Ms Victoria Pitt

Ms Victoria Pitt

Lecturer

School of Nursing and Midwifery (Nursing)

Career Summary

Biography

Victoria teaches into the Bachelor of Nursing Program. She has a particular interest in the progression and retention issues associated with nursing students. Victoria completed her PhD in 2014 on the factors that impact on Bachelor of Nursing students' academic and clinical progression.

Research Expertise
Victoria continues to engage in research that explores student progression in Bachelor of Nursing programs, however has also been involved research projects exploring nursing curriculum, critical thinking skills of students and the experience of international students.

Teaching Expertise
Since 2014 Victoria has worked in the role of Bachelor of Nursing Program convenor. Successfully guiding the program through accreditation in 2016 and continuing to support the programs ongoing commitment to the student experience and continued growth and development.



Qualifications

  • Master of Nursing, University of Newcastle
  • Graduate Diploma of Nursing and Palliative Care, Australian Catholic University

Keywords

  • Academic progression
  • Nursing education
  • Palliative care

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
13/01/2014 -  Bachelor of Nursing Program Convenor

Program convenors assist students to access http://www.newcastle.edu.au/current-students/support"><span style="color:#0066cc;">support to reach their academic potential and to tackle life's challenges.

School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Van Der Riet PJ, Pitt VL, 'Caring for a person requiring palliative care', Clinical Reasoning : Learning to Think Like a Nurse, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 244-263 (2013) [B2]
Co-authors Pamela Vanderriet
2011 Van Der Riet PJ, Pitt VL, Blyton GM, 'Nursing care of clients experiencing loss, grief and death', Medical Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Client Care, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 90-106 (2011) [B2]
Co-authors Pamela Vanderriet

Journal article (14 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Pitt V, Powis D, Levett-Jones T, Hunter S, 'The influence of critical thinking skills on performance and progression in a pre-registration nursing program', Nurse Education Today, 35 125-131 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Background: The importance of developing critical thinking skills in preregistration nursing students is recognized worldwide. Yet, there has been limited ex... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Background: The importance of developing critical thinking skills in preregistration nursing students is recognized worldwide. Yet, there has been limited exploration of how students' critical thinking skill scores on entry to pre-registration nursing education influence their academic and clinical performance and progression. Aim: The aim of this study was to: i) describe entry and exit critical thinking scores of nursing students enrolled in a three year bachelor of nursing program in Australia in comparison to norm scores; ii) explore entry critical thinking scores in relation to demographic characteristics, students' performance and progression. Method: This longitudinal correlational study used the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT) to measure critical thinking skills in a sample (. n=. 134) of students, at entry and exit (three years later). A one sample t-test was used to determine if differences existed between matched student critical thinking scores between entry and exit points. Academic performance, clinical performance and progression data were collected and correlations with entry critical thinking scores were examined. Results: There was a significant relationship between critical thinking scores, academic performance and students' risk of failing, especially in the first semester of study. Critical thinking scores were predictive of program completion within three years. The increase in critical thinking scores from entry to exit was significant for the 28 students measured. In comparison to norm scores, entry level critical thinking scores were significantly lower, but exit scores were comparable. Critical thinking scores had no significant relationship to clinical performance. Conclusion: Entry critical thinking scores significantly correlate to academic performance and predict students risk of course failure and ability to complete a nursing degree in three years. Students' critical thinking scores are an important determinant of their success and as such can inform curriculum development and selection strategies.

DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2014.08.006
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Sharyn Hunter
2015 Everson N, Levett-Jones T, Lapkin S, Pitt V, van der Riet P, Rossiter R, et al., 'Measuring the impact of a 3D simulation experience on nursing students' cultural empathy using a modified version of the Kiersma-Chen Empathy Scale', Journal of Clinical Nursing, (2015) [C1]

Aims and objectives: To determine the effect of immersive 3D cultural simulation on nursing students&apos; empathy towards culturally and linguistically diverse patients. Backgrou... [more]

Aims and objectives: To determine the effect of immersive 3D cultural simulation on nursing students' empathy towards culturally and linguistically diverse patients. Background: Accelerated globalisation has seen a significant increase in cultural diversity in most regions of the world over the past forty years. Clinical encounters that do not acknowledge cultural factors contribute to adverse patient outcomes and health care inequities for culturally and linguistically diverse people. Cultural empathy is an antecedent to cultural competence. Thus, appropriate educational strategies are needed to enhance nursing students' cultural empathy and the capacity to deliver culturally competent care. Design: A one-group pretest, post-test design was used for this study. The simulation exposed students to an unfolding scene in a hospital ward of a developing county. Methods: A convenience sample of second-year undergraduate nursing students (n = 460) from a semi-metropolitan university in Australia were recruited for the study. Characteristics of the sample were summarised using descriptive statistics. T-tests were performed to analyse the differences between pre- and post simulation empathy scores using an eight item modified version of the Kiersma-Chen Empathy Scale. Results: Students' empathy towards culturally and linguistically diverse patients significantly improved after exposure to the 3D simulation experience. The mean scores for the Perspective Taking and Valuing Affective Empathy subscales also increased significantly postsimulation. Conclusions: The immersive 3D simulation had a positive impact on nursing students' empathy levels in regards to culturally and linguistically diverse groups. Research with other cohorts and in other contexts is required to further explore the impact of this educational approach. Relevance to clinical practice: Immersive cultural simulation experiences offer opportunities to enhance the cultural empathy of nursing students. This may in turn have a positive impact on their cultural competence and consequently the quality of care they provide to culturally and linguistically diverse patients.

DOI 10.1111/jocn.12893
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Conor Gilligan, Rachel Rossiter, Donovan Jones, Tracy Levett-Jones, Pamela Vanderriet, Helen Courtney-Pratt
2015 Levett-Jones T, Pitt V, Courtney-Pratt H, Harbrow G, Rossiter R, 'What are the primary concerns of nursing students as they prepare for and contemplate their first clinical placement experience?', Nurse Education in Practice, 15 304-309 (2015) [C1]

Nursing students&apos; first clinical placement experience can be a critical turning point -reinforcing professional aspirations for some, and for others, a time of emotional turb... [more]

Nursing students' first clinical placement experience can be a critical turning point -reinforcing professional aspirations for some, and for others, a time of emotional turbulence. There is a paucity of research focusing on students' perceptions and concerns prior to their first placement experience. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the concerns of first year bachelor of nursing students from one Australian university as they prepared for their first clinical placement. Participants completed an online 'readiness for practice' survey consisting of 22 items. This paper focuses on participants' responses to the one open ended question: 'Please comment on any concerns that you have in relation to being prepared for your first clinical placement'. Summative qualitative content analysis was used for analysis. 144 students (55%) responded to the open ended question. Responses were categorised into six themes including: Not prepared for placement; feeling nervous, anxious and worried; bullying and belonging; practicalities; patient safety and making mistakes; and working outside of my scope of practice. It appears that activities designed to equip students with the capacity to manage the inherent challenges of undertaking a clinical placement may sometimes have a paradoxical effect by increasing students' level of stress and anxiety. An enhanced understanding of students' concerns may help educators implement appropriate support strategies.

DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2015.03.012
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Rachel Rossiter, Tracy Levett-Jones, Helen Courtney-Pratt
2014 Pitt V, Powis D, Levett-Jones T, Hunter S, 'Nursing students' personal qualities: a descriptive study.', Nurse Educ Today, 34 1196-1200 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2014.05.004
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Sharyn Hunter
2014 Hunter S, Pitt V, Croce N, Roche J, 'Critical thinking skills of undergraduate nursing students: Description and demographic predictors', Nurse Education Today, 34 809-814 (2014) [C1]

Aim: This study investigated the critical thinking skills among undergraduate nursing students in Australia to obtain a profile and determine demographic predictors of critical th... [more]

Aim: This study investigated the critical thinking skills among undergraduate nursing students in Australia to obtain a profile and determine demographic predictors of critical thinking. Background: There is universal agreement that being a critical thinker is an outcome requirement for many accreditation and registering nursing bodies. Most studies provide descriptive statistical information about critical thinking skills while some have studied the changes in critical thinking after an intervention. Limited research about factors that predict critical thinking skills is available. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted using convenience sampling. Two hundred and sixty-nine students were recruited across three years of an undergraduate programme in 2009. Most students' age ranged from under 20 to 34. years (58%), 87% were female, 91% were Australian and 23% of first and second year students had nursing associated experience external to the university. Data about critical thinking skills were collected via the Health Science Reasoning Test (HSRT). Linear regression analysis investigated the predictors of nursing students' critical thinking skills. Results: The students in third year had a profile of critical thinking skills comparable with HSRT norms. Year of study predicted higher critical thinking scores for all domains (p < . 0.001) except the subscale, analysis. Nationality predicted higher scores for total CT skill scores (p < . 0.001) and subscales, inductive (p=0.001) and deductive reasoning (p=0.001). Nursing associated experience predicted higher scores for the subscale, analysis (p < . 0.001). Age and gender were not predictive. However, these demographic predictors only accounted for a small variance obtained for the domains of CT skills. Conclusion: An understanding of factors that predict nursing students' CT skills is required. Despite this study finding a number of significant predictors of nursing students' CT skills, there are others yet to be understood. Future research is recommended exploring explicit CT instructional approaches and nursing students' CT skills. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2013.08.005
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Sharyn Hunter
2014 Pitt V, Powis D, Levett-Jones T, Hunter S, 'The influence of personal qualities on performance and progression in a pre-registration nursing programme', Nurse Education Today, 34 866-871 (2014) [C1]

Background: Research conducted primarily with psychology and medical students has highlighted that personal qualities play an important role in students&apos; academic performance... [more]

Background: Research conducted primarily with psychology and medical students has highlighted that personal qualities play an important role in students' academic performance. In nursing there has been limited investigation of the relationship between personal qualities and performance. Yet, reports of student incivility and a lack of compassion have prompted appeals to integrate the assessment of personal qualities into pre-registration nursing student selection. Before this can be done research is needed to explore the influence of students' personal qualities on programme performance and progression. Aim: This study explores the relationships between students' personal qualities and their academic and clinical performance, behaviours and progression through a pre-registration nursing programme in Australia. Method: This longitudinal descriptive correlational study was undertaken with a sample of Australian pre-registration nursing students (n=138). Students' personal qualities were assessed using three personal qualities assessment (PQA) instruments. Outcome measures included grades in nursing theory and clinical courses, yearly grade point average, final clinical competency, progression (completion), class attendance and levels of life event stress. Results: Significant correlations were found between academic performance and PQA scores for self-control, resilience and traits of aloofness, confidence and involvement. Final clinical competence was predicted by confidence and self-control scores. Students with higher empathy had higher levels of life event stress in their first year and class attendance had a positive correlation with self-control. Completing the programme in three years was weakly predicted by the measure of resilience. No difference was noted between extreme or non-extreme scorers on the PQA scales with respect to performance or progression. Conclusion: This sample of students' personal qualities was found to influence their academic and clinical performance and their ability to complete a pre-registration programme in three years. However, further research is required with larger cohorts to confirm the use of personal qualities assessment during selection. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2013.10.011
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Sharyn Hunter
2014 Courtney-Pratt H, Levett-Jones T, Lapkin S, Pitt V, Gilligan C, Van der Riet P, et al., 'Development and psychometric testing of the satisfaction with Cultural Simulation Experience Scale', Nurse Education in Practice, (2014) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Decreasing the numbers of adverse health events experienced by people from culturally diverse backgrounds rests, in part, on the ability of education provide... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Decreasing the numbers of adverse health events experienced by people from culturally diverse backgrounds rests, in part, on the ability of education providers to provide quality learning experiences that support nursing students in developing cultural competence, an essential professional attribute. This paper reports on the implementation and evaluation of an immersive 3D cultural empathy simulation.The Satisfaction with Cultural Simulation Experience Scale used in this study was adapted and validated as the first stage of this study. Exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were undertaken to investigate the psychometric properties of the scale using two randomly-split sub-samples. Cronbach's Alpha was used to examine internal consistency reliability. Descriptive statistics were used for analysis of mean satisfaction scores and qualitative comments to open-ended questions were analysed and coded.A purposive sample (n=497) of second of nursing students participated in the study. The overall Cronbach's alpha for the scale was 0.95 and each subscale demonstrated high internal consistency: 0.92; 0.92; 0.72 respectively. The mean satisfaction score was 4.64 (SD 0.51) out of a maximum of 5 indicating a high level of participant satisfaction with the simulation. Three factors emerged from qualitative analysis: "Becoming culturally competent", "Learning from the debrief" and "Reflecting on practice".The cultural simulation was highly regarded by students. Psychometric testing of the Satisfaction with Cultural Simulation Experience Scale demonstrated that it is a reliable instrument. However, there is room for improvement and further testing in other contexts is therefore recommended.

DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2015.07.009
Co-authors Rachel Rossiter, Pamela Vanderriet, Helen Courtney-Pratt, Tracy Levett-Jones, Donovan Jones, Conor Gilligan
2013 McCoy MA, Levett-Jones T, Pitt V, 'Development and psychometric testing of the Ascent to Competence Scale', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 33 15-23 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2011.11.003
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones
2013 Pitt V, Powis D, Levett-Jones T, Hunter S, 'Can an existing personal qualities measure be used to examine nursing students' professional and personal attributes?', Focus on Health Professional Education: A Multi-disciplinary Journal, 15 41-54 (2013) [C1]
Co-authors Sharyn Hunter, Tracy Levett-Jones
2012 Pitt VL, Powis DA, Levett-Jones TL, Hunter S, 'Factors influencing nursing students' academic and clinical performance and attrition: An integrative literature review', Nurse Education Today, 32 903-913 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 39
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Sharyn Hunter
2011 Jeong Y-S, Hickey N, Levett-Jones TL, Pitt VL, Hoffman KA, Norton CA, Ohr SO, 'Understanding and enhancing the learning experiences of culturally and linguistically diverse nursing students in an Australian bachelor of nursing program', Nurse Education Today, 31 238-244 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2010.10.016
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Sarah Jeong, Tracy Levett-Jones, Kerry Hoffman, Carol Norton
2010 Jeong Y-S, Hickey N, Levett-Jones TL, Pitt VL, Hoffman KA, Norton CA, Ohr SO, 'Understanding and enhancing the learning experiences of culturally diverse nursing students in a bachelor of nursing program', HNE Handover. For Nurses and Midwives, 3 21-27 (2010) [C2]
Co-authors Kerry Hoffman, Sarah Jeong, Tracy Levett-Jones, Carol Norton
2004 Pitt V, 'Integration versus segregation: The experiences of a group of disabled students moving from mainstream school into special needs further education', British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 67 233 (2004)
2004 Pitt V, Curtin M, 'Integration versus segregation: The experiences of a group of disabled students moving from mainstream school into special needs further education', Disability and Society, 19 387-401 (2004)

Although the latest education policy for disabled students is one of inclusion, some students are moving out of mainstream schools into specialist colleges for their further educa... [more]

Although the latest education policy for disabled students is one of inclusion, some students are moving out of mainstream schools into specialist colleges for their further education. This research uses a combination of group and individual interviews to explore why this move away from mainstream education is made. Results show that these students' moved into specialist education because of the inadequate physical accessibility of their mainstream colleges, the quality of disability services available to them and their previous experiences whilst in mainstream school. These students were able to identify both strengths and weaknesses within mainstream and special education for disabled students, and believed that educational placement should therefore be a matter of choice depending on the physical, academic and emotional needs of the individual. It would appear, however, that for the students participating in this research, their local mainstream colleges were unable to cater for their needs, indicating that their decision to move into a special needs college was not based on a real choice. Mainstream colleges are challenged to create a truly inclusive environment so that disabled students are offered a real choice.

DOI 10.1080/09687590410001689485
Citations Scopus - 24
Show 11 more journal articles

Conference (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Hunter S, Arthur C, Pitt VL, 'Enhancing nursing students' clinical reasoning skills: An innovative teaching strategy', 4th International Clinical Skills Conference: Showcasing Innovation and Evidenced Based Clinical Skills Education and Practice: Abstracts, Prato, Tuscany (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Carol Arthur, Sharyn Hunter
2011 Pitt VL, Powis DA, Levett-Jones TL, Hunter S, 'Moving towards tomorrow's workforce: Using personal qualities to guide selection', Innovations in Nursing Practice, Thinking Aloud, Thinking Ahead: 15th Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2011, Hamilton, NZ (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Sharyn Hunter
2011 Hunter S, Pitt VL, Levett-Jones TL, 'Improving nursing students' clinical reasoning', Innovations in Nursing Practice, Thinking Aloud, Thinking Ahead: 15th Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2011, Hamilton, NZ (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Sharyn Hunter
2010 Jeong Y-S, Pitt VL, Hickey N, Norton CA, 'Understanding and enhancing the learning experiences of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) nursing students at an Australian University', 3rd International Nurse Education Conference. Poster Programme, Sydney (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Sarah Jeong, Carol Norton
2010 McCoy MA, Pitt VL, Levett-Jones TL, 'Testing the psychometric properties of the ascent to competence scale: A study of nursing students' clinical placement experiences', 3rd International Nurse Education Conference. Programme, Sydney (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones
2010 Pitt VL, Powis DA, Levett-Jones TL, Hunter S, 'Altering selection strategies: The future of undergraduate nursing education', ANZAME 2010: Overcoming Barriers, Re(E)Forming Professional Practice, Townsville, QLD (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Sharyn Hunter
2010 Pitt VL, Van Der Riet PJ, Levett-Jones TL, 'Integrating palliative care into undergraduate nursing curriculum. The University of Newcastle's experience', Third National Palliative Care Education Conference, Brisbane, QLD (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Pamela Vanderriet
2009 Pitt VL, Levett-Jones TL, Hunter S, Powis DA, 'Personal qualities and nursing students clinical & academic performance', Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2009: Concurrent Sessions, Christchurch, NZ (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Sharyn Hunter, Tracy Levett-Jones
2009 Pitt VL, Levett-Jones TL, Hunter S, Powis DA, 'Selection or support: The best direction for improving undergraduate nursing?', RCNA Annual Conference 09: Program and Book of Abstracts, Melbourne, VIC (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Sharyn Hunter
Show 6 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $2,480

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20111 grants / $1,000

Australasian Nurse Educators Conferene 2011: Innovations in Nurse Education in Practice, Thinking Aloud, Thinking Ahead, Wintec Hamilton, New Zealand, 23 - 25 November 2011$1,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Ms Victoria Pitt
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100839
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20101 grants / $1,480

ANZAME' 10, James Cook University, Townsville, 13 - 16 July 2010$1,480

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Ms Victoria Pitt
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000607
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.5

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Factors Effecting Quality of Life of CKD Older People Undergo Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD) at Home in a Rural Area in Thailand PhD (Nursing), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Ms Victoria Pitt

Position

Lecturer
BN Program Convenor
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Nursing

Contact Details

Email victoria.pitt@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 6645
Fax (02) 4921 6301

Office

Room RW1-19
Building Richardson Wing
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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