Ms Ginger Chu

Ms Ginger Chu

Conjoint Senior Lecturer

School of Nursing and Midwifery (Nursing)

Career Summary

Biography

Ginger Chu, is a Hunter New England (HNE) Nursing Clinical Research Fellow anda leader in clinical practice as a NephrologyClinical Nurse Consultant. She has worked in Taiwan and Australia as a Registered Nurse for 16 years.

Her passion is in Education and Research; throughout her career as a Conjoint Senior Lecturer at the University of Newcastle, she has successfully supported 7 of her colleagues to complete their master degrees. Her research focus is in management of patients with kidney disease; her past projects included:

  • (2012) Can 2 % chlorhexidine aqueous solution provides better infection control in PD exit site care when compared with 10% povidine-iodine 
  • (2013) What is the patient’s perspective and experience of managing phosphate binders?
  • (2014) Is low concentration of heparin lock (1000u/ml) adequate to maintain catheter patency in haemodialsysis patients?

In 2015, she was awarded a translational research award by HNELHD for recognition of the high impact to patient care and translation to practice from one of her projects.

HNE Nursing Clinical Research Fellowship has allowed her to focuse on the management of sleep apnoea in haemodialysis patients. She works collaboratively with her renal and respiratory colleagues at John Hunter Hospital to identify the best dialysis model for patients suffering from sleep apnoea symptoms. Sleep apnoea is common in dialysis patients. The consequences of sleep apnoea include depression, fatigue and risk of stroke and heart attack. Despite the high prevalence and poor outcomes being well published in literature, it is currently under-recognised and under-treated in the dialysis population. Her research will shed some light on how dialysis treatment improves the symptoms of sleep apnoea. She was awarded a clinical research fellowship by HNELHD for this project, which has the potential to make a significant difference in dialysis patient health management.


Qualifications

  • Master of Nursing, University of Sydney
  • Registered Nurse, NSW Nurses Registration Board
  • Bachelor of Nursing, University of Newcastle
  • Certificate of Chemotherapy Nursing Practice, Mater Misericordiae Hospital - Waratah - NSW

Keywords

  • Chronic Kidney Disease
  • Dialysis
  • Nephrology
  • Renal

Languages

  • Mandarin (Fluent)
  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110312 Nephrology and Urology 50
110203 Respiratory Diseases 50

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
30/11/2011 -  Conjoint Senior Lecturer The University of Newcastle
Nursing and Midwifery School
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2017 - 31/12/2019 Clinical Research Fellow Hunter New England Health
Research and Innovation Unit
Australia
31/05/2010 -  Clinical Nurse Consutant John Hunter Hospital, Division of Medicine
Division of Medicine
Australia
1/01/2009 - 31/12/2010 Acting Nursing Unit Manager John Hunter Hospital, Division of Medicine
Division of Medicine
Australia
1/01/2006 - 31/12/2008 Clinical Nurse Specialist John Hunter Hospital, Division of Medicine
Division of Medicine
Australia
31/01/2004 - 31/12/2005 Registered Nurse John Hunter Hospital
Nephrology/Gastroenterology
Australia
31/05/2003 - 31/12/2004 Registered Nurse Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney
New Graduate Program
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2017 HNELHD High Value Health Care Award
Hunter New England Health
2017 2017 FHEAM HDR Award
The University of Newcastle, Post Graduate Student Association
2016 HNELHD Achievement Award
Hunter New England Health
2015 HNELHD Translational Research Award
Hunter New England Area Health Service
2010 HNELHD Quality award
Hunter New England Health
2007 HNE Chief Executive's Encouragement Award
Hunter New England Health
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Chu G, Choi P, McDonald VM, 'Sleep disturbance and sleep-disordered breathing in hemodialysis patients', Seminars in Dialysis, 31 48-58 (2018)

© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Sleep disturbance is one of the most common dialysis-related symptoms reported by hemodialysis patients. Poor sleep confers significant physical an... [more]

© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Sleep disturbance is one of the most common dialysis-related symptoms reported by hemodialysis patients. Poor sleep confers significant physical and psychological burden on patients with kidney disease and is associated with reduced quality of life and survival. More recent evidence also indicates that sleep-disordered breathing may be a risk factor for kidney injury.

DOI 10.1111/sdi.12617
Co-authors Vanessa Mcdonald
2016 Chu G, Fogarty GM, Avis LF, Bergin S, McElduff P, Gillies AH, Choi P, 'Low dose heparin lock (1000 U/mL) maintains tunnelled hemodialysis catheter patency when compared with high dose heparin (5000 U/mL): A randomised controlled trial', Hemodialysis International, 20 385-391 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis Introduction Heparin is commonly used after hemodialysis treatments as a locking solution to prevent catheter thrombosis. The compar... [more]

© 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis Introduction Heparin is commonly used after hemodialysis treatments as a locking solution to prevent catheter thrombosis. The comparative efficacy and safety of different heparin concentrations to maintain catheter patency has been previously reported in retrospective studies. We conducted a prospective, randomised, controlled study of 1000 U/mL heparin (low dose) versus 5000 U/mL heparin (high dose) locking solution to maintain patency of tunnelled catheters. Methods One hundred patients receiving chronic, unit-based hemodialysis with newly placed tunnelled hemodialysis catheters (less than 1 week) were randomly assigned to either a low dose (n = 48) or high dose heparin (n=52). The primary intention-to-treat analysis examined time to malfunction in both groups over a 90 day period. A secondary analysis compared baseline patient characteristics in relation to catheter malfunction. Findings Overall rate of catheter patency loss was 32% of catheters by 90 days. There was no significant difference in time to malfunction of catheters locked with low dose or high dose heparin (P = 0.5770). Time to catheter malfunction was not associated with diabetic, hypertensive or smoking status. There was no difference in mean delivered blood flow rate, venous and arterial pressure, and dialysis adequacy between low dose and high dose groups. No patient suffered a hemorrhagic complication requiring hospitalisation during the study period. Discussion Low dose heparin is adequate to maintain tunnelled hemodialysis catheter patency when compared with high dose heparin. The study also suggests that there is no relationship between catheter malfunction and diabetic, hypertensive or smoking status.

DOI 10.1111/hdi.12401
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff
2014 Chu G, 'A defined peritonitis clinical pathway in the emergency department improves outcomes for peritoneal dialysis patients', Renal Society of Australasia Journal, 10 30-33 (2014) [C1]

Background Peritonitis is the most common infection and cause of treatment failure for patients receiving peritoneal dialysis (PD). Peritonitis can be life-threatening if treatmen... [more]

Background Peritonitis is the most common infection and cause of treatment failure for patients receiving peritoneal dialysis (PD). Peritonitis can be life-threatening if treatment is not initiated in a timely manner. We have identified in our facility that patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with peritonitis often have delayed treatment. This could be due to a lack of understanding from ED clinicians and/or poor communication between ED and the renal department. Therefore, a local clinical pathway was developed to optimise peritonitis patient care. Aims To evaluate the effectiveness of a local peritonitis clinical pathway designed to reduce time for patients with PD-related peritonitis receiving their first antibiotic treatment. Setting All patients with PD peritonitis presenting through a tertiary hospital ED. Main outcome measured Time for patients with PD-related peritonitis receiving their first antibiotic treatment in hospital. Results The average time for peritonitis treatment decreased from 6 hours and 49 minutes to 5 hours and 18 minutes after the clinical pathway was implemented. Currently there is no published data to benchmark our result, even though the results indicated that the local clinical pathway may have been effective. Implications for clinical practice Since the implementation of this project, three patients were able to be safely discharged from ED without needing hospital admission and this is due to prompt management and good communication between ED and the renal department. Delayed treatment not only causes increased demand in ED service, but also results in unnecessary hospital admission, which impacts on both the patient and the overall health care system.

2013 Chu G, Adams K, Crawford S, 'Improving catheter-related blood stream infection in haemodialysis patients using a practice development framework', Renal Society of Australasia Journal, 9 16-21 (2013) [C1]

Catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) contributes to hospitalisation and death in the haemodialysis population. Increasing numbers of catheter infections prompted a unit... [more]

Catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) contributes to hospitalisation and death in the haemodialysis population. Increasing numbers of catheter infections prompted a unit practice development program to reduce infection episodes. Objective/hypothesis: Improvement in clinical practice in dialysis catheter care would decrease dialysis CRBSI in the haemodialysis population. Context: Five dialysis units and one nephrology ward in regional Australia. Participants: Nephrology nurses working with haemodialysis patients who have central venous dialysis catheters (CVDC) in situ. Method: Use of a practice development framework to engage clinicians in reviewing their clinical practice and developing strategies to decrease dialysis CRBSI. Clinical practice was measured by undertaking clinical audits of CVDC care. The CRBSI rate was monitored and reported by the infection control department annually. Results: Rates of dialysis CRBSI have decreased from 4.39 per 100 patient-months to 3.42 per 100 patient-months (p < 0.001) 12 months after the implementation of the project. There was a statistically significant association between improved staff practice and infection outcome measures. Conclusion: Dialysis CRBSI is a common, yet preventable complication in the dialysis unit. The results show that dialysis nurses play a significant role in preventing dialysis CRBSIs. Basic infection control standards are paramount and should be strictly followed for effective CVDC care.

Citations Scopus - 3
2011 Chu G, Williams A, 'Working towards improved communication between patients, visitors and staff using essentials of care', HNE Handover for Nurses and Midwives, 4 36-37 (2011) [C2]
Show 2 more journal articles

Conference (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Chu G, 'Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Haemodialysis Patients', Sydney (2017)
2017 Chu G, 'Does regular hygiene audit reduce CVC infection rate in the dialysis unit? Single centre 5 year experience', Sydney (2017)
2016 Chu G, 'Can 2% chlorhexidine aqueous solution provide better infection control in PD exit site care when compared with 10% povidone-iodine: a single unit experience', Melbourne (2016)
2015 Chu G, 'Team Leader capability framework in dialysis', Perth (2015)
2012 Chu G, 'Dialysis Nurse Competency', Melburne (2012)
Show 2 more conferences

Other (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Chu G, 'Reduce Heparin use in Haemodialysis Patients', (2014) [O1]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 10
Total funding $293,228

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $9,664

HNELHD Innovation Scholarship$9,664

Funding body: Hunter New England Health

Funding body Hunter New England Health
Project Team

John Hunter Hospital Wansey Community Dialysis Centre

Scheme Innovation Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20174 grants / $248,376

Clinical Research Fellowship$225,876

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team

John Hunter Nephrology and Respiratory Department, Dr. Peter Choi, Prof Vanessa McDonald

Scheme Clinical Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Woodend fundation funding for surgical and clinical research equipment$15,000

Funding body: The University of Newcastle, Australia

Funding body The University of Newcastle, Australia
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Graham Burley Memorial Scholarship$6,000

Funding body: Baxter HealthCare

Funding body Baxter HealthCare
Scheme Graham Burley Memorial Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Nursing and Allied Health Scholarship $1,500

Funding body: Australian College of Nursing

Funding body Australian College of Nursing
Scheme Nursing and Allied Health Scholarship and Support Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20162 grants / $27,788

Australian Postgraduate Award $26,288

Funding body: Australian Government Department of Education

Funding body Australian Government Department of Education
Scheme Australian Postgraduate Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON N

Nursing and Allied Health Scholarship $1,500

Funding body: Australian College of Nursing

Funding body Australian College of Nursing
Scheme Nursing and Allied Health Scholarship and Support Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20152 grants / $3,000

International Society of Peritoneal Dialysis (ISPD) conference scholarship$1,500

Funding body: Baxter HealthCare

Funding body Baxter HealthCare
Scheme ISPD conference scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Nursing and Allied Health Scholarship $1,500

Funding body: Australian College of Nursing

Funding body Australian College of Nursing
Scheme Nursing and Allied Health Scholarship and Support Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20111 grants / $4,400

Post Graduate Scholarship$4,400

Funding body: NSW Department of Health | Australia

Funding body NSW Department of Health | Australia
Scheme Post Graduate Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N
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Ms Ginger Chu

Position

Conjoint Senior Lecturer
Nephrology Department, John Hunter Hospital
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Nursing

Contact Details

Email g.chu@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 02 49048815
Mobile 0429850453

Office

Room 1a Dudley road Charlestown, NSW 2290
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