Dr Traci Flynn

Dr Traci Flynn

Senior Lecturer

School of Humanities and Social Science

Career Summary

Biography

My research and teaching is a culmination of my clinical, industrial and academic experiences.  I worked clinically in the USA, UK and New Zealand with individuals with hearing impairment, with a focus on people those who received cochlear implants.

Inspired to make a difference, I worked for two hearing aid manufacturers in Denmark.  I influenced the design of devices to be user-friendly.  During this time, I was awarded a US patent and published three articles in clinical journals. Importantly, I co-wrote the Functional Assessment Guide with Professor Anne Marie Tharpe from Vanderbilt University as a core reference for audiologists.

While working within industry, the hearing devices utilized latest technology.  However, there was a need to establish the evidence base and benefits for this new technology.  This excited me to pursue and earn my research degree (PhD).  I earned my PhD from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, with a concentration in Audiology. My studies focused on the hearing and middle ear status of children and young adults with cleft palate ± lip.

With my unique skillset, I combined my previous clinical, industrial, and academic experiences to focus on the impact of hearing devices on children with hearing impairment’s language and quality of life during my post-doc at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. 

Currently, I am excited to focus on the quality of life and language abilities in children with hearing disorders. 


Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Science, University of Minnesota - USA
  • Master of Arts, University of Minnesota - USA

Keywords

  • Hearing impairment
  • Language
  • Rehabilitation

Languages

  • Swedish (Working)
  • English (Mother)

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Clinical Educator University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia
Clinical Educator University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia
Casual Academic University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/4/2013 - 31/12/2017 Postdoctoral Research Fellow Karolinska Institute
Speech Pathology
Sweden
1/4/2008 - 31/3/2013 PhD student University of Gothenburg and Sahlgrenska University Hospital
Department of Audiology
Sweden

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/8/2002 - 28/2/2007 Research Audiologist

Maternity leave:  October 2005-February 2007

Oticon A/S, Copenhagen
Denmark

Awards

Award

Year Award
2016 Majblomman Diploma Ceremony
Majblomman

Member

Year Award
2018 International Issues Board, Chair
American Speech and Hearing Association

Patents

Number Title Patent Family Registered Approved
2006/0245611 Hearing aid with visual indicator
The invention comprises a hearing aid, which has a casing containing a signal receiving part for receiving an audio signal, an audio transducer for providing an audio signal to the user, a signal transmission path between the signal receiving part and the audio transducer, whereby a battery is provided for powering the signal receiving part, the signal path and the audio transducer, and where further means are provided for assessing the function of the hearing aid and for generating an electrical indication signal which indicates the function of the hearing aid and where further means are provided for intermittently generating a power signal in response to the electrical indication signal and where means are provided for converting the power signal into a light signal, such that the light signal is visible from outside the hearing aid.
A1 13/5/2004 2006

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
EDUC6165 Critiquing and designing research in inclusive, special education or disability service settings
School of Education, The University of Newcastle
Course Coordinator 1/2/2018 - 30/11/2018
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (23 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Cochrane JA, Flynn T, Wills A, Walker FR, Nilsson M, Johnson SJ, 'Clinical Decision Support Tools for Predicting Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review', Journal of Arthroplasty, (2020)

© 2020 Elsevier Inc. Background: Total knee arthroplasty is the standard surgical treatment for end-stage osteoarthritis. Although widely accepted as a successful procedure, appro... [more]

© 2020 Elsevier Inc. Background: Total knee arthroplasty is the standard surgical treatment for end-stage osteoarthritis. Although widely accepted as a successful procedure, approximately 30% of patients are not satisfied due to non-optimal postoperative outcomes. Clinical decision support tools that are able to accurately predict post-surgery outcomes would assist in providing individualized advice or services to help alleviate possible issues, resulting in significant benefits to both the healthcare system and individuals. Methods: Five databases (Ovid Medline, Ovid EMBASE, CINAHL complete, Cochrane Library, and Scopus) were searched for the key phrases ¿knee replacement¿ or ¿knee arthroplasty¿ and ¿decision support tool,¿ ¿decision tool,¿ ¿predict* tool,¿ ¿predict* model,¿ ¿algorithm¿ or ¿nomogram.¿ Searches were limited to peer-reviewed journal articles published between January 2000 and June 2019. Reference lists of included articles were examined. Authors came to a consensus on the final list of included articles. Results: Eighteen articles were included for review. Most models reported low predictive success and inability to externally validate. Both candidate and final predictor variables were inconsistent between studies. Only 1 model was considered strongly predictive (AUROC >0.8), and only 2 studies were able to externally validate their developed model. In general, models that performed well used large patient numbers, were tested on similar demographics, and used either nonlinear input transformations or a completely nonlinear model. Conclusion: Some models do show promise; however, there remains the question of whether the reported predictive success can continue to be replicated. Furthermore, clinical applicability and interpretation of predictive tools should be considered during development.

DOI 10.1016/j.arth.2020.10.053
Co-authors Rohan Walker, Michael Nilsson, Sarah Johnson, Adrian Wills
2020 Fogels J, Jönsson R, Sadeghi A, Flynn M, Flynn T, 'Single-Sided Deafness-Outcomes of Three Interventions for Profound Unilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Randomized Clinical Trial', Otology and Neurotology, 41 736-744 (2020) [C1]

© 2020 Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. All rights reserved. Objective:A comparison of three interventions for profound unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.Study Design:Prospect... [more]

© 2020 Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. All rights reserved. Objective:A comparison of three interventions for profound unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.Study Design:Prospective, crossover randomized clinical trial.Participants:Fifteen participants with profound unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.Interventions:Three potential technical interventions were compared: Bone Conduction Device on softband, Contralateral Routing of Signal (CROS), and Remote Microphone. Each intervention was randomly trialed for a period of 3 weeks, separated by a 1 week washout period.Outcome Measures:Speech in noise recognition test performed under four conditions (lateral noise poorer ear, lateral noise better ear, speech poorer ear, speech better ear). Standardized questionnaires (Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit, Bern Benefit in Single Sided Deafness Questionnaire, and Speech, Spatial, and Other Qualities 12) were used to evaluate amplification benefit at baseline and following each intervention.Results:The use of remote microphone provided the best results in the speech recognition in noise test. A benefit in some signal-To-noise ratios was presented of the CROS over bone conduction device on softband in the Speech Poor Ear condition. On questionnaires of benefit, participants did not rate a particular intervention as significantly better than any other. Following the study, CROS was the intervention preferred by the 8 of 15 participants (53%). The majority of participants (80%) chose to continue with an intervention rather than no treatment.Conclusion:The use of all interventions resulted in increased performance in speech recognition in noise and rated higher on subjective benefits in comparison with baseline. People with SSD are a heterogeneous population when considering perceived difficulties. Future research should focus on segmenting the population of SSD depending on factors such as etiology, high frequency loss in the better ear, and age of acquired loss for the poorer ear. This stratification may possibly increase the benefit for the patient in terms of more individual-based clinical routines.

DOI 10.1097/MAO.0000000000002633
Co-authors Mark Flynn
2020 Persson AE, Al-Khatib D, Flynn T, 'Hearing Aid Use, Auditory Development, and Auditory Functional Performance in Swedish Children With Moderate Hearing Loss During the First 3 Years', American Journal of Audiology, 29 1-14 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1044/2020_aja-19-00092
2020 Stübner C, Flynn T, Gillberg C, Fernell E, Miniscalco C, 'Schoolchildren with unilateral or mild to moderate bilateral sensorineural hearing loss should be screened for neurodevelopmental problems', Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics, 109 1430-1438 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/apa.15088
2020 Lohmander A, Westberg LR, Olsson S, Tengroth BI, Flynn T, 'Canonical Babbling and Early Consonant Development Related to Hearing in Children With Otitis Media With Effusion With or Without Cleft Palate', Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal, (2020)

© 2020, American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association. Objective: To investigate and compare babbling, early consonant production and proficiency from 10 to 36 months of age and ... [more]

© 2020, American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association. Objective: To investigate and compare babbling, early consonant production and proficiency from 10 to 36 months of age and its relationship with hearing in children with otitis media with effusion (OME) with or without cleft palate. Design: Prospective, longitudinal group comparison study. Setting: University hospital. Participants: Fifteen children born with nonsyndromic cleft palate with or without cleft lip (CP±L) and 15 age-matched children with hearing loss (HL) associated with OME but without cleft palate (noncleft group). Main Outcome Measures: Canonical babbling (CB) and early consonant variables (presence of oral stops, anterior stops, dental/alveolar stops, number of different true consonants) at 10 and 18 months, and percentage of consonants correct proficiency (PCC) at 36 months. Results: A total of 54% of the CP±L group and 77% of the noncleft group had CB. The noncleft group had a significantly higher prevalence of all consonant variables. Percentage of consonants correct was 61.9% in the CP±L group and 81.6% in the noncleft group. All early consonant variables except CB were significantly related to PCC. Hearing sensitivity at 18 and 30 months correlated with PCC and explained 40% of the variation. Conclusions: Mild HL impacted presence of CB at 10 months and was related to consonant proficiency at 36 months in children with HL associated with OME and children with cleft palate. The noncleft group showed results at 36 months similar to children with normal hearing; however, the CP±L group did not. Although the cleft palate may have a bigger impact on the speech development, management of hearing sensitivity would also be beneficial.

DOI 10.1177/1055665620966198
2020 Ditton E, Johnson S, Hodyl N, Flynn T, Pollack M, Ribbons K, et al., 'Improving Patient Outcomes Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: Identifying Rehabilitation Pathways Based on Modifiable Psychological Risk and Resilience Factors', Frontiers in Psychology, 11 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2020.01061
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Sarah Johnson, Michael Nilsson, Rohan Walker
2019 Persson A, Miniscalco C, Lohmander A, Flynn T, 'Validation of the Swedish version of the LittlEARSA (R) Auditory Questionnaire in children with normal hearing - a longitudinal study', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF AUDIOLOGY, 58 635-642 (2019)
DOI 10.1080/14992027.2019.1621397
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2019 Duncan J, Lim SR, Baker F, Flynn T, Byatt T, 'Online and Offline Social Capital of Adolescents Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing', The Volta Review, 119 57-82 (2019)
DOI 10.17955/tvr.119.2.804
Co-authors Jill Duncan
2018 Garvis S, Harj-Luukkainen H, Flynn T, 'A descriptive study of early childhood education steering documents in Finland, Sweden and Australia around language immersion programmes', Asia-Pacific Journal of Research in Early Childhood Education, 12 1-22 (2018)

© 2018 by The Pacific. Being able to speak different languages is important in today's global world to allow communication and understanding. Countries may vary in how they s... [more]

© 2018 by The Pacific. Being able to speak different languages is important in today's global world to allow communication and understanding. Countries may vary in how they support early language learning with immersion programmes. This paper specifically explores the steering documents in Finland, Sweden, and Australia for children attending early childhood education settings (children aged birth to five years). A content analysis was used to explore patterns. The descriptive comparison allows similarities and differences across the countries to emerge. As a result, a table describing the different immersion and monolingual approaches in respective country is presented. The paper concludes with a broader discussion on steering documents in early childhood education in regards to young children's rights to learning languages and attending different immersion programmes within early childhood.

DOI 10.17206/apjrece.2018.12.3.1
2018 Carew P, Mensah FK, Rance G, Flynn T, Poulakis Z, Wake M, 'Consider the costs of aiding mild hearing loss in the absence of clear benefits: Response to McCreery and colleagues', Child: Care, Health and Development, 44 928-929 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/cch.12601
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2018 Carew P, Mensah FK, Rance G, Flynn T, Poulakis Z, Wake M, 'Mild-moderate congenital hearing loss: secular trends in outcomes across four systems of detection', CHILD CARE HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT, 44 71-82 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/cch.12477
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
2017 Tengroth B, Hederstierna C, Neovius E, Flynn T, 'Hearing thresholds and ventilation tube treatment in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate', International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 97 102-108 (2017)

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. Objective Children with cleft lip and palate have a high prevalence of otitis media with effusion (OME) which is often associated with a fluctuating, conducti... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. Objective Children with cleft lip and palate have a high prevalence of otitis media with effusion (OME) which is often associated with a fluctuating, conductive hearing loss in the low and mid-frequencies and a risk for permanent hearing loss in the higher frequencies. Although common, there is no consensus on the treatment of OME with ventilation tubes. The aim of this study is to document if the risk for permanent hearing loss and acquired cholesteatoma increases due to treatment with ventilation tubes (VT treatments) during childhood in a group of children with cleft lip and palate. Methods A retrospective medical chart review of 33 children (25 boys and 8 girls) born with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) was completed. Audiological data (results of hearing sensitivity tests, the total number of hearing tests, and number of VT treatments) were extracted from medical records from when the children were 4¿7 and >7¿10 years of age. Results The hearing thresholds in the speech frequencies improved with age (p¿<¿0,05) but a minority of the children continued to present with elevated hearing thresholds in the higher frequencies at >7¿10 years of age. There were no significant correlations between number of VT treatments and hearing thresholds at >7¿10 years. Four of the 33 children presented with complications: two children exhibited perforations of the ear drum (6.1%) and two children developed unilateral cholesteatoma (6.1%). Conclusion In the current study, the hearing sensitivity of children with cleft lip and palate improved with age. However, this improvement was not seen in the higher frequencies. Twelve percent of the children experienced complications following VT treatments. Due to these complications, it is recommended that all children with cleft palate should have routine follow-ups by an ENT doctor and audiologist. As part of the routine follow-up care, hearing assessments should be performed before and after VT treatments.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.03.031
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2016 Sundman H, Flynn T, Tengroth B, Lohmander A, 'ABR thresholds in infants born with CLP and OME and infants with OME', International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 81 21-25 (2016)

© 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate and compare auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds related to otitis media with effusion (OME... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate and compare auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds related to otitis media with effusion (OME) in infants with and without cleft palate and/or lip (CP¿±¿L). Methods Forty-seven infants with CP¿±¿L and 67 infants with OME participated in the study. Hearing thresholds of ears of infants with OME were compared between groups and within the group with CP¿±¿L. Results Infants with CP¿±¿L and OME presented with similar hearing thresholds as infants with OME and not CP¿±¿L. Within the cleft group, infants with isolated cleft palate and OME demonstrated significantly higher hearing thresholds than infants with unilateral cleft lip and palate and OME. Conclusion A high prevalence of infants with CP¿±¿L present with OME early in life. Hearing thresholds of these infants are similar to infants without CP¿±¿L, but with OME. The ear status and hearing thresholds of infants with CP¿±¿L needs to be monitored to be able to provide the best access to hearing in order to fully allow speech and language development.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijporl.2015.11.036
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2014 Flynn T, Persson C, Moller C, Lohmander A, Magnusson L, 'A longitudinal study of hearing and middle ear status of individuals with cleft palate with and without additional malformations/syndromes', Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal, 51 e94-e101 (2014)

© 2014 American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association. Objective: To describe and compare the middle ear status and hearing sensitivity in adolescence with isolated cleft palate p... [more]

© 2014 American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association. Objective: To describe and compare the middle ear status and hearing sensitivity in adolescence with isolated cleft palate plus additional malformations and/or syndromes with those with only an isolated cleft palate.Design: Retrospective and longitudinal. Two groups of individuals with isolated cleft palate were compared.Participants: A cohort of individuals born over 4 years in the western region of Sweden. The cohort was divided into one group with isolated cleft palate (n = 31; ICP) and one group with isolated cleft palate plus additional malformations and/or syndromes (n = 37; ICP+).Methods: Middle ear status and hearing thresholds were collected from the medical records at 7, 10, 13, and 16 years of age, examined, and compared within and between groups over time. Results: The ICP+ group demonstrated a significantly higher prevalence of abnormal middle ear status and elevated hearing thresholds as compared with the ICP group. As the individuals aged, the prevalence of abnormal middle ear status decreased. The hearing levels in both groups decreased in the low to middle frequencies as individuals aged; however, the hearing in the high frequencies did not.Conclusions: Individuals with cleft palate need to be followed routinely for middle ear status and hearing thresholds to ensure optimal audiological rehabilitation, with particular attention to those with additional malformations and/or syndromes.

DOI 10.1597/12-288
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2014 Klintö K, Eva-Kristina-Salameh, Olsson M, Flynn T, Svensson H, Lohmander A, 'Phonology in Swedish-speaking 3-year-olds born with cleft lip and palate and the relationship with consonant production at 18 months', International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, 49 240-254 (2014)

Background Approximately 50% of children born with cleft palate present speech difficulties around 3 years of age, and several studies report on persisting phonological problems a... [more]

Background Approximately 50% of children born with cleft palate present speech difficulties around 3 years of age, and several studies report on persisting phonological problems after palatal closure. However, studies on early phonology related to cleft palate are few and have so far mainly been carried out on English-speaking children. Studies on phonology related to cleft palate in languages other than English are also warranted. Aims To assess phonology in Swedish-speaking children born with and without unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) at 3 years of age, and to identify variables at 18 months that are associated with restricted phonology at age 3 years. Methods & Procedures Eighteen consecutive children born with UCLP and 20 children without cleft lip and palate were included. Transcriptions of audio recordings at 18 months and 3 years were used. Per cent correct consonants adjusted for age (PCC-A), the number of established phonemes, and phonological simplification processes at 3 years were assessed and compared with different aspects of consonant inventory at 18 months. Outcomes & Results PCC-A, the number of established phonemes, and the total number of phonological processes differed significantly at 3 years between the two groups. Total number of oral consonants, oral stops, dental/alveolar oral stops and number of different oral stops at 18 months correlated significantly with PCC-A at 3 years in the UCLP group. Conclusions & Implications As a group, children born with UCLP displayed deviant phonology at 3 years compared with peers without cleft lip and palate. Measures of oral consonant and stop production at 18 months might be possible predictors for phonology at 3 years in children born with cleft palate. © 2013 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

DOI 10.1111/1460-6984.12068
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 25
2014 Flynn T, Lohmander A, 'A longitudinal study of hearing and middle ear status in individuals with UCLP', Otology and Neurotology, 35 989-996 (2014)

OBJECTIVE: To define the age when the higher prevalence of abnormal middle ear dissipates in individuals with cleft lip and palate and to investigate how this may affect hearing s... [more]

OBJECTIVE: To define the age when the higher prevalence of abnormal middle ear dissipates in individuals with cleft lip and palate and to investigate how this may affect hearing sensitivity over time. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective and prospective cohort study. SETTING: University hospital. PATIENTS: Three groups of individuals with unilateral cleft lip and palate from the same cleft center: 1) a group of individuals followed longitudinally from 1 to 5 years of age (n = 22), 2) another group of individuals followed longitudinally from 7 to 16 years of age (n = 24), and 3) a group which encompasses young adults between 20 and 31 years of age (n = 26). MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURE(S): Abnormal middle ear status and hearing sensitivity. RESULTS: The prevalence of abnormal middle ear status decreases as the individuals within the 3 groups age from 89% at age 1 year to 10% in young adulthood. Hearing statistically improved as children became older up to 13 years of age and then worsened in the high frequencies between 16 and 20 to 31 years of age. CONCLUSION: There is a high prevalence of abnormal middle ear status in individuals with cleft lip and palate. This higher prevalence of abnormal middle ear status may lead to poorer high-frequency hearing, which could potentially lead to challenges in academics and difficulties understanding speech in social situations. Further investigation into these, the prevalence of abnormal middle ear status and hearing in comparison to a control group is warranted. © 2014, Otology & Neurotology, Inc.

DOI 10.1097/MAO.0000000000000429
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
2013 Flynn T, Lohmander A, Moller C, Magnusson L, 'A longitudinal study of hearing and middle ear status in adolescents with cleft lip and palate', Laryngoscope, 123 1374-1380 (2013)

Objectives/Hypothesis To study longitudinal prevalence of otitis media with effusion (OME) in children between 7 and 16 years of age by cleft group, and hearing sensitivity across... [more]

Objectives/Hypothesis To study longitudinal prevalence of otitis media with effusion (OME) in children between 7 and 16 years of age by cleft group, and hearing sensitivity across time and across frequencies. Study Design Retrospective and longitudinal. Methods All children with cleft palate born from 1991 to 1993 were included in the study (n = 58). Audiological and otological data were reviewed at 7, 10, 13, and 16 years of age. The group was divided by cleft type (24 unilateral cleft lip and palate, 23 cleft palate only, and 11 bilateral cleft lip and palate). Results The prevalence of abnormal middle ear status decreased significantly with age. When comparing cleft types, the isolated cleft palate group presented with a significantly lower prevalence of abnormal middle ear status than the other groups at 7 and 16 years of age (21% as compared to 32% in the unilateral group and 38% in the bilateral group). The pure-tone average improved with age, while the high-frequency pure-tone average did not. When cleft types were compared, the bilateral group demonstrated significantly poorer hearing in the high frequencies than the other groups. Conclusion Children with cleft palate need regular audiological and otological follow-up to ensure management is appropriate and timely. The increased hearing thresholds in the high frequencies may be due to the increased episodes of OME. © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

DOI 10.1002/lary.23839
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 31
2012 Flynn T, Möller C, Lohmander A, Magnusson L, 'Hearing and otitis media with effusion in young adults with cleft lip and palate', Acta Oto-Laryngologica, 132 959-966 (2012)

Conclusion: Speech recognition in noise is affected when otitis media with effusion (OME) is present in young adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Objective: The objective... [more]

Conclusion: Speech recognition in noise is affected when otitis media with effusion (OME) is present in young adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the hearing and performance on auditory tasks of young adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate as compared to young adults without cleft lip and palate. Methods: Twenty-six young adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate and 23 young adults without cleft lip and palate participated in the study. Pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, speech recognition in noise at the word and sentence level, and masking level difference were examined. Results: Results revealed elevated hearing thresholds in the young adults with cleft lip and palate as compared with young adults without cleft lip and palate. No differences concerning speech recognition in noise and binaural processing were observed between the young adults with cleft lip and palate and those without. However, there was poorer speech recognition performance in those adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate and OME on the day of testing as compared with young adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate without OME on the day of testing. © 2012 Informa Healthcare.

DOI 10.3109/00016489.2012.669497
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2011 Lohmander A, Olsson M, Flynn T, 'Early consonant production in Swedish infants with and without unilateral cleft lip and palate and two-stage palatal repair', Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal, 48 271-285 (2011)

Objective: To investigate consonant production at 12 and 18 months of age following early soft palate repair in infants with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP), and to compare... [more]

Objective: To investigate consonant production at 12 and 18 months of age following early soft palate repair in infants with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP), and to compare it with typically developing children without clefts. Design: Randomized study with comparison group. Participants: Twenty Swedish infants born with UCLP and 21 without clefts (COMP) were included in a randomized trial of palatal surgery (Scandcleft project). Soft palate closure was completed at age 5 months; hard palate closure was performed in 11 of the infants with UCLP at 1 year of age (HPC) and was left open in nine (HPO). Method: Audio recordings at 12 months (UCLP = 9, COMP = 21) and at 18 months (UCLP = 18, COMP = 21) were phonetically transcribed. Consonant inventory, frequency of manner and place of articulation, true canonical babbling (TCB), and impact of hearing status were analyzed. Results: At 12 months of age, all children had reached the stage of TCB. Mild hearing impairment was significantly correlated with fewer consonant types. A lower frequency of dentals and oral stops was found in the UCLP group than in the COMP group. However, the number of oral stops was high compared with what has been previously reported. Conclusions: Early soft palate closure seems to give a relatively high number of oral stops even with the hard palate unrepaired, although with significantly fewer dentals/alveolars than are seen in peers without clefts. Differences in consonant inventory were correlated with hearing function. © 2011 The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association.

DOI 10.1597/09-105
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 24
2009 Flynn T, Möller C, Jönsson R, Lohmander A, 'The high prevalence of otitis media with effusion in children with cleft lip and palate as compared to children without clefts', International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 73 1441-1446 (2009)

Objectives: Children with cleft lip and palate universally present with otitis media with effusion. This prevalence has not been systematically studied. The purpose of the present... [more]

Objectives: Children with cleft lip and palate universally present with otitis media with effusion. This prevalence has not been systematically studied. The purpose of the present study was to examine and compare the prevalence of otitis media with effusion, hearing sensitivity, and audiometry method utilised for assessment in children with and without clefts. Methods: Two groups of children (children with unilateral cleft lip and palate, N = 22, and children without clefts, N = 20) were followed prospectively and longitudinally from 1 to 5 years of age. Data were collected at four points (1, 1.5, 3, and 5 years of age). Assessments at each of the four points included: (1) otomicroscopy, (2) tympanometry, and (3) hearing assessment. Results: Overall the children with unilateral cleft lip and palate demonstrated a significantly higher prevalence of otitis media with effusion (121 ears, 74.7%) than children without clefts (31 ears, 19.4%) (p < 0.001). This higher prevalence was also significant at 1, 1.5, 3, and 5 years of age (p < 0.001). Of those ears with otitis media with effusion, 83.1% of the ears exhibited a hearing loss (PTA >20 dB), with this loss more prevalent in the cleft group (89.7% UCLP and 70.0% non-cleft). The hearing loss was significantly more pronounced in the cleft (group 35.71 dB HL UCLP and 26.41 dB HL non-cleft group). Children with unilateral cleft lip and palate utilised a lower age-appropriate audiometry testing method than age-matched children with no cleft at 1, 1.5, and 3 years of age. Conclusions: Children with unilateral cleft lip and palate present with a significantly higher prevalence of otitis media with effusion than children without cleft. Also, the hearing loss associated with otitis media with effusion is demonstrated in this study. Furthermore, the method of audiometry has been examined and children with unilateral cleft lip and palate had to be assessed with a lower level of method than children without cleft. © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijporl.2009.07.015
Citations Scopus - 112Web of Science - 95
2006 Flynn MC, Flynn TS, 'Digital technology offers a better solution to feedback problems in pediatric patients', Hearing Journal, 59 58-63 (2006)
DOI 10.1097/01.HJ.0000286490.74197.6e
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Mark Flynn
2005 Flynn T, Flynn M, Harvey M, 'The FM advantage in the real classroom.', Journal of Educational Audiology, 12 35-42 (2005)
2004 Flynn MC, Austin N, Flynn TS, Ford RPK, Buckland L, 'Universal Newborn Hearing Screening introduced to NICU infants in Canterbury Province, New Zealand', New Zealand Medical Journal, 117 (2004)

Aims: Universal Newborn Hearing Screening (UNHS) is being implemented worldwide as an effective method of early identification of hearing loss. The impact of delayed detection of ... [more]

Aims: Universal Newborn Hearing Screening (UNHS) is being implemented worldwide as an effective method of early identification of hearing loss. The impact of delayed detection of sensorineural hearing loss is a major lifelong impairment. The aim of the study was to assess the feasibility of introducing universal newborn hearing screening over the 12-month period in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Christchurch Women's Hospital, and to assess the costs, and resources required. Methods: Universal Newborn Hearing Screening was conducted over a 12 month period in the Neonatal Service of Christchurch Women's Hospital. Throughout the implementation period, data were collected to monitor and benchmark against World's best practice. Results: During the 12 months of the study, 435 babies were screened for hearing loss in the Neonatal Service at Christchurch Women's Hospital. Of these babies, 19 (4.37%) were referred for diagnostic 'auditory brainstem response' ABR testing to confirm hearing loss. Two babies were confirmed with hearing loss, with only one baby exhibiting a known risk factor for deafness. This resulted in a positive predictive index of 10.53%. Conclusions: This study highlights that UNHS can be implemented efficiently and cost-effectively within the Neonatal Service of a New Zealand Hospital. The results were consistent with best practice, and show the benefits of UNHS against 'at risk' screening. The ultimate success of this study will be in the implementation of UNHS across New Zealand. © NZMA.

Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Mark Flynn
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 9
Total funding $458,093

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20202 grants / $14,704

Individual's memory and their ability to process grammar: A comparative eye-tracking study$13,444

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

A/Prof Kiwako Ito (Lead), A/Prof Kylie Shaw and Dr Traci Flynn

Scheme Strategic Network and Pilot Project Grants Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

2020 Faculty of Education and Arts Strategic Early Advice and Feedback Scheme$1,260

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Dr Traci Flynn

Scheme 2020 FEDUA Strategic Early Advice and Feedback Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20191 grants / $1,389

American Speech and Hearing Association Annual Convention, USA, 21 - 23 November 2019$1,389

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Scheme FEDUA Conference Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20173 grants / $64,000

Impact of remote microphone use on language and quality of life in children with developmental language disorder and autism spectrum disorder$30,000

Funding body: Stiftelsen Promobilia

Funding body Stiftelsen Promobilia
Project Team

Traci Flynn and Carmela Miniscalco

Scheme Project grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C3220 - International Philanthropy
Category 3220
UON N

Language in adolescents with mild/mod hearing loss$19,000

Funding body: Hörselforskningsfonden

Funding body Hörselforskningsfonden
Project Team

Traci Flynn and Carmela Miniscalco

Scheme Project grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C3220 - International Philanthropy
Category 3220
UON N

Language in adolescents with mild/mod hearing loss$15,000

Funding body: Aina Börjesons stiftelse för logopedisk forskning och behandling

Funding body Aina Börjesons stiftelse för logopedisk forskning och behandling
Project Team

Traci Flynn and Carmela Miniscalco

Scheme Project grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C3220 - International Philanthropy
Category 3220
UON N

20161 grants / $30,000

Language and quality of life in adolescents with hearing loss$30,000

Funding body: Jerring Funden

Funding body Jerring Funden
Project Team

Traci Flynn and Carmela Miniscalco

Scheme Project grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C3220 - International Philanthropy
Category 3220
UON N

20131 grants / $148,000

Impact of early intervention on the speech and language development in children with conductive hearing impairment$148,000

Funding body: Centrum för Hörsel och kommunikationsforskning

Funding body Centrum för Hörsel och kommunikationsforskning
Project Team

Traci Flynn

Scheme Project grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding C3220 - International Philanthropy
Category 3220
UON N

20051 grants / $200,000

Family adjustment to the identification of a child’s hearing loss through universal newborn hearing screening$200,000

Funding body: Ministry of Science Technology and Innovation (Industrial PhD)

Funding body Ministry of Science Technology and Innovation (Industrial PhD)
Project Team

Traci Flynn

Scheme Industrial PhD
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding C3232 - International Govt - Other
Category 3232
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 Masters Vocabulary Development in Young Children at Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) M Philosophy(Speech Pathology), College of Human and Social Futures, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Hörsel- tal och språkutveckling hos barn med hörselnedsättning från födseln till tre års ålder (Hearing, speech, and language development in children with hearing loss from birth to three years old) Speech Pathology, Karolinksa Institutet Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD The impact of mild to moderate permanent hearing loss on language and auditory outcomes in young children Audiology, The University of Melbourne Co-Supervisor
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News

Speech Pathology Collaboration first for China

April 27, 2017

UON has partnered with Orient Speech Therapy Center Limited to develop a world-class speech pathology training program for its clinics in China.

Speech Pathology Students Improve the Lives of the Aged

December 9, 2013

A new initiative in Speech Pathology is creating Work Integrated Learning opportunities while enhancing the lives of residents of a local aged care facility.

Dr Traci Flynn

Positions

Senior Lecturer
School of Humanities and Social Science
College of Human and Social Futures

Clinical Educator
School of Humanities and Social Science
College of Human and Social Futures

Casual Academic
School of Education
College of Human and Social Futures

Contact Details

Email traci.flynn@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 49138775
Mobile +61(0)421477370

Office

Room SR140
Building Social Sciences
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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