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Dr Kerry Dally

Senior Lecturer

School of Education

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Kerry Dally is a Senior Lecturer in Special Education and Early Childhood Education. She joined the University of Newcastle as a full-time Lecturer in March 2005, after completing her PhD in 2002 and working as a Research Officer for three years, firstly with the Newcastle Institue of Public Health and then the Centre for the Study Of Research Training and Impact.

Kerry's teaching career, spanning 20 years, has included teaching in various capacities as a Special Education teacher in a School for Specific Purposes (SSP), a primary school teacher and as a coordinator and itinerant outreach teacher with the Lower Hunter Early Childhood Support Service, providing support to children with disabilities in inclusive Pre-school and Early Childhood Education settings.

Research Expertise
My research interests span a number of areas including learning difficulties, learning to read in English as a second language, early childhood intervention, and values education.

After teaching for over 20 years, I am committed to engaging in research that addresses current educational issues and problems within schools. I have conducted a longitudinal investigation of factors impacting on children's reading acquisition, using structural equation modelling techniques and multiple regression analysis. This study revealed that inattentive behaviour has a significant influence on disrupting children's reading progress over and above phonological awareness skills. This earlier interest in the effects of self-regulation on student learning and quantitative methods has led to my involvement as a university advisor to two clusters of NSW primary schools implementing values education projects. These collaborations have yielded important insights into the transformative effects that ensue from whole-school approaches to values education. Publications from these projects include a chapter in the International Research Handbook on Values Education and Student Wellbeing and a chapter in Teacher Education and Values Pedagogy: A Student Wellbeing Approach.

I have also been involved in a longitudinal evaluation of an early intervention program delivered via remote mediums, including tele-conferencing, video-conferencing, email and video exchanges to families of young children with sensory disabilities living in rural and remote areas of Australia. The implementation of this program compared favourably with elements of best-practice in early childhood family-centred approaches.

Teaching Expertise
My teaching experiences prior to lecturing at the University included Special Schools (SSPs), primary school, and inclusive Early Childhood Intervention as an itinerant teacher. I am currently lecturing in Special Education (Learning Difficulties and Interpersonal Skills) and Early Childhood courses (primarily Early Childhood Intervention) at both the undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Administrative Expertise
During 2010 I was appointed to the role of Acting Director of the Special Education Centre. The Special Education Centre hosts a number of agencies which provide a range of services for children with disabilities and their families and teachers. Firstchance provides an Early Childhood Intervention Program which is staffed by a multidisciplinary team including teachers, teacher aides, speech pathologists, occupational therapists and family workers. Positive Partnerships provides online training for families and teachers of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder while the National Disability Coordination Officer facilitates networking opportunities and information sharing for school students and those leaving school and transitioning to work. The centre is also home to the national office of Keyword Sign Australia which distributes resources for supporting the communication skills of people with no, or very limited, language. As Acting Director I am responsible for managing the administrative functions of the centre including Occupational Health and Safety matters, authorisation of affiliated staff through the University systems, and liaison with University services such as Information Technology, Facilities Management and Legal Services.

Collaborations
From 2006-2009, Kerry was involved with primary schools in the Newcastle and mid-North Coast regions as a University Advisor in the school's Values Education projects. Kerry has presented guest lectures at some of the schools and during 2010 provided workshops on Values Education for the NSW Department of Education and Training and for the Hong Kong Institute of Education.

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Newcastle
  • Diploma in Education, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Educational Studies, University of Newcastle
  • Master of Special Education, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Early Childhood Education
  • Early Childhood Intervention
  • Early Childhood Special Education
  • Interpersonal and Communication Skills
  • Learning Difficulties
  • Reading Acquisition
  • Reading Difficulties
  • Values Education

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
130399 Specialist Studies in Education not elsewhere classified 60
199999 Studies in Creative Arts and Writing not elsewhere classified 20
220499 Religion and Religious Studies not elsewhere classified 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/11/2006 -  University Advisory Network Associate Curriculum Corporation

Awards

Research Award

Year Award
2002 Doctoral Thesis Award
Australian Early Childhood Association
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Lovat TJ, Dally KA, Clement ND, Toomey R, Values Pedagogy and Student Achievement: Contemporary Research Evidence, Springer, Dordrecht, 205 (2011) [A1]
DOI 10.1007/978-94-007-1563-9
Co-authors Terry Lovat
2010 Toomey R, Lovat TJ, Clement ND, Dally KA, Teacher Education and Values Pedagogy: A Student Wellbeing Approach, David Barlow Publishing, Terrigal, N.S.W, 261 (2010) [A3]
Co-authors Terry Lovat

Chapter (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Spedding SF, Dally KA, 'Understanding and supporting literacy competence', Inclusion in Action, Cengage Learning, Melbourne 314-355 (2011) [B2]
2010 Dally KA, 'The second pillar of the student wellbeing pedagogy: Social and emotional learning', Teacher Education and Values Pedagogy: A Student Wellbeing Approach, David Barlow Publishing, Macksville, New South Wales 32-53 (2010) [B1]
2010 Dally KA, 'A teacher's duty: An examination of the short-term impact of values education on australian primary school teachers and students', International Research Handbook on Values Education and Student Wellbeing, Springer, Berlin 503-520 (2010) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-90-481-8675-4_29
2008 Robinson GL, Dally KA, 'Understanding literacy and numeracy', Inclusion in Action, Thomson, South Melbourne, VIC 246-301 (2008) [B2]
2008 Robinson GL, Dally KA, 'Developing literacy and numeracy skills', Inclusion in Action, Thomson, South Melbourne, VIC 302-343 (2008) [B2]
2001 Dally KA, 'Phonological processing, behavioural adjustment and early reading', Creating Positive Futures, AREA, Victoria 191-208 (2001) [B2]
2000 Chan KS, Dally KA, 'Review of Literature', Mapping the Territory, Department of Education Training and Youth Affairs, QLD 161-331 (2000) [B1]
Show 4 more chapters

Journal article (26 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Holbrook A, Dally K, Avery C, Lovat T, Fairbairn H, 'Research Ethics in the Assessment of PhD Theses: Footprint or Footnote?', Journal of Academic Ethics, 1-20 (2017)

© 2017 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht There is an expectation that all researchers will act ethically and responsibly in the conduct of research involving humans and a... [more]

© 2017 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht There is an expectation that all researchers will act ethically and responsibly in the conduct of research involving humans and animals. While research ethics is mentioned in quality indicators and codes of responsible researcher conduct, it appears to have little profile in doctoral assessment. There seems to be an implicit assumption that ethical competence has been achieved by the end of doctoral candidacy and that there is no need for candidates to report on the ethical dimensions of their study nor for examiners to assess this integral aspect of researcher development. In the context of ensuring that institutions are fulfilling their responsibility of producing ethically sensitive and competent researchers, it is salient to investigate whether doctoral thesis examiners make comment about ethical issues in their reports. This study analysed an archive of examiner reports to identify the frequency, magnitude and nature of examiner comment about ethics. Although comment was rare (5% of reports) examiners provided: prescriptive instruction on ethical review processes; formative instruction on the design, conduct, and reporting of research projects; and positive or negative judgments about a candidate's ethical competence, the latter often aligned with meeting, or not meeting, 'doctoral standards'. The scarcity of ethics in examination criteria and examiner reports implies a silence that needs to be addressed to ensure graduating candidates are prepared to conduct ethical and responsible research.

DOI 10.1007/s10805-017-9276-z
Co-authors Allyson Holbrook, Terry Lovat
2017 Holbrook A, Dally K, Avery C, Lovat T, Fairbairn H, 'Erratum to: Research Ethics in the Assessment of PhD Theses: Footprint or Footnote?', Journal of Academic Ethics, 1 (2017)
DOI 10.1007/s10805-017-9287-9
Co-authors Terry Lovat, Allyson Holbrook
2017 Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Lonsdale C, Dally K, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, 'Mediators of change in screen-time in a school-based intervention for adolescent boys: findings from the ATLAS cluster randomized controlled trial', Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 40 423-433 (2017) [C1]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. The mechanisms of behavior change in youth screen-time interventions are poorly understood. Participants were 361 adolescent boy... [more]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. The mechanisms of behavior change in youth screen-time interventions are poorly understood. Participants were 361 adolescent boys (12¿14¿years) participating in the ATLAS obesity prevention trial, evaluated in 14 schools in low-income areas of New South Wales, Australia. Recreational screen-time was assessed at baseline, 8- and 18-months, whereas potential mediators (i.e., motivation to limit screen-time and parental rules) were assessed at baseline, 4- and 18-months. Multi-level mediation analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle and were conducted using a product-of-coefficients test. The intervention had a significant impact on screen-time at both time-points, and on autonomous motivation at 18-months. Changes in autonomous motivation partially mediated the effect on screen-time at 18-months in single and multi-mediator models [AB (95% CI)¿=¿-5.49 (-12.13, -.70)]. Enhancing autonomous motivation may be effective for limiting screen-time among adolescent males. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry No: ACTRN12612000978864.

DOI 10.1007/s10865-016-9810-2
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans, Jordan Smith, Ron Plotnikoff
2016 Khairuddin KF, Dally K, Foggett J, 'COLLABORATION BETWEEN GENERAL AND SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHERS IN MALAYSIA', Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, 16 909-913 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1471-3802.12230
2016 Lubans DR, Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Beauchamp MR, Miller A, Lonsdale C, et al., 'Mediators of psychological well-being in adolescent boys', Journal of Adolescent Health, 58 230-236 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved. Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the effect of the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time (... [more]

© 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved. Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the effect of the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time (ATLAS) intervention on psychological well-being in adolescent boys and to examine the potential mediating mechanisms that might explain this effect. Methods: ATLAS was evaluated using a cluster randomized controlled trial in 14 secondary schools located in low-income communities (N = 361 adolescent boys, mean age = 12.7 ±.5 years). The 20-week intervention was guided by self-determination theory and involved: professional development for teachers, provision of fitness equipment to schools, enhanced school sport sessions, researcher-led seminars, a smartphone application, and parental strategies for reducing screen time. Assessments were conducted at baseline and immediately post intervention (8 months). Psychological well-being was measured using the Flourishing Scale. Motivational regulations (intrinsic, identified, introjected, controlled, and amotivation) and basic psychological needs (autonomy, competence, and relatedness) in school sport, muscular fitness, resistance training skill competency, and recreational screen time were examined as potential mediating mechanisms of the intervention effect. Results: The intervention effect on well-being was small but statistically significant. Within a multiple mediator model, changes in autonomy needs satisfaction, recreational screen time, and muscular fitness significantly mediated the effect of the intervention on psychological well-being. Conclusions: In addition to the physical health benefits, targeted physical activity programs for adolescent boys may have utility for mental health promotion through the mechanisms of increasing autonomy support and muscular fitness and reducing screen time.

DOI 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2015.10.010
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Andrew Miller, David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Jordan Smith
2016 Lubans DR, Smith JJ, Plotnikoff RC, Dally KA, Okely AD, Salmon J, Morgan PJ, 'Assessing the sustained impact of a school-based obesity prevention program for adolescent boys: The ATLAS cluster randomized controlled trial', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 13 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Obesity prevention interventions targeting 'at-risk' adolescents are urgently needed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the sustained impact ... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Obesity prevention interventions targeting 'at-risk' adolescents are urgently needed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the sustained impact o f the 'Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time' (ATLAS) obesity prevention program. Methods: Cluster RCT in 14 secondary schools in low-income communities of New South Wales, Australia. Participants were 361 adolescent boys (aged 12-14 years) 'at risk' of obesity. The intervention was based on Self-Determination Theory and Social Cognitive Theory and involved: professional development, fitness equipment for schools, teacher-delivered physical activity sessions, lunch-time activity sessions, researcher-led seminars, a smartphone application, and parental strategies. Assessments for the primary (body mass index [BMI], waist circumference) and secondary outcomes were conducted at baseline, 8- (post-intervention) and 18-months (follow-up). Analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle using linear mixed models. Results: After 18-months, there were no intervention effects for BMI or waist circumference. Sustained effects were found for screen-time, resistance training skill competency, and motivational regulations for school sport. Conclusions: There were no clinically meaningful intervention effects for the adiposity outcomes. However, the intervention resulted in sustained effects for secondary outcomes. Interventions that more intensively target the home environment, as well as other socio-ecological determinants of obesity may be needed to prevent unhealthy weight gain in adolescents from low-income communities. Trial registration: Australian Clinical Trial Registry ACTRN12612000978864.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0420-8
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Jordan Smith, Philip Morgan
2015 Dally K, Dempsey I, 'Content validation of statements describing the essential work of Australian special education teachers', Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 40 112-125 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.14221/ajte.2015v40n2.8
2015 Dally K, Dempsey I, 'Content Validation of Statements Describing the Essential Work of Australian Special Education Teachers', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF TEACHER EDUCATION, 40 112-125 (2015)
2014 Dempsey I, Dally K, 'Professional standards for Australian special education teachers', Australasian Journal of Special Education, 38 1-13 (2014)

Although professional standards for Australian teachers were developed several years ago, this country is yet to develop such standards for special education teachers. The lack of... [more]

Although professional standards for Australian teachers were developed several years ago, this country is yet to develop such standards for special education teachers. The lack of standards for the special education profession is associated with the absence of a consistent process of accreditation in Australia and a lack of clarity in the pathways that teachers may pursue to achieve accreditation. In this paper, we review professional standards for special education teachers in the UK and the US, and the related yet limited work completed in Australia. Substantial commonalities across these jurisdictions demonstrate that much of the groundwork has been completed in the important task of developing special education standards in this country. © The Authors 2014.

DOI 10.1017/jse.2014.1
Citations Scopus - 2
2014 Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Dally KA, Salmon J, Okely AD, et al., 'Rationale and study protocol for the 'Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time' (ATLAS) group randomized controlled trial: An obesity prevention intervention for adolescent boys from schools in low-income communities', Contemporary Clinical Trials, 37 106-119 (2014) [C3]

Introduction: The negative consequences of unhealthy weight gain and the high likelihood of pediatric obesity tracking into adulthood highlight the importance of targeting youth w... [more]

Introduction: The negative consequences of unhealthy weight gain and the high likelihood of pediatric obesity tracking into adulthood highlight the importance of targeting youth who are 'at risk' of obesity. The aim of this paper is to report the rationale and study protocol for the 'Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time' (ATLAS) obesity prevention intervention for adolescent boys living in low-income communities. Methods/design: The ATLAS intervention will be evaluated using a cluster randomized controlled trial in 14 secondary schools in the state of New South Wales (NSW), Australia (2012 to 2014). ATLAS is an 8-month multi-component, school-based program informed by self-determination theory and social cognitive theory. The intervention consists of teacher professional development, enhanced school-sport sessions, researcher-led seminars, lunch-time physical activity mentoring sessions, pedometers for self-monitoring, provision of equipment to schools, parental newsletters, and a smartphone application and website. Assessments were conducted at baseline and will be completed again at 9- and 18-months from baseline. Primary outcomes are body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. Secondary outcomes include BMI z-scores, body fat (bioelectrical impedance analysis), physical activity (accelerometers), muscular fitness (grip strength and push-ups), screen-time, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, resistance training skill competency, daytime sleepiness, subjective well-being, physical self-perception, pathological video gaming, and aggression. Hypothesized mediators of behavior change will also be explored. Discussion: ATLAS is an innovative school-based intervention designed to improve the health behaviors and related outcomes of adolescent males in low-income communities. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2013.11.008
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 16
Co-authors David Lubans, Jordan Smith, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, Geoff Skinner
2014 Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Dally KA, Salmon J, Okely AD, et al., 'Smart-phone obesity prevention trial for adolescent boys in low-income communities: The ATLAS RCT', Pediatrics, 134 e723-e731 (2014) [C1]

OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time (ATLAS) intervention for adolescent boys, an obesity prevention interv... [more]

OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time (ATLAS) intervention for adolescent boys, an obesity prevention intervention using smartphone technology. METHODS: ATLAS was a cluster randomized controlled trial conducted in 14 secondary schools in low-income communities in New South Wales, Australia. Participants were 361 adolescent boys (aged 12-14 years) considered at risk of obesity. The 20-week intervention was guided by self-determination theory and social cognitive theory and involved: teacher professional development, provision of fitness equipment to schools, face-to-face physical activity sessions, lunchtime student mentoring sessions, researcher-led seminars, a smartphone application and Web site, and parental strategies for reducing screen-time. Outcome measures included BMI and waist circumference, percent body fat, physical activity (accelerometers), screen-time, sugar-sweetened beverage intake, muscular fitness, and resistance training skill competency. RESULTS: Overall, there were no significant intervention effects for BMI, waist circumference, percent body fat, or physical activity. Significant intervention effects were found for screen-time (mean ± SE:-30 ± 10.08 min/d; P = .03), sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (mean:-0.6 ± 0.26 glass/d; P = .01), muscular fitness (mean: 0.9 ± 0.49 repetition; P = .04), and resistance training skills (mean: 5.7 6 0.67 units; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: This school-based intervention targeting low-income adolescent boys did not result in significant effects on body composition, perhaps due to an insufficient activity dose. However, the intervention was successful in improving muscular fitness, movement skills, and key weight-related behaviors.

DOI 10.1542/peds.2014-1012
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 38
Co-authors David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff, Jordan Smith, Philip Morgan
2014 Al-Khalaf A, Dempsey I, Dally K, 'The Effect of an Education Program for Mothers of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Jordan', International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling, 36 175-187 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10447-013-9199-3
Citations Scopus - 4
2013 Lubans DR, Lonsdale C, Plotnikoff RC, Smith J, Dally K, Morgan PJ, 'Development and evaluation of the Motivation to Limit Screen-time Questionnaire (MLSQ) for adolescents.', Prev Med, 57 561-566 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.07.023
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, Jordan Smith, David Lubans
2011 Lovat TJ, Dally KA, Clement ND, Toomey R, 'Values pedagogy and teacher education: Re-conceiving the foundations', Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 36 31-44 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14
Co-authors Terry Lovat
2011 Lovat TJ, Clement ND, Dally KA, Toomey R, 'The impact of values education on school ambience and academic diligence', International Journal of Educational Research, 50 166-170 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ijer.2011.07.008
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Terry Lovat
2010 Lovat TJ, Clement ND, Dally KA, Toomey R, 'Values education as holistic development for all sectors: Researching for effective pedagogy', Oxford Review of Education, 36 713-729 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/03054985.2010.501141
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Terry Lovat
2010 Lovat TJ, Clement ND, Dally KA, Toomey R, 'Addressing issues of religious difference through values education: An Islam instance', Cambridge Journal of Education, 40 213-227 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/0305764X.2010.504599
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Terry Lovat
2006 Dally K, 'The influence of phonological processing and inattentive behavior on reading acquisition', JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY, 98 420-437 (2006)
DOI 10.1037/0022-0063.98.2.420
Citations Web of Science - 47
2006 Dally KA, 'The influence of phonological processing and inattentive behavior on reading acquisition', Journal of Educational Psychology, 98 420-437 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1037/0022-0663.98.2.420
Citations Scopus - 60
2004 Holbrook AP, Bourke SF, Lovat TJ, Dally KA, 'Investigating PhD thesis examination reports', International Journal of Educational Research, 41 98-120 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ijer.2005.04.008
Citations Scopus - 20
Co-authors Terry Lovat, Allyson Holbrook
2004 Holbrook AP, Bourke SF, Lovat TJ, Dally KA, 'PhD Theses at the Margin: Examiner Comment on Re-examined Theses', Melbourne Studies in Education, 45 89-115 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/17508487.2004.9558608
Co-authors Terry Lovat, Allyson Holbrook
2004 Dally KA, Holbrook AP, Graham AM, Lawry MJ, 'The processes and parameters of Fine Art PhD examination', International Journal of Educational Research, 41 136-162 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ijer.2005.04.010
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Miranda Lawry, Allyson Holbrook
2004 Holbrook AP, Bourke SF, Lovat TJ, Dally KA, 'Qualities and Characteristics in the Written Reports of Doctoral Thesis Examiners', Australian Journal of Educational & Developmental Psychology, 4 126-145 (2004) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Terry Lovat, Allyson Holbrook
2004 Dally KA, Holbrook AP, Lawry MJ, Graham AM, 'Assessing the exhibition and the exegesis in visual arts higher degrees: perspectives of examiners', Working Papers in Art & Design, 3 1-14 (2004) [C1]
Co-authors Allyson Holbrook, Miranda Lawry
2001 Chan LKS, Dally KA, 'Learning disabilities and literacy & numeracy development', Australian Journal of Learning Disabilities, 6 (1) 12-19 (2001) [C1]
2001 Chan LKS, Dally KA, 'Instructional techniques and service delivery approaches for students with learning difficulties', Australian Journal of Learning Disabilities, 6 (3) 12-19 (2001) [C1]
Show 23 more journal articles

Conference (19 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Lubans DR, Smith J, Miller A, Dally K, Morgan P, 'Reducing screen-time improves well-being in adolescent boys: findings from the ATLAS Cluster RCT' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Andrew Miller, Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2015 Holbrook A, Dally K, Bourke S, Fairbairn H, Lovat T, 'Reference to "ethics" in PhD examiner reports: Where is it?', AARE Conference Papers (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Terry Lovat, Allyson Holbrook
2012 Tajin RT, Dally KA, Lovat TJ, 'Teachers' perceptions and school-based provisions in the domain of values development: Case-studies of six government primary schools in Bangladesh', AARE 2012 Conference Proceedings & Program (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Terry Lovat
2009 Lovat TJ, Toomey R, Clement ND, Dally KA, 'The impact of values education on student effects and school ambience: Results from ten Australian case studies', 16th International Conference on Learning: Sessions (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Terry Lovat
2008 Dally KA, Lovat T, 'Values education: Teaching and learning values in K-6 classrooms', 5th Australian Family and Community Strengths Conference: Program & Abstract Book (2008) [E3]
2005 Dally KA, Holbrook AP, Graham AM, Lawry MJ, Ashburn EA, 'Assessment Practice in Visual Arts Higher Degrees', European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction 11th Biennial Conference. Integrating Multiple Perspectives on Effective Learning Environments (2005) [E3]
Co-authors Miranda Lawry, Allyson Holbrook
2005 Holbrook AP, Dally KA, Graham AM, Lawry MJ, 'Examiner Reflections on the Fine Art Higher Degree Examination Process', AARE 2004 Conference Papers Collection (2005) [E1]
Co-authors Allyson Holbrook, Miranda Lawry
2005 Holbrook AP, Bourke SF, Lovat TJ, Dally KA, 'An investigation of inconsistencies in PhD examination decisions', AARE 2004 Conference Papers Collection (2005) [E2]
Co-authors Allyson Holbrook, Terry Lovat
2004 Bourke SF, Holbrook AP, Lovat TJ, Dally KA, 'Characteristics, degree completion times and thesis quality of Australian PhD candidates', Proceedings of the 2004 International Quality in Postgraduate Research Conference (2004) [E2]
Co-authors Allyson Holbrook, Terry Lovat
2004 Holbrook AP, Dally KA, Bourke SF, Lovat TJ, Lawry MJ, Lu Y, 'Evaluating some fundamental features of doctoral assessment', Proceedings of the 2004 International Quality in Postgraduate Research Conference (2004) [E3]
Co-authors Allyson Holbrook, Miranda Lawry, Terry Lovat
2004 Dally KA, Holbrook AP, Graham AM, Lawry MJ, 'The Fine Art higher degree examination process', Proceedings of the 2004 International Quality in Postgraduate Research Conference (2004) [E3]
Co-authors Allyson Holbrook, Miranda Lawry
2004 Holbrook AP, Bourke SF, Lovat TJ, Dally KA, 'An investigation of inconsistencies in PhD examination decisions', Abstract of Papers (2004) [E3]
Co-authors Allyson Holbrook, Terry Lovat
2004 Holbrook AP, Dally KA, Graham AM, Lawry MJ, 'Examiner reflections on the Fine Art Higher Degree examination process', Abstract of Papers (2004) [E3]
Co-authors Miranda Lawry, Allyson Holbrook
2004 Holbrook AP, Dally KA, Graham AM, Lawry MJ, 'The perspectives of examiners on the processes of research higher degree supervision and examination in fine art', Conference Paper (2004) [E2]
Co-authors Allyson Holbrook, Miranda Lawry
2003 Dally K, 'A longitudinal investigation of phonological processing, inattentive behaviour and reading acquisition', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY (2003)
2003 Dally KA, Holbrook AP, Bourke SF, Graham AM, Lawry MJ, 'Higher Degree Examination in Fine Art', Defining the Doctorate (2003) [E1]
Co-authors Allyson Holbrook, Miranda Lawry
2002 Holbrook AP, Lovat TJ, Bourke SF, Dally KA, Hazel GJ, 'Examiner comment on theses that have been revised and resubmitted', AARE 2002 Conference Papers (2002) [E2]
Co-authors Allyson Holbrook, Terry Lovat
2002 Dally KA, 'The Influence of Phonological Processing and Inattentive Behaviour on Early Reading', AARE 2002 Conference Papers (2002) [E2]
2000 Dally KA, 'Phonological processing, behavioural adjustment and early reading', Aurstralian Resource Educators' Association National Conference 2000 Publication (2000) [E3]
Show 16 more conferences

Report (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2009 Lovat TJ, Toomey R, Dally KA, Clement ND, 'Project to Test and Measure the Impact of Values Education on Student Effects and School Ambience', Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, 268 (2009) [R1]
Co-authors Terry Lovat
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 7
Total funding $529,124

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20151 grants / $25,000

Evaluation of the Hunter Prelude Baby Program$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Prelude

Funding body Hunter Prelude
Project Team Doctor Kerry Dally, Doctor Linda Newman
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1500694
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20121 grants / $261,837

Increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviour to improve health and wellbeing in adolescent boys from disadvantaged schools$261,837

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Kerry Dally, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1100085
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20091 grants / $5,000

Provision of goods or services to curriculum corporation$5,000

Funding body: Curriculum Corporation

Funding body Curriculum Corporation
Project Team Doctor Kerry Dally
Scheme Consultancy/Tender
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190357
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20081 grants / $27,272

Evaluation of the Best Start Kindergarten Assessment Process$27,272

Funding body: NSW Department of Education and Training

Funding body NSW Department of Education and Training
Project Team Dr Peter Whiteman, Emeritus Professor Phil Foreman, Doctor Kerry Dally
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188967
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20071 grants / $200,000

Project to test and measure the impact of values education on student effects and school ambiance$200,000

Funding body: Department of Education, Science and Training

Funding body Department of Education, Science and Training
Project Team Emeritus Professor Terry Lovat, Doctor Neville Clement, Doctor Kerry Dally
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188011
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20061 grants / $10,014

An assessment of the influences affecting the explicit teaching of values in 9 primary schools$10,014

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Kerry Dally
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0187224
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20031 grants / $1

Good Beginnings: Promoting successful transitions from Early Childhood Centres to School$1

Funding body: Smith Family

Funding body Smith Family
Project Team Doctor Kerry Dally
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo G0183680
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed7
Current7

Total current UON EFTSL

Masters0.15
PhD1.65

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Knowledge and Use of Ethics by Novice Researchers: A Study that Explores the Background Philosophical and Practical Knowledge and Application of Ethics Thinking in PhD Students PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD An investigation of services for Australian children with a hearing loss and the National Disability Insurance Scheme PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 Masters Towards Integrated, Inclusive Services - Effectiveness of an Embedded Occupational Therapy Kindergarten Handwriting Program M Philosophy (Occupat Therapy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Translating Australian special education policy into inclusive practice PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD The Impact Strategy Instruction has on Children with a Deficit in the Phonological Loop of Working Memory and a Reading Disability PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Exploring The Influence of the Background Factors on Wellbeing of Single Parents in Kuwait: A Structural Equation Modelling Approach PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Restorative Practices and the Impact on a Learning Community PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD The Development of Professional Standards for Bachelor of Special Education Programs in Saudi Arabia Universities PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD An Investigation of Phonological Processing and Reading Skills in Bhutanese Primary Students PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD An Investigation of Primary Education from a Values Education Perspective: Case Studies of Government Primary Schools PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Christian-Muslim Relationships in Medan and Dalihan na tolu - A Social Capital Study of The Batak Cultural Values and Their Effect on Interreligious Encounters PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2012 Masters An Education Program for Mothers of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Jordan M Philosophy (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2010 PhD Moral Judgement to Moral Action: Implications for Education PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2009 PhD An Investigation of Social and Emotional Skills and their Relationship with Behaviour Problems in Thai Secondary Students PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Kerry Dally

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Education
Faculty of Education and Arts

Contact Details

Email kerry.dally@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 6281
Fax (02) 4921 6939

Office

Room SE01
Building Special Education Centre
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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