Professor Susan Ledger

Professor Susan Ledger

Head of School

School of Education

Career Summary

Biography

Susan Ledger is Head of School - Dean of Education at University of Newcastle. She is a dedicated educator, researcher and advocate for the teaching profession who has a passion for connecting people, places and projects. She has had a range of educational experiences in both primary, secondary and tertiary settings around the globe. Her recent publications explore how rural and international fields of study complement and compete with each other. In 2017, she introduced SimLab@Murdoch (Mursion), an immersive platform that simulates classrooms, into the preparation of graduate teachers. SimLab@Murdoch (Mursion) also offers a platform for students and pre-service educators to practice and rehearse teaching, interviews and general interactions.

Her current research interests intersect three research fields: policies and practices related to teacher education; preparing to teach in diverse contexts (international & remote); and the use of mixed reality simulations to better prepare students for these contexts.

Susan provides a global to local perspective on the teaching profession. She is leading reform by implementing simulation into the initial teacher education program at University of Newcastle. She initiated a successful 12month internship program unique to WA and introduced the Post Graduate Certificate in International Education aligned with the International Baccalaureate Teaching and Learning Certificates whilst at Murdoch.

As Head of School - Dean of Education at UoN she is responsible for transforming teacher education, advocating for the profession and developing partnerships between schools, universities and educational sectors.

Sue enjoys working collaboratively and has developed friendships and partnerships with researchers, organisations and practitioners around the globe.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Western Australia
  • Bachelor of Education, Edith Cowan University
  • Diploma of Teaching, Western Australian College of Advanced Education
  • Master of Education, Murdoch University

Keywords

  • Diverse Schooling
  • Literacy & Language
  • Rural & Remote Education
  • Simulation in Teacher Education
  • Teacher Education
  • international Education

Languages

  • English (Mother)
  • Indonesian (Working)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
390201 Education policy 34
390307 Teacher education and professional development of educators 33
390401 Comparative and cross-cultural education 33

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Professor University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2016 Exemplary Practice for Professional Experience
Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership (AITSL)
2015 Early Career Award
Western Australia Institute of Educational Research
2015 Murdoch VC Citation for Excellence in Enhancing Learning Award
Murdoch University
2014 Australian Rural Educators Award for University School Partnerships
Society for the Provision of Education in Rural Australia (SPERA)
2014 Award for Excellence in Pre-Service Teacher Support
Western Australia Department of Education
2013 Award for Excellence for Internship Program
Western Australia Department of Education

Member

Year Award
2017 Life Membership Award
Society for the Provision of Education in Rural Australia (SPERA)
2017 Murdoch LEAD Academy
Murdoch University
2017 Life Membership Award
Society for the Provision of Education in Rural Australia (SPERA)

Research Award

Year Award
2015 University/School Research Award
Australian Teacher Education Association [ATEA]
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Ledger S, Vidovich L, O'Donoghue T, Global to Local Curriculum Policy Processes, Springer International Publishing (2014)
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-08762-7

Chapter (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Ledger S, 'Resilience Building for Pre-service Teachers: BRiTE, Micro-Teaching and Augmented Reality/Simulation (BRiTE-AR)', Cultivating Teacher Resilience, Springer Singapore 245-262 (2021)
DOI 10.1007/978-981-15-5963-1_15
2017 Tindall-Ford S, Ledger S, Williams J, Ambrosetti A, 'Immersion programs in Australia: Exploring four models for developing 'classroom-ready' teachers', Educating Future Teachers: Innovative Perspectives in Professional Experience 193-215 (2017)

'Classroom-ready' graduate teachers require a sound understanding of the complex context that constitutes the 'classroom' in which they are expected to teach. ... [more]

'Classroom-ready' graduate teachers require a sound understanding of the complex context that constitutes the 'classroom' in which they are expected to teach. The preservice teachers' experiences within schools provide critical insights into these complexities and provide ongoing professional development towards their classroom readiness. It is in the school setting where theory learnt at university can inform and support preservice teachers to make sense of their observations of students' learning, teachers' teaching and their own teaching practice. We contend that within a traditional professional experience, the opportunities to link educational theory to teaching practice are usually incidental rather than purposeful, with preservice teachers often having limited opportunity to observe and experience the multifaceted nature of being a teacher. At both the state and national levels, governments are advocating for the improvement of preservice teachers' school experiences and for universities to ensure the graduation of 'classroom-ready' teachers. This chapter examines how initial teacher education providers are enhancing preservice teachers' teaching and learning experiences through innovative in-school immersion programs with the goal of producing more professionally prepared, 'classroom-ready' graduates. The chapter showcases four different models of school immersion programs from across Australia, outlining the purpose, structure and intended outcomes of each. A critique of these models highlighting tensions and vulnerabilities to implementation of immersion programs results in recommendations for initial teacher education providers who are seeking to support the immersion of preservice teachers as they transition into the teaching profession.

DOI 10.1007/978-981-10-5484-6_12
Citations Scopus - 4
2017 White S, Tindall-Ford S, Heck D, Ledger S, 'Exploring the Australian teacher education 'partnership' policy landscape: Four case studies', Educating Future Teachers: Innovative Perspectives in Professional Experience 13-31 (2017)

Schools have long been integrally involved in initial teacher education particularly through the professional experience component. In recent decades however, there have been spec... [more]

Schools have long been integrally involved in initial teacher education particularly through the professional experience component. In recent decades however, there have been specific policy calls for greater involvement of schools in teacher preparation. These calls have come in two distinct waves of partnership policy reforms in Australia. The first began in earnest with the Australian Government announcement through the National Partnership Agreement on Improving Teacher Quality (Council of Australian Governments (COAG) National partnership agreement on improving teacher quality, 2008), which identified two priorities. Firstly, it championed a systemic response to strengthening linkages between schools and universities, and secondly, it recognised the professional learning opportunities of preservice teachers and in-service teachers working together as co-producers of knowledge. The second wave, influenced by the Melbourne Declaration (Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs MCEETYA. Melbourne declaration on educational goals for young Australians, 2008), resulted in the government response to the Teacher Education Ministerial Advisory Group (TEMAG) report (Teacher Education Ministerial Advisory Group (TEMAG). Action now: classroom ready teachers. Australian Government, Canberra, 2015) and the accompanying move to mandate school-university partnerships for the purpose of teacher education program accreditation. These national partnership priorities have been taken up in differentways across the various states and territories and by universities and schools. This chapter maps the policy reforms both nationally and at the various jurisdictional levels and uses four illustrative cases to analyse the opportunities and challenges for future partnerships and recommendations for teacher educators working to sustain such partnerships.

DOI 10.1007/978-981-10-5484-6_2
Citations Scopus - 7
2014 Ledger S, Vidovich L, O Donoghue T, 'Case Study One: Satu International School (SIS)', Global to Local Curriculum Policy Processes, Springer International Publishing 85-107 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-08762-7_5
2014 Ledger S, Vidovich L, O Donoghue T, 'Case Study Three: Tiga International School (TIS)', Global to Local Curriculum Policy Processes, Springer International Publishing 135-151 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-08762-7_7
Show 2 more chapters

Journal article (25 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Whitsed C, Burgess M, Ledger S, 'Editorial Advisory Board Members on Reimagining Higher Education Internationalization and Internationalization of the Curriculum', Journal of Studies in International Education, 25 348-368 (2021)

This research explores how editorial advisory board members across four highly ranked international higher education¿focused journals understand higher education internationalizat... [more]

This research explores how editorial advisory board members across four highly ranked international higher education¿focused journals understand higher education internationalization generally, and internationalization of the curriculum (IoC) specifically. Notionally, as gatekeepers, editorial advisory board members hold a powerful strategic position in the scholarly debates that characterize an active discipline, and can indirectly assert a strong influence over the academic direction of the field(s) to which they belong. All editorial advisory members for the journals Higher Education, Studies in Higher Education, Higher Education Research & Development, and the Journal of Studies in International Education were invited to contribute to this research with 25 (N = 25, 30%) consenting to participate. Utilizing qualitative, semi-structured interviewing, participants discussed their views on higher education internationalization, IoC, and the importance of these in the contemporary university. Participants also discussed what dimensions of IoC need to be further addressed in higher education discourses and research, and opportunities and challenges they foresee concerning higher education internationalization now and into the future. Findings reveal, for participants, internationalization continues to be perceived as a multivocal, largely Anglo-European, and neoliberal enterprise which is at a crossroad, and needs to be reimagined for the betterment of all in society. Collectively, participants draw attention to a lack of criticality and problematization within higher education internationalization discourses, and highlighted the need for research, scholarship, and academic leaders to expand the focus of IoC to address future global challenges and needs.

DOI 10.1177/1028315320984840
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2021 Simanjorang M, Taylor PC, Ledger S, 'Learning to teach from the student s point of view: an ethical call from transformative learning', Reflective Practice, 22 47-59 (2021)

Drawing on an autoethnographic inquiry we present a first-person, narrative account of a mathematics teacher¿s experience of developing an ethically responsible teaching practice.... [more]

Drawing on an autoethnographic inquiry we present a first-person, narrative account of a mathematics teacher¿s experience of developing an ethically responsible teaching practice. Reflective commentary on narrative vignettes illustrates the teacher¿s inquiry in the role of researcher as transformative learner. Inspired by transformative learning theory, he engaged in critical self-reflection on his moments of teaching, which prompted him to switch from the teacher¿s point of view and pay heed to his student¿s meaning perspective. This transformation of perspective enabled him to avoid conflict by negotiating a deal with the young resistant learner¿¿a rebel kid¿¿to generate mutual respect, focus on values, and successfully adjust to the student¿s learning trajectory. The result of this inquiry suggests that endeavouring to teach from students¿ points of view is important not only for engaging meaningfully in an educative relationship but also for enhancing the sense of ethical responsibility of both teachers and students.

DOI 10.1080/14623943.2020.1821628
2021 Ersozlu Z, Ledger S, Ersozlu A, Mayne F, Wildy H, 'Mixed-Reality Learning Environments in Teacher Education: An Analysis of TeachLivE Research', SAGE Open, 11 (2021)

TeachLivE¿, a mixed-reality simulated classroom technology, has been used in initial teacher education programs to provide repeatable experiential learning opportunities for stude... [more]

TeachLivE¿, a mixed-reality simulated classroom technology, has been used in initial teacher education programs to provide repeatable experiential learning opportunities for students now for more than a decade and in more than 80 universities worldwide. However, no broad scale investigation has been conducted into how the platform has been used or what research has been generated as a result. The aim of this study is to provide insight into the types of TeachLivE¿ research carried out since its inception and to identify trends and potential gaps in this research. Peer-reviewed academic primary research publications¿journal articles (23), conference proceedings (12), and thesis dissertations (20)¿were reviewed for participants, research methods, analysis, research design, data collection tools, and design approaches. Of the 102 articles identified as relevant, ¿instructional skills development¿ and ¿integration of TeachLivE¿ in teacher education¿ were the most commonly researched topics. Findings indicate that preservice teachers were the most commonly studied group of participants, research methods were predominately qualitative, single-subject experimental research design was employed most often, and the most used data collection tools were surveys and observation. These findings highlight that the range of topics is increasing, with studies on in-service teachers in school-based contexts beginning to emerge as a new area of interest. This systematic review has implications for researchers and the developers of TeachLivE¿. It provides valuable insight and recommendations for future studies in this emerging teacher education field, where technology is not simply used ¿in the classroom¿ but rather ¿as the classroom.¿

DOI 10.1177/21582440211032155
2021 Ledger S, Masinire A, Diaz MDA, Burgess M, 'Reframing the policy discourse: A comparative analysis of teacher preparation for rural and remote education in australia, south africa, and mexico', Education Policy Analysis Archives, 29 (2021)

The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has highlighted a ¿vicious cycle of decline¿ in rural, regional and remote (RRR) regions, with significant inequal... [more]

The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has highlighted a ¿vicious cycle of decline¿ in rural, regional and remote (RRR) regions, with significant inequalities in educational outcomes between rural and urban areas. However, interventions have not resulted in transformative or lasting improvements to education in rural contexts. This paper presents a cross-comparative country analysis of current global policy on RRR education. We used a policy analysis framework to interrogate national policy texts concerning teacher education for RRR contexts in three countries-Australia, South Africa and Mexico. A rigorous selection process of the literature yielded 17 key policy texts, which were examined for the influences, practices, language and outcomes relating to teacher education preparation for RRR locales. Findings highlighted a legacy of historical influences and a metrocentric bias in policy texts, with limited examples of assets-based education. We argue that these factors may be perpetuating the significant and persistent disadvantage in RRR education. We recommend an alternative policy discourse that recognises the productivities and potentialities of an assets-based approach within the local context, where school leaders and teachers are positioned as central change agents in RRR education.

DOI 10.14507/epaa.29.6233
2021 Fischetti J, Ledger S, Lynch D, Donnelly D, '-Practice before Practicum: Simulation in Initial Teacher Education', Teacher Educator, (2021)

The benefits of micro-teaching (pre-service teachers practicing their teaching skills with small groups of peers or students) are well documented. However, the overcrowding of the... [more]

The benefits of micro-teaching (pre-service teachers practicing their teaching skills with small groups of peers or students) are well documented. However, the overcrowding of the teacher education curriculum, in part due to regulatory mandates, led many initial teacher education (ITE) programs to abandon using micro-teaching. The focus of this study was to understand the experiences of pre-service teachers who are engaging in real-time simulation technology as a new form of micro-teaching. The analysis of our findings indicated that the use of the mixed-reality learning environments (MRLEs) showed promise in helping build candidate self-confidence and preparing novices for their first ¿real¿ teaching practicum. MRLEs appear to be particularly useful for assisting with developing confidence, planning for diverse learners, understanding personalizing pedagogy and engaging with classroom management. We argue the importance of micro-teaching ¿2.0¿ as a strategy to ¿practice before prac¿ and call for increased inclusion of simulation within ITE programs.

DOI 10.1080/08878730.2021.1973167
Co-authors John Fischetti, Debra Donnelly
2020 Dickson A, Perry LB, Ledger S, 'Challenges impacting student learning in the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme', Journal of Research in International Education, 19 183-201 (2020)

While the International Baccalaureate¿s Middle Years Programme (MYP) is growing in popularity in Australia and across the globe, few studies have examined the benefits and challen... [more]

While the International Baccalaureate¿s Middle Years Programme (MYP) is growing in popularity in Australia and across the globe, few studies have examined the benefits and challenges of this IB programme for supporting student learning. Using a qualitative case study design of three Australian schools that formerly offered the MYP, we investigated teacher and school leader perceptions of the MYP for promoting student learning. Perceived benefits included high achievement and skill development through the MYP¿s emphasis on inquiry-based learning and real-world relevance; criterion-referenced assessments; and a healthy balance between core and elective learning areas. Challenges for students stemmed primarily from operational difficulties and possible systems-level constraints impacting teachers, including integration of the Australian Curriculum with the MYP; ability to meet the MYP¿s demands; confusion about MYP terminology and grading systems; and understanding interdisciplinary units. The findings suggest that MYP Coordinators and school leaders play a critical role in ensuring that schools realise the benefits of the MYP for student learning by providing systems-level support to optimise its benefits.

DOI 10.1177/1475240920976228
2020 Dickson A, Perry LB, Ledger S, 'Letting Go of the Middle Years Programme: Three Schools Rationales for Discontinuing an International Baccalaureate Program', Journal of Advanced Academics, 31 35-60 (2020)

International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (MYP) is recognized for its rigor, inquiry-based learning, and development of academic skills. While it is growing in popularity... [more]

International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (MYP) is recognized for its rigor, inquiry-based learning, and development of academic skills. While it is growing in popularity worldwide, some schools have discontinued the program. Literature on the reasons why schools discontinue the MYP is limited. Using a qualitative case study design, we examined the perspectives of school leaders, former MYP coordinators, and experienced MYP teachers at three private and public Australian schools to find out why they discontinued the MYP. Our findings add to the limited literature base on the topic¿they reveal schools discontinued the program due to challenges from various systems-level constraints, leadership issues, school organizational structures, and individual teacher challenges. Although our small sample prevents generalizability, our findings generate novel insights and hypotheses that can inform school decision making and future research about the sustainability of the MYP.

DOI 10.1177/1932202X19869006
Citations Scopus - 2
2020 Jamaludin R, McKAY E, Ledger S, 'Are we ready for Education 4.0 within ASEAN higher education institutions? Thriving for knowledge, industry and humanity in a dynamic higher education ecosystem?', Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, 12 1161-1173 (2020)

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the perception, readiness and change involved in the implementation of Education 4.0 within the region of Association of Southeast... [more]

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the perception, readiness and change involved in the implementation of Education 4.0 within the region of Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) among policymakers, enablers (lecturers) and receivers (students), within globalisation, referred here as the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR). Design/methodology/approach: This study used a mixed method research design using quantitative data from a Likert scale of 1¿5, involving: (1) Not Ready; (2) Ready; (3) No Sure; (4) Quite Ready and (5) Extremely Ready. Open-ended questions formed the qualitative approach taken by the researchers to uncover the richness of the respondents' perceptions of Education 4.0. The test items reliability index of 0.744 drew quantitative data from the perspective of the educational policymakers, enablers and receivers to reveal their collective definition of each construct (knowledge, industry and humanity). Findings: This study has exposed the importance of knowing and capturing the interrelated components of an educational ecosystem that exists in higher education (HE) within the ASEAN region. The personal readiness of respondents towards Education 4.0 is very high; yet concern was raised about the financial and managerial readiness of institutions across the region. Originality/value: This study highlighted the dynamic nature of the HE ecosystem and the connectivity between the elements of Education 4.0 ¿ knowledge, industry and humanity within the ASEAN region.

DOI 10.1108/JARHE-06-2019-0144
Citations Scopus - 3
2020 Ledger S, Kawalilak C, 'Conscientious internationalisation in higher education: contextual complexities and comparative tensions', ASIA PACIFIC EDUCATION REVIEW, 21 653-665 (2020)
DOI 10.1007/s12564-020-09650-0
Citations Scopus - 1
2019 Ledger S, Ersozlu Z, Fischetti J, 'Preservice Teachers Confidence and Preferred Teaching Strategies using TeachLivE Virtual Learning Environment: A Two-Step Cluster Analysis', Eurasia Journal of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education, 15 1-17 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.29333/ejmste/102621
Citations Scopus - 11
Co-authors John Fischetti
2019 Ledger S, Fischetti J, 'Micro-teaching 2.0: Technology as the classroom', Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 36 37-54 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.14742/ajet.4561
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 5
Co-authors John Fischetti
2019 Ledger S, Thier M, Bailey L, Pitts C, 'OECD's Approach to Measuring Global Competency: Powerful Voices Shaping Education', TEACHERS COLLEGE RECORD, 121 (2019)
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
2019 Sproul J, Ledger S, MacCallum J, 'A Review of Digital Media Guidelines for Students with Visual Light Sensitivity', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DISABILITY DEVELOPMENT AND EDUCATION, 68 222-239 (2019)
DOI 10.1080/1034912X.2019.1679355
Citations Scopus - 1
2019 Rappa NA, Ledger S, Teo T, Wai Wong K, Power B, Hilliard B, 'The use of eye tracking technology to explore learning and performance within virtual reality and mixed reality settings: a scoping review', INTERACTIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS, (2019)
DOI 10.1080/10494820.2019.1702560
Citations Scopus - 2
2019 Merga MK, Ledger S, 'Teachers' attitudes toward and frequency of engagement in reading aloud in the primary classroom', LITERACY, 53 134-142 (2019)
DOI 10.1111/lit.12162
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2018 Ledger S, Merga MK, 'Reading aloud: Children's attitudes toward being read to at home and at school', Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 43 124-139 (2018)

Whilst there exists a plethora of research about the benefits of reading aloud on children's literacy development and a range of government reports highlighting the positive ... [more]

Whilst there exists a plethora of research about the benefits of reading aloud on children's literacy development and a range of government reports highlighting the positive investment return on early intervention strategies such as reading aloud, most literature is presented from an adult perspective. Limited research exists on children's attitudes toward being read to at home or school or the frequency of reading aloud practices that occur within these contexts. This mixed method study examines reading aloud practices in schools (N=21) and homes (N=220). It captures the attitude toward reading aloud practices from the viewpoint of 220 children aged between 6-12 years of age (Grade 1-6) across a representative range of diverse school contexts in Western Australian. The findings identify specific reading aloud practices, patterns of frequency and perceived barriers to reading aloud in the classroom and at home. The study provides support for the practice of reading aloud to be continued past the period of acquisition and independent reading. It raises concern about the low frequency of reading aloud practices at home and school and the early signs of a literacy. It also highlights the limited attention to affective domains of reading that occur in schools.

DOI 10.14221/ajte.2018v43n3.8
Citations Scopus - 14
2018 Ledger S, Vidovich L, 'Australian teacher education policy in action: The case of pre-service internships', Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 43 11-29 (2018)

Studies on internships within initial teacher education have existed in literature since the early 1900s, they have espoused the benefits of experiential learning or critiqued the... [more]

Studies on internships within initial teacher education have existed in literature since the early 1900s, they have espoused the benefits of experiential learning or critiqued the variance available in terms of structure, length of time and purpose. However, little research on teacher internships has been reported within a policy context. This study employs a modified 'policy trajectory' framework to capture the impact of teacher internship models emerging from policy reform in Australia driven by the National Partnership Agreement on Improving Teacher Quality Program (NPTQ). It highlights how policy contexts and practices are inextricably interconnected and influenced by key policy 'threads' related to people, philosophy, place, processes and power (5Ps). Significant benefits of internships are revealed. Variations in resourcing, influence and local conditions evidence enactment of NPTQ resulted in uneven and potentially inequitable outcomes. The authors call for more research, transparency and enhanced accountability for government investment for internships.

DOI 10.14221/ajte.2018v43n7.2
Citations Scopus - 9
2018 Dickson A, Perry LB, Ledger S, 'Impacts of International Baccalaureate programmes on teaching and learning: A review of the literature', Journal of Research in International Education, 17 240-261 (2018)

International Baccalaureate (IB) programmes are growing rapidly worldwide, driven in part by their global reputation and concept-driven, inquiry-based approach to teaching and lea... [more]

International Baccalaureate (IB) programmes are growing rapidly worldwide, driven in part by their global reputation and concept-driven, inquiry-based approach to teaching and learning. This thematic review of a range of literature sources examines the impact of IB programmes on teaching and learning, highlighting trends, challenges, and benefits. Findings of the review revealed that most of the studies, both qualitative and quantitative, examined stakeholders¿ perspectives or self-reported experiences of IB programmes; a very small number used research designs that control for confounding factors or allow causal inferences to be drawn. A wide range of stakeholders report that IB programmes develop research and critical thinking skills, intercultural appreciation and global awareness, as well as cultivate collaborative working cultures and creative pedagogical practices among teachers. Challenges include extra demands on teachers for lesson planning and assessment, additional stress for teachers and students, and competing demands and expectations with national requirements. Recommendations are provided which may guide future research endeavours.

DOI 10.1177/1475240918815801
Citations Scopus - 6
2018 Merga MK, Ledger S, 'Parents' views on reading aloud to their children: Beyond the early years', Australian Journal of Language and Literacy, 41 177-189 (2018)

While children benefit from exposure to reading aloud at home, relatively little is known about parents' perceptions of the practice. Reading aloud supports development of a ... [more]

While children benefit from exposure to reading aloud at home, relatively little is known about parents' perceptions of the practice. Reading aloud supports development of a range of reading and cognitive skills, provides a valuable opportunity for focused interaction between parents and children, and enhances children's attitudes toward reading. This paper reports on data from the mixed-methods 2016 Western Australian Study in Reading Aloud collected from consenting parents at 14 primary schools. Findings explore frequency of reading aloud to children at home, parental attitudes toward the practice, duration of reading sessions, and perceived barriers to reading aloud. Findings give educators insight into the home literacy learning context, as well as illustrating the barriers contemporary families perceive in supporting their children's literacy development at home.

Citations Scopus - 3
2017 Sproul J, MacCallum J, Ledger S, 'Screens and teens with migraines: visually sensitive learners in contemporary digital classrooms', Disability and Society, 32 1275-1279 (2017)

Technology-rich school classrooms incorporate digital media in the form of computers and interactive whiteboards into the visual learning environment. Whilst evidence-based resear... [more]

Technology-rich school classrooms incorporate digital media in the form of computers and interactive whiteboards into the visual learning environment. Whilst evidence-based research shows use of technology improves academic outcomes for high school students in general, there are limited data available on the consequences of digital media use for high school students with migraine. This article highlights the historical issues with light-emitting media, the physical parameters that are changed by adoption of these digital media into the classroom and some of the adverse effects caused by visual light stimulation. The article concludes by calling for further social research to better understand adjustments needed by students with migraine in the digital media classroom, and the policies needed to support image parameter guidelines for schools. In this article, the term visual light sensitivity refers to any student¿s abnormal sensitivity to optically sighted light leading to negative responses, including that of migraine.

DOI 10.1080/09687599.2017.1330455
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2017 Dickson A, Perry LB, Ledger S, 'How accessible is IB schooling? Evidence from Australia', Journal of Research in International Education, 16 65-79 (2017)

This study examines access to International Baccalaureate schools in Australia. It is important to examine whether, as a highly regarded form of rigorous academic education, IB pr... [more]

This study examines access to International Baccalaureate schools in Australia. It is important to examine whether, as a highly regarded form of rigorous academic education, IB programmes are available to a wide range of students. We examine the location of schools in Australia that offer one or more of the IB Primary Years Programme, Middle Years Programme or Diploma Programme, their fees and admissions policies, and what types of students they enrol. The findings show that most schools in Australia that offer any of these three IB programmes are located in affluent communities of large cities, are privately-funded, charge moderate to high fees, and enrol mostly students from privileged socioeconomic backgrounds.

DOI 10.1177/1475240917696037
Citations Scopus - 11
2015 Ledger S, Vidovich L, O Donoghue T, 'International and Remote Schooling: Global to Local Curriculum Policy Dynamics in Indonesia', Asia-Pacific Education Researcher, 24 695-703 (2015)

The present paper fills a void in the literature by focusing on curriculum policy processes in schools that are both remote and international. It is based on an analysis of the co... [more]

The present paper fills a void in the literature by focusing on curriculum policy processes in schools that are both remote and international. It is based on an analysis of the complex interrelationships between international and remote education; between ¿the global¿ and ¿the local¿. It maps the dynamics of curriculum policy processes in three remote international schools in Indonesia and their journey in adopting the International Baccalaureate Primary Years Program (IBPYP). Whilst the study reported was primarily focused on how teachers made meaning of the IBPYP and the micro-politics involved, the significance of accelerating globalization required an examination of accompanying national, regional and global influences embedded in the complex curriculum policy processes. The concept of a ¿policy trajectory¿ provided a framework for the research. After analysis of findings, a model was constructed to capture the dynamics of curriculum policy processes along the entire trajectory from global to local levels.

DOI 10.1007/s40299-014-0222-1
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Ledger S, Ure C, Burgess M, Morrison C, 'Professional Experience in Australian Initial Teacher Education: An Appraisal of Policy and Practice', Higher Education Studies, 10 116-116
DOI 10.5539/hes.v10n4p116
Suoranta J, Teräs M, Teräs H, Jandric P, Ledger S, Macgilchrist F, Prinsloo P, 'Speculative Social Science Fiction of Digitalization in Higher Education: From What Is to What Could Be', Postdigital Science and Education,
DOI 10.1007/s42438-021-00260-6
Dickson A, Perry L, Ledger S, 'Challenges of the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme: Insights for school leaders and policy makers', education policy analysis archives, 29 137-137
DOI 10.14507/epaa.29.5630
Show 22 more journal articles

Conference (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Whipp PR, Ledger S, Geagea A, 'ITE non-academic entry evaluation using SimLab', ASCILITE 2019 - Conference Proceedings - 36th International Conference of Innovation, Practice and Research in the Use of Educational Technologies in Tertiary Education: Personalised Learning. Diverse Goals. One Heart. (2019)

Murdoch University requires all Initial Teacher Education (ITE) candidates to respond to a 5-minute SimLab interaction with the aim of teaching a topic of choice, learning somethi... [more]

Murdoch University requires all Initial Teacher Education (ITE) candidates to respond to a 5-minute SimLab interaction with the aim of teaching a topic of choice, learning something about each avatar and concluding, by asking questions to confirm understanding of the information discussed. A rubric, addressing 4-criteria, is used to evaluate student success. A demonstration of SimLab and preliminary research data that explores the effectiveness and predictive validity of simulation as an on-entry performance assessment are the foci of this work.

2015 Van Vooren C, Bueno Villaverde A, Steffen V, Chun L, Ledger S, 'GLOBAL RESEARCH ENGAGEMENT: A CASE STUDY', INTED2015: 9TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE, Madrid, SPAIN (2015)
2012 Broadley T, Ledger S, 'An online community designed to support future makers in educational reform', ASCILITE 2012 - Annual conference of the Australian Society for Computers in Tertiary Education (2012)

Australian education is undergoing national reform at many levels. The school sector, where preservice teachers will be employed, are adjusting to the demands of the National Curr... [more]

Australian education is undergoing national reform at many levels. The school sector, where preservice teachers will be employed, are adjusting to the demands of the National Curriculum and improving teacher quality through the National Professional Standards for Teachers. In addition, the university sector, where pre-service teachers are prepared, is undergoing its own education reform through the introduction of a demand-driven system and ensuring quality for tertiary education interns through the Higher Education Standards Framework. In moving to prepare preservice teachers for the school system; universities are grappling with the double-barreled approach to teacher quality; quality within the university course and quality within the student teachers being prepared. Through a collaborative partnership including university lecturers, Department of Education central administration staff, school principals, school coordinators, practicum supervisors, mentor teachers and pre-service teachers; the stakeholders have formed an online community of learners engaging in reflective practice who are committed to improving teacher quality. This online community not only links the key stakeholders within the project, it facilitates the nexus between theory and practice often missing in our pre-service teacher placements. This paper reports preliminary data about an initiative to ensure final year pre-service teachers are aspiring to meet the graduate professional standards through the use of an innovative online community.

Citations Scopus - 2
Ledger S, 'Simulation in Higher Education: Choice, Challenges and Changing Practice', Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Education Innovation (ICEI 2019)
DOI 10.2991/icei-19.2019.91
Show 1 more conference
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 8
Total funding $1,581,168

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20215 grants / $869,168

Speculative social science fiction of digitalisation of higher education: towards a humanised digital future?$738,413

Funding body: Academy of Finland

Funding body Academy of Finland
Project Team

Juha Souranta, Marko Teras, Hanna Teras (Tempere Finland) Felicitas Macgilchrist (Germany), Paul Prinsillo (South Africa), Peter Jandric (Croatia)

Scheme Centre of Excellence
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2025
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

NSW Education Waratah Scholarships $100,000

Funding body: Department of Education

Funding body Department of Education
Project Team Professor Susan Ledger, Professor Susan Ledger
Scheme NSW Education Waratah Scholarships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2024
GNo G2100024
Type Of Funding C2400 – Aust StateTerritoryLocal – Other
Category 2400
UON Y

Mixed Reality Learning Environment Lab: Interdisciplinary & International Research in Higher Education$20,000

Funding body: College of Human and Social Futures | University of Newcastle

Funding body College of Human and Social Futures | University of Newcastle
Scheme CHSF - Equipment and Infrastructure
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Writing for all: Studying the development of handwriting and keyboarding skills in the Early Years$9,495

Funding body: Ian Potter Foundation

Funding body Ian Potter Foundation
Project Team Professor Susan Ledger, Anabela Malpique
Scheme Education
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2023
GNo G2101164
Type Of Funding C3200 – Aust Not-for Profit
Category 3200
UON Y

CHSF Early Advice Scheme 2021$1,260

Funding body: College of Human and Social Futures | University of Newcastle

Funding body College of Human and Social Futures | University of Newcastle
Scheme CHSF - Early Advice Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20202 grants / $697,000

LEAP program: Science, Math, English, retraining$500,000

Funding body: Murdoch University

Funding body Murdoch University
Scheme Teaching and Learning Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Writing For All: Studying the development of writing and keyboard skills in the early years$197,000

Funding body: Ian Potter Foundation

Funding body Ian Potter Foundation
Project Team

Malpique, Merga, Pino Pasternak, Ledger

Scheme Education
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2023
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

20191 grants / $15,000

SHEE Small Research Grant: Pain Simulation$15,000

Funding body: Murdoch University

Funding body Murdoch University
Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed7
Current6

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2021 PhD The Best Sustainable Inclusive Practices for Vanuatu Schools in Educating Students with Disabilities PhD (Education), College of Human and Social Futures, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2021 PhD What are the Unwritten Expectations That Rural Communities Hold Regarding the Role of Their Local Combined Sector Principal? PhD (Education), College of Human and Social Futures, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2021 Masters How is Positive Education Most Effectively Delivered in Schools? M Philosophy (Education), College of Human and Social Futures, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2020 Masters Time to move on: Internships, career progression and retention of early-career teachers Education, Murdoch University Co-Supervisor
2019 PhD The Impact of Mixed Reality Learning Environments on the Preparation of Preservice Early Childhood Teachers PhD (Education), College of Human and Social Futures, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2019 PhD What are children's' perspectives of themselves as learners in a virtual world? (Minecraft gameplay) Education, Murdoch University Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2021 PhD Afrikaans immigrant students in WA: Ethnic identify and educational experiences Education, Murdoch University Principal Supervisor
2020 Masters Alumni perspectives of elite education: Was it worth it? Education, Murdoch University Co-Supervisor
2020 PhD Visual light hypersensitivity, classroom digital media and inclusive pedagogy: Untangling the maze Education, Murdoch University Co-Supervisor
2019 Masters English teachers and the Asia Literacy Priority: Is it really a priority? Education, Murdoch University Principal Supervisor
2019 Professional Doctorate International Baccalaureate’s Middle Years Programme: Liberation or suffocation? Education, Murdoch University Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Transforming Mathematic Problems in Indonesian Primary schools by embedding Islamic and Indonesian Contexts Education, Murdoch University Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Integrating Ethics into Mathematics Education: A philosophical auto-ethnographic inquiry into Indonesian Mathematics Education Education, Murdoch University Co-Supervisor
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Research Projects

Simulation in Teacher Education 2020 -

ARC Discovery Grant working with Murdoch, UNE, University of Central Florida, UWA.


12 Month Internships 2011 -

National Quality Teaching and School Partnership Funding (2011) designed, delivered, reviewed, remodelled and continually improved the 12month internship program for ongoing sustainability. 


Alliance of International Education - Australian Chapter 2019 -

Lead the development of an Australian Chapter for the Alliance of International Education


Preparing PSTs for Rural and Remote Contexts - Mexico, Australia, Sth Africa 2018 -

Joint research program with Witssatersrand University South Africa, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico


NSWCDE & NESA Innovative Approaches to ITE and Professional Experience Working Group 2021 -

NSWCDE & NESA Working Party to explore and promote innovative approaches to ITE and Professional Experience


Writing for All: Handwriting and Keyboarding skills in the Early Years 2020 -

A joint project led by Anabela Malpique (Murdoch) and including Margaret Merga (ECE), Debro Pino-Pasternak (UniCanberra) and Susan Ledger (Newcastle)


Simulation and Quality Teaching in Indonesia 2021 -

Newcastle SoEd  UniSurabaya and East Indonesian Consortia of Teacher Education programsexploring ways of including simulation and quality teaching in programs and associated research.


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Professor Susan Ledger

Position

Head of School
Education
School of Education
College of Human and Social Futures

Contact Details

Email susan.ledger@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 49212066
Mobile 0408080051
Links Personal webpage
Google+
Research Networks
Research Networks
Personal webpage
Research Networks

Office

Room W364
Building Behavioural Sciences
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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