Associate Professor Allison Cummins

Associate Professor Allison Cummins

Associate Professor

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Career Summary

Biography

Allison Cummins is a high performing academic who is passionate about education and research.  Allison was appointed as Associate Professor in Midwifery in 2021 at the University of Newcastle. In her role as Discipline Lead in Midwifery she is implementing a new innovative curriculum and increasing the visibility of the profession of midwifery. Allison continues to make an outstanding contribution to student learning through innovative subject design, embedding transitional workshops, whole of program coordination and co-design of curriculum.

Allison has built a body of research around midwifery models of care and graduate transitions. Her renowned reputation for research in this specific area has led to international research opportunities attracting funding and invited keynote addresses. Her current projects are discovering the experiences of women during the COVID-19 pandemic based on model of maternity care, outcomes for women with anxiety and depression who receive midwifery continuity of care and evaluating innovative midwifery models of care known as midwifery antenatal and postnatal services (MAPS)  Allison has over 30 publications including peer reviewed high ranking journal articles, book chapters and co-edited two books.

Through internal and external service and engagement Allison has become a recognised leader in Midwifery. She is an elected Midwifery Director on the Board for the Australian College of Midwives,  the peak professional body for midwives, Allison influences policy and the recognition of midwives and the profession of midwifery.

Internationally, Allison is a member of the Trans Tasman Midwifery Education Consortium and the Quality Maternal Newborn Care Alliance. Both these groups conduct research and inform policy in an International context.

Allison is an Associate Editor of the midwifery journal “Women and Birth International” (WOMBI) that publishes relevant research on all matters that affect women and birth. WOMBI is ranked the number 1 midwifery journal in the world and the 10th for nursing and midwifery.



Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Technology Sydney
  • Master of Education in Adult Education, University of Technology Sydney

Keywords

  • Midwifery
  • Midwifery continuity of care
  • Midwifery education
  • Midwifery models of care
  • Quality Maternal Newborn Care

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
420499 Midwifery not elsewhere classified 80
420699 Public health not elsewhere classified 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/12/2016 - 1/12/2023 Senior Lecturer in Midwifery University of Technology Sydney
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/12/2020 - 1/12/2023 Midwifery Director on the Board for the Australian College of Midwives

Allison Cummins was elected to the Australian College of Midwives Board in 2020 and was appointed for a term of three years. Her role on the Board is to provide a midwifery perspective on the ACM's strategic direction and governance. 

Australian College of Midwives

Awards

Research Award

Year Award
2020 Distilling Impact from research
University of Technology Sydney

Teaching Award

Year Award
2019 Approaches to learning and teaching that influence, motivate and inspire students to become woman-centred, professionally competent and collaborative practitioners
University of Technology Sydney
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Gray M, Kitson-Reynolds E, Cummins A, Starting life as a midwife: An international review of transition from student to practitioner (2019)

This volume explores the unique challenges midwifery graduates face as they move into practice. It identifies the similarities and differences in midwifery education, regulation, ... [more]

This volume explores the unique challenges midwifery graduates face as they move into practice. It identifies the similarities and differences in midwifery education, regulation, and clinical practice faced by graduate midwives in all continents, examining the various support systems available for graduate midwives in many countries, and identifying the common strategies (formal and informal) and approaches that have proved to be effective in supporting midwifery graduates.The book volume brings together the experiences of new midwives starting out in registered practice, to share the challenges and triumphs during their transition to confident practitioners. It identifies, explains and details both established and innovative new mechanisms in place to support new midwives in each country, and examines the effects the experiences of transitioning to practice may have on future professional practice, resilience and sustainability. Lack of support during the new-graduate transition to practice has been associated with early attrition from the midwifery profession. Stress, disillusion, and horizontal violence have been identified as factors that influence midwifery attrition rates. Exploration of the various support mechanisms currently available in different countries may stimulate the sharing of best practices in providing new midwives with transition to practice programmes and generate further research.Each chapter is harmonized to facilitate the comparison between countries, and the maternity services context is explained using each country's specific legislation, regulation and registration of midwives. The preparation of midwifery students for qualified practice is outlined to explain how midwifery students are trained and socialized into the profession, mentored in their placements and then transitioned to registered midwife status. This book appeals to midwives, managers, educators, and newly graduated interested in international midwifery practice.

DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-93852-3
Citations Scopus - 1

Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Cummins A, Gray M, ''Birth of a midwife: The transitional journey from student to practitioner'', Starting Life as a Midwife: An International Review of Transition from Student to Practitioner 1-17 (2019)

Australia has a mixed private and public health service. The majority of childbearing women will access maternity services through the public health system. The majority of midwiv... [more]

Australia has a mixed private and public health service. The majority of childbearing women will access maternity services through the public health system. The majority of midwives will work as part of the public health system. Most births occur in hospitals attended by a midwife, less than a third of all births occur in a private hospital with an obstetrician, a small proportion occur in a birth centre and <1% occur at home with a privately practising midwife. Midwives are employed to work on a roster in a public or private hospital. Some will work in small group practices providing care to a caseload of women known as midwifery-led continuity of care, usually in the hospital or birth centre setting. An even smaller proportion will provide homebirth as part of the public system or as a privately practising midwife in their own business. Pathways to becoming a midwife include a direct entry undergraduate degree, a direct entry double degree in nursing and midwifery and a postgraduate degree designed for registered nurses. Midwifery is regulated by the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia, and all midwives need to be registered with the Australian Health Practitioners Regulation Authority. Newly graduated midwives have traditionally completed a transition to practice program that involves working for a specified period of time in each area of the maternity service. More recently new graduate midwives have been employed directly into midwifery-led continuity of care models. This chapter will provide an overview of the transitional journey from midwifery student to newly graduated midwife in the Australian context.

DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-93852-3_1

Journal article (30 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Asefa F, Cummins A, Dessie Y, Foureur M, Hayen A, 'Patterns and predictors of gestational weight gain in Addis Ababa, Central Ethiopia: a prospective cohort study.', Reprod Health, 18 159 (2021)
DOI 10.1186/s12978-021-01202-y
Co-authors Maralyn Foureur
2021 Asefa F, Cummins A, Dessie Y, Foureur M, Hayen A, 'Erratum: Midwives' and obstetricians' perspectives about pregnancy related weight management in Ethiopia: A qualitative study (PLoS ONE (2020) 15:12 (e0244221) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0244221)', PLoS ONE, 16 (2021)

The fourth author&apos;s name is spelled incorrectly. The correct spelling is: Maralyn Foureur. The correct citation is: 1. Asefa F, Cummins A, Dessie Y, Foureur M, Hayen A (2020)... [more]

The fourth author's name is spelled incorrectly. The correct spelling is: Maralyn Foureur. The correct citation is: 1. Asefa F, Cummins A, Dessie Y, Foureur M, Hayen A (2020) Midwives' and obstetricians' perspectives about pregnancy related weight management in Ethiopia: A qualitative study. PLoS ONE 15(12): e0244221. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0244221.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0247720
Co-authors Maralyn Foureur
2021 Catling C, Rossiter C, Cummins A, McIntyre E, 'Midwifery workplace culture in Sydney, Australia', Women and Birth, (2021)

Problem: Aspects of the midwifery workplace culture have previously been measured as negative with limited leadership or support. Support for midwives is essential for them to fac... [more]

Problem: Aspects of the midwifery workplace culture have previously been measured as negative with limited leadership or support. Support for midwives is essential for them to face the complexity and workloads in Australian maternity units. Background: Understanding the culture of the midwifery workplace is important to develop strategies to stem workforce attrition and to optimise care of women and their families. Aims: This study aimed to assess midwives¿ perceptions of workplace culture in two maternity units in Sydney, Australia, and compare the results with a national study using the same validated instrument. Method: This study reports results using the Australian Midwifery Workplace Culture instrument (n = 49 midwives) and stakeholder groups (n = 10). Simple descriptive statistics were used, and the qualitative responses were analysed thematically. Findings: Compared to the national sample, participants rated their workplace more favourably, especially their relationships with managers and colleagues. Over one-third (36.7%) considered that their workplace had a positive culture, compared with 27.9%e. However, they rated their workplaces more negatively on time constraints and staff resources, and reported limited autonomy. Workplaces were highly medicalised which impacted their philosophy of woman-centred care and their ability to work autonomously. Discussion: Factors related to collegiality in the workplace, relationship with managers, midwives¿ intention to leave the profession and time constraints are discussed in comparison to the national study, as well as other relevant research. Conclusion Workplace collaboration, support, respect and understanding were extremely important to midwives, as were adequate staffing levels, teamwork and opportunities for further education.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2021.07.001
2021 Stulz VM, Bradfield Z, Cummins A, Catling C, Sweet L, McInnes R, et al., 'Midwives Providing Woman-Centred Care during the COVID-19 pandemic: A national qualitative study', Women and Birth, (2021)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2021.10.006
Co-authors Karen Mclaughlin
2021 Minooee S, Cummins A, Foureur M, Travaglia J, 'Catastrophic thinking: Is it the legacy of traumatic births? Midwives' experiences of shoulder dystocia complicated births', WOMEN AND BIRTH, 34 E38-E46 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2020.08.008
Co-authors Maralyn Foureur
2021 Gilkison A, Cummins A, 'Sustainable midwifery: Supporting new graduates' transition to practice', WOMEN AND BIRTH, 34 111-112 (2021)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2020.09.019
2021 Cummins A, Griew K, Devonport C, Ebbett W, Catling C, Baird K, 'Exploring the value and acceptability of an antenatal and postnatal midwifery continuity of care model to women and midwives, using the Quality Maternal Newborn Care Framework', Women and Birth, (2021)

Background: Having a known midwife throughout pregnancy, birth and the early parenting period improves outcomes for mothers and babies. In Australia, midwifery continuity of care ... [more]

Background: Having a known midwife throughout pregnancy, birth and the early parenting period improves outcomes for mothers and babies. In Australia, midwifery continuity of care has been recommended in all states, territories and nationally although uptake has been slow. Several barriers exist to implementing midwifery continuity of care models and some maternity services have responded by introducing modified models of continuity of care. An antenatal and postnatal continuity of care model without intrapartum care is one example of a modified model of care that has been introduced by health services. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the value and acceptability of an antenatal and postnatal midwifery program to women, midwives and obstetricians prior to implementation of the model at one hospital in Metropolitan Sydney, Australia. Methods: A qualitative descriptive methodology was undertaken to discover the value and acceptability to the implementation of the model. Data was collected via focus groups and one to one interviews from the service users (pregnant women and two partners) and service providers (midwives and obstetricians). We also collected demographic data to demonstrate the diversity of the setting. The Quality Maternal Newborn Care (QMNC) Framework was used to guide the focus groups and analyse the data. Findings: Four themes emerged from the data that were named feeling safe and connected, having more quality time and being confident, having a sense of community and respecting cultural diversity. The findings were analysed through the lens of the quality components of the QMNC framework. The final findings demonstrate the value and acceptability of implementing this model of care from women's, midwives and obstetrician's perspective. Conclusions/implications: Providing midwifery continuity of care through the antenatal and postnatal period without intrapartum care, is being implemented in Australia without any research. Using the QMNC framework is a useful way to explore the qualities of a new emerging service and the values and acceptability of this model of care for service providers and service users.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2021.03.006
2021 Minooee S, Cummins A, Foureur M, Travaglia J, 'Shoulder dystocia: A panic station or an opportunity for post-traumatic growth?', Midwifery, 101 103044 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2021.103044
Co-authors Maralyn Foureur
2020 Foureur M, Kumsa F, Cummins A, Hayen A, Dessie Y, 'Gestational Weight Gain and its Effect on Birth Outcomes in sub-Saharan Africa: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis', PLoS ONE, 15 (2020) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Maralyn Foureur
2020 Geia L, Baird K, Bail K, Barclay L, Bennett J, Best O, et al., 'A unified call to action from Australian nursing and midwifery leaders: ensuring that Black lives matter', Contemporary Nurse, 56 297-308 (2020) [C1]

Nurses and midwives of Australia now is the time for change! As powerfully placed, Indigenous and non-Indigenous nursing and midwifery professionals, together we can ensure an eff... [more]

Nurses and midwives of Australia now is the time for change! As powerfully placed, Indigenous and non-Indigenous nursing and midwifery professionals, together we can ensure an effective and robust Indigenous curriculum in our nursing and midwifery schools of education. Today, Australia finds itself in a shifting tide of social change, where the voices for better and safer health care ring out loud. Voices for justice, equity and equality reverberate across our cities, our streets, homes, and institutions of learning. It is a call for new songlines of reform. The need to embed meaningful Indigenous health curricula is stronger now than it ever was for Australian nursing and midwifery. It is essential that nursing and midwifery leadership continue to build an authentic collaborative environment for Indigenous curriculum development. Bipartisan alliance is imperative for all academic staff to be confident in their teaching and learning experiences with Indigenous health syllabus. This paper is a call out. Now is the time for Indigenous and non-Indigenous nurses and midwives to make a stand together, for justice and equity in our teaching, learning, and practice. Together we will dismantle systems, policy, and practices in health that oppress. The Black Lives Matter movement provides us with a ¿now window¿ of accepted dialogue to build a better, culturally safe Australian nursing and midwifery workforce, ensuring that Black Lives Matter in all aspects of health care.

DOI 10.1080/10376178.2020.1809107
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Maralyn Foureur, Jed Duff, Amanda Johnson10, Michael Hazelton, Alison Hutton, Rhonda Wilson, Jenny Sim, Brett Mitchell
2020 Frawley JE, McKenzie K, Sinclair L, Cummins A, Wardle J, Hall H, 'Midwives' knowledge, attitudes and confidence in discussing maternal and childhood immunisation with parents: A national study', VACCINE, 38 366-371 (2020)
DOI 10.1016/j.vaccine.2019.10.006
Citations Web of Science - 1
2020 Cummins A, Coddington R, Fox D, Symon A, 'Exploring the qualities of midwifery-led continuity of care in Australia (MiLCCA) using the quality maternal and newborn care framework', WOMEN AND BIRTH, 33 125-134 (2020)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.03.013
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 1
2020 Frawley JE, McKenzie K, Cummins A, Sinclair L, Wardle J, Hall H, 'Midwives' role in the provision of maternal and childhood immunisation information', WOMEN AND BIRTH, 33 145-152 (2020)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.02.006
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2020 Asefa F, Cummins A, Dessie Y, Foureu M, Hayen A, 'Midwives' and obstetricians' perspectives about pregnancy related weight management in Ethiopia: A qualitative study', PLOS ONE, 15 (2020)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0244221
Citations Web of Science - 1
2020 Minooee S, Cummins A, Sims DJ, Foureur M, Travaglia J, 'Scoping review of the impact of birth trauma on clinical decisions of midwives', Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 26 1270-1279 (2020) [C1]

Objective: The psychological and emotional impact of a traumatic birth experience on clinicians is well-established. It is also known that emotions can generally influence decisio... [more]

Objective: The psychological and emotional impact of a traumatic birth experience on clinicians is well-established. It is also known that emotions can generally influence decisions. However, it is not clear whether experiencing a birth trauma can affect the professional behaviour and decision-making of clinicians. This study explores the impact of birth trauma on clinical decision-making of midwives. Data Sources: Four databases (Medline, Scopus, CINAHL and ProQuest) were searched to identify English language studies published from 1990 to 2018. Due to the lack of studies with specific focus on clinical decision-making after birth trauma, we defined two main domains for our literature search. To be included, studies had to focus on either traumatic birth experience or clinical decision-making in midwifery. The findings of the two domains were then integrated. Study Selection: Of a total 2104 studies identified, 70 received full-text screening with 40 included in the review. Twenty-two articles were about traumatic birth events and 18 examined decision-making in midwifery. Data Extraction: Information were extracted on each article's purpose, study design, data collection, participants, definitions of birth trauma and the context in which clinical decisions were made. Results: Thematic analysis was conducted. The impact of birth trauma on midwives could be categorized into the following themes: psychological issues; professional concerns; changes in practice and positive impact. Review of literature indicated that clinical decision-making could be influenced through all these themes. Conclusion: Decision-making can be impacted by the midwife's affective state related to previous experience of birth trauma. The continuum of impact may vary from increased defensiveness to increased personal and professional growth. Being aware of this impact can help midwives to better manage their emotions while making decision after traumatic birth experiences.

DOI 10.1111/jep.13335
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Maralyn Foureur
2019 Symon A, McFadden A, White M, Fraser K, Cummins A, 'Using a quality care framework to evaluate user and provider experiences of maternity care: A comparative study', MIDWIFERY, 73 17-25 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2019.03.001
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
2019 Symon A, McFadden A, White M, Fraser K, Cummins A, 'Using the Quality Maternal and Newborn Care Framework to evaluate women's experiences of different models of care: A qualitative study', MIDWIFERY, 73 26-34 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2019.03.002
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2018 Cummins AM, Wight R, Watts N, Catling C, 'Introducing sensitive issues and self-care strategies to first year midwifery students', MIDWIFERY, 61 8-14 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2018.02.007
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2018 Cummins AM, Smith R, Catling C, Watts N, Scarf V, Fox D, Gray J, 'Midwifery Graduate Attributes: A model for curriculum development and education', MIDWIFERY, 61 66-69 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2018.02.019
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2018 Cummins AM, Catling C, Homer CSE, 'Enabling new graduate midwives to work in midwifery continuity of care models: A conceptual model for implementation', WOMEN AND BIRTH, 31 343-349 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2017.11.007
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
2018 Symon A, McFadden A, White M, Fraser K, Cummins A, 'Adapting the Quality Maternal and Newborn Care (QMNC) Framework to evaluate models of antenatal care: A pilot study', PLOS ONE, 13 (2018)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0200640
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2018 Valizadeh S, Hosseinzadeh M, Mohammadi E, Hassankhani H, Fooladi MM, Cummins A, 'Coping mechanism against high levels of daily stress by working breastfeeding mothers in Iran', International Journal of Nursing Sciences, 5 39-44 (2018)

Objectives: Breastfeeding mothers returning to work undertake multiple conflicting roles at home and work that can result in high levels of stress. Exploring coping skills amongst... [more]

Objectives: Breastfeeding mothers returning to work undertake multiple conflicting roles at home and work that can result in high levels of stress. Exploring coping skills amongst these mothers can help in planning useful programmes to promote family wellbeing. This study aims to explore the experiences of working breastfeeding mothers and their coping mechanism against high levels of daily stress. Methods: In this qualitative study, we described the experiences of 20 Iranian breastfeeding mothers through in-depth and semi-structured interviews. All interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. Results: Two main themes emerged as follows: 1) self-management with subthemes of a) attitude reconstruction, b) order and planning, c) creating a boundary between work and family and d) reprioritising life affairs; and 2) seeking help with subthemes of a) family member support, b) childcare facilities and c) spirituality. Conclusions: Findings suggest that women need support from family members and family-friendly policies at the workplace. Breastfeeding mothers may benefit from educational programmes that focus on effective coping strategies.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijnss.2017.12.005
Citations Scopus - 3
2018 Minooee S, Cummins A, Foureur M, 'Shoulder dystocia and range of head-body delivery interval (HBDI): The association between prolonged HBDI and neonatal outcomes: Protocol for a systematic review', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY AND REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY, 229 82-87 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.ejogrb.2018.08.016
Co-authors Maralyn Foureur
2018 Hogan R, Orr F, Fox D, Cummins A, Foureur M, 'Developing nursing and midwifery students' capacity for coping with bullying and aggression in clinical settings: Students' evaluation of a learning resource', NURSE EDUCATION IN PRACTICE, 29 89-94 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2017.12.002
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Maralyn Foureur
2017 Cummins AM, Denney-Wilson E, Homer CSE, 'The mentoring experiences of new graduate midwives working in midwifery continuity of care models in Australia', NURSE EDUCATION IN PRACTICE, 24 106-111 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2016.01.003
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 9
2016 Cummins AM, Denney-Wilson E, Homer CSE, 'The challenge of employing and managing new graduate midwives in midwifery group practices in hospitals', JOURNAL OF NURSING MANAGEMENT, 24 614-623 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/jonm.12364
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
2016 Catling C, Hogan R, Fox D, Cummins A, Kelly M, Sheehan A, 'Simulation workshops with first year midwifery students', NURSE EDUCATION IN PRACTICE, 17 109-115 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2015.12.003
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2015 Cummins AM, Denney-Wilson E, Homer CSE, 'The experiences of new graduate midwives working in midwifery continuity of care models in Australia', MIDWIFERY, 31 438-444 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2014.12.013
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 27
2014 Cummins AM, Catling C, Hogan R, Homer CSE, 'Addressing culture shock in first year midwifery students: Maximising the initial clinical experience', WOMEN AND BIRTH, 27 271-275 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2014.06.009
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
2014 Catling C, White H, Cummins A, Hogan R, 'The Virtual Tutor Project: A Student-Friendly Guide to Clinical Skills', CLINICAL SIMULATION IN NURSING, 10 E277-E280 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.ecns.2014.01.005
Citations Web of Science - 1
Show 27 more journal articles

Conference (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Fox D, Hanna C, Cummins A, 'Babies born with ambiguous genitalia: Exploring the midwife's role in supporting families at birth', WOMEN AND BIRTH (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.07.218
2019 Cummins A, Coddington R, Fox D, Symon A, 'Exploring the qualities of midwifery-led continuity of care in Australia (MiLCCA) using the quality maternal and newborn care framework', WOMEN AND BIRTH (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.07.231
Citations Web of Science - 3
2018 Cummins A, 'A toolkit to enable new graduate midwives to work in midwifery continuity of care models', WOMEN AND BIRTH (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2018.08.068
2017 Cummins A, 'Extending the boundaries - Enabling new graduate midwives to work in midwifery continuity of care models in Australia', WOMEN AND BIRTH (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2017.08.047
Citations Web of Science - 1
2015 Hogan R, Orr F, Cummins A, 'Sustaining 'super' midwives: Building resilience in midwifery students', WOMEN AND BIRTH (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2015.07.066
Citations Web of Science - 1
2015 Catling C, Hogan R, Fox D, Cummins A, Kelly M, Sheehan A, 'Improving confidence in first year midwifery students', WOMEN AND BIRTH (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2015.07.137
2013 Cummins A, 'Addressing culture shock in 1st year midwifery students: Maximising the initial clinical experience', WOMEN AND BIRTH (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2013.08.169
2013 Cummins A, 'Facilitation of new graduate midwives into midwifery continuity of care models', WOMEN AND BIRTH (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2013.08.170
2013 Cummins A, Catling C, Hogan R, Sheehan A, Smith R, 'The art and science of supporting midwifery students in clinical practice', WOMEN AND BIRTH (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2013.08.131
Show 6 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 4
Total funding $106,000

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20211 grants / $35,000

Pregnant women and new mothers accessing culturally safe health care & support through #thismymob$35,000

Funding body: University of Technology Sydney

Funding body University of Technology Sydney
Project Team

Dr Allison Maree Cummins – Lead investigator 75% Dr Vanessa Louise Scarf A/Prof Christopher Lawrence Ms Sophie Ritchie Prof Olivera Marjanovic A/Prof Tuck Wah Leong Prof Kathleen Marion Baird Ms Loretta Musgrave (Chief

Scheme FEIT Cross Faculty Collaboration, University of Technology Sydney
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20182 grants / $40,000

Midwifery Led Continuity of Care in Australia (MiLCCA) project $20,000

Funding body: University of Technology Sydney

Funding body University of Technology Sydney
Project Team

Cummins, A - lead investigator – 75% Dr R Coddington, Dr D Fox Dr A Symon (Dundee Uni)

Scheme Early Career Researcher
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Project aimed to determine the attitudes of midwives towards maternal and childhood vaccination and understand how they communicate to parents about maternal and childhood vaccination 2018$20,000

Funding body: University of Technology Sydney

Funding body University of Technology Sydney
Project Team

Dr Frawley Dr Cummins – co-investigator 30% Dr Sinclair Dr Wardle Dr Hall

Scheme Faculty of Health seed funding grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20171 grants / $31,000

Evaluation of Wollongong Midwifery Group Practice$31,000

Funding body: Wollongong Hospital and Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District

Funding body Wollongong Hospital and Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District
Project Team

Cummins, A. – lead investigator -80% Dr R Coddington Professor M Foureur M

Scheme Wollongong Hospital Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current7

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2021 Masters The acceptability of video-conferencing for the provision of Clinical Supervision for Midwives Midwifery, University of Technology Sydney Co-Supervisor
2021 Honours Fear of labour and birth in young adult primiparous women in Australia: A descriptive phenomenological study using the Fear of Birth Scale as a prompt Midwifery, University of Technology Sydney Co-Supervisor
2020 Honours How do models of maternity care in Australia impact on women's experiences of psychological birth trauma Midwifery, University of Technology, Sydney Co-Supervisor
2020 PhD Exploring the career trajectory of early career midwives who aspire to work in midwifery continuity of care models Midwifery, University of Technology Sydney Principal Supervisor
2019 PhD Barriers and Facilitators for Breastfeeding Among Working Mothers in Saudi Arabia PhD (Nursing), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2019 PhD Understanding the Pedagogy of Continuity of Care Experiences Within Pre-registration Midwifery Education: A Critical Feminist Approach PhD (Midwifery), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Exploration of midwives’ experiences about shoulder dystocia-complicated births and investigation of the incidence of shoulder dystocia in the Royalat one Australian Hospital for Women: An exploratory sequential mixed methods study Midwifery, University of Technology Sydney Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2021 PhD Gestational Weight Gain in Central Ethiopia: Patterns, Predictors, Birth Weight, Women’s and Care Providers’ Views. A Mixed Method Study Public Health, University of Technology Sydney Co-Supervisor
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Research Projects

Does the model of maternity care make a difference to birth outcomes for women who have a perinatal mental health concern? A retrospective cohort study 2021 -

Background: The benefits of midwifery continuity of care during pregnancy for healthy women with a
low risk pregnancy have been well established. High quality evidence suggests that midwife-led care (or
caseload midwifery) is associated with improved maternal and neonatal outcomes such as increased
chance of spontaneous vaginal birth, reduced rate of fetal loss or neonatal death, reduced rate of
preterm birth and lower rates of intrapartum interventions. Despite clear evidence on the positive
impact of caseload midwifery for women with low risk pregnancies, less is known about pregnancies
that are complicated with physical or mental conditions. Pregnancy may trigger or exacerbate mental
disorders, in particular anxiety and depression which are reported as the most common mental
disorders during antenatal and postnatal periods. However, the role of caseload midwifery in
pregnancies affected by mental health conditions is under-researched.
Aim: To determine if midwifery care provided under a caseload midwifery model is associated with
improved perinatal outcomes for women with perinatal anxiety and depression and/or other perinatal
mental health conditions compared to standard models of maternity care (shared midwifery/GP/
midwife/obstetric).
Hypothesis: Midwifery continuity of care model improves perinatal outcomes for women who have
anxiety and depression and/or other perinatal mental health conditions.


Validation of the Quality Maternal and Newborn Care Framework index (QMNCFi) - survey user version 2020 -

Quality maternity care is known to improve a range of outcomes for mothers and babies. The Lancet Series on Midwifery’s Quality Maternal and Newborn Care (QMNC) Framework (Renfrew et al., 2014) is a high-level synthesis of the global evidence on quality maternity care. It has influenced global benchmarks for antenatal care (WHO [World Health Organization], 2016) and specific national maternity care policy (COAG Health Council, 2019; Scottish Government, 2017). Crucially, the QMNC Framework’s comprehensive, evidence-based approach to identifying the components and characteristics of quality care provides a benchmark for service evaluation across different service delivery contexts.
Following our successful adaptation of the QMNC Framework for qualitative evaluations of maternity care (Cummins et al., 2019; Cummins et al., 2021; Symon et al., 2018, 2019b), we have now developed the QMNC Framework index (QMNCFi), a prototype tool for quantitative evaluation of maternity services by service users. This proposal describes the formal psychometric evaluation of the QMNCFi in an international online study in the United Kingdom, Australia, India and Ghana.


Association of model of care on pregnant women's stress, anxiety and depression during the COVID-19 pandemic 2020 -

Background: Research has examined how to provide care to women during the COVID-19 pandemic. Some research has explored women’s experiences during the pandemic however no research has asked women how they feel about the changes to care and analysed the association of continuity of carer on women’s experiences. We examined pregnant women’s self-reported changes to their planned pregnancy care and evaluate associations between continuity of care and women’s feelings about changes to their planned care. A cross-sectional online survey of pregnant women aged over 18 years in their final trimester of pregnancy in Australia was undertaken. The survey questions evaluated women’s experiences and how they felt about maternity care changes by level of continuity. We found 1668 women completed the survey with most women having reported at least one change to pregnancy care and birthing plans. Most were unhappy about the changes experienced. Women receiving full continuity of care were more likely to rate their feelings to changed care plans as happy or very happy (p<0.001) than those women who received partial or no continuity.


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Associate Professor Allison Cummins

Position

Associate Professor
Midwifery Team at Newcastle University School of Nursing and Midwifery College of Health Medicine and Wellbeing
School of Nursing and Midwifery
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Contact Details

Email allison.cummins@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 434 84220

Office

Location Central Coast Clinical School and Research Institute

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