Dr Kiwako Ito

Dr Kiwako Ito

Associate Professor

School of Humanities and Social Science

The Rhythm and Melody of Language

Associate Professor Kiwako Ito is tuning in to the rhythm of speech to understand its complexities.

Associate Professor Kiwako Ito studies the effect of prosody, or rhythm and melody in speech and how people respond to it. Research on prosody is an important focus in many disciplines including Linguistics, Speech Pathology, Education, Psychology and Computer Science. Ito’s own empirical research into how people respond to the emphasis in speech is focused on children with developmental disorders, aging adults and hearing impaired individuals.

One of her latest studies has delivered exciting results that disprove the stereotype that children with autism are generally not sensitive to prosody and ‘joint attention cues’.

The study focused on children aged one to three years old and involved them watching a video where an actor asks ‘Where is the pig,’ then turns their head to look at the pig. Associate Professor Ito used an eye tracking device to monitor the child’s gaze and test whether the children would respond to the speech cues and joint attention cues of the actor turning their head and pointing.

Associate Professor Ito says that what she found went against the stereotypical belief that children with autism don’t respond to speech and social cues.

“A joint attention cue such as pointing, a head turn or a shift of gaze is what we use to draw attention of others to the same direction. Typically developing children are expected to follow the gaze of the actor to the thing that is pointed to. The prediction for this experiment was that children with autism would have low sensitivity to these cues,” she said.

“The data from this study proves that wrong. The children we tested were actually very sensitive and did shift their gaze according to the joint attention cues and it happened much faster than expected. They are also sensitive to the emphasis in speech.”

Lab for Applied Language Sciences

The eye tracking device Associate Professor Ito uses is the key instrument in a new Lab for Applied Language Sciences at the University of Newcastle. Associate Professor Ito plans to develop the lab as a collaborative space where she can work with researchers from other disciplines on a broad range of applications.

“The eye tracker is set up to chase the eye movements of anyone from infants to people playing a board game or using a computer. What I manipulate is the speech input. In most of my experiments I show the subject something and then I test reactions to the placement of emphasis in speech,” Associate Professor Ito said.

“This can tell us how quickly the mind processes the speech input and how quickly we make decisions accordingly. Our eye movements are one of the fastest muscle responses in our body. It’s part of our natural survival system and we can’t help moving our eyes around if there is some informative input such as speech,” she said.

The lab offers opportunities for collaboration with pathology clinicians, medical researchers, psychologists and educators. Ito expects that research will include speech perception in children, adults and people with clinical conditions, grammatical development in school age children and children with developmental disorders and the effect of specific types of training on second/foreign language processing.

“I keep hearing from educators that the anxiety issue is really prevalent at all stages of development, so that is another area I am aiming to cultivate in the lab.”

“My study of prosody also incorporates the tone of voice, which means I can run experiments to see what kind of tone of voice can help people focus or get their attention without making them anxious,” she said.

“We can also incorporate the presence or absence of gesture. When people talk they use facial expressions, eye gaze and body language, so we can experiment to see what kind of combination is most effective and a good mode for communication.”

How is grammar heard?

A new research project that Ito is commencing involves speech pathology and education collaborators. Their research aims to get a baseline of how typically developing children hear and process grammar.

“We then hope to extend this process and assess how children with hearing disabilities process speech and respond to speech stimuli,” Associate Professor Ito said.

“The experiment we are setting up has to do with how people hear or don’t hear the ‘s’ in a sentence. For example take the sentence: ‘The alligators that slowly moved through the swamp hear the frog.’ If you hear the ‘s’ at the beginning of the sentence on ‘alligators’ you expect not to hear the ‘s’ on the verb ‘hear’.”

“If they can’t hear the ‘s’ they can’t process the grammatical function. People are not aware of this process they are doing daily, but the eye-tracker can capture the moment they respond to the ‘s’ or not respond.”

This type of research will create a database that informs us what age school age children start responding to this type of stimuli and process grammar.

“We can compare data between children and adults and draw the trajectory of grammar and language development,” Associate Professor Ito said.

“We can then test children with hearing disabilities, autism, and memory problems and compare it to the baseline data. This will show us how speech perception and memory span interacts and affects the ability to process grammar.”

Associate Professor Ito says her research is ideal for industry applications and there may be organisations who are interested in supporting this research to produce a communication device that is specific to the clinical condition.

“Through this research we will find out what kind of cues are processed better by people with hearing disabilities and by people who have attention disorders or memory deficits. This can also be applied to aging populations who have both hearing and memory declination.”

The Rhythm and Melody of Language

Associate Professor Kiwako Ito is tuning in to the rhythm of speech to understand its complexities.

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Career Summary

Biography

Research Topics

I investigate how people understand spoken language. I apply psycholinguistic methodologies (e.g., eye-tracking) to study how people respond to speech signals in a wide range of groups of language users.

My research focuses on the effect of prosody (i.e., dynamicity in rhythm and melody in speech) on the comprehension of spoken message. I have investigated how children process prosodic emphasis (e.g., louder, longer words with dynamic pitch movement) while they comprehend spoken sentences. I have demonstrated prosodic functions also in adolescents with Williams syndrome and children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). These studies suggest that dynamic speech can facilitate communication with people with developmental disorders, although people with cognitive impairment may process prosodic speech signals differently than their typically-developing peers. My ongoing research project with young children with ASD tests whether prosodic prominence facilitates visual object search and event recall. Our project team (Dr. Liz Kryszak at Nationwide Children’s Hospital & Dr. Micha Eslner at Ohio State University) is also trying to determine prosodic differences between therapists’ speech and parental speech to better understand what makes the input from therapies effective for language development.

I am also interested in how adult foreign language learners process spoken input in their second language and how they improve their foreign language skills. Our recent studies (with Dr. Wynne Wong at The Ohio State University) demonstrate the effects of non-traditional, input-processing training on the acquisition of new grammatical structures in French. Our experiments examine participants’ eye-movements over the set of scenes before and after the training and test whether the treatment improves the learners’ spontaneous responses to grammatical cues. I have supervised PhD dissertation projects with eye-tracking experiments that investigated processing of lexical tone in Mandarin learners and spontaneous processing of ser and estar in heritage Spanish speakers.  

Recent Presentations

Ito, K. & Kryszak, E. (2019). Responses to prosodic prominence in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. International Congress of Phonetic Sciences 2019, Melbourne, Australia.

Petrone, C., Sneed-German, E., Sneed-German, J., & Ito, K. (2019). Effects of tune and inerspeaker differences on the interpretation of requests and offers. International Congress of Phonetic Sciences 2019, Melbourne, Australia.

Kryszak, E., Ito, K., IbañezT., Bargemann, C. (2019). Sensitivity to prosody and joint-attention cues in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.  American Psychological Association (APA) Convention 2019, Chicago, USA.

Ito, K., Sneed-German, J., Sneed-German, E., & Petrone, C. (2019). Intonation affect perlocutionary meaning in requests and offers. Phonetics and Phonology in Europe, 2019, Lecce, Italy.

Elsner, K., Allen, Benjamin, Kryszak, L., & Ito, K. (2019). Turn-taking differs between parents and therapists speaking to children with ASD. 32ndAnnual CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing, Boulder, Colorado.

Ito, K. & Wong, W. (2018). The effect of auditory Processing Instruction training on the acquisition of the French Causative: an eye-tracking study. Second Language Research Forum 2018.

Ito, K., Sneed German, J., Petrone, C., & Sneed German, E. (2018). Effects of intonation on the multi-dimensional interpretation of requests and offers. Soiolinguistic, Psycholinguistic, and Formal Perspectives on Meaning, Paris.

Petrone, C., Sneed German, E., Ito, K., & Sneed German, J. (2018). Multidimensional interpretation of rising and falling tunes for requests and offers. Laboratory Phonology 18, Lisbon.

Teaching expertise

Invited lectures:

  • Processing Prosody across Languages, Varieties, and Nativeness. Tübingen, Germany: Aug 31 – Sep 1, 2017.
  • Aix Summer School on Prosody. Methods in Prosody and Intonation Research: Data, Theories, Transcription. Aix-en Provence, France: Sep 6-9, 2016.
  • Workshop on Visual World Paradigm and Speech Processing: Laboratoire Parole & Langage, Aix-en Provence, France: 9/10-11, 2012.
  • Eye tracking methodology. LSA Summer Mini-Institute: 7/14-18, 2008
  • Intonation and discourse structures in unscripted conversation.  Invited 1-week tutorial Department of Linguistics, University of Leipzig, Germany, 2004.

Courses Taught:

  • Language and the Mind: 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
  • Introduction to Language in the Humanities: 2007, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017
  • Phonetics: 2014, 2016
  • Eye-tracking Methods for Psycholinguistics: 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2018
  • Seminar in Psycholinguistics: 2011, 2012
  • The Basics of Language for Language Learners: 2012, 2013

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Illinois
  • Masters in Linguistics, University of Illinois

Keywords

  • Eyetracking for Studying Language Processing
  • Language Acquisition
  • Psycholinguistics
  • Speech Signal Processing

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
170204 Linguistic Processes (incl. Speech Production and Comprehension) 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
LING1112 Introduction to Linguistics 2
Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle, Australia
Course Coordinator 30/07/2019 - 12/10/2019
Ling2502 Issues of Bilingualism and Bilingual Education
Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle, Australia
Course Coodinator 30/07/2019 - 12/10/2019
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Ito K, 'Gradual development of focus prosody and affect prosody comprehension: A proposal for a holistic approach', Trends in Language Acquisition Research 247-270 (2018)

© 2018 John Benjamins Publishing Company Excellence in communication skills requires an ability to appropriately represent the discourse structure including focus, as well as good... [more]

© 2018 John Benjamins Publishing Company Excellence in communication skills requires an ability to appropriately represent the discourse structure including focus, as well as good comprehension of speaker affect. Both focus and affect are communicated in large part through prosody, so comprehension and production of the accompanying prosody is essential. However, past studies on focus prosody have been both theoretically and methodologically separated from the research on affect prosody. (In this chapter, I use the term 'focus prosody' to refer to prosodic phenomena that are either produced or perceived as the cue to a specific part of speech that conveys the focal content of a message. This includes 'narrow focus', which is defined in terms of the informational scope (e.g., answers to Wh-questions), and 'contrastive focus', which is a subtype of narrow focus that evokes interpretational alternatives.) This chapter argues that the suggested difference in the developmental trajectory (i.e., focus prosody develops slower as compared to affect prosody) may be an artifact of the perspective divergence, and points out that the mastery of prosodic skills in both these domains must be necessarily gradual - though they may not develop hand-in-hand. A holistic approach that considers the interaction between affect prosody and focus prosody is proposed as a future direction of the research on prosodic development within and across individuals.

DOI 10.1075/tilar.23.13ito
2014 Ito K, 'Children s pragmatic use of prosodic prominence', Pragmatic Development in First Language Acquisition, John Benjamins Publishing Company, Amsterdam (2014)
2013 White M, Rajkumar R, Ito K, Speer SR, 'Eye tracking for the online evaluation of prosody in speech synthesis', Natural Language Generation in Interactive Systems 281-301 (2013)

© Cambridge University Press 2014. The past decade has witnessed remarkable progress in speech synthesis research, to the point where synthetic voices can be hard to distinguish f... [more]

© Cambridge University Press 2014. The past decade has witnessed remarkable progress in speech synthesis research, to the point where synthetic voices can be hard to distinguish from natural ones, at least for utterances with neutral, declarative prosody. Neutral intonation often does not suffice, however, in interactive systems: instead it can sound disengaged or ¿dead,¿ and can be misleading as to the intended meaning. For concept-to-speech systems, especially interactive ones, natural language generation researchers have developed a variety of methods for making contextually appropriate prosodic choices, depending on discourse-related factors such as givenness, parallelism, or theme/rheme alternative sets, as well as information-theoretic considerations (Prevost, 1995; Hitzeman et al., 1998; Pan et al., 2002; Bulyko and Ostendorf, 2002; Theune, 2002; Kruijff-Korbayová et al., 2003; Nakatsu and White, 2006; Brenier et al., 2006; White et al., 2010). In this setting, it is possible to adapt limited-domain synthesis techniques to produce utterances with perceptually distinguishable, contextually varied intonation (see Black and Lenzo, 2000; Baker, 2003; van Santen et al., 2005; Clark et al., 2007, for example). To evaluate these utterances, listening tests have typically been employed, sometimes augmented with expert evaluations. For example, evaluating the limited domain voice used in the FLIGHTS concept-to-speech system (Moore et al., 2004; White et al., 2010) demonstrated that the prosodic specifications produced by the natural language generation component of the system yielded significantly more natural synthetic speech in listening tests and, in an expert evaluation, compared to two baseline voices.

DOI 10.1017/CBO9780511844492.012
Citations Scopus - 2
2011 Foltz A, Maday K, Ito K, 'Order Effects in Production and Comprehension of Prosodic Boundaries', Prosodic Categories: Production, Perception and Comprehension, Springer Science & Business Media, Dordrecht (2011)
2011 Ito K, Speer S, 'Semantically-independent but contextually-dependent interpretation of contrastive accent', Prosodic Categories: Production, Perception and Comprehension, Springer Science & Business Media, Dordrecht (2011)
2006 Ito K, Speer S, 'Using interactive tasks to elicit natural dialogue', Methods in Empirical Prosody Research, Walter de Gruyter, Berlin (2006)
Show 3 more chapters

Journal article (15 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Ito K, Wong W, 'PROCESSING INSTRUCTION AND THE EFFECTS OF INPUT MODALITY AND VOICE FAMILIARITY ON THE ACQUISITION OF THE FRENCH CAUSATIVE CONSTRUCTION', STUDIES IN SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION, 41 443-468 (2019)
DOI 10.1017/S0272263118000281
2019 Wong W, Ito K, 'THE EFFECTS OF PROCESSING INSTRUCTION AND TRADITIONAL INSTRUCTION ON L2 ONLINE PROCESSING OF THE CAUSATIVE CONSTRUCTION IN FRENCH: AN EYE-TRACKING STUDY (vol 40, pg 241, 2018)', STUDIES IN SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION, 41 486-487 (2019)
DOI 10.1017/S0272263118000050
2018 Wiener S, Ito K, Speer SR, 'Early L2 Spoken Word Recognition Combines Input-Based and Knowledge-Based Processing', LANGUAGE AND SPEECH, 61 632-656 (2018)
DOI 10.1177/0023830918761762
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2018 Wong W, Ito K, 'THE EFFECTS OF PROCESSING INSTRUCTION AND TRADITIONAL INSTRUCTION ON L2 ONLINE PROCESSING OF THE CAUSATIVE CONSTRUCTION IN FRENCH: AN EYE-TRACKING STUDY', STUDIES IN SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION, 40 241-268 (2018)
DOI 10.1017/S0272263117000274
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2017 Ito K, Martens MA, 'Contrast-marking prosodic emphasis in Williams syndrome: results of detailed phonetic analysis', International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, 52 46-58 (2017)

© 2016 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists Background: Past reports on the speech production of individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) suggest that their prosody is a... [more]

© 2016 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists Background: Past reports on the speech production of individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) suggest that their prosody is anomalous and may lead to challenges in spoken communication. While existing prosodic assessments confirm that individuals with WS fail to use prosodic emphasis to express contrast, those reports typically lack detailed phonetic analysis of speech data. The present study examines the acoustic properties of speech prosody, aiming for the future development of targeted speech interventions. Aims: The study examines the three primary acoustic correlates of prosodic emphasis (duration, intensity, F0) and determines whether individuals with WS have difficulty in producing all or a particular set of the three prosodic cues. Methods & Procedures: Speech produced by 12 individuals with WS and 12 chronological age (CA)-matched typically developing individuals were recorded. A sequential picture-naming task elicited production of target phrases in three contexts: (1) no contrast: gorilla with a racket ¿ rabbit with a balloon; (2) contrast on the animal: fox with a balloon ¿ rabbit with a balloon; and (3) contrast on the object: rabbit with a ball ¿ rabbit with a balloon. The three acoustic correlates of prosodic prominence (duration, intensity and F0) were compared across the three referential contexts. Outcomes & Results: The two groups exhibited striking similarities in their use of word duration and intensity for expressing contrast. Both groups showed the reduction and enhancement of final lengthening, and the enhancement and reduction of intensity difference for the animal contrast and for the object contrast conditions, respectively. The two groups differed in their use of F0: the CA group produced higher F0 for the animal than for the object regardless of the context, and this difference was enhanced when the animal noun was contrastive. In contrast, the WS group produced higher F0 for the object than for the animal when the object was contrastive. Conclusions & Implications: The present data contradict previous assessment results that report a lack of prosodic skills to mark contrast in individuals with WS. The methodological differences that may account for this variability are discussed. The present data suggest that individuals with WS produce appropriate prosodic cues to express contrast, although their use of pitch may be somewhat atypical. Additional data and future speech comprehension studies will determine whether pitch modulation can be targeted for speech intervention in individuals with WS.

DOI 10.1111/1460-6984.12250
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2017 Turnbull R, Royer AJ, Ito K, Speer SR, 'Prominence perception is dependent on phonology, semantics, and awareness of discourse', Language, Cognition and Neuroscience, 32 1017-1033 (2017)

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. The perception of prosodic prominence is thought to be influenced by multiple competing factors. Three experime... [more]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. The perception of prosodic prominence is thought to be influenced by multiple competing factors. Three experiments tested the effects of phonological salience, discourse context and listener¿s knowledge about the discourse on prosodic prominence judgements, using short adjective¿noun phrases extracted from a corpus of spontaneous speech. These phrases had either a prominent L + H* 0 or a less prominent H* !H* pitch accent contour. The phrases were presented in a discourse context which either supported or did not support a contrastive interpretation of the adjective. Effects of the contrastive context to increase the perception of prominence only emerged for the phrases with the phonologically prominent L + H* 0 pitch accent sequence. Additionally, the magnitude of the contrast effect was correlated with the listener¿s awareness of the discourse context, suggesting an ample interplay between linguistic context, pragmatic context, and phonology in prominence perception.

DOI 10.1080/23273798.2017.1279341
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 2
2016 Wiener S, Ito K, 'Impoverished acoustic input triggers probability-based tone processing in mono-dialectal Mandarin listeners', Journal of Phonetics, 56 38-51 (2016)

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Previous research on Mandarin spoken word recognition suggests that when processing lexical tone native listeners tune to various acoustic properties of the i... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Previous research on Mandarin spoken word recognition suggests that when processing lexical tone native listeners tune to various acoustic properties of the incoming signal such as f0 height, contour and change. These studies overlook the uneven distribution of tone across the Mandarin lexicon; given a particular string of segments, native listeners may be more likely to anticipate a certain tone due to prior experience with the language. The present study used the gating paradigm to investigate how much of the acoustic signal is needed for listeners to trigger such probability-based tone processing. Duration-blocked gates were generated from twelve low frequency and twelve high frequency mono-syllabic morphemes, with each syllable carrying either the most or least probable tone based on spoken corpora. Results from 22 mono-dialectal Mandarin speakers indicate that listeners immediately begin making use of tonal probability information after hearing only the onset and 40 ms of the vowel, primarily when hearing infrequent syllables. These findings demonstrate that the processing of suprasegmental information can be initiated with previously learned distributional knowledge until sufficient acoustic cues inform the listener of an incoming word.

DOI 10.1016/j.wocn.2016.02.001
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2015 Ito K, Arai M, Hirose Y, 'The interpretation of phrase-medial prosodic prominence in Japanese: is it sensitive to visual and discourse context?', Language, Cognition and Neuroscience, 30 167-196 (2015)

© 2013 Taylor & Francis. Due to the language-specific prosodic architecture, a phrase-medial pitch expansion in Japanese may signal either a narrow contrast or the beginning... [more]

© 2013 Taylor & Francis. Due to the language-specific prosodic architecture, a phrase-medial pitch expansion in Japanese may signal either a narrow contrast or the beginning of a new syntactic phrase. To examine how visual and discourse context affects the tug of war between these two interpretations, three eye-tracking experiments tested the interpretation of a pitch expansion in referential contexts that varied in the plausibility of contrastive interpretation. The results showed that the degree of structural interpretation was inversely related to the plausibility of contrastive interpretation. Although there was no direct evidence of contrastive processing of the pitch prominence, participants responded to the trials with the pitch expansion much slower than to those without the expansion only when the contrastive interpretation of the pitch prominence was contextually infelicitous. These results suggest that the phrase-medial pitch expansion may have been simultaneously processed for contrast and structural disambiguation. However, the task that demanded resolutions of standing referential ambiguities seemed to make the structural disambiguation the best use of the prosodic cue.

DOI 10.1080/01690965.2013.864778
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2015 Wiener S, Ito K, 'Do syllable-specific tonal probabilities guide lexical access? Evidence from Mandarin, Shanghai and Cantonese speakers', Language, Cognition and Neuroscience, 30 1048-1060 (2015)

© 2014 Taylor & Francis. An eye-tracking study investigated how the interaction between syllable frequency and syllable-specific tonal probability guides online lexical acce... [more]

© 2014 Taylor & Francis. An eye-tracking study investigated how the interaction between syllable frequency and syllable-specific tonal probability guides online lexical access in speakers of mutually unintelligible Chinese dialects with three disparate tonal systems. Mono-dialectal Mandarin speakers, bi-dialectal Shanghai¿Mandarin speakers and bi-dialectal Cantonese¿Mandarin speakers searched for target Mandarin syllable¿tone combinations while their eye movements and mouse clicks were recorded. The results showed dialectal differences in online eye fixation patterns but not in offline mouse responses. For all groups, mouse clicks were fastest for infrequent syllables with most probable tones and slowest for infrequent syllables with least probable tones. In online eye movement responses, only mono-dialectal Mandarin speakers showed an interaction between syllable frequency and tonal probability. Mono-dialectal Mandarin speakers¿ fixations were fastest for infrequent syllables with probable tones and slowest for infrequent syllables with improbable tones. Mono-dialectal speakers also showed a greater amount of competition from the more probable segmental competitor when hearing improbable tones. Bi-dialectal speakers showed different timing in their integration of tonal probabilities. These findings suggest that highly bilingual speakers track and use Mandarin tonal probabilities, but their sensitivity to L2 tonal information may lag behind monolinguals for online word recognition.

DOI 10.1080/23273798.2014.946934
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 9
2015 Wagner L, Speer SR, Moore LC, Mccullough EA, Ito K, Clopper CG, Campbell-Kibler K, 'Linguistics in a Science Museum: Integrating Research, Teaching, and Outreach at the Language Sciences Research Lab', Language and Linguistics Compass, 9 420-431 (2015)

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. We describe the mission and practices of the Language Sciences Research Lab, a fully functional research lab embedded within a science museum. ... [more]

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. We describe the mission and practices of the Language Sciences Research Lab, a fully functional research lab embedded within a science museum. Within this environment, we integrate cutting-edge research, formal instruction, informal learning, and outreach to the public so that our work in each domain interacts with and enriches the others. We are guided by core concepts from the field of informal science education, and we strive to inspire excitement and expand both scholarly and public knowledge about the language sciences.

DOI 10.1111/lnc3.12164
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2014 Ito K, Bibyk SA, Wagner L, Speer SR, 'Interpretation of contrastive pitch accent in six- to eleven-year-old English-speaking children (and adults)', Journal of Child Language, 41 82-108 (2014)

Both off-line and on-line comprehension studies suggest not only toddlers and preschoolers, but also older school-age children have trouble interpreting contrast-marking pitch pro... [more]

Both off-line and on-line comprehension studies suggest not only toddlers and preschoolers, but also older school-age children have trouble interpreting contrast-marking pitch prominence. To test whether children achieve adult-like proficiency in processing contrast-marking prosody during school years, an eye-tracking experiment examined the effect of accent on referential resolution in six- to eleven-year-old children and adults. In all age groups, a prominent accent facilitated the detection of a target in contrastive discourse sequences (pink cat¿green cat), whereas it led to a garden path in non-contrastive sequences (pink rabbit¿green monkey: the initial fixations were on rabbits). While the data indicate that children as young as age six immediately interpret contrastive accent, even the oldest child group showed delayed fixations compared to adults. We argue that the children's slower recovery from the garden path reflects the gradual development in cognitive flexibility that matures independently of general oculomotor control. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012.

DOI 10.1017/S0305000912000554
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 18
2012 Ito K, Jincho N, Minai U, Yamane N, Mazuka R, 'Intonation facilitates contrast resolution: Evidence from Japanese adults and 6-year olds', Journal of Memory and Language, 66 265-284 (2012)

Two eye-tracking experiments tested how pitch prominence on a prenominal adjective affects contrast resolution in Japanese adult and 6-year old listeners. Participants located two... [more]

Two eye-tracking experiments tested how pitch prominence on a prenominal adjective affects contrast resolution in Japanese adult and 6-year old listeners. Participants located two animals in succession on displays with multiple colored animals. In Experiment 1, adults' fixations to the contrastive target (pink cat ¿ GREEN cat) were facilitated by a pitch expansion on the adjective while infelicitous pitch expansion (purple rabbit ¿ ORANGE monkey) led to a garden-path effect, i.e., frequent fixations to the incorrect target (orange rabbit). In 6-year olds, only the facilitation effect surfaced. Hypothesizing that the interval between the two questions may not have given enough time for children to overcome their tendency to perseverate on the first target, Experiment 2 used longer intervals and confirmed a garden-path effect in 6-year olds. These results demonstrate that Japanese 6-year olds can make use of contrast-marking pitch prominence when time allows an establishment of proper discourse representation. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.jml.2011.09.002
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 25
2009 Speer SR, Ito K, 'Prosody in first language acquisition - Acquiring intonation as a tool to organize information in conversation', Linguistics and Language Compass, 3 90-110 (2009)

Recent research on children's acquisition of prosody, or the rhythm and melody in language, demonstrates that young children use prosody in their comprehension and production... [more]

Recent research on children's acquisition of prosody, or the rhythm and melody in language, demonstrates that young children use prosody in their comprehension and production of utterances to a greater extent than was previously documented. Spoken language, structured by prosodic form, is the primary input on which the mental representations and processes that comprise language use are built. Understanding how children acquire prosody and develop the mapping between prosody and other aspects of language is crucial to any effort to model the role of prosody in the processing system. We focus on two aspects of prosody that have been shown to play a primary role in its use as an organizational device in human languages, prosodic phrasal grouping, and intonational prominence. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/j.1749-818X.2008.00103.x
Citations Scopus - 29
2008 Ito K, Speer SR, 'Anticipatory effects of intonation: Eye movements during instructed visual search', Journal of Memory and Language, 58 541-573 (2008)

Three eye-tracking experiments investigated the role of pitch accents during online discourse comprehension. Participants faced a grid with ornaments, and followed prerecorded ins... [more]

Three eye-tracking experiments investigated the role of pitch accents during online discourse comprehension. Participants faced a grid with ornaments, and followed prerecorded instructions such as "Next, hang the blue ball" to decorate holiday trees. Experiment 1 demonstrated a processing advantage for felicitous as compared to infelicitous uses of L + H* on the adjective noun pair (e.g., blue ball followed by GREEN ball vs. green BALL). Experiment 2 confirmed that L + H* on a contrastive adjective led to 'anticipatory' fixations, and demonstrated a "garden path" effect for infelicitous L+H* in sequences with no discourse contrast (e.g., blue angel followed by GREEN ball resulted in erroneous fixations to the cell of angels). Experiment 3 examined listeners' sensitivity to coherence between pitch accents assigned to discourse markers such as 'And then,' and those assigned to the target object noun phrase. © 2008.

DOI 10.1016/j.jml.2007.06.013
Citations Scopus - 115Web of Science - 106
2001 Ito K, 'Effect of focus and inter-accent-interval on lexical pitch accents in Japanese', JOURNAL OF THE ACOUSTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA, (2001)
DOI 10.1121/1.4744546
Show 12 more journal articles

Conference (81 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Ito K, Sneed-German J, Sneed-German E, Petrone C, 'Intonation affect perlocutionary meaning in requests and offers', Lecce (2019)
2019 Elsner M, Allen B, Kryszak E, Ito K, 'Turn-taking differs between parents and therapists speaking to children with ASD', Boulder, Corolado (2019)
2019 Ito K, Kryszak E, 'Responses to prosodic prominence in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder', Melbourne (2019)
2019 Petrone C, Sneed German E, Sneed German J, Ito K, 'Effects of tune and inerspeaker differences on the interpretation of requests and offers', Melbourne (2019)
2019 Kryszak E, Ito K, Ibañez T, Cory B, 'Sensitivity to prosody and joint attention cues in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder', Chicago (2019)
2018 Ito K, Wong W, 'The effect of auditory Processing Instruction training on the acquisition of the French Causative: an eye-tracking study', Montreal (2018)
2018 Petrone C, Sneed-German J, Ito K, Sneed-German E, 'Multidimensional interpretation of rising and falling tunes for requests and offers.', Lisbon (2018)
2018 Ito K, Sneed German J, Petrone C, Sneed-German E, 'Effects of intonation on the multi-dimensional interpretation of requests and offers', Paris (2018)
2017 Bazaco C, Ito K, 'Online processing of Ser and Estar in Spanish: Native Speakers and L2 Learners', Columbus, OH (2017)
2017 Wong W, Ito K, 'L2 Online Processing of the French Causative: The Effect of Processing Instruction on Eye Movements', Columbus, OH (2017)
2017 Wiener S, Ito K, Chan M, Speer S, 'Effects of high variability training and explicit instruction on non-native speech production', Columbus, OH (2017)
2017 Elsner M, Ito K, 'An Automatically Aligned Corpus of Child-directed Speech', 18TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL SPEECH COMMUNICATION ASSOCIATION (INTERSPEECH 2017), VOLS 1-6, Stockholm, SWEDEN (2017)
DOI 10.21437/Interspeeeh.2017-379
2017 Elsner M, Ito K, 'An automatically aligned corpus of child-directed speech', Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association, INTERSPEECH (2017)

Copyright © 2017 ISCA. Forced alignment would enable phonetic analyses of child directed speech (CDS) corpora which have existing transcriptions. But existing alignment systems ar... [more]

Copyright © 2017 ISCA. Forced alignment would enable phonetic analyses of child directed speech (CDS) corpora which have existing transcriptions. But existing alignment systems are inaccurate due to the atypical phonetics of CDS. We adapt a Kaldi forced alignment system to CDS by extending the dictionary and providing it with heuristically-derived hints for vowel locations. Using this system, we present a new time-aligned CDS corpus with a million aligned segments. We manually correct a subset of the corpus and demonstrate that our system is 70% accurate. Both our automatic and manually corrected alignments are publically available at osf.io/ke44q.

DOI 10.21437/Interspeech.2017-379
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Wiener S, Ito K, Speer SR, 'Individual variability in the distributional learning of L2 lexical tone', Proceedings of the International Conference on Speech Prosody (2016)

© 2016, International Speech Communications Association. All rights reserved. This study tested whether successful learners of an artificial tone language exhibit sensitivity to v... [more]

© 2016, International Speech Communications Association. All rights reserved. This study tested whether successful learners of an artificial tone language exhibit sensitivity to varying degrees of tonal informativeness, which has previously been shown to effect spoken word recognition in native Mandarin speakers. Twenty naïve listeners, whose L1 is American English, learned an artificial language in which each visual nonce symbol was arbitrarily associated with a Mandarin-like monosyllable and tone. The stimuli were designed to mimic Mandarin¿s uneven distribution of syllable-tone combinations; syllable frequency and the likelihood of a syllable co-occurring with a particular tone were manipulated across 4 days of training. The results showed that successful learners (those whose perception and production accuracy were consistently above the daily median) most accurately perceived and produced frequent syllables with probable tones and infrequent syllables with probable tones. Successful learners were least accurate in perceiving and producing infrequent syllables with least probable tones. Learners whose daily accuracy was below the median showed no such sensitivity to syllable-conditioned tonal probability. This finding supports the claim that L2 learners can be sensitive to statistical information available from novel input, and further demonstrates that statistical learning takes place even from an early stage of acquisition in successful L2 learners.

Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Petrone C, Lonobile A, Zielinski C, Ito K, 'Effects of prosody in processing speaker commitment in French', Proceedings of the International Conference on Speech Prosody (2016)

© 2016, International Speech Communications Association. All rights reserved. In French, an utterance-final fall is often associated to commitment on speaker¿s behalf and it is ty... [more]

© 2016, International Speech Communications Association. All rights reserved. In French, an utterance-final fall is often associated to commitment on speaker¿s behalf and it is typically used in assertions. Final rises and final rise-fall-rises signal that the speaker does not commit to the proposition of the sentence. Hence, they are often used to convey incredulity. This study tested whether listeners use earlier prosodic cues as well as the final contour in the sentences to achieve a pragmatic interpretation of an utterance. Sixteen Subject-Verb-Object sentences were presented as assertions and incredulity questions. Both prenuclear (e.g., expanded pitch range) and nuclear (e.g., final boundary tone) differentiated the intentions. Twenty-two listeners matched each auditory stimulus with one of the two facial expressions, while their eye movements were monitored. For assertions, listeners looked at the congruent picture only after listening to the whole sentence. However, for incredulity questions, anticipatory fixations to the referent picture gradually increased from the beginning of the sentence. The findings suggest that the interaction between prenuclear and nuclear contours in processing speaker commitment may vary across different tunes.

Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Ito K, de Marneffe M-C, Sandels P, 'Developmental shift in organization of lexical alternatives', Ottawa (2016)
2016 Ito K, 'How contrastive accent is or isn t integrated with sentential context in children and adults', Barcelona (2016)
2016 Wiener S, Ito K, Speer S, 'Balancing probability-based processing with acoustic-based processing in an L2', Iowa City (2016)
2016 Wiener S, Ito K, Speer S, 'Speaker variability and explicit awareness of novel speech cues modulate word recognition in an L2', New York City (2016)
2016 Bazaco C, Ito K, 'Eye-tracking evidence of online processing of Ser and Estar in Spanish', Bilbao, Spain (2016)
2016 Wong W, Ito K, 'Learning the causative construction in French: an eye-tracking study', New York City (2016)
2016 Wiener S, Ito K, Speer S, 'Native and non-native word recognition within a hybrid abstractionist and episodic model', Ottawa (2016)
2016 Wiener S, Ito K, Speer S, 'Perception and Production of Newly Learned Words in an L2: A Distributional Learning Account', Washington DC (2016)
2016 Bazaco C, Ito K, 'Lexicalization of Ser and Estar in Spanish: An eye-tracking study.', Ottawa (2016)
2015 Ito K, Martens M, 'Prosodic expression of contrast in Williams syndrome', Glasgow (2015)
2015 Wiener S, Ito K, Speer S, 'Statistical Learning and speaker variability on the acquisition of lexically contrastive pitch variation', Los Angeles (2015)
2015 Ito K, Turnbull R, Speer S, 'Allophonic tunes of contrast: lab and spontaneous speech lead equivalent fixation responses', Urbana-Champaign, Illinois (2015)
2014 Turnbull R, Royer AJ, Ito K, Speer SR, 'Prominence perception in and out of context', Proceedings of the International Conference on Speech Prosody (2014)

The perception of prosodic prominence is known to be influenced by several distinct factors. In this study, we investigated the role of context, both global and local, in the prom... [more]

The perception of prosodic prominence is known to be influenced by several distinct factors. In this study, we investigated the role of context, both global and local, in the prominence judgements of näi{dotless}ve listeners. Monolingual English listeners marked where they heard prominence on pairs of twoword phrases (e.g. blue ball, green drum). Stimuli varied in whether or not the first phrase implied a contrastive focus on the second phrase. We found clear evidence of a hierarchy of prominence across pitch accent types: L+H* > H* > !H* > unaccented. Additionally, we found that contrast status only affected prominence markings when the participants were made explicitly aware of the discourse context and were instructed to imagine themselves physically present to observe the conversation. This effect of global context suggests that information structure cannot be reliably interpreted in the absence of an established discourse context. Taken together, these results suggest that näi{dotless}ve listeners are sensitive to prominence differences at levels corresponding to categorical annotations. Perception of a word's relative prominence was consistently influenced by phonetic and phonological factors, while pragmatic factors (such as contrast-evoking context) required more elaborate plausibility manipulations in order to affect prominence perception.

Citations Scopus - 2
2014 Ito K, Martens M, McKenna E, 'Processing of pitch prominence in Williams syndrome.', Columbus, OH (2014)
2014 Ito K, Minai U, Royer A, 'Is EVERY child different until they turn 15?: Not so quick development of universal quantifier comprehension', Columbus OH (2014)
2014 Wiener S, Ito K, 'A probability-based account of tonal representations in Mandarin mental lexicon', Ontario, Canada (2014)
2013 Wiener S, Ito K, 'It's probably porridge: The role of tonal probability in Mandarin lexical access', Columbia, SC, USA (2013)
2013 Wiener S, Ito K, 'Bayesian Learning and Word Recognition in Bilingual Speakers of Tone Languages', Montreal, Canada (2013)
2013 Wiener S, Ito K, 'Syllable-specific tonal probabilities in Mandarin lexical access', Columbus, OH (2013)
2013 Wiener S, Ito K, 'Dialect-specific use of tonal probability in Mandarin word recognition', Ann Arbor, MI, USA (2013)
2012 Ito K, Nakamura C, Mazuka R, 'Effects of visual and discourse contexts and prosody on referential resolution', New York City (2012)
2012 Ito K, Campbell-Kibler K, 'The effect of sociolinguistic cues on dialectal speaker adaptation: A study on pin-pen merger', Columbia, SC, USA (2012)
2011 Ito K, Speer S, 'Phonological and phonetic properties of contrastive referential expressions in spontaneous dialogue', Montréal, Canada (2011)
2011 Ito K, Hirose Y, Arai M, 'Interactions between syntactic priming and contrastive prosody in Japanese', Montreal, Canada (2011)
2011 Speer S, Ito K, 'Prosodic properties of contrastive information in spontaneous productions', Paris, France (2011)
2011 Ito K, Nakamura C, Mazuka R, 'Interaction between context-driven salience and prosody during referential resolution', Montreal, Canada (2011)
2011 Hirose Y, Arai M, Ito K, 'Facilitatory and interfering interactions between contrastive prosody and syntactic priming', Paris, France (2011)
2011 Oxana S, Ito K, 'Sensitivity to sub-phonemic variation during lexical identification: evidence from visual analogue scale (VAS) goodness-ratings', Hong Kong (2011)
2011 Ito K, Kathryn C-K, 'Speaker adaptation to /I/-/E/ merger: an eye-tracking study', Hong Kong (2011)
2011 Ito K, Speer S, 'Prosodic properties of contrastive utterances in spontaneous speech', Hong Kong (2011)
2010 Arai M, Ito K, Hirose Y, 'Do prosodic cues enhance or attenuate an effect of syntactic priming?', Palo Alto, CA (2010)
2010 Ito K, 'Discourse-driven awareness of contrast and the effect of pitch accent on referential resolution.', Leiden, The Netherlands (2010)
2009 White M, Rajkumar R, Ito K, Speer SR, 'Eye tracking for the online evaluation of prosody in speech synthesis: Not so fast!', Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association, INTERSPEECH (2009)

This paper presents an eye-tracking experiment comparing the processing of different accent patterns in unit selection synthesis and human speech. The synthetic speech results fai... [more]

This paper presents an eye-tracking experiment comparing the processing of different accent patterns in unit selection synthesis and human speech. The synthetic speech results failed to replicate the facilitative effect of contextually appropriate accent patterns found with human speech, while producing a more robust intonational garden-path effect with contextually inappropriate patterns, both of which could be due to processing delays seen with the synthetic speech. As the synthetic speech was of high quality, the results indicate that eye tracking holds promise as a highly sensitive and objective method for the online evaluation of prosody in speech synthesis. Copyright © 2009 ISCA.

Citations Scopus - 6
2009 White M, Rajkumar R, Ito K, Speer S, 'Eye tracking for the online evaluation of prosody in speech synthesis: Not so fast!', Brighton, UK (2009)
2009 Ito K, Horie R, Oishi H, Hasegawa M, 'Electrophysiological Evidence for Incremental Processing of Lexical Pitch Accent in Japanese', Barcelona, Spain (2009)
2009 Ito K, Horie R, Oishi H, Hasegawa M, Mazuka R, 'An incremental processing of lexical accent: An ERP study in Japanese', Chicago, IL (2009)
2009 Ito K, Jincho N, Yamane N, Minai U, Mazuka R, 'Use of emphatic prosody in Japanese adults & 6-year olds', Barcelona, Spain (2009)
2009 Bergmann A, Ito K, 'Production and comprehension of interpretation-driven versus Input-driven speech', Davis, CA (2009)
2009 Bibyk S, Ito K, Wagner L, Speer S, 'Children can use contrastive pitch accent in on-line processing', Barcelona, Spain (2009)
2009 Bibyk S, Ito K, Wagner L, Speer S, 'Children can use contrastive pitch accent in on-line processing', Boston, MA (2009)
2009 Ito K, Jincho N, Yamane N, Minai U, Mazuka R, 'Use of emphatic pitch prominence for contrast resolution: An eye-tracking study with 6-year old and adult Japanese listeners', Boston, MA (2009)
2008 Metusalem R, Ito K, 'The role of L+H* pitch accent in discourse construction', Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Speech Prosody, SP 2008 (2008)

L+H* is claimed to evoke contrast between lt whether this prominent accent projects a contrastive relation for the discourse foreground, spontaneous continuations of short stories... [more]

L+H* is claimed to evoke contrast between lt whether this prominent accent projects a contrastive relation for the discourse foreground, spontaneous continuations of short stories were examined. For both subject and object positions, participants mentioned contrastive alternatives more often when the corresponding discourse entity was introduced with L+H* in the context. Also, the presence of L+H* on a discourse marker (e.g., And NEXT) that preceded the continuation facilitated the mention of the contrastive subject/object. These results do not merely confirm the function of L+H* on arguments in projecting contrastive relations, but also uncovers the facilitative mediation of the contrastive relation by L+H* on a discourse marker.

2008 Ito K, Speer SR, 'Use of L+H* for immediate contrast resolution', Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Speech Prosody, SP 2008 (2008)

Previous eye tracking studies [1] demonstrated that a prominent L+H* accent in English instructions evoked a contrastive relationship between discourse referents, immediately guid... [more]

Previous eye tracking studies [1] demonstrated that a prominent L+H* accent in English instructions evoked a contrastive relationship between discourse referents, immediately guiding listeners' eye movements to contrastive candidates in the visual scene. However, the visual layout in the previous study conflated looks to contrastive candidates with those to previously fixated object groups, thus calling into question the cause of the very early fixations to contrastive targets. In order to eliminate the possibility that L+H* evokes contrast only when the visual layout allows easy detection of the target, the current experiment used layouts where contrastive candidates had separate visual domains. The results confirm the immediate effect of L+H*, demonstrating a faster increase in fixations to contrastive targets than with H*. In addition, results show an intonational 'garden-path effect' due to the immediate integration of L+H* as contrast marking accent.

Citations Scopus - 1
2008 Speer SR, Ito K, 'Prominence and phrasing in spoken discourse processing', INLG 2008 - 5th International Natural Language Generation Conference, Proceedings of the Conference (2008)

We review psycholinguistic research on the use of intonation in dialogue, focusing on our own recent work. In experiments using complex real-world tasks and naïve speakers and lis... [more]

We review psycholinguistic research on the use of intonation in dialogue, focusing on our own recent work. In experiments using complex real-world tasks and naïve speakers and listeners, we show that speakers reliably specific prosodic cues to signal their intensions, and that listeners use these cues to recognize syntactic and pragmatic aspects of discourse meaning.

2008 Jincho N, Ito K, Yamane N, Minai U, Mazuka R, 'Effects of visual contrast in pre-nominal modifier phrase comprehension in Japanese: an eye tracking experiment with children and adults', Chapel Hill, SC (2008)
2008 Ito K, Speer S, 'Semantically-independent but contextually-dependent interpretation of contrastive accent', Lisbon, Portugal (2008)
2008 Bergmann A, Maday K, Ito K, 'Order Effects in Production and Comprehension of Prosodic Boundaries', Lisbon, Portugal (2008)
2008 Ito K, Speer S, 'Predictive use of contrastive intonation in visual search: Intersective color vs. subsective scalar adjectives', Chapel Hill, SC (2008)
2008 Ito K, Jincho N, Minai U, Yamane N, Mazuka R, 'Use of emphatic intonation for contrast resolution in Japanese: Adults vs. 6-yr olds', Chapel Hill (2008)
2008 Speer S, Ito K, 'Intonational prominence: Production in dialogue, comprehension during visual search', Ithaca, NY (2008)
2008 Byron D, Shockley D, Brown-Schmidt S, Ito K, Speer S, 'Effects of Non-linear Discourse structure on Interpreting Ambiguous Noun Phrases', Chapel Hill, SC (2008)
2008 Metusalem R, Ito K, 'Accentual Prominence and Contrast Representation in Discourse Development', Lisbon, Portugal (2008)
2008 Metusalem R, Ito K, 'The Effect of Contrastive Accent in Discourse Construction', Chapel Hill, SC (2008)
2007 Bergmann A, Ito K, 'Attachment of ambiguous RCs: A production study', Turku, Finland (2007)
2007 Ito K, Jincho N, Mazuka R, Yamane N, Minai U, 'Effect of contrastive intonation in discourse comprehension in Japanese: An eye tracking study with adults and 6-yr olds.', San Diego, CA (2007)
2006 Ito K, Speer S, 'Intonational effects in the comprehension of discourse contrast', NYC (2006)
2006 Ito K, Speer S, 'Immediate effects of intonational prominence in a visual search task', Dresden (2006)
2005 Ito K, Speer S, 'The effect of Intonation on visual search: An eye-tracking study', Cambridge, UK (2005)
2005 Ito K, Speer S, 'Immediate use of Intonational cues in a discourse- based visual search task', Ghent, Belgium (2005)
2004 Ito K, Speer S, Beckman M, 'Information status and pitch accent distribution in spontaneous English dialogues', College Park, MD (2004)
2004 Ito K, Speer S, Beckman M, 'Informational Status and Pitch Accent Distribution in Spontaneous Dialogues in English', Nara, Japan (2004)
2004 Ito K, Garnsey S, 'Brain responses to Focus-Related Prosodic Mismatch in Japanese', Nara, Japan (2004)
2003 Ito K, 'The effect of focus on lexical pitch peak alignment in Tokyo Japanese and Bermeo Basque', Urayasu, Japan (2003)
2003 Ito K, 'The focus-independent effect of tonal proximity on the realization of lexical pitch accent in Tokyo Japanese and Bermeo Basque', Barcelona, Spain (2003)
2003 Ito K, Elordieta G, Hualde J-I, 'Peak alignment and intonational change in Basque', Barcelona, Spain (2003)
2002 Ito K, 'Ambiguity in broad focus and narrow focus interpretation in Japanese', Aix-en Provence, France (2002)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 5
Total funding $2,228,800

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $58,000

Examining changes in social and communication skills in young children with Autism Spectrum Disorder participating in Early Intensive Behavior Intervention$58,000

Funding body: Nationwide Children's Hospital

Funding body Nationwide Children's Hospital
Project Team

Kryszak, Elizabeth; Kiwako Ito

Scheme Intramural Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20151 grants / $19,800

The representation, organization, and access of lexical tone by native and non-native Mandarin speakers$19,800

Funding body: National Science Foundation

Funding body National Science Foundation
Project Team

Kiwako Ito; Seth Wiener

Scheme Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20071 grants / $306,000

Production and comprehension of spontaneous Japanese and English dialogue$306,000

Funding body: National Science Foundation

Funding body National Science Foundation
Project Team

Shari R. Speer; Kiwako Ito

Scheme BCS-0617609
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20061 grants / $1,627,000

Intonation in spontaneous English & Japanese dialogue$1,627,000

Funding body: National Institutes of Health

Funding body National Institutes of Health
Project Team

Shari Speer; Kiwako Ito

Scheme R01 DC007090-01A2
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20041 grants / $218,000

Intonation in unscripted Japanese & English dialogue$218,000

Funding body: National Science Foundation

Funding body National Science Foundation
Project Team

Shari R. Speer; Kiwako Ito

Scheme PAC 0418464
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
United States 72
Japan 14
France 6
India 1
Italy 1
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News

Speech Pathology Collaboration first for China

April 27, 2017

UON has partnered with Orient Speech Therapy Center Limited to develop a world-class speech pathology training program for its clinics in China.

Speech Pathology Students Improve the Lives of the Aged

December 9, 2013

A new initiative in Speech Pathology is creating Work Integrated Learning opportunities while enhancing the lives of residents of a local aged care facility.

Dr Kiwako Ito

Position

Associate Professor
School of Humanities and Social Science
Faculty of Education and Arts

Contact Details

Email kiwako.ito@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 6109

Office

Room MC114
Building McMullin
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