Dr Jill Duncan

Dr Jill Duncan

Senior Lecturer

School of Education

Career Summary

Biography

Jill Duncan is a teacher, scholar, academic, and advisor whose priority is to ensure that evidence underpins strategic direction, government policy, program implementation, and pedagogical practice. She has held education-related academic and senior leadership positions in Australia and the USA and has received many awards for her services to children with disabilities and their families. Her current research foci include diversity in education, inclusive education workforce capability, and social capital as a measure of education outcome. 


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Western Australia
  • Bachelor of Science, University of Cincinnati - USA
  • Master of Education, University of Cincinnati - USA
  • Master of Educational Management, University of Western Australia

Keywords

  • childhood deafness
  • diversity in education
  • inclusive education
  • social capital

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
130312 Special Education and Disability 50
130399 Specialist Studies in Education not elsewhere classified 20
160506 Education Policy 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
EDUC6055 Audiology, Speech and Auditory Development
University of Newcastle Faculty of Education
Audiology, Speech and Auditory Development 
Course Coordinator 1/01/2004 - 1/01/2014
EDUC6662 Speech Science and Speech Development
Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Speech Science and Speech Development for Children with Hearing Loss
Speech Science and Speech Development 1/01/2011 - 1/01/2014
EDUC6860 Listening and Spoken Language: Fundamentals
University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Listening and Spoken Language: Fundamentals
Listening and Spoken Language: Fundamentals 1/01/2004 - 1/01/2014
EDUC6861 Listening and Spoken Language: Early Intervention
University of Newcastle

Listening and Spoken Language: Early Intervention

Listening and Spoken Language: Early Intervention 1/01/2004 - 1/01/2014
EDUC6862 Listening and Spoken Language: School Age Children
Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Listening and Spoken Language: School Age Children
Listening and Spoken Language: School Age Children 1/01/2004 - 1/01/2014
EDUC6863 Auditory-verbal Practice: Research
Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Auditory-verbal Practice: Research
Auditory-verbal Practice: Research 1/01/2004 - 1/01/2014
EDUC6064 Auditory/Oral Programming for Children with HI: Advanced Practice
The University of Newcastle, NSW
Auditory/Oral Programming for Children with Hearing Loss: Advanced Practice
Auditory/Oral Programming for Children with Hearing Loss: Advanced Practice 1/01/2004 - 1/01/2006
EDUC6082 Policy, Administration and Collaboration in Special & Inclusive Education
University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Policy, Administration and Collaboration in Special & Inclusive Education

Policy, Administration and Collaboration in Special & Inclusive Education 1/07/2017 - 1/12/2017
EDUC6165 Critiquing and designing research in inclusive, special education or disability service settings
The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts | Australia
Critiquing and designing research in inclusive, special education or disability service settings
Critiquing and Designing Research in Inclusive, Special Education or Disability Service Settings 1/07/2017 - 1/12/2017
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Rhoades EA, Duncan J, AUDITORY-VERBAL PRACTICE Family-Centered Early Intervention, Charles C Thomas Publisher, 322 (2017)
2014 Duncan J, Rhoades EA, Fitzpatrick EM, Auditory (Re)Habilitation for Adolescents with Hearing Loss: Theory and Practice (2014)

© Oxford University Press 2014. All rights reserved. There is a growing realization that many adolescents with hearing loss require special attention. Despite the benefits of earl... [more]

© Oxford University Press 2014. All rights reserved. There is a growing realization that many adolescents with hearing loss require special attention. Despite the benefits of early diagnosis, early amplification, and early intervention, some adolescents with hearing loss do not achieve age equivalent developmental milestones. The purpose of this book is to assist auditory (re)habilitation practitioners in mitigating the negative effects of hearing loss on communicative, socio-emotional, and academic performance of adolescents who rely on auditory-based spoken language to communicate. It is essential that adolescents whose parents choose auditory-based spoken language, receive systematic, consistent, well-planned, appropriate auditory (re)habilitation. This book presents an evidence-based approach to auditory (re)habilitation for adolescents with hearing loss. Practitioners are provided with theoretical and practical strategies for intervention, targeting a historically overlooked population. Practitioners will find its framework, based on enhancing adolescent inner resources, an informative and unique approach toward enabling adolescent self-determination.

DOI 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195381405.001.0001
2010 Rhoades EA, Duncan J, Auditory-Verbal Practice: Toward a Family-Centered Approach, Charles C Thomas, Ill, USA, 401 (2010) [A3]

Chapter (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Duncan JC, Rhoades EA, 'Introduction to auditory-verbal practice', Auditory-verbal practice: Family-centered early intervention (2nd ed.), Charles C. Thomas, Springfield, IL 5-15 (2017)
2017 Rhoades EA, Duncan JC, 'Editors' summaries & comments, opportunities & challenges', Auditory-verbal early intervention practice: Toward a family-centered approach, Charles C. Thomas, Spring field, Illinois 303-316 (2017)
2017 Duncan JC, 'Circles of influence', Auditory-verbal practice: Toward a family-centered approach, Charles c. Thomas, Springfield, Illinois 67-77 (2017)
2016 Duncan JC, 'Inclusive education for students with hearing loss', Special education needs: A guide for inclusive practices, Sage Publications Inc, UK 250-267 (2016)
2013 Duncan JC, Fitzpatrick E, Doucet P, Bell C, Bernstein A, Dickson C, et al., 'Audiologic rehabilitation around the world', Paediatric audiologic rehabilitation: From infancy to adolescence, Thieme, New York 175-191 (2013)
2012 Duncan J, 'Students with hearing loss', Students with hearing loss, Sage, London 211-225 (2012) [B2]
2011 Duncan J, 'Application of auditory (re)habilitation teaching behaviors to a signed communication education context', Cochlear Implants: Evolving Perspectives, Gallaudet University Press, Washington, DC 228-240 (2011) [B1]
2010 Duncan J, 'Circles of influence', Auditory-Verbal Practice: Toward a Family-Centered Approach, Charles C Thomas Publisher, Springfield, Illinois 97-111 (2010) [B1]
2010 Rhoades EA, Duncan J, 'Introduction to auditory-verbal practice', Auditory-Verbal Practice : Toward a Family-Centered Approach, Charles C Thomas Publisher, Springfield, Illinois 5-21 (2010) [B1]
2001 Duncan JC, Dodson C, 'Why is auditory-verbal therapy referred to as diagnostic?', 50 FAQs about AVT, Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Washington, D.C. 87-89 (2001)
Show 7 more chapters

Journal article (14 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Duncan JC, Wong CL, Ching YC, Whitfield J, 'Exploring the Social Capital of Adolescents Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing and Their Parents: A Preliminary Investigation', AMERICAN ANNALS OF THE DEAF, 162 463-478 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1353/aad.2018.0004
2018 Duncan JC, O'Neill R, 'Taking up the baton', Deafness and Education International, 20 1-2 (2018)
DOI 10.1080/14643154.2018.1457426
2018 Davison-Mowle J, Leigh G, Duncan J, Arthur-Kelly M, 'Description of the direct teaching activities of itinerant teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students', Deafness and Education International, 20 23-40 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This study sought to describe and classify the support activities provided by all itinerant teachers for studen... [more]

© 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This study sought to describe and classify the support activities provided by all itinerant teachers for students who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) in regular schools in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT), without exclusion. The itinerant teachers (n = 14) varied in terms of formal qualifications and experience and provided support to all DHH (n = 61) students in ACT schools, inclusive of students across all age/grade levels and those with additional disabilities. Analysis of teachers¿ responses to a detailed questionnaire provided frequency and time measures for 22 possible activities, which were simplified using factor analysis into 11 categories of activities. Categorization of the activities indicated that 91% of the support time was used for direct teaching, and that 73% of the direct teaching time was primarily focused on the development of skills in language, listening, and speech. The other 27% of the direct teaching time was used for explicit class programme support. As well as providing direct teaching, the itinerant teachers provided consultation services to school personnel and parents. The findings are discussed in relation to the previous literature describing the activities of itinerant teachers of DHH students.

DOI 10.1080/14643154.2018.1442908
Co-authors Michael Arthur-Kelly, Greg Leigh
2018 Duncan J, O'Neill R, 'Decision making in the education of children and young people who are deaf or hard of hearing', DEAFNESS & EDUCATION INTERNATIONAL, 20 121-122 (2018)
DOI 10.1080/14643154.2018.1521901
2018 Barr M, Duncan J, Dally K, 'A Systematic Review of Services to DHH Children in Rural and Remote Regions.', Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 23 228-130 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/deafed/enx059
Co-authors Kerry Dally
2016 Wong CL, Ching TYC, Whitfield J, Duncan J, 'Online social participation, social capital and literacy of adolescents with hearing loss: A pilot study', Deafness and Education International, 18 103-116 (2016)

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. The internet and social media have fast become an everyday aspect of adolescents¿ lives. Online participation m... [more]

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. The internet and social media have fast become an everyday aspect of adolescents¿ lives. Online participation may increase social capital and be particularly beneficial for individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH), as it provides an alternative method to communicate, interact with others and access information. However, reduced levels of literacy may be a barrier to participate and benefit from online activities. This pilot study aimed to assess the feasibility of using an online survey to measure the online social habits, social capital, and literacy in DHH adolescents; and explore the relationship between these variables. An online questionnaire encompassing measures of internet, social media usage, bonding and bridging social capital in online/offline settings, and literacy was completed by twenty-nine Australian DHH adolescents (aged 11-18). The results showed that an online survey method is feasible to collect data on online participation and social capital, but not reliable for literacy outcomes. The DHH adolescents reported very high use of the internet. A positive relationship was found between internet use and online bridging social capital suggesting that the internet assists DHH teenagers to expand worldviews and express their opinions. In contrast, no relationship was found with internet use and bonding social capital which indicates the internet still cannot be a substitute for face-toface interactions for social support. Due to the small sample size and unreliability of self-report literacy scores, we were unable to determine any association between social capital and literacy. However, this pilot informs and provides recommendations for future research examining the relationship between social media use, social capital, and literacy.

DOI 10.1080/14643154.2016.1159783
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2012 McCarthy M, Duncan J, Leigh GR, 'Telepractice: The Australian experience in an international context', Volta Review, 112 297-312 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Greg Leigh, Melissa Mccarthy Mc
2010 Duncan J, Kendrick A, McGinnis MD, Perigoe C, 'Auditory (re)habilitation teaching behavior rating scale', Journal of Rehabilitative Audiology, XLIII 65-86 (2010) [C1]
2009 Duncan J, 'Parental readiness for cochlear implant decision-making', Cochlear Implants International, 10 38-42 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/cii.384
Citations Scopus - 9
2008 Duncan J, 'Telepractice aural habilitation for school-age children', Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, 15 5-17 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1044/arii15.1.5
2006 Duncan JC, 'Application of auditory-verbal methodology and pedagogy to school age children', Journal of Educational Audiology, 39-49 (2006)
2002 Duncan J, 'Application of auditory (re)habilitation teaching behaviors to a signed communication education context 229-241 (2002)

This chapter focuses explicitly on teaching behaviors that can be used by the teacher of the deaf1 to facilitate the auditory-based spoken language development of students in a si... [more]

This chapter focuses explicitly on teaching behaviors that can be used by the teacher of the deaf1 to facilitate the auditory-based spoken language development of students in a signed communication education environment. It presents potential challenges the teacher of the deaf may face in this special learning context. What this chapter does not do is prescribe when auditory-based spoken language is to be used in this unique education environment. That is a matter for the family, school leaders, and the education team to decide. The reader is encouraged to see Mayer and Leigh (2010) for a review of pertinent issues regarding the changing context of sign bilingual education and the applicability of simultaneous production of signed and spoken codes. This chapter closes with a case study pertinent to the topic. In addition to the teaching behaviors presented here and as a matter of principle and regardless of communication methodology, teachers of the deaf are encouraged to use an integrated, developmental approach whereby the progression of cognitive and linguistic functioning is accomplished through social interaction. Attention is consistently placed on the development of communication through natural social discourse as well as activities within and outside of the formal learning context. The teacher is encouraged to maintain a process focus at all times so that "how the student is learning" as compared with "what the student is learning" is identified to the students and made explicit throughout all interactions (Duncan, Rhoades, & Fitzpatrick, in press). Ten core teaching behaviors presented in this chapter are excerpts from the work of Duncan, Kendrick, McGinnis, and Perigoe (2010). Many of the teaching behaviors were identified by Caleffe-Schenck (1983, 1992a, 1992b) and later refined by Perigoe (Auditory-Verbal International, 2004; Auditory-Verbal International, Certification Council, 2004; Auditory-Verbal International, Professional Education Committee, 1998-1999). All teaching behaviors can be identified in the work of Helen Beebe (1953, 1976, 1982), Beebe, Pearson, and Koch (1984), Doreen Pollack (1964, 1970, 1981, 1984), and Daniel Ling (1964, 1973, 1976, 1984, 1989, 2002). Due to the origin of the teaching behaviors presented, each is linked to the auditory-verbal methodology (see, for example, Duncan, 2006). In recent times, the term "auditory (re)habilitation" has been used by the author instead of auditoryverbal due to its inclusiveness of all children and students using auditory-based spoken language regardless of age, culture, and language preference (Duncan et al., 2010). For the purpose of this chapter, 10 key teaching behaviors have been chosen. Many more teaching behaviors can be applied to this pedagogical context; however, these 10 are fundamental to the facilitation of auditory-based spoken communication (Duncan et al., 2010). After the teacher of the deaf becomes confident employing these teaching behaviors, additional behaviors can be incorporated when appropriate. For children using hearing technology such as cochlear implants or hearing aids, upon enrollment in a class, teachers are expected to engage in a discussion with families regarding the anticipated use and purpose of the student's hearing technology. It is essential that the teacher understand the extent to which the student is expected to use audition in day-to-day communication. Following this family discussion, the teacher is encouraged to have an ongoing open discussion with the whole class and individual students regarding the use of hearing technology in the classroom. Students themselves need to be aware of who is and who is not using hearing technology. Among other things, this facilitates the development of empathy as the students without hearing technology endeavor to help maintain an appropriate acoustic environment. To this end, all class members understand the importance of hearing techn...

1999 Duncan JC, 'Length and complexity of utterances produced by kindergarten children with impaired hearing and their hearing peers', Australian Journal of Education of the Dea, 5 63-69 (1999)
1999 Duncan J, 'Conversational skills of children with hearing loss and children with normal hearing in an integrated setting', Volta Review, 101 193-211 (1999)

This study examines the conversation skills used by children with hearing loss and their chronological-age-matched hearing peers in an integrated setting. Data were collected from... [more]

This study examines the conversation skills used by children with hearing loss and their chronological-age-matched hearing peers in an integrated setting. Data were collected from a naturalistic (integrated kindergarten context) as the children interacted with their peers, and a quasi-naturalistic setting (tutorial room context) as they interacted in dyads. A modified version of the Social Organization of Discourse Checklist/Conversational Skills (Beattie, 1990) was used to code both sets of data. Children with hearing loss were matched to their hearing peers based on chronological age. The Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Test, a nonparametric test that is used to test the null hypothesis that two populations are the same in terms of their ranks, was used to compare the results of the chronological age-matched pairs in each of the dyad and integrated kindergarten contexts. Analysis of the data documented that there were no significant differences in the majority of the conversational skills used by the children with hearing loss and the children with normal hearing.

Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 10
Show 11 more journal articles

Conference (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Duncan J, 'Adolescents with hearing loss: Auditory (rehabilitation) framework', Academy of Rehabilitative Audiology Annual Institute, Providence, RI (2012) [E3]
2011 Duncan J, 'Strategies for facilitating social communication necessary for successful integration of adolescents with hearing loss', ANZCED 2011: Staying on Track with Deaf Education, St Kilda (2011) [E3]
2011 Duncan J, Kendrick A, McGinnis M, Perigoe C, 'Auditory (re)habilitation teaching behaviour rating scale', Audiology Now! 2011 Convention, Chicago (2011) [E3]
2011 Duncan J, Ma J, 'Audiological and auditory (re)habilitative management of children with common cavity', Audiology Now! 2011 Convention, Chicago (2011) [E3]
2010 Duncan J, 'Building reliance via personal resources', Educators of Deaf Students Association and Deafness Centre 'Building Resilience in Students and Teacher', Parramatta, NSW (2010) [E3]
2007 Duncan J, 'Aural (Re)habilitation for adolescents', ASHA Convention 2007. Presentations, Chicago (2007) [E3]
Show 3 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 6
Total funding $86,700

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $2,000

AG Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Arizona, 28-30 June 2018$2,000

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Jill Duncan

Scheme FEDUA Conference Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20132 grants / $26,700

Social capital, language, literacy, and quality of life of adolescents who are deaf/hard of hearing and their chronologically-age matched hearing peers: A pilot study$20,000

An investigation into the social capital of Australian adolescents who are DHH and their parents and its relationship with individual child or family characteristics, language, literacy, and psychosocial outcomes.

Funding body: WA Foundation for Deaf Children

Funding body WA Foundation for Deaf Children
Project Team

Duncan, J.

Scheme WA Foundation for Deaf Children
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON N

Social capital, language, literacy, and quality of life of adolescents who are deaf/hard of hearing and their chronologically-age matched hearing peers: A pilot study$6,700

An investigation into the online social participation, social capital and literacy of adolescents with hearing loss.

Funding body: Deafness Foundation

Funding body Deafness Foundation
Project Team

Duncan, J.

Scheme Deafness Foundation
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON N

20081 grants / $50,000

Defining auditory-verbal pedagogy for children with hearing loss$50,000

An investigation to define the key teaching behaviours of paediatric auditory (re)habilitation and to document the use of these teaching behaviours over time. 

Funding body: Children’s Hearing Foundation, Taiwan.

Funding body Children’s Hearing Foundation, Taiwan.
Project Team

Duncan, J.

Scheme Children’s Hearing Foundation, Taiwan
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding C3212 - International Not for profit
Category 3212
UON N

19982 grants / $8,000

Parental understanding of hearing aid care and maintenance$5,000

An investigation into parents of children with hearing loss understanding of hearing aid care and maintenance, which resulted in the dissemination of hearing aid care kits and an instructional video. 

Funding body: WA Deafness Council

Funding body WA Deafness Council
Project Team

Duncan, J., & Schneider, P.

Scheme WA Deafness Council
Role Investigator
Funding Start 1998
Funding Finish 1999
GNo
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON N

Self-perceptions of parents of children with hearing loss$3,000

An investigation of self-perceptions of parents of children with hearing loss attending a recreational weekend designed to facilitate capacity, networking, and broader understanding of deafness.

Funding body: Gordon Reid Foundation and the Lotteries Commission

Funding body Gordon Reid Foundation and the Lotteries Commission
Project Team

Duncan, J. & Livingstone, S.

Scheme Gordon Reid Foundation and the Lotteries Commission
Role Investigator
Funding Start 1998
Funding Finish 1999
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current5

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 Masters The Impact of Using Strengths-Based Case Management Practises with Applied Behaviour Analysis for Children with Autism M Philosophy (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD The Social Capital of Australian Adolescents Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing and Its Association with Individual and Family Characteristics PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 Masters Creative Curriculum: Teaching Approaches for Secondary Aged Students with Significant and Complex Needs M Philosophy (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD An investigation of services for Australian children with a hearing loss and the National Disability Insurance Scheme PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Teachers' Leadership in the Use of Information and Communication Technology Within Deaf and Hard of Hearing Education: An Exploration of an e-Learning Framework to Enrich Student Learning Achievement and Social Development PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Supporting Students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing in Regular Schools: Influences on the Support Activities Provided by Itinerant Teachers PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Jill Duncan

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Education
Faculty of Education and Arts

Contact Details

Email jill.duncan@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 61 2 4921 6282

Office

Room SEG-34
Building Special Education
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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