%, respectively. Further data analysis suggested that discontinuing hearing screening within two clinic rooms may further increase sensitivity and specificity. Consequently, careful evaluation of the environment and validation of results should be conducted to ensure the efficacy of any hearing screening programme. © 2002 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted.

DOI 10.1080/14417040210001669201
2001 Jury MA, Flynn MC, 'Auditory and vestibular sequelae to traumatic brain injury: a pilot study', NEW ZEALAND MEDICAL JOURNAL, 114 286-288 (2001)
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 24
1999 Flynn MC, Dowell RC, 'Speech perception in a communicative context: An investigation using question answer pairs', JOURNAL OF SPEECH LANGUAGE AND HEARING RESEARCH, 42 540-552 (1999)
DOI 10.1044/jslhr.4203.540
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
1998 Flynn MC, Dowell RC, Clark GM, 'Aided speech recognition abilities of adults with a severe or severe-to-profound hearing loss', JOURNAL OF SPEECH LANGUAGE AND HEARING RESEARCH, 41 285-299 (1998)
DOI 10.1044/jslhr.4102.285
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 12
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Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
1996 Flynn M, Dowell R, Clark G, 'Speech perception of hearing aid users versus cochlear implantees', COCHLEAR IMPLANTS, SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA (1996)
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Dr Mark Flynn

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Executive Director, Better Health, Healthcare and Treatment - Global Impact Cluster
Research & Innovation
Office - DVC (Research and Innovation)
Research and Innovation Division

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Email mark.flynn@newcastle.edu.au
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