Dr Karen McLaughlin

Dr Karen McLaughlin

Associate Lecturer

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Career Summary

Biography

I am a Clinical Midwife Specialist, researcher and academic with almost 30 years clinical nursing/midwifery experience. My clinical experience has predominately been at the John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW firstly in the area of Paediatric oncology and then in Midwifery. My main area of research is Asthma in Pregnancy with my Masters thesis examining the role of midwives in the antenatal management of asthma and my PhD further examined the management of asthma in pregnancy from the viewpoint of health professionals and pregnant women with asthma. I also examined the acceptability and feasibility of introducing a novel asthma management strategy using the measurement of Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide (FeNO) into antenatal care. As an academic in the School of Nursing and Midwifery teaching into the Bachelor of Midwifery Degree I am passionate about providing clinical relevant and evidence-based information to the students and ensuring that they are given the opportunity to explore the Art of Midwifery and gain the knowledge and skills required to become passionate and proficient midwives.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Medicine, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Nursing (Conv), University of New England
  • Post Graduate Diploma in Midwifery, University of Newcastle
  • Graduate Certificate in Parenting Education, John Hunter Hospital
  • Master of Philosophy, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Management
  • Pregnancy
  • Qualitative

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 McLaughlin K, Jensen ME, Foureur M, Gibson PG, Murphy VE, 'Fractional exhaled nitric oxide-based asthma management: The feasibility of its implementation into antenatal care in New South Wales, Australia', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 60 389-395 (2020) [C1]

© 2019 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Background: The use of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO)-based asthma management durin... [more]

© 2019 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Background: The use of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO)-based asthma management during pregnancy can significantly reduce asthma exacerbations in non-smoking pregnant women. The feasibility of implementing this strategy into antenatal care has not been explored. Aims: To examine the feasibility of implementing FeNO-based asthma management into antenatal clinics in New South Wales (NSW) Australia. Materials and Methods: Semi-structured face-to-face interviews with video elicitation were conducted with healthcare professionals (HCPs) providing antenatal care in one of two hospital-based antenatal clinics in NSW, Australia. The video shown demonstrated the use of the FeNO instrument and other aspects of the management strategy, in antenatal care. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results: A total of 20 interviews were conducted with 15 midwives, four obstetricians, and one general practitioner. Two main themes and ten sub-themes arose: Getting a number (sub-themes: engaging, technically easy, objective, predictive, reassuring); and Resourcing (sub-themes: time and timing, systems, staff, education and cost). Comments included: ¿It's easy, fast and effective¿ and ¿the main barrier is time¿. All HCPs felt capable of facilitating the FeNO-based management strategy, with appropriate education, and were willing to undertake this strategy, saying: ¿¿it would be perfectly acceptable for a midwife or doctor to do it¿; also, ¿they don't necessarily need to see a physician, it's something that midwives would take on generally¿¿. Conclusion: Participants in this study considered FeNO-based asthma management for pregnant women to be a feasible addition to antenatal care following appropriate provision of resources and education.

DOI 10.1111/ajo.13061
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Vanessa Murphy, Peter Gibson, Maralyn Foureur, Megan Jensen
2020 Dewar B, Stulz V, Buliak A, Connolly L, McLaughlin DK, Newport K, et al., 'Exploring and developing student midwives experiences (ESME) An appreciative inquiry study', Midwifery, 91 102844-102844 (2020)
DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2020.102844
2020 McLaughlin K, Jensen M, Foureur M, Murphy VE, 'Antenatal asthma management by midwives in Australia Self-reported knowledge, confidence and guideline use', Women and Birth, 33 e166-e175 (2020) [C1]

© 2019 Australian College of Midwives Background: Asthma affects approximately 12.7% of pregnant women in Australia. Increased maternal and infant morbidity is closely associated ... [more]

© 2019 Australian College of Midwives Background: Asthma affects approximately 12.7% of pregnant women in Australia. Increased maternal and infant morbidity is closely associated with poorly controlled asthma during pregnancy. Midwives are well placed to provide antenatal asthma management but data on current asthma management during pregnancy is not available, nor is the use of guidelines for clinical practice by this health professional group. Aim: To explore self-reported antenatal asthma management provided by midwives across Australia and how this reflects guideline recommendations. Method: An online survey was developed and distributed throughout Australia via the Australian College of Midwives, social media and healthcare facilities. Results: Responses from 371 midwives were obtained. Ten percent of midwives rated their knowledge as ¿good¿ and 1% as ¿very good¿, with 39% ¿poor¿ or ¿very poor¿. Being ¿somewhat¿ or ¿not at all¿ confident to provide antenatal asthma management was noted by 87% of midwives. Clinical guidelines were referred to by 50% of midwives and 40% stated that their main role was to refer women to other healthcare professionals. Only 54% reported that a clear referral pathway existed. Most respondents (>90%) recognised key recommendations for asthma management such as smoking cessation, appropriate vaccinations, and the continuation of prescribed asthma medications. Conclusion: Although midwives appear aware of key clinical recommendations for optimal antenatal asthma management, low referral to clinical practice guidelines and lack of knowledge and confidence was evident. Further research is required to determine what care pregnant women with asthma are actually receiving and identify strategies to improve antenatal asthma management by midwives.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.04.007
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Vanessa Murphy, Maralyn Foureur, Megan Jensen
2020 McLaughlin K, Jensen ME, Foureur M, Gibson P, Murphy VE, 'The acceptability and feasibility of implementing a Fractional exhaled Nitric Oxide (FeNO)-based asthma management strategy into antenatal care: The perspective of pregnant women with asthma', Midwifery, 88 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2020.102757
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Vanessa Murphy, Peter Gibson, Maralyn Foureur, Megan Jensen
2019 Robijn AL, Jensen ME, McLaughlin K, Gibson PG, Murphy VE, 'Inhaled corticosteroid use during pregnancy among women with asthma: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Clinical and Experimental Allergy, 49 1403-1417 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Background: Studies demonstrate the prescription rate for inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) decreases in early pregnancy, possibly increasing exacer... [more]

© 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Background: Studies demonstrate the prescription rate for inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) decreases in early pregnancy, possibly increasing exacerbation risk. This could be related to non-adherence to prescribed asthma medication or medication cessation by the patient or doctor. ICS use during pregnancy has not previously been summarized in a systematic review. Objective: The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the use of ICS during pregnancy among asthmatic women, specifically: (1) the prevalence of use, (2) changes of use during pregnancy compared with pre-pregnancy and (3) medication adherence among ICS users. Methods: We systematically searched literature in Embase, MEDLINE, CINAL and Cochrane, using terms related to asthma, pregnancy and medication use. All English articles reporting ICS among pregnant women with asthma were included. Prevalence, changes in ICS use during pregnancy and ICS adherence were pooled using STATA (version 15.0, StataCorp USA). Results: A total of 4237 references were retrieved in the initial search. Screening and review led to the inclusion of 52 articles for one or more aims (Aim 1: N¿=¿45; Aim 2, N¿=¿13; and Aim 3, N¿=¿5). The pooled prevalence of ICS use during pregnancy was 41% (95%CI 36%-45%); 49% (95%CI 44%-55%) in Europe, 39% (95%CI 32%-47%) in Australia and 34% (95%CI 27%-41%) in North America. In eight prescription databases, ICS prescription rates lowered in the first trimester of pregnancy, compared with pre-pregnancy, increased in the second trimester and decreased in the third trimester. Five studies reported ICS adherence among pregnant women, using four measures of self-reported non-adherence. In two comparable studies, pooled ICS non-adherence was 40% (95%CI 36%-44%). Conclusions: The prevalence of ICS use among pregnant women with asthma is 41% and varies widely between countries and continents, and prescription rates for ICS change throughout pregnancy. More studies are needed to investigate ICS adherence during pregnancy in women with asthma.

DOI 10.1111/cea.13474
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Megan Jensen, Peter Gibson, Vanessa Murphy
2018 McLaughlin K, Foureur M, Jensen ME, Murphy VE, 'Review and appraisal of guidelines for the management of asthma during pregnancy', Women and Birth, 31 e349-e357 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Australian College of Midwives Background: Asthma affects 12.7% of pregnancies in Australia. Poorly controlled asthma is associated with increased maternal and infant morbi... [more]

© 2018 Australian College of Midwives Background: Asthma affects 12.7% of pregnancies in Australia. Poorly controlled asthma is associated with increased maternal and infant morbidity and mortality. Optimal antenatal management of asthma during pregnancy has the potential to reduce complications relating to asthma. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines help to translate health research findings into practice and when implemented can improve health outcomes. National and International guidelines currently provide recommendations for optimal asthma care in pregnancy. Aim: To appraise the existing asthma in pregnancy guidelines with respect to their evidence for recommendations, consistency of recommendations and appropriateness for clinical practice. Method: The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) tool was used to appraise four English language asthma in pregnancy guidelines, published or updated between 2007 and 2016. The recommendations, range and level of evidence was analysed. Results: Two of the four guidelines scored highly in most domains of the appraisal. Many of the recommendations made in the appraised guidelines were consistent. Due to the lack of randomised controlled trials involving pregnant women with asthma, most recommendations were evidenced by consensus and expert opinion rather than high quality meta-analysis, systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials. Conclusion: The recommended antenatal asthma management was generally consistent among the guidelines but lacked clarity in some areas which then leave them open to interpretation. More randomised controlled trials involving pregnant women with asthma are required to fortify the recommendations made and asthma management guidelines should be included in Australian Antenatal Care Guidelines as they currently are not.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2018.01.008
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Megan Jensen, Maralyn Foureur, Vanessa Murphy
2016 McLaughlin K, Kable A, Ebert L, Murphy V, 'Midwives' perception of their role in providing antenatal asthma management in Australia - A qualitative study', Midwifery, 35 11-16 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. International guidelines recommend a collaborative approach to the care of pregnant women with asthma. Midwives, as the primary health care provider for child... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. International guidelines recommend a collaborative approach to the care of pregnant women with asthma. Midwives, as the primary health care provider for childbearing women should be viewed as collaborative partners in the provision of antenatal asthma management. However, the role of the midwife in providing antenatal asthma management has not been widely reported.Method: Australian midwives' perceived role in antenatal asthma management was studied using a qualitative descriptive method. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 13 midwives working in a regional tertiary hospital. Morse and Field's four-stage process was used to analyse the data.Findings: the perceived role of the midwife in antenatal asthma management varied among participants. Some midwives stated their role was to refer women on to other health professionals. Other midwives stated that they should provide education to the women regarding their asthma management during their pregnancy.Conclusion: participants were uncertain about their role and lacked confidence in antenatal asthma management. The midwifery context in which they worked and the resources available to them at this health care facility appeared to influence the perception of their role.

DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2016.01.016
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Ashley Kable, Vanessa Murphy, Lyn Ebert
2015 McLaughlin K, Kable A, Ebert L, Murphy VE, 'Barriers preventing Australian midwives from providing antenatal asthma management', British Journal of Midwifery, 23 116-123 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 MA Healthcare Ltd. International guidelines indicate that management of asthma during pregnancy should be multidisciplinary; however, the role of midwives has not been rese... [more]

© 2015 MA Healthcare Ltd. International guidelines indicate that management of asthma during pregnancy should be multidisciplinary; however, the role of midwives has not been researched. Method: A qualitative descriptive study exploring Australian midwives' current knowledge about asthma in pregnancy and their perceived role in antenatal asthma management was conducted, involving individual semi-structured in-depth interviews with 13 midwives in a tertiary referral hospital. Data were analysed using Morse and Field's four-stage process. Findings: Midwives identified barriers preventing them from providing antenatal asthma management, including: lack of knowledge about asthma in pregnancy; time constraints; women's knowledge about asthma in pregnancy; lack of a clear referral pathway; and lack of accessible asthma management equipment. Barriers were influenced by the institutional context in which the midwives worked. Conclusion: While participants identified barriers preventing them from providing recommended antenatal asthma management, they also suggested that improving their knowledge about asthma in pregnancy and developing a clear referral pathway may be beneficial.

DOI 10.12968/bjom.2015.23.2.116
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Vanessa Murphy, Ashley Kable, Lyn Ebert
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Conference (16 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Mclaughlin K, Foureur M, Jensen M, Gibson P, Murphy V, 'Stop, Start or Continue Asthma Medication in Pregnancy: Acceptability of a Biomarker-Based Approach to Antenatal Clinic Obstetricians and Midwives', AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY (2019)
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Vanessa Murphy, Maralyn Foureur
2019 Mclaughlin K, Jensen M, Foureur M, Gibson P, Murphy V, 'Are pregnant women with asthma receiving guideline-recommended antenatal asthma management?- A survey of pregnant women in Australia', WOMEN AND BIRTH (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.07.207
Co-authors Megan Jensen, Maralyn Foureur, Vanessa Murphy, Peter Gibson
2019 Mclaughlin K, Jensen M, Foureur M, Gibson P, Murphy V, 'The acceptability and feasibility of a novel asthma management strategy in Australian antenatal clinics-a qualitative descriptive study', WOMEN AND BIRTH (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.07.273
Co-authors Megan Jensen, Maralyn Foureur, Vanessa Murphy, Peter Gibson
2019 Robijn A, Jensen M, Mclaughlin K, Gibson P, Murphy V, 'Evaluating inhaled corticosteroid use among pregnant women with asthma: systematic review and meta-analysis', EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, Madrid, SPAIN (2019)
DOI 10.1183/13993003.congress-2019.PA2558
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megan Jensen, Vanessa Murphy, Peter Gibson
2019 McLaughlin K, Jensen M, Foureur M, Gibson P, Murphy V, 'The acceptibility and feasibility of FeNo-based asthma management in Australian antenatal clinics- A qualitative descriptive study', EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, Madrid, SPAIN (2019)
DOI 10.1183/13993003.congress-2019.PA2624
Co-authors Maralyn Foureur, Peter Gibson, Vanessa Murphy, Megan Jensen
2019 McLaughlin K, Jensen M, Foureur M, Gibson P, Murphy V, 'A survey of pregnant women with asthma in Australia-Are they receiving guideline recommendations?', EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, Madrid, SPAIN (2019)
DOI 10.1183/13993003.congress-2019.PA5030
Co-authors Maralyn Foureur, Peter Gibson, Vanessa Murphy, Megan Jensen
2019 Robijn A, Jensen M, McLaughlin K, Gibson P, Murphy V, 'EVALUATING INHALED CORTICOSTEROID USE AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN WITH ASTHMA', RESPIROLOGY (2019)
Co-authors Megan Jensen, Peter Gibson, Vanessa Murphy
2019 Mclaughlin K, Jensen M, Foureur M, Gibson P, Murphy V, 'KNOWLEDGE AND CONFIDENCE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONALS IN PROVIDING ASTHMA MANAGEMENT IN PREGNANCY: RESULTS OF AN AUSTRALIAN NATIONWIDE SURVEY', RESPIROLOGY (2019)
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Vanessa Murphy, Maralyn Foureur
2019 Mclaughlin K, Connolly L, Buliak A, Newport K, Drayton N, Rebolledo S, et al., 'Exploring the student midwife experience (ESME): Discovering the power and passion of midwifery', WOMEN AND BIRTH (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.07.270
2017 McLaughlin K, McCaffery K, Foureur M, Murphy V, 'REVIEW OF ASTHMA IN PREGNANCY GUIDELINES', RESPIROLOGY (2017)
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Vanessa Murphy, Maralyn Foureur
2016 Mclaughlin K, Kable A, Ebert L, Murphy V, 'MIDWIVES' PERCEPTION OF THEIR ROLE IN PROVIDING ANTENATAL ASTHMA MANAGEMENT IN AUSTRALIA-A QUALITATIVE STUDY', RESPIROLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Ashley Kable, Vanessa Murphy, Lyn Ebert
2011 McLaughlin KM, Mattes J, Murphy VE, Steel KR, Powell H, Gibson PG, 'The Growing Into Asthma (GIA) Study: Need for improved management of respiratory illnesses in early life', PSANZ 2011 15th Annual Congress: Poster Abstracts, Hobart, TAS (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Vanessa Murphy, Joerg Mattes, Peter Gibson
2011 Mattes J, Murphy VE, McLaughlin KM, Steel KR, Powell H, Gibson PG, 'Are maternal asthma exacerbations during pregnancy related to impaired infant growth in the first six months of life?', Respirology, Perth, WA (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Vanessa Murphy, Joerg Mattes
2010 McLaughlin KM, Steel KR, McCaffery K, Powell HG, Clifton VL, Giles W, et al., 'Psychosocial characteristics and perceived medication risk in pregnant women and asthma', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health: Abstracts of the 14th Annual Congress of the Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand 2010, Wellington, NZ (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Michael Hensley
2010 Steel KR, McLaughlin KM, McCaffery K, Powell GH, Clifton VL, Giles W, et al., 'Psychosocial characteristics and perceived medication risk in pregnant women with asthma', Respirology, Brisbane, QLD (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Michael Hensley
2009 McLaughlin KM, Murphy VE, McCaffery K, Powell H, Clifton VL, Giles W, et al., 'The relationship between patient perceived risk of inhaled corticosteroids in pregnancy and medication adherence', Respirology, Darwin, NT (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Vanessa Murphy, Peter Gibson, Michael Hensley
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 PhD Women's Knowledge and Awareness of the Risk of Venous Thromboembolism During Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period in Al-Jouf City, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia PhD (Midwifery), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Karen McLaughlin

Position

Associate Lecturer
School of Nursing and Midwifery
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Contact Details

Email karen.mclaughlin@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40557561
Fax (02) 4921 XXXX

Office

Room Richardson Wing RW-236
Building Richardson Wing
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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